Rhode Island Reading Room
These documents are made available free to the public by the Rhode Island USGenWeb Project

Industries and Wealth
of the Principal Points in Rhode Island, being the city of Providence, Pawtucket, Central Falls, Woonsocket, Newport, Narragansett Pier, Bristol & Westerly.

New York: A. F. Parsons Publishing Co., 1892


PAWTUCKET
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ALDEN R. VAUGHAN, Watchmaker and Jeweler, No. 328 Main Street.  --  For excellent value in the line of jewelry, watches, diamonds and silverware, or for low prices and liberal methods of dealing, no establishment of the kind in Pawtucket compares with that of Alden R. Vaughan, located at No. 328 Main Street.  Although a comparatively new enterprise, having been founded in 1891, by the present proprietor, this house has developed a large and permanent patronage.  The store, which has the dimensions of 18 x 40 feet, is neatly and attractively fitted up, and perfect in convenience of arrangement for the successful prosecution of the business, while the services of from two to three competent assistants are required in constant attendance.  A large and first-class assortment is at all times handled, embracing everything in the line of elegant jewelry, in all the latest and most fashionable designs and novelties of the day, also gold and silver watches, of both foreign and domestic manufacture, superb diamonds, clocks, sterling silver and plated ware, etc., all of which have been procured from the best and most reliable manufacturers in the country, and the prices quoted are maintained at the lowest figures consistent with first-class goods and fair and equitable dealings. Special attention is here given to repairing of every description, and all the work entrusted to the care of this house is promptly and satisfactorily executed in the highest style of the jewelers' art.  Mr. Vaughan, who is a native of Vermont, is a practical and experienced watchmaker and jeweler.  He is the inventor and patentee of Vaughan's Patent Main Spring Winder, for removing and replacing springs in clock barrels, which is represented in the cut above.  The inventor of this little machine has worked for ten years trying to perfect a tool that could be easily used, that would cover the different sizes of springs, be simple in its construction, strong, durable, inexpensive, well proportioned and neat in appearance, and that would relieve the clock-repairer in that worst of all jobs that comes in his line of work, the handling of heavy springs. He has produced it in various forms, but no attempt has been made to manufacture it for the trade, believing that the machine could be still improved. Difficulties and objections, one after another, have been overcome, and now we believe they furnish to the clock-repairer as complete a tool, and one as much needed, as any that has ever been put on the market.

[illustration on page 211:  Vaughan's Patent Main Spring Winder.]



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JOHN W. LITTLE & CO., Printing, Record Building.  --  The firm of John W. Little & Co. are widely known as book and job printers.  The business was first established in 1883.  They occupy one floor, having an area of 4,000 feet and are finely equipped for prompt, successful and satisfactory work in every department.  No house of its age has been more successful in this line of enterprise or produced a better class of work than that of John W. Little & Co.  Their premises are admirably arranged, supplied with one cylinder and two job presses, operated by electric-power, and they also have a large stock of new type. Work in printing of all kinds is performed with true artistic conception and with fine results.  They employ from eight to ten men, and are prepared to take large or small contracts and guarantee prompt and satisfactory work in every instance.  Their prices are invariably fair and reasonable.  Their trade extends to all parts of New England.  Mr. John W. Little, the active member of the firm, is a native of Whitinsville, Mass., but has been a resident of Pawtucket since 1874.  He is a prominent member of the F. and A. M., the I. O. O. F., and other organizations.



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D. D. DWYER, Wholesale Fruits and Produce, Bayley Street.  --  Mr. Dwyer, who is a native of Webster, Mass., first embarked in this business for himself at Springfield, in 1870, at which place he remained up to 1887, and then removed to this city, taking up his location at his present desirable stand on Bayley Street, near the Chicago Beef Company.  These premises comprise a three-story building, having ample dimensions of 50 x 100 feet, which is appropriately fitted up throughout with special reference to the business, and is perfect in convenience of arrangement for the handling and preservation of the immense stock at all times carried.  Everything in the line of the choicest variety of fruits and produce of all kinds is found here, specialties being made of oranges, lemons, bananas, potatoes, etc. Fresh invoices are constantly received from New York and Canada, and all orders, of any magnitude, are promptly filled, the exigencies of the business requiring the services of six efficient assistants and two teams in constant employment.  The general business here transacted is strictly of a wholesale character.  Mr. Dwyer is a popular member of the Business Men's Association here, and a most successful merchant.



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JOHN D. SAWYER & CO., General Mill Supplies and Hardware, No. 296 Main Street.  --  The well-known and eminently successful house of John D. Sawyer & Co. was established in 1888, and now enjoys an excellent reputation and trade.  A store of ample dimensions is occupied, and a large stock of mill supplies, light hardware, carpenters' and machinists' tools, guns and sporting-goods, is kept constantly on hand.  The firm are agents for Lawlor's click gear, used on mules in cotton and woolen mills.  They are prepared to repair machinery, and also manufacture belt-hooks, for belting in factories and mills.  A corps of competent assistants is employed, and significant advantages are extended to customers in the matter of prices. Both a wholesale and retail business is transacted. Mr. John D. Sawyer, the active member of the firm, is a native of Canton, Mass., but has been a resident of Pawtucket since 1888.  He is a prominent member of the F. and A. M., and other societies.



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F. EUGENE BARKER & CO., Dealers in Hardware and Cutlery, Builders', Machinists', Manufacturers' and Farmers' Supplies, No. 226 Main Street.  -- A house that is recognized as one of the representative business houses of Rhode Island is the firm of  F. Eugene Barker & Co., dealers in hardware and cutlery, builders', machinists', manufacturers' and farmers' supplies.  The house was established in August, 1884, at No. 192 Main Street, corner of East Avenue, Pawtucket, and October 15, 1891, the business was removed to the present handsome and commodious quarters.  This store is one of the finest in Pawtucket.  The front is 18 feet wide, and the store widens at the rear, to a width of 40 feet.  Its depth is 87 feet.  Two floors are occupied by the large and complete stock, which embraces builders' and machinists' hardware, and all kinds of agricultural implements.  The house also carries a fine assortment of fishing-tackle and sporting-goods, having the finest line of these goods to be found in this part of the State.  Mr. F. Eugene Barker, the head of this house, comes of one of the leading families in Rhode Island, and he has been for many years prominently identified with the hardware trade, having been of the firm Barker, Chadsey & Co., of Providence.  Since his location in Pawtucket, he has come to be one of the leading merchants of our thriving city.



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ALFRED J. SMITH, Auctioneer, New and Second-hand Furniture, Etc., No. 19 Exchange Street, Opposite Depot.  --  A well-known and very successful auctioneer in Pawtucket, is Mr. Alfred J. Smith.  Mr. Smith undertakes the purchase and sale, on commission, of real and personal effects of mostly all kinds, the chief line of goods, however, being new and second-hand furniture, pianos, stoves, mattresses, flock and feather beds, carpets, oilcloths, rugs, lounges, household linen, and similar articles, and of these a large and varied assortment is usually on hand for sale by auction or private treaty.  The store, 40 x 180 feet in size, is well fitted with every convenience for purchasers and visitors, and three competent assistants are in regular attendance.  Mr. Alfred J. Smith was born in Newport, on May 6, 1846, and received only an ordinary school education. He went to work in cotton-mills, and in 1866 he become overseer for Dexter & Bros., retaining that position up to 1882, and constantly educating himself in the meanwhile.  In this latter year, he embarked with Mr. W. L. Brigg, as W. L. Brigg & Co., in the furniture dealing business, Mr. Brigg retiring in 1885, and in 1888 Mr. Smith added the present very important branch to his business, as a real estate and furniture auctioneer. Mr. Smith possesses all the necessary attributes for a successful man in this very difficult profession.



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LYND & MURPHY, Ladies', Gents' and Misses' Boots, Shoes and Rubbers, Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnishing Goods, No. 3 Broad Street.  --  Messrs. Lynd & Murphy commenced operations in 1882, dealing in hats, caps and gents' furnishing goods, and in 1885 boots and shoes were added to the stock.  The store occupied is 25 x 100 feet in dimensions, handsomely finished and supplied with plate-glass windows and show cases, and lighted by electricity.  It is the largest establishment in its line in the city, and an elegant assortment is carried of gents' furnishing specialties.  Splendid facilities have been provided for the manufacture of fine shirts.  Perfect fit, the best material and the latest style are always guaranteed, the goods being widely preferred for their many excellent qualities of wear, finish and artistic workmanship.  Silk hats and Derbys are also made to order.  The line of hats, caps, underwear, shirts, collars, cuffs, neckwear, umbrellas, trunks and fine shoes for ladies and misses cannot be surpassed in this city, and the most reasonable prices at all times prevail.  The following well-known clerks have been employed by the firm for some time and contribute much to the popularity of the house by their prompt and courteous treatment of customers:  Henry J. Lynd, Daniel Murphy, Vital Lacroix, John Fitzpatrick, William Butler, George Alexander, Edward Domina, Francis Murphy, James Cullen, Peter Morgan, John Carlin, John Fitzgerald, Joseph Durgin, Miss Mary Murphy, Miss Nellie Murphy, Miss Mary Wall and Miss Theresa Lynd.  Mr. Henry J. Lynd and Daniel Murphy, the copartners, are highly esteemed in the business circles of the city.  Mr. Lynd is a native of Rhode Island and has been a resident of Pawtucket for eighteen years. Mr. Murphy is a native of Maine, has resided in Pawtucket thirty-five years, was a member of the Second Rhode Island Regiment, Company H, during the late war, and is now a member of Post No. 17, G. A. R., the Business Men's Association and other societies.



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S. R. BAKER, Dealer in Fish, Fruits and Vegetables of All Kinds, No. 68 North Main Street.  --  In 1884 Mr.  S. R. Baker first embarked in this business for himself in Pawtuxet, his native town, where he remained located up to about a year or so ago, and then removed to this city, at the above address.  This store, 18 x 40 feet in dimensions, is neatly and conveniently fitted up in the most appropriate manner and all the necessary facilities are provided, including a capacious ice box holding two tons, for the handling and preservation of the stock. In the large and complete assortment will be found every variety of fresh and salt water fish in season, also oysters, clams, lobsters, crabs, etc., a specialty being made of Seconnet fish, which are received daily, also all kinds of fruits and vegetables in their respective seasons, canned goods, etc., and these edibles represent the best class of supplies obtainable in the market. Customers are assured of receiving the full weight, honest value, low prices and prompt and courteous treatment here, and four assistants and two teams are required in constant service to meet the demands of the trade.  All orders receive immediate attention, the telephone call being No. 4139, and goods are delivered in any part of the city, free of charge.  Mr. Baker is strictly honorable and reliable, those trading with him once being sure to remain patrons always.  He is a member of the Royal Arcanum and I. O. O. F.



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PAWTUCKET RENOVATING WORKS, Office and Works, Nos. 246 and 248 East Avenue. --  This business was founded by Mr. E. M. Arnold in 1880, and the pronounced success that has attended his efforts is but a just tribute to his honorable and upright methods of conducting affairs.  The premises occupied comprise the first-floor and basement of a building, having the dimensions of 40 x 70 feet, and no expense has been spared in fitting up the works with the latest improved machinery, steam-power, and all the facilities and general complete equipment necessary for doing the most thorough work in a prompt and reliable manner, while from four to six competent assistants are required in constant employment.  Carpets are taken up and thoroughly dusted and cleansed without the slightest injury to the fabric, color or design, also made over and relaid, and a specialty is likewise made of renovating feather beds and mattresses, which are cleaned and made up again equal to new.  The prices quoted here in every instance, are made as low as is consistent with a service which will be satisfactory to all, and these goods are called for and delivered free of charge, at any residence.  The large and permanent trade developed by this house extends throughout Pawtucket, Central and Valley Falls and Lonsdale, and all orders receive immediate attention, the telephone call being No. 4335-5. Mr. Arnold, who is a practical and experienced man, thoroughly familiar with every branch of this business, was born and brought up in this state.



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CHARLES D. NICHOLS, Hack, Boarding and Livery Stable, No. 10 Slack's Lane. --  Mr. Nichols first embarked in this business for himself in 1872, and he has since enjoyed a most prosperous career.  The premises occupied comprise a two-story building, having the ample dimensions of 80 x 100 feet.  The stables are well lighted, ventilated and drained, while from six to eight careful grooms and stallmen are given constant employment.  Particular attention is given to boarding horses by the day, week or month, and the care taken in every instance is such as to afford the most complete satisfaction.  Mr. Nicols has forty stalls, and ample accommodation for both horses and carriages.  He has, too, some of the finest and most stylish equipages to be found in this section of the country, and a stock of superior horses, which can be hired for business or pleasure, day or night, at the most reasonable terms, and he gives personal attention to all orders for weddings, parties, funerals, etc., his telephone call being No. 4264. Among the carriages kept on hand are coaches, coupes, hacks, buggies, light wagons and vehicles of every description, which are unexcelled for comfort, elegance and style. Mr. Nichols also buys and sells horses of all kinds, suitable for all classes of work, and in every instance all his transactions in this direction are effected without misrepresentation.  He is a native of Woonsocket and a member of the Knights of Pythias, Red Men and other fraternal orders.



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A. J. JOHNSON, JR., Registered Pharmacist, No. 413 Main Street.  --  A leading and skillful representative of the pharmaceutical profession in Pawtucket is Mr. A. J. Johnson, Jr., who is a thoroughly experienced and legally registered pharmacist.  He embarked for himself in his present enterprise in 1886, and from the first he has steadily won his way to popular favor and confidence. His store, 18 x 40 feet in dimensions, is a model of tasteful and convenient appointment.  A very large and carefully selected assortment is constantly carried, comprising everything in the line of high grade drugs and medicines, chemicals of standard purity, acids, extracts, proprietary remedies of admitted merit and worth, pharmaceutical preparations, toilet and fancy articles, druggists' sundries of every description, confectionery, cigars, etc., and two experienced assistants are in attendance. A special feature of the business is the compounding of physicians' prescriptions and family recipes, all of which are here prepared in the most accurate and careful manner, and in every instance from the purest and freshest ingredients obtainable.  Mr. Johnson is widely recognized throughout this section as a competent, vigilant and responsible druggist and apothecary, and much of his large and permanent patronage is derived from some of the most prominent physicians and families of this city.  He was born in Connecticut, and for the past five years has been a highly esteemed resident of this city and a member of the A. F. and A. M.



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CHICAGO BEEF COMPANY, Commission Merchants in Swift's Chicago Beef, Mutton, Pork and Smoked Provisions, Telephone No. 4230, J. F. Abbott, Manager, No. 33 Bayley Street.  --  The Chicago Beef Company is the only wholesale house of the kind in Pawtucket, and it has for several years past been the chief source of supply for this section of Rhode Island, having been established here in 1880 by the present manager, Mr. J. F. Abbott.  Swift's Chicago beef is the specialty of the business, and every facility is possessed for receiving shipments direct from Chicago by the principal railroads, the cars being unloaded at the warehouse.  In addition, mutton, pork and smoked provisions are dealt in; and the house is the center of a trade of considerable volume and influence, reaching at wholesale only, throughout Pawtucket, Central Falls, Valley Falls and Lonsdale; the yearly sales being 4,000 head of cattle, and sheep and smoked provisions, pork, etc., in due portion.  Two wagons are retained for delivery purposes and six competent hands are regularly employed. The premises comprise a two-story building, 35 x 90 feet in dimensions, fully equipped throughout for the efficient conduct of the important business transacted; and in addition, and ice house, 20 x 60 feet in size, having a capacity for fifty head of cattle and forty tons of ice.  The able and experienced manager here, Mr. J. F. Abbott, was born at Hampton, Conn., and is a prominent and respected member of several fraternal and social circles.



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C. F. KINNEY, Troy Steam Laundry, Nos. 25 and 29 High Street.  --  The Troy Steam Laundry, which is under the efficient management and direction of Mr. C. F. Kinney, was originally established in 1882, by Mr. L. C. Smith, who conducted it up to 1889, when he was succeeded by the firm of Merithew & Kinney, but during the current year this partnership was dissolved, and the present proprietor assumed sole control of its affairs.  This laundry comprises a three-story building, having the ample dimensions of 25 x 60 feet, and is completely equipped in every respect, while employment is furnished to fourteen efficient hands. Every care is here exercised that the goods intrusted to the care of this house, shall leave it in a clean and perfect condition, and particular attention is given to shirts, collars and cuffs, underwear, etc., all patrons invariably finding their clothing washed and done up here in the best manner without tearing or injury, while washing is called for and delivered, free of charge, throughout Providence, Central Falls and Pawtucket, three teams being engaged in constant service.  A large and permanent patronage has been secured, as many as fourteen thousand pieces being finished weekly. Mr. Kinney was born in Massachusetts, and is a member of the highest standing of the Knights of Honor and other social orders.



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THOMAS S. CAMERON, Dealer in Fish, Fruits and Oysters, No. 157 Main Street. --  Foremost among the oldest-established and most popular business men of this city, stands Mr. Thomas S. Cameron, dealer in fish, oysters and fruits. Mr. Cameron, who is a native of Pawtucket, has for an extended period of time, been prominently identified with the interests of the city, and it was as far back as 1868 that he first embarked for himself in his present enterprise.  The store, 20 x 40 feet in dimensions, is neatly and attractively appointed throughout, every facility and convenience being provided, and from four to five efficient assistants are employed. A large and carefully selected stock is at all times carried, embracing fish of every variety in their respective seasons, fine oysters, clams, scollops, lobsters, etc.; also all kinds of foreign and domestic fruits, and canned goods in infinite variety, which have been procured direct from the best and most reliable sources in the country.  All of these toothsome food supplies are guaranteed to be in a fresh and wholesome condition when offered for sale, and the lowest ruling market prices are at all times quoted.  All orders are promptly filled and delivered at any given address and the market is connected by telephone.  Mr. Cameron is the recipient of a large, liberal and permanent share of public favor and patronage.



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PAWTUCKET ICE COMPANY, [Incorporated], Organized October 15, 1890, Formerly Dispeau, Russell & Co., Ice Dealers, No. 98 North Main Street.  --  The Pawtucket Ice Company has long been successfully conducting operations in supplying this community with ice, and in the busy season a dozen teams are employed delivering ice to customers.  The business was originally founded in 1857 by Messrs. Dispeau & Childs, the firm becoming Dispeau, Russell & Co., in 1885.  On October 15, 1890, the present company was organized and incorporated under the State laws of Rhode Island, with a capital stock of $48,000 and the following gentlemen as officers:  President, Isaac N. Eddy; secretary and treasurer, H. H. Russell; clerk, H. L. Russell, nephew of Mr. H. H. Russell.  Mr. Eddy is a native of Olneyville, R.I., the Messrs. Russell of Sunderland, Mass.  By their long experience they are thoroughly qualified for all the duties of their positions.  The company have two ice houses at Valley Falls, R. I., each of 7,000 tons capacity, and an ice house at Cumberland Mills, with a capacity of 6,000 tons, and about 15,000 tons are disposed of annually.  Thirty hands are employed and there is no doubt that, owing to the facilities possessed by this company, they are fully able to supply ice in any quantities on favorable terms as compared with contemporary concerns.



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SUMMER STREET STABLE, H. M. Arnold & Son, Proprietor, Corner North Union Street.  --  Without question the handsomest and the best conducted institution of the kind in New England is the Summer Street Stable. The stable is an admirable piece of architecture.  The building is of fine brick, with terra cotta trimmings, and has a frontage of 270 feet on North Union Street, and 85 feet on Summer Street.  There is a 30-foot entrance. The interior of the place is excellently appointed.  The floors are laid in concrete, there is an abundance of light, heat is furnished by steam, and the sanitary fittings are of the most improved modern order.  The stalls, on the first floor, are cleanly kept, and have a capacity for 185 horses. There are two carriage washing-rooms and two neatly fitted harness-rooms. At night the stable is illuminated with electric-lights.  The interior is finished in Georgia pine and hardwoods, while the private office, ladies' and gentlemen's sitting rooms are finished in calico ash. Two large elevators convey carriages to and from the second and third floors, where the vehicles are kept.  On the front corner of the building is the inscription, in terra cotta, 'All Nature is Love, Man Included', and on the side of the building this inscription, 'How Do the Beasts Groan'.  The business of this firm was founded in 1865 by Mr. H. M. Arnold, on the East Side of Pawtucket, continuing there up to 1871, when he removed to Broad Street, where he had built a new stable.  In 1890 the construction of the present quarters was begun, and the work was completed in the spring of 1892, the work having been done at a cost of $65,000.  The present year Mr. Arnold admitted to partnership his son, Frank H. Arnold, a native of this city, and popularly known in the community.  The senior member of the firm was born in the old town of Smithfield, R.I., in 1831. He has long resided in this city.  The Messrs. Arnold own a fine stock of horses, also vehicles of all kinds, and carry on a general livery, boarding, hack, and baiting stable business.



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GEO. L. WHITNEY, Meats, Fruits and Vegetables, Canned Goods, Etc., No. 77 Broad Street.  --  A flourishing concern doing a large business in meats, fruits, vegetables and cannned goods in Pawtucket is that of Geo. L. Whitney, No. 77 Broad Street.  This well-known concern was established in 1890 by Messrs. Brownell & Whitney, of whom the former retired in the year 1891, leaving the entire business under the control of his partner, who has succeeded in building up a trade of a most enviable character, requiring the constant employment of six able salesmen and clerks. The premises occupied comprise a corner store, 20 x 40 feet in dimensions, fitted with an ice box of enormous capacity, and possessing all the facilities identical with the trade.  Mr. Whitney has a large business in Pawtucket, Central Falls and Lonsdale, keeping three wagons on the road continuously.  He is a native of Massachusetts, where he was born in 1863, and is a prominent member of the Order of Good Fellows and several other societies.



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WM. H. EATON, Jeweler, Watches, Clocks, Jewelry, No. 287 Main Street.  -- This business was established here in 1884 by the present proprietor, and he has since carried it on with marked ability.  The commodious store occupied is nicely fitted up with all the most modern adjuncts of convenience and attractiveness, including plate glass show cases, ornamental fixtures, electric-light, etc., and two courteous and efficient assistants are in constant attendance.  In watches, clocks, jewelry, eyeglasses and spectacles, optical goods, etc., the display here made is most attractive and the general complete assortment found is not surpassed anywhere. Special attention is given to the repairing of watches, clocks and jewelry, perfect satisfaction being guaranteed in every instance.  Mr. Eaton is a practical watchmaker and jeweler of long experience in the trade.  A native of Nova Scotia, he has resided in this country for the past quarter of a century, and is a popular member of the I. O. O. F., and other social orders.



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ORR & MULLEN, Retailers of Boots, Shoes and Rubbers, White Front Shoe Store, No. 311 Main Street.  --  Prominent among the leading boot and shoe stores in Pawtucket, contributing to the general sum of commercial activity, is that of Messrs. Orr & Mullen, retailers of boots, shoes and rubbers. This enterprising firm was established on May 15, 1891, by Messrs. Grant & Mullen, and March 1, 1892, Mr. Orr purchased Mr. Grant's interest, when the present firm style of Orr & Mullen was adopted and the house bounded at once into prominence, securing a liberal share of public patronage.  The premises occupied comprise a well-ordered store, 20 x 60 feet in dimensions, heavily stocked with all kinds of ladies', gentlemen's and children's footwear, at the lowest consistent prices, and employing four salesmen.  Mr. C. A. Orr was born in East Greenwich in 1865, and has lived in this city for six years. He is a member of the F. and A. M., and Knights of Pythias; while Mr. A. B. Mullen, who is a native of Canada, and thirty-one years of age, is a prominent member of the A. O. of A. W., and has lived in the United States for twenty-one years.  The copartners are young men of executive business ability and very popular in Pawtucket.



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JAMES HOLBURN & SONS, Tailors, Cummings Block, No. 10 Park Place.  -- Among the most skillful and proficient exponents of the merchant tailor's art in Pawtucket, stands the well-known firm of James Holburn & Sons. Mr. James Holburn was born in Scotland, but for the past five years has resided in this country, and in 1889 embarked in his present enterprise with his two sons, at No. 10 Park Place, Cummings Block.  This store, 20 x 40 feet in dimensions, is neatly and handsomely fitted up with all the modern adjuncts of convenience and attractiveness and is well stocked with a large and general assortment of foreign and domestic fabrics of all kinds in suitings, trouserings, vestings, overcoatings, etc., embracing all the newest styles in fashionable and seasonable goods.  From ten to twelve skilled and experienced workmen are given constant employment, and all garments turned out by this house are guaranteed to give perfect satisfaction in every feature of merit, in cut, fit, style, material and general workmanship and finish.  All orders receive immediate attention and the prices quoted are invariably placed at the lowest figures consistent with first-class productions and fair and equitable dealings.  All the members of this firm are painstaking, energetic and reliable business man, thoroughly skilled in every branch of this industry.



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A. STRAUSS & CO., 'Arcade' Clothiers, No. 246 Main Street, Fletcher's Row. --  As for back as 1860 the business of this establishment was originally founded in Providence, but eight years later the firm which succeeded to the control at the time, Messrs. T. Strauss & Co., removed it to this city, and continued to manage its affairs up to1872, when the present proprietors became the owners.  The commodious and attractive store, 20 x 80 feet in dimensions, is handsomely furnished and appointed in the most convenient and tasteful manner.  The heavy stock carried embraces a complete assortment of the finest class of ready-made clothing for men's, boys' and youth's wear, of the latest cut and most fashionable styles, these garments being pronounced perfect in fit, superior workmanship and material.  A specialty is also made of the newest shapes in hats and caps of all kinds, while gentlemen's furnishing goods of every description are likewise handled, the prices at all times quoted being placed at such low figures as to defy successful competition.  Mr. Strauss, the active member of this firm, was born in Germany, but has resided in this country since 1865.  He is a member of the I. O. O. F., Knights of Pythias and other similiar orders, and is a major of the Rhode Island Cavalry.



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CHRIS. T. TAFT, Sign and Ornamental Painter, No. 21 North Main Street.  -- This business was established here by Mr. Taft in 1890, and under his efficient management and direction, has since been developed to large proportions. The premises occupied comprise a shop, 25 x 50 feet in measurement, which is made attractive by a high order of mechanical art and handsome finishing, and is fully equipped with all the requisite facilities and conveniences necessary for the successful operation of trade.  Mr. Taft is a thoroughly first-class artist in his line of trade, upon which he brings to bear eight years of practical experience, and he is always prepared to execute all work in a most excellent, superior and workmanlike manner.  He makes a specialty of all kinds of ornamental signs in wood, glass, etc., of the most elaborate designs, also gives particular attention to orders for show cards of all kinds, and in every case he never fails to give entire satisfaction in every feature of merit.  His trade extends throughout this city, Central and Valley Falls  and Lonsdale.  Born in Pawtucket, he is favorably known as an honorable and enterprising business man.



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FRED BEBBY, Studio, Sheldon Building.  --  In 1887 this business was first established here by the present proprietor, and from its inception a large and influential trade has been received.  The premises occupied include a floor, 18 x 60 feet in dimensions, suitably divided into reception, dressing and operating rooms, the former being handsomely and conveniently furnished, and adorned with a fine display of many beautiful works of art. The operating gallery is equipped with the latest improved photographic appliances, apparatus, new scenery, backgrounds, etc., and two efficient assistants are permanently employed.  Mr. Bebby carries on a general business in executing photographs and pictures of all kinds, sizes and styles, while he also gives special attention to the production of portraits in oils, water colors, India ink and pastels.  The pictures here made are noted for their delicacy of shading, perfect likeness, fineness of finish and artistic correctness.  Mr. Bebby has earned a well-deserved reputation for the superiority of his productions.  He was born in England, but has resided in this country since 1872.



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GEORGE S. MORGAN, Pharmacist, Trinity Square.  --  This well-known and highly-esteemed gentleman established  business here in 1889, and has been eminently successful in gaining a widespread patronage.  The store is 20 x 60 feet in dimensions, handsomely finished in mahogany, carved and plain, and supplied with large show cases, an elegant soda fountain, costing about $2,000, and other fixtures which cost about $3,000. The establishment is the finest in its line in the State and with its handsome tile flooring and beautifully decorated walls, presents a claim for beauty and finish rarely equaled in any city.  The extensive and well-selected stock embraces a full line of pure drugs, chemicals and medicines, surgeons' and physicians' requisites, perfumery and toilet articles, cigars and confectionary, and a fine assortment of such pharmaceutical preparations as are known to possess healing virtues and curative properties devoid of deleterious substances. The compounding of physicians' prescriptions and family recipes receive that careful and intelligent professional attention which their important character so imperatively demands.  The store is kept open all night.  Mr. Morgan is a native of Montreal, P. Q., a graduate of the Montreal College of Pharmacy, a member of the Rhode Island State Pharmaceutical Association, and eminently popular.



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J. H. GREGORY, Hats, Caps and Gents' Furnishings, No.243 Main Street.  --  The enterprising and popular hat and gents' furnishing goods emporium of Mr. J. H. Gregory is the leading headquarters in town for the most fashionable class of custom, who never fail to find here everything that is seasonable and desirable in this line of trade, at popular prices.  Founded in 1887 by the present proprietor, the business of this house has since been conducted by him with uniform success.  The store, 18 x 40 feet in dimensions, is neatly and attractively appointed and three courteous salesmen are employed.  The stock embraces hats and caps of all kinds of the best makes, including the Knox and Dunlap celebrated styles in high silk and derby hats, of the latest and most fashionable shapes introduced; besides an elegant line of the newest designs in neckwear, gloves, hosiery, shirts, collars and cuffs, suspenders, underwear, handkerchiefs and gentlemen's furnishing goods of every description.  A leading specialty is made of the finest custom-made shirts to order at short notice.  Mr. Gregory was born in England, but has resided in this country for the past nineteen years, and is a popular member of the Foresters.



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CHARLES W. CLOUGH, Watchmaker, and Dealer in Watches, Clocks, Jewelry, Spectacles, Eyeglasses, Etc., No. 3 North Union Street.  --  Among the leading watchmakers contributing to the general sum of commercial activity in Pawtucket, may be mentioned the prosperous concern of Chas. W. Clough, No. 3 Union Street.  Mr. Clough is a native of New Hampshire. He was established on his own responsibility, in 1876, and has since built up a very substantial business, and enjoys a large and influential patronage in Pawtucket.  His well-appointed store is 20 x 70 feet in dimensions, handsomely fitted up, and stocked with a full line of watches, clocks, a general line of jewelry, diamonds, and silver and plated ware, for all of which he has a large local trade, which requires the continual employment of three competent watchmakers.  He also manufactures electric clocks, and does repairing of all kinds, adjusts watches to temperature, and in short, he does everything that comes within the range of practical watchmaking, and its incidental features.  Mr. Clough is a practical watchmaker himself, and has an established and enviable reputation in Pawtucket.  He is a gentleman in the prime of life, and a prominent figure in such fraternal orders as the I. O. O. F., F. and A. M. and K. of P.



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S. B. HAVENS & CO., Restaurant, Caterers and Confectioneers, No. 176 Main Street.  --  The largest catering, confectionery and restaurant business in Pawtucket is, beyond question, that conducted by Messrs. S. B. Havens & Co.  The business may be divided into three main departments; bakery and confections, catering and restaurant.  The first was established by the present proprietor, Mr. S. B. Havens, in 1876; the second was added in 1887 and the restaurant was opened in 1891.  The bakery, situated at No. 48 East Avenue, comprises a two-story building, 20 x 75 feet in size, and a fully-equipped shop in the rear. Here are made the finest household bread, rolls, pastry, fancy and plain cakes, etc., and these are supplied to private families and others located throughout Pawtucket, Central Falls, Valley Falls and Lonsdale.  As caterers, the firm control the lion's share of the high-class trade hereabouts and supply every possible requisite for dinner-parties, balls, suppers, wedding and other breakfasts, festivals, etc., from a spoon to a band of music, and not excepting the finest line of confections, and where desired, competent and trustworthy waiters; while the firm are large manufacturers of ice cream and supply the family trade, particularly, as well as hotels, clubs, boarding-houses, etc.  The most attractive feature of the business is, however, the recently opened restaurant.  This is contained in a floor, 30 x 60 feet in size, furnished in a sumptuous and very attractive style; with handsome appointments, electric-lights, soda fountain and other superior fixtures; seating accommodation is provided for fifty persons and the tempting and delicious viands served are the finest edibles the market affords and many of the special dishes are veritable palate-ticklers. The kitchen in the basement is well ordered, and the nine competent assistants there regularly employed have at their head an experienced chef.  The bakery and catering departments furnish work for ten skilled hands and necessitate the retention of three wagons for delivery purposes.  Mr. S. B. Havens is a young man of Coventry, R. I. birth, and is a member of the F. and A. M., the Knights of Pythias, the Order of American Mechanics and other leading societies.



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F. O. REILLY & SON, Florists and Decorators, No. 24 High Street.  --  A popular and old-established florist and decorator of Pawtucket is Mr. F. O. Reilly, who is widely recognized throughout this section as an expert floriculturist.  Mr. Reilly, who was born in Ireland, has resided in this country for the past twenty-eight years, and since locating here has taken an active interest in municipal affairs, being for four years a member of the Common Council and at present is alderman (second term) from the Fifth Ward.  In 1867 he embarked in the florist business for himself and has since conducted it alone, with the exception of two years, when his son was associated with him up to 1891, after which he again assumed control of its affairs.  The store at all times contains the choicest assortment of cut flowers of the rarest specimens in season, and the entire stock is daily replenished, being supplied direct from Mr. Reilly's greenhouses, which are located at No. 25 Oak Hill Avenue. His nurseries here cover an area of one and a half acres, while his three hot-houses have the ample dimensions of 20 x 100 feet; and everything in the line of plants, flowers, exotics, palms, bulbs, seedlings, etc., is found displayed in infinite variety, so great being the assortment, that many rare and beautiful flowers which would be difficult to obtain elsewhere, are sure to be exhibited
here.  From three to four efficient assistants are given constant employment and special attention is given to decorations of all kinds, including the arrangement of flowers for churches, weddings, receptions, entertainments, etc., also to the laying out and care of grounds, and in every instance the work performed is done in the most artistic and careful manner, at reasonable prices, in the highest style of the florist's art.  Mr. Reilly also furnishes bouquets and designs for the table, and funeral emblems, wreaths, baskets, anchors, etc., in fact, any given style desired.



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J. H. CUMMING, Laundry and Dyehouse, Works Rear No. 221 North Main Street, Office, No. 310 Main Street.  --  Beyond question the largest combined dyehouse and laundry in this State is that situated in Pawtucket at the rear of No. 221 North Main Street, and owned and conducted by Mr. J. H. Cumming, a name which, in connection with dyeing, cleaning and laundry work, is now familiar to most residents throughout this section of the New England States.  This responsible house maintains more than three hundred branch offices and agencies all over Rhode Island, as well as resident offices in Franklin, Mass., and Providence, besides the chief office at No. 310 Main Street here.  Each one of these branches is the center of an established connection in its own locality, and contributes its quota to the heavy volume of operations at the works.  These comprise two buildings, each 54 x 45 feet in dimensions, (of which three floors are assigned to the laundry department), containing an elaborate plant of machines, tools, appliances and facilities, all of the latest improved pattern for ensuring uniformly excellent results; a 40-horse power steam-engine being the motive force used, and regular employment furnished on the spot for sixty operatives, all skilled in their respective departments. All kinds of household and ordinary dyeing in any colors, cleaning and laundry work are undertaken, as also carpet beating and cleaning, and some extent of the operations of the house may be gauged from the fact that about three thousand pieces are dyed, cleaned or laundered every day, and a thousand yards of carpet beaten and cleaned, while ten wagons are kept constantly busy running between Pawtucket, Providence, Central Falls, Valley Falls and Lonsdale.  The dyeing and cleaning business was inaugurated by the present proprietor in 1874; the laundry department having been added about ten years later.  The able proprietor, Mr. J. H. Cumming, who is a thoroughly practical dyer of long and varied experience, was born in Scotland in 1844, coming to the United States in 1869, and is a member of the Knights of Pythias and other leading societies.



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GEORGE SMALES, Stair-builder and Screen Manufacturer, Dealer in All Kinds of Newel Posts, Balusters, Hand Rails, Etc., No. 78 Pleasant Street.  --  A well-known and very successful stair-builder and screen manufacturer engaged in this city, is Mr. George Smales.  Stairs of all kinds and to any pattern are built to order upon the latest improved geometrical lines of construction; door and window screens are made and fitted, turning, band sawing, planing and general job work are promptly attended to, and newel posts, balusters, hand rails, etc., are supplied in any quantities required on short notice, estimates being cheerfully furnished upon application for any kind of work.  The enterprise was established by the present proprietor in 1887, although the premises occupied have been utilized as a wood-working shop and planing mill since 1842, and the trade now controlled, largely centered in the city of Providence, furnishes regular employment for twelve skilled mechanics.  The shop, etc., comprise two floors, each 30 x 60 feet in area, and is fully equipped with a plant of improved wood-working machines and other appliances for ensuring the best results in the shortest space of time; electric-power being the motive force used. Mr. George Smales, who is thoroughly practical in this line of industry, was born in Yorkshire, Eng., in 1854, coming to the United States in 1881, and is a member of the Sons of Saint George.



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CAVANAUGH & MANNING, Pawtucket Hotel Stables, Nos. 46, 48 and 50 Broadway.  --  This firm established their business here in 1889, and have always commanded a liberal and influential patronage.  Their stables are spacious and commodious, well lighted, ventilated and drained, and possess first-class accommodations for fifty horses.  The firm operate a general hack, livery, boarding and sale business, running six depot hacks, and having all descriptions of vehicles to hire, including a number of the most stylish equipages to be seen in the city, and a stock of superior driving horses which can be hired for business or pleasure, night or day, on the most moderate terms.  The firm are prepared to supply carriages in any number desired for funerals, weddings and excursion parties at the shortest notice.  The firm also deal in new and second-hand carriages, light and heavy harness, robes and blankets, carrying a full stock at all times, and offering bargains which cannot be duplicated elsewhere. The members of this firm are Messrs. M. J. Cavanaugh and P. J. Manning.  Mr. Cavanaugh was born in Cumberland, R. I., served in the late war as a member of Company H, 7th Rhode Island Infantry, and is a member of the C. K. A. and the Royal Society of Good Fellows, and an enterprising and popular business man.  Mr. Manning was born in Ireland, in 1838, and came to this country when ten years of age.  He has been established as a furnishing undertaker and embalmer since 1874, and is thoroughly prepared for prompt and efficient service in furnishing and directing funerals and for practical embalming.  Telephone calls are answered day or night at his office, Nos. 40 to 50 Broadway, and at his residence, No. 19 School Street.



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E. H. SMITH, Grocery and Market, Nos. 83, 85 and 87 North Main Street.  --  As dealers in staple and fancy groceries, meats, fruits and dairy products, this house is the acknowledged leader in this section of the State.  The business was originally established in 1872, by Wm. Andrews, who was succeeded in 1885 by C. E. Freeman.  In 1889, Mr. Smith, the present proprietor, became a partner and succeeded to the sole control in 1890.  The business premises comprise two connecting stores, thoroughly spacious in size, with a storehouse in the rear, and ice boxes for meats, butter, etc.  As regards domestic staple groceries and food products, the stock is thoroughly comprehensive, covering the entire wide range and including everything in its best quality as demanded by the refined tastes of the people of this city and vicinity.  A specialty is made of Ellington creamery butter, while such staples as teas, coffees and spices, so difficult to obtain of the desired standard, are prominent features of the trade, and the business in these lines alone has attained very extensive proportions. In the canned goods department the firm handle only those brands of meats, fruits and vegetables that experience and test have shown to be perfect both as regards quality and method of preservation.  The stock also includes fresh and salt meats, green and dried fruits, cigars and tobacco, sugars, syrups and molasses, and table delicacies of all kinds.  The trade is large and active in Pawtucket, Central Falls and Valley Falls, and goods are promptly delivered to customers at the lowest market prices.  Mr. Smith is a native of Rhode Island and is an energetic and enterprising business man.



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MURPHY & MACOMBER, Plumbers and Gasfitters, No. 14 Dexter Street.  --  A very successful firm of plumbers and gasfitters in Pawtucket is that of Messrs. Murphy & Macomber, who, although established as recently as the early part of 1892, have already succeeded in building up a large trade reaching throughout Rhode Island, its volume furnishing regular employment for twelve skilled mechanics.  All kinds of sanitary and ordinary plumbing and gasfitting are equally undertaken, including contracts for new work and general jobbing and repairing, the chief lines being the making of connections with main sewer, the supply and fixing of water-closets, urinals, bathtubs, washbowls, pumps, tanks, cisterns, boilers, gas brackets, chandeliers, etc., and as specialties, house drainage and ventilation and all kinds of mill work.  The shop, 19 x 70 feet in size, is fully equipped with all tools and appliances, and contains a large and carefully chosen stock of plumbers' and gasfitters' supplies, the latest improved sanitary appliances, etc.   Estimates are cheerfully submitted upon application, and prices will always be found at least as low as any other responsible house. The individual partners are Mr. James F. Murphy and Mr. William H. Macomber, who were born in Pawtucket, in 1863 and 1864, respectively, and have been actively engaged as practical plumbers for upwards of ten years.



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FRED. H. WHITE, State Agent for Billings, Taylor & Co., Full Line of Colors in Oil and Japan, Varnish, Dry Colors, Mixed Paints, Etc., Nos. 363 and 365 Main Street.  --  This concern was founded originally in 1886 by Messrs. White, Fuller & Son, and was conducted by them with excellent success until 1888, when they were succeeded by the present proprietor. Mr. White was born in Norton, Mass., in 1848, and has been a resident of this city since he was two years of age.  He has a wide range of experience in this line of business and under his able management and direction the trade, which is both wholesale and retail, has grown to its present volume and importance, extending as it does throughout this city and vicinity.  The premises comprise a double store of two floors, and are provided with every facility for the successful transaction of the business.  The stock carried is full and complete, and embraces white lead and zincs of the very best manufacture in any size of tin or wooden packages, boiled and raw oils, foreign and domestic window frame glass, varnishes, mixed and unmixed paints, Japans, brushes of all sizes from the course whitewash or knotted roof brush to the artists' camel's-hair brush, foreign and domestic tube colors, shellac, calcimining, gold and silver leaf, Dutch metal and gold paint, putty, glazier's diamonds, sign writers and artists, rests, palettes, pigments, etc.  The stock also includes a splendid line of fine foreign and domestic wall papers in all the very latest tints, designs and patterns, with borders, dadoes, friezes, centerpieces, etc., to match.  A specialty is the Messrs. Billings, Taylor & Co.'s full line of colors in oil and Japan, also their varnishes, dry colors, mixed paints, etc., for which Mr. White is the agent for this State.  Mr. White is a very enterprising and energetic gentleman, fully familiar with the wants of his patrons, and the goods he keeps on hand are of the very best quality and offered at the lowest prices.



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GEO. A. LANE, Boarding and Livery Stables, Mason Street and Railroad Avenue.  --  The boarding and livery stable of Mr. Geo. A. Lane, was founded here as far back as 1862, by Mr. David Briggs, who carried it on for five years, and then sold out to the firm of Bowen and Wightman; who, in turn, were succeeded in 1872, by Bowen & Lane; and they controlled its affairs together, up to the death of the former, in 1891, from which time on, its affairs have been under the sole management and direction of the present proprietor.  These premises comprise a building of three stories, 50 x 100 feet in dimensions, and the stables, which have a concrete floor, are well lighted, drained and ventilated, the stalls being clean and roomy, and affording accommodation for forty horses, while there is a storage capacity for many carriages and wagons.  Eight competent and experienced hands are employed in permanent service, and all horses taken to board by the day, week or month, receive the best of food, care and attention in every case.  A fine line of horses, buggies, coupes, light-wagons, and carriages of all kinds, is also kept for hire at the most reasonable rates, and all orders receive immediate attention in every instance, the office being connected by telephone for the convenience of patrons.  Mr. Lane, who is a native of this city, brings to bear upon this business twenty years of practical experience, and has enjoyed a most successful career.



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W. L. WOOD, Pharmacist, No. 285 Main Street.  --  Mr. Wood, who is a legally registered and duly qualified pharmacist, embarked for himself in his present enterprise in 1885, at No. 285 Main Street.  His store, 20 x 40 feet in dimensions, is a model of tasteful and convenient appointment, and with its fine show cases, fixtures, handsome soda fountain and well-displayed stock, presents one of the most attractive features of this thoroughfare.  The large and complete assortment carried embraces only pure and fresh drugs, chemicals, pharmaceutical preparations, all proprietary remedies of well-known merit and efficacy, toilet and fancy articles, perfumery, druggists' sundries, confectionery, cigars, etc., in fact, everything pertaining to a well-regulated and first-class pharmacy. Two thoroughly competent and trustworthy assistants are in constant attendance, and a specialty is here made of compounding physicians' prescriptions and family recipes in the most accurate and careful manner.   Mr. Wood brings to bear upon this business sixteen years of practical experience, and has always conducted this store upon the highest standard of professional skill.  He is a native of Providence, and a member of the Knights of Pythias.



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COOK'S CASH MARKET, Dealers in Beef, Pork, Ham, Lamb, Sausage, Vegetables, Fruit, Etc., Telephone No. 4318-2, No. 41 Broad Street.  --  A popular business house of Pawtucket, devoted to the trade in meats, is that known as Cook's Cash Market, which, although have been established here during recent years, has secured an enduring hold on public favor and patronage vouchsafed to few, if any, older concerns in the city. The large and commodious premises, 20 x 60 feet in dimensions, are fitted up in the most attractive manner with all the modern adjuncts of convenience for the purposes of the business, including an immense ice box, having a capacity for three tons of ice.  In the large and comprehensive stock carried will be found the primest cuts of choice beef, veal, lamb, pork, mutton, ham, sausages, smoked, salted and corned meats of all kinds, poultry, game, hare and venison, and all the different varieties of fruits and vegetables in season the market affords.  These supplies have been most carefully selected in every instance, and for freshness and uniform excellence of quality cannot be surpassed, while they are sold at the lowest ruling consistent prices.  All orders are promptly and satisfactorily filled and delivered, as many as from three to five competent assistants and two teams being employed in constant service.  This business was originally founded here in 1890 by Mr. M. C. Cook, who was succeeded by the present proprietor, Mr. S. S. Gladding, Jr., agent, two years later. He is a native of Newport, but has resided in this city for twenty-eight years, from his earliest childhood up.



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HUGH J. McGINN, Ladies' and Gents', Misses' and Children's Boots, Shoes and Rubbers, No. 154 Main Street.  --  One of the leading and best patronized boot and shoe emporiums of this city, is that which is under the efficient management and direction of Mr. Hugh J. McGinn, and was inaugurated here in 1887, by the present proprietor.  The store, 20 x 43 feet in dimensions, is neatly and conveniently appointed throughout, with everything necessary for the handling and display of the stock, and from three to four competent assistants are employed in regular attendance. In the large and complete assortment carried, will be found everything that is fashionable and desirable in the line of footwear of every description, for men, women, youth, boys and children, including boots, shoes, slippers and rubbers, in all sizes, widths, styles and grades.  Mr. McGinn gives special attention to all orders for custom work, and is always in a position to offer substantial inducements, both in the prices and quality of his goods, which would be difficult to duplicate elsewhere; while to all customers correct styles and perfectly fitting boots and shoes are assured, as only the best and most reliable makes in the country are handled.  Mr. McGinn is a painstaking, energetic and reliable young business man, who devotes his untiring attention to the demands of the trade.  He is a native of Pawtucket, and a popular member of the Foresters and other social orders.



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LOUIS V. GUERTIN, Jeweler, No. 33 Broad Street.  --  In 1887, Mr. Guertin first embarked in this business for himself, at the above address, and being thoroughly experienced in every branch of the trade, and fully conversant with the demands of customers, he has since built up a large and flourishing patronage.  The salesroom, 15 x 20 feet in dimensions, is neatly and tastefully fitted up, and stocked to repletion with a large and varied assortment of everything in the line of small jewelry, of both useful and ornamental articles, in all the latest novelties and styles of the day, also gold and silver watches of both foreign and domestic manufacture, clocks, sterling silver and plated ware, diamonds and other precious stones, eyeglasses and spectacles, etc.  All of these goods have been most carefully selected from the best manufacturers, and are guaranteed to be exactly as represented, while they are offered for sale at the most reasonable prices to be found anywhere in town. Two efficient assistants are employed by Mr. Guertin, who also gives special attention to the repairing of fine watches, clocks, jewelry, etc., all of which work is promptly and skillfully executed in the highest style of the art.  The proprietor, who is a native of Canada, has resided in this country for the past twenty-two years, and is a member of several social orders and a practical watchmaker and jeweler.



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WILLIAM H. SLOCUM, General Machinery Forging and Jobbing of All Kinds, Rear Cole Bros., No. 17 Bailey Street.  -- The business of machine forging is represented in Pawtucket by Mr. William H. Slocum, who inaugurated his business here in 1879, and has built up a reputation and patronage that is eminently creditable to his industry and skill.  His workshop is spacious in size, provided with an abundant outfit of the best machinery, tools and appliances; and every facility is afforded for guaranteeing perfect workmanship and the prompt fulfillment of all orders.  General machinery forging is executed at short notice and in the highest style of the art, and jobbing of all kinds is given skillful attention.  No house in this section of the country is better prepared for supplying the demands of the trade.  Mr. Slocum is a native of  Pawtucket, served in the late war as a member of Company A., 9th Rhode Island Infantry, and is a member of Tower Post No. 17, G. A. R.



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PAWTUCKET HAIR CLOTH COMPANY, Charles E. Pervear, Agent, No. 4 Cross Street.  --  Few people are aware of the importance possessed by Central Falls as a manufacturing center, or the bearing it has, not only upon the New England States, but the country at large.  Centered at this point are a number of representative manufacturing enterprises, chief among which is that conducted by the Pawtucket Hair Cloth Company, with main office at No. 4 Cross Street.  This company was incorporated in 1861, with a capital stock of $300,000 and with Messrs. David Ryder, Onley Arnold, George L. Littlefield, A. H. Littlefield and J. M. Ryder, named as incorporators.  They began operations in the old Slater Mill in Pawtucket, and were the first to introduce automatic machinery into this country for the manufacture of hair seating, using the inventions of Isaac Lindsley.  Their present plant comprises a substantial brick structure, four stories high, 50 x 200 feet, and a two-story building, 40 x 80 feet, with dyehouse of about the same size; all fully equipped with new and improved machinery, including 400-power looms, two steam-boilers and three waterwheels, and steady employment is given to 150 skilled hands. The company use from 60,000 to 75,000 pounds of horses' tails each year for hair seatings, with a cotton or linen warp, and which are received mostly from Siberia and South America.  These horse-hair seats for chairs and sofas are the standard wherever introduced, and are in heavy and influential demand in all parts of the United States.  With an experienced management, knowing just what the trade most desires, this company's reputation for making the best hair cloth in the market can be fully sustained, as every effort is made to keep the productions up to that high standard of excellence and finish that has so long been common to this house.  In this review of the leading interests of Rhode Island, few industries in the State are entitled to more prominent mention than that conducted so successfully by the Pawtucket Hair Cloth Company. The officers of the company are Hon. Henry B. Metcalf, president; Hon. Olney Arnold, treasurer; Charles E. Pervear, agent.  President Metcalf is one of the representative men of the State, largely interested in her industries and promoting her commerce in many channels with intelligent enterprise and pronounced success.  For twenty years he was the commercial manager of this company, being elected as its head in 1891, on the death of the late Hon. Daniel G. Littlefield, who had been the president for a number of years.  Mr. Metcalf is also treasurer of the Campbell Machine Company, interested in the Boston Button Company, of Boston, and identified with various local enterprises in Pawtucket and Central Falls.  Treasurer Arnold is a native of Rhode Island and one of its best-known citizens; president and a director of the First National Bank, treasurer of Providence County Bank, secretary and treasurer of Cumberland Mills, and prominent in commercial, financial and social life.

[illustration on p. 224:  engraving of the Pawtucket Hair Cloth Company mills]


Continued with Central Falls

These documents are made available free to the public for non-commercial purposes by the Rhode Island USGenWeb Project. Transcribed 2001 by Beth Hurd


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