Rhode Island Reading Room
These documents are made available free to the public by the Rhode Island USGenWeb Project

Industries and Wealth
of the Principal Points in Rhode Island, being the city of Providence, Pawtucket, Central Falls, Woonsocket, Newport, Narragansett Pier, Bristol & Westerly.

New York: A. F. Parsons Publishing Co., 1892

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Rhode Island PERKINS HORSESHOE COMPANY, Manufacturers of Perkins' Horse and Mule Shoes, and Toe Calks, No. 31 Exchange Place. -- One of the representative industries of Rhode Island is that so successfully conducted by the Rhode Island Perkins Horseshoe Company at Valley Falls.  This company is famous the world over as manufacturer of Perkins' horse and mule shoes, and toe calks, and is the second oldest in the line in the United States. The company was incorporated in 1867, under the laws of the State of Rhode Island, as the Rhode Island Horseshoe Company, the present title being adopted in 1891.  It has a capital stock of $2,750,000 and is officered as follows, viz,: F. W. Carpenter, president; C. H. Perkins, general manager; R. W. Comstock, secretary; C. R. Stark, treasurer.  The plant covers an area of six acres, and the productive capacity of the works is sixty tons of manufactured goods per day.  The works are among the most complete of their kind in the world, and all of the special machinery in use was invented by Mr. Perkins and manufactured by the house.  They manufacture their own iron, and give employment in the various departments of their business, to 500 hands.  The superiority of the Perkins horseshoe, as demonstrated in active service long ago, has been steadily and conscientiously maintained.  They are always made of the best material, the quality of which is greatly improved under the company's processes of manufacture; while they are perfect in weight, strength and durability, and the best yet offered to the public, while the prices quoted for them are extremely moderate.  The various styles of shoes made by this company include the Perkins toe-weight shoe, in three different weights; the Goodenough shoes, the Perkins snowshoe, the Perkins cowboy shoes, X. L. steel shoes, etc.; while a specialty is made of the Perkins steel side-weight hind shoe, their latest and best production.  Every intelligent horseshoer well knows its superior advantages.  It is made of the best selected material; is made concaved, in order to avoid throwing mud, stones or snow; and it is almost impossible to pick up a stone with them.  The price put upon them is about one-half that of the cost of the hand-turned, and leading horseshoers throughout the country prefer them to all other makes.  They are put up in all cases with rights and lefts in the keg, and are supplied in quantities to suit at short notice.  In a word, this company is fully prepared to furnish the very first-class shoes for almost every variety of solid-footed animals, and suitable or necessary for any district or section of this country, or any part of the world.  Their regular standard brands remain the same, with the exception that they have better adapted them to the more modern style of horseshoeing by leaving the toe a little more rounding and taking out some of the concave.  The Perkins snowshoe, as now made, is vastly superior in all points to any like style of shoes in the market, for either plain shoeing, as a trotting or showshoe, or for use in mud or clay grounds.  For the purpose for which they are made - light and fine work - the X. L. Steel shoes stand at the head of that style of machine shoes.  Their Goodenough pattern horse and mule shoes have been for some time the first choice of the horse railroad companies of this country.  They are largely used on transfer lines and are every year gaining ground in private shops.  They are a most economical shoe, as they require no fitting, while they are calked and ready to put on at short notice.  The Perkins toe calks are in constantly increasing demand on their merits, and are conscientiously maintained at the highest standard of excellence and efficiency.  The trade of the company extends to all parts of the United States, and fame of the company's products having spread to all parts of the civilized globe, and its business is constantly broadening in extent and increasing in volume and importance. An office is operated in this city, while all orders are filled from the works, and patrons are supplied without delay in every instance.  The general manager, Mr. Perkins, has filled that position since the inception of the company, as has also the secretary, Mr. Comstock, while all the officers are experienced in the industry, and enjoy a standing in the business world which places them far beyond the requirements of any praise which these pages could bestow.


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ARNOLD & STEERE, Makers of Solid Gold Band and Stone Rings, Facory, No. 94 Point Street. -- The great success of the enterprise conducted by Messrs. Arnold and Steere is a testimonial to the ability and energy of the management.  This house was founded in 1866 by Arnold & Webster, and the present proprietors succeeded to the control in 1890.  The factory is located at No. 94 Point Street, and occupies a floor 40 x 150 feet in dimensions, conveniently fitted up throughout, and provided with every mechanical facility whereby the best order of production may be secured. Seventy-five experienced workmen are employed, and the operations are systematically divided into departments, each having its complement of applicances, devices and materials and its quota of skilled workmen, some having been employed for the past twenty years, under experienced supervision.  The manufacture embraces gold rings in engraved bands and a large variety of ladies' set rings in all kinds of stones, pearls, etc., all of which are made in solid gold.  The goods are made in an almost endless variety of size, shape and design, and the beauty, originality, and propriety of the patterns, together with the superior quality which is maintained, leave nothing to conjecture as to the cause of the demand for them among dealers in all sections of the Union.  Orders are promptly filled, and all transactions are placed upon the most satisfactory basis. Mr. Thos. F. Arnold is a native of this city and Mr. Horace W. Steere is a native of Gloucester, R.I.  Both gentlemen are among our most prominent citizens, reliable and responsible, and influential factors in our industrial development.


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EDWARD N. COOK, Manufacturer of Gold and Silver Plate and Plated Wire, No. 33 Page Street, Corner of Friendship Street. -- Among the many commercial and industrial enterprises of Providence, there are very few that can compare in importance with the manufacturing jewelry trade and its kindred interests.  From small beginnings it has grown for the last few decades until it has reached astonishing proportions, and it is now one of the most prominent centers in the United States for the manufacture of all kinds of goods in this line, while the products are recognized everywhere to be equal, if not superior in beauty and elegance of design and workmanship to those made in any other portion of the world.  A most necessary and important branch of this trade is the manufacture of certain classes of material, and among the well-known, reliable and progressive houses engaged in this special line, is that of Mr. Edward N. Cook, manufacturer of gold and silver plate, etc., centrally located at No. 33 Page Street, corner of Friendship Street.  This enterprising gentleman is a native of Massachusetts, but has been a resident of this State at Johnstown (sic) for many years, and having acquired a thorough knowledge of this business by years of close practical experience, he founded this enterprise on his own account, in 1886, and by attending closely to the wants of the trade, producing none but A1 goods, and adhering strictly to honorable, straightforward business principles, he soon developed a very large and permanent trade, that now extends to all parts of the United States, and as it continued to increase, he was compelled to seek more commodious quarters, in order to meet its demands, and in 1889 he moved to his present eligible location.  The premises utilized are amply spacious and commodious, admirably adapted to the wants of the trade, and appropriately fitted up for business and manufacturing purposes.  The factory is fully equipped with the latest improved modern machinery, tools and appliances, also steam-power, and a full force of skilled and experienced workmen is given constant employement.  The proprietor devotes his entire attention to the business and is prepared to execute at the shortest notice, all orders for gold and silver plate, also plated wire, either single or double, all of which are made of the very best materials and in the best workmanlike manner, while the prices quoted are the very lowest.  Mr. Cook is a young man of superior business ability, enterprising and honorable, prompt in his dealings, and justly merits the success he has achieved by his energy and industry.


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A. BURGESS & SON, Manufacturers of Leather Belts, Loom Pickers, Picker and Lace Leather, and Dealers in Manufacturers' Findings, Factory and Office, No. 692 North Main Street. -- A. Burgess & Son, have a reputation and trade co-extensive with the whole civilized world as manufacturers of leather belts, loom pickers, picker and lace leather, and as dealers in manufacturers' findings generally, with factory and office at No. 692 Main Street.  The foundation of this extensive business was laid in 1835 by Mr. Alpheus Burgess.  He subsequently admitted his son, Mr. Alexander Burgess, to partnership, and retired from the firm in 1865; when Mr. Edwin A. Burgess became a partner with his father, and on the decease of the latter, in 1887, succeeded to the sole control.  The factory is a substantial three-story building, 50 x 200 feet in dimensions, supplied with improved machinery and ample steam-power, and having a productive capacity of 5,000 feet of belting per day.  The manufacture of rawhide belting and lacing is also carried on at the tannery of Wm. Coupe & Co., in South Attleboro, Mass., in which firm Mr. Burgess is a partner.  The output of these two factories is recognized as standard in all the markets of the world.  This house has supplied the Allan Print Works, the American Screw Company, and nearly all the great mills in New England with belting and findings, and ship immense quantities to the leading manufacturers of Great Britain, Europe, South America and other nations of the world.  Col. Edwin A. Burgess is a native of Providence, and accounted among that class of energetic, public-spirited business men in whose hands the continued development of this city rests. He enlisted in the First Rhode Island Infantry when nineteen years of age, serving for three months, and is now A. D. C. on the staff of Gen John Palmer, Grand Commander of the G. A. R.; and a member of Prescott Post, of this city; a director of the Merchants Insurance Co., and the Mercantile Trust Company; a half-owner of the Franklin Machine Compnay, and honored and esteemed by his fellowmen.


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MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK, No. 14 Westminster Street. -- One of the most creditable and interesting histories of steady financial progress is that of the Merchants National Bank, of Providence, No. 14 Westminster Street.  This institution has ever proved one of the financial bulwarks of the city, and one ever guided by the soundest and most conservative policy.  It was originally incorporated with a capital of $300,000, February, 1818, and is therefore seventy-three years of age.  April 22, 1818, William Richmond, 2d, was appointed first president and Joseph Wheelock, cashier.  Its capital was $300,000, and it was located in a building on the present site.  Its first board of directors were: Gravener (sic) Taft, William Richmond, 2d, Andrew Taylor, Peleg Rhodes, Truman Beckwith, Samuel N. Richmond, Randolph Chandler, Stephen H. Smith, Josiah B. Woods, Charles Potter, George S. Rathbone, Charles L. Bowler and Nathan Tingley.  During its seventy-three years of existence the bank has had three presidents and seven cashiers. The first president, William Richmond, 2d, held that office from April 22, 1818, to January 14, 1850, thirty-two years.  He was succeeded by Josiah Chapin, who filled the position until 1868, at which time old age and infirmities compelled him to resign.  He was then eighty years of age.  He was succeeded by ex-Governor Royal C. Taft, the present incumbent.  The cashiers of the bank who have served since its incorporation are Joseph Wheelock, Henry E. Hudson, Henry P. Knight, William B. Burdick, Augustus M. Tower, Charles T. Robbins and John W. Vernon, the present incumbent, who has served since 1868.  The capital stock was increased from time to time until, in 1865, it was $939,500.  At this time the bank was reorganized and converted from a state bank to a national bank, and the capital stock increased to $1,000,000.  In 1856 the present Merchants Bank building on Westminster Street was erected.  The building and estate cost over $90,000, and the banking rooms when fitted up were considered the finest in New England.  That the prosperity of the bank has been continuous, both as a state and as a national institution, is evidenced by the fact that it has never passed a dividend during the seventy-three years of its existence.  As a state bank the dividends, regularly paid each half year, averaged seven per cent per annum.  Since its reorganization as a national bank in 1865 its dividends have averaged seven and one-half per cent, per annum.  For many years the Merchants Bank, in connection with the Suffolk Bank of Boston, redeemed the bills of all the banks of the State, a work of great labor and responsibility and some profit.  It is a question whether this most useful service to the public, which engrossed the attention and energy of the management of both banks, did not eventually involve a greater loss through neglect of other channels of banking activities than the temporary gain realized from the enormous volume of business connection with this redemption work.  After the inauguration of the national banking system the Merchants National Bank and the National Bank of North America effected the clearings for the other banks of the city, a work that some three years since was assumed by the Clearing House Association of the banks of the city.  Since then the clearings of the Merchants National Bank for the year ending June 30, 1889, amounted to $53,700,000, and for the year ending June 30, 1891, to $59,200,000 the largest amount credited by the Clearing House to any institution in the city.  The Merchants National has ever been a favorite with the business world; its unusually extended deposits are those of active merchants, and of the City of Providence, while it discounts much of the most desireable commercial paper on the market.  Its capital stock is held by leading citizens as one of the choicest and must remunerative of investments.  Its board of directors is thoroughly representative, being composed of prominent capitalists and business men, whose names are synonymous with ability and integrity and whose interests are closely allied to the growth and prosperity of the city and State; and there is no fiscal institution here which enjoys greater confidence or whose management is more signally prudent and sagacious.  Its officers and directors are as follows, viz:  President, Hon. Royal C. Taft; cashier, J. W. Vernon; directors, Royal C. Taft, Frank Mauran, Frank E. Richmond, Samuel R. Dorrancce, John W. Danielson, Edward D. Pearce, Horatio N. Campbell, Frederic C. Sayles, and George M. Smith.  President Taft has been a director of the bank for the past thirty-five years, and both he and Cashier Vernon were elected to their respective positions in 1868.  Both are able, clear-headed financiers and have every qualification at command, including vast practical experience and perfected methods of conducting the vast volume of business centered here. The bank capital is an eloquent commentary upon the wisdom and prudence of its executive management, while its operations and investments have been so satisfactory that a snug surplus of $200,000 has been accumulated, with undivided profits of $165,823.26; and its individual deposits average over $2,200,000, and its loans and discounts upwards of  $3,100,000.  This bank transacts a general business and numbers among its patrons many of our wealthiest corporations, merchants and business men.  It makes an extended series of collections through its correspondents, who include the Importers and Traders National Bank and the Bank of Commerce, New York; and the Exchange National Bank and the National Bank of Redemption, of Boston.  The banking-rooms of the Merchants National are situated on the ground-floor of its own magnificent six-story building, and are among the finest and best equipped in the city.  As through the handsome swinging doors one enters the establishment, its admirable arrangement is the first impression conveyed to the mind.  Notwithstanding the large amount of business daily transacted here, a quiet elegance pervades the place.  About July, 1890, the bank began some extensive improvements on its building, remodeling the whole of the interior and adding another story, making it six stories high.  The stairway leading from the enterance on Westminster Street up into the building was torn down, and a new entrance made on the northwest corner.  An elevator was also put in the upper rooms fitted up for offices.  On each floor there is a spacious hallway.  Every room is fitted up with gas and electric-light attachments, so that either or both can be used if desired.  The lower floor is fitted up for the business of the bank.  The bank will have its own entrance on Westminster Street, and in no way can access be obtained from any other part of the building.  The banking-rooms are fitted up with every accommodation.


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PROVIDENCE CORNICE COMPANY, Manufacturers of all Kinds of Sheet Metal Work, Skylights, Ventilators, Finials, Cornices, Tin, Copper and Corugated Iron Roofing, Conductors, Gutters, Etc., George Salmon, Treasurer, No. 135 Dorrance Street. -- One of the leading houses in Providence engaged as coppersmiths and sheet metal workers is that of George Salmon, working in conjunction with the Providence Cornice Company, both located at No. 135 Dorrance Street, which are widely known in this section of the country for turning out the most satisfactory work at the lowest trade prices, and, accordingly, control a heavy volume of business throughout the New England States among the better class of regular patrons.  Of the many kinds of work turned out, the chief lines are: every description of light and heavy copper works for plumbers, printworks, cotton-mills, dye-houses, bleacheries, steamboats, sugar refiners, candy-makers, hotels, saloons, jewelers, chemical-works, etc.; skylights, ventilators, finials, cornices, tin, copper and corrugated iron roofing, conductors, gutters, etc., as well as metal spinning repairs of all kinds in copper, iron, tin and lead, and jobbing of every description incidental to the trade, estimates being furnished and models of work required sent upon application.  This house manufactures extensively slashers for printworks and cotton-mills and carries an extensive stock in this line.  The two businesses were established in 1874, by the present sole owner, Mr. George Salmon, who has at his command an experience in the trade of forty-five years, and personally superintends the prompt and accurate fulfillment of all orders undertaken.  To ensure the most satisfactory results every modern device and facility has been embraced, and thus, the manufactory, comprising two spacious floors, each 30 x 100 feet in area, is replete with a full equipment of plant, machines, tools and appliances pertaining to the industry, steam-power being the motive force used, and eighteen skilled mechanics regularly employed on the spot.  Mr. George Salmon is a native of London, England, whence he came to Providence twenty years ago.


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MOWRY & SCOTT, Attorneys and Counsellors-at-law, No. 20 Weybosset Street. -- Prominent among the successful lawyers of Providence is the firm of Mowry & Scott.  These gentlemen have been engaged in the successful practice of law for a quarter of a century, Mr. Mowry in Providence and Mr. Scott both in Providence and New York City.  The firm, although engaged in general law practice, made a specialty of equity, real estate and patent law, including not only patent causes in the courts, but also practice in the Patent Office in the United States and in foreign countries.  Mr. Mowry is a native of Rhode Island, graduated at Brown University in 1861, and was a soldier of the Union.  He has for many years been known as a successful and safe counsel in equity and real estate law as well as a conscientious legislator both in the Municipal and State legislatures, having for a long term of years been a member of both the Common Council and Board of Aldermen of the city of Providence and representing the city of Providence as its senator in the General Assembly.  Mr. Scott is a native of Massachusetts, entering Brown University in the class of 1863, but left before graduation to enter the Union Army.  He served with the three months' troops, and a second time entered the army, being commissioned as first-lieutenant and adjutant of the Third Rhode Island Cavalry, subsequently being promoted to a captaincy in the same regiment, serving therein till the close of the war.  He read law in the office of the late Hon. Thomas A. Jenckes, of this State, and was admitted to the Rhode Island Bar in 1866, and commenced practice in that year in Providence.  In 1869 he removed to New York City to engage in the practice of patent law in connection with Mr. Jenckes, one of the ablest patent lawyers of this country.  After the death of Mr. Jenckes, Mr. Scott continued the practice of patent law in New York City.  In 1891 he returned to Rhode Island and with Mr. Mowry formed the present partnership of Mowry & Scott, giving particular attention to the practice of his specialty, patent law.  -- 'Elisha C. Mowry was born in Smithfield, near Blackstone.  When about four years old, his father and family moved to Providence, where he had the advantages of the excellent schools of that city till he was twelve years of age.  After a residence of more than two years in Sheboygan, Wis., he returned to Providence, and between 1851 and 1853 prepared for college at the excellent University Grammar School, of which Messrs. Frieze and Lyon were principals.  Entering Brown University in 1853, he had completed but half of the college course, when ill-health compelled him to suspend his studies.  The next four years were passed in teaching school in New York State, in which he was particularly successful, and in commercial business in Buffalo, N. Y.  Having recovered his health, he returned to his college studies in 1859, and graduated at Brown University in 1861.  He served his country in the 10th Regiment Rhode Island Volunteers in 1862, and during the next three years pursued the study of law in the office of the Hon. Samuel Currey, of Providence, teaching school winters in Rhode Island and Massachusetts with marked success.  In 1864 and early in 1865, he was the principal of the High School in East Douglas.  He was admitted to the Rhode Island Bar in May, 1865, and to the United States Courts in 1866.  Elisha C. Mowry is now (1878) one of the most promising young lawyers of Providence. He has the entire confidence of the people and of a large clientage, as an honest, upright man, well-read in legal matters, of broad intelligence, large general culture, and sound judgment.  Although attached to a political party largely in the minority, he has repeatedly been elected by the people to several responsible offices of trust and honor.  He has been an active and efficient member of the School Board of Providence since 1872, for several years chairman of the important committee on evening schools; was a member of the Common Council from 1871 to 1877.  In the latter year he was elected alderman.  In these positions he has exerted large influence, having been chairman and member of some of the most important standing and special committees.' (From 'The Descendants of Nathan Mowry', by William A. Mowry, A. M., 1878).  He served two terms as alderman and the next year (1880) was chosen to represent the city of Proidence in the State Senate.


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MACULLAR, PARKER & COMPANY, First-class Clothing, for Men, Youths and Boys, Ready-made and Made to Measure, No. 112 Westminster Street. -- The very marked improvement in male apparel in this country, of late years, is a distinctly notable feature of this age of tasteful attire.  Compared with the clumsy and unshapely 'store clothes', worn a generation ago, the neat-fitting and elegant suits displayed by our leading clothiers to-day are certainly a triumph of art; while the custom garments turned out by fashionable tailoring firms, are not only designed and out in accordance with exact scientific principles, but are made up and finished in a style utterly unknown a few decades past.  And in this connection attention is notably directed in a review of the representative business houses of Providence, to the spacious and well-ordered establishment of Macullar, Parker & Company, No. 112 Westminster Street, where can always be found an immense assortment of first-class ready-made clothing, for men, youths, and boys, at remarkably low figures.  Suits are made to measure here, also, at short notice, fine tailoring being a specialty, and perfect fit is assured in every instance, while style, cut, finish and fabric, are warranted.  The prices prevailing are exceptionally moderate, quality of material and character of workmanship considered, and patrons of this widely-known and noted firm, can always rely upon getting a superior article and satisfactory treatment.  Only thoroughly reliable, high-grade goods are offered for sale here, the stock embracing a line of clothing and suitings, from which the most fastidious in dress can make selection, and no pains are spared to please.  The business premises at the location above-indicated occupy the whole of a 40 x 100 feet, four-story and basement building.  The ready-made department, which is on the first floor, is commodious and handsomely appointed; the custom department is on the second floor, and the third and fourth floors are used as stock- and workrooms; upward of fifty, including clerks, salemen, cutters, and tailors, being employed in this establishment, which is a branch of the old and noted house of Macullar, Parker & Company, whose headquarters are at No. 400 Washington Street, Boston.  The firm, than which none in New England maintains a higher reputation for excellent goods or honorable dealing, has been in existence since 1849, the Providence branch being established in 1876.  Mr. Edward L. Root, the efficient manager here, is a gentleman in the prime of life, and a native of Massachusetts, residing in this city some seventeen years.  He is a man of thorough experience, as well as of energy and business ability, and prior to assuming his present position, in 1887, had been employed by the firm, in a responsible capacity in their Providence house, ever since its inception. The stock displayed in the store here, includes ready-made clothing of fashionable cut and elegant material, in all sizes, styles, shapes and patterns, both in finest and medium grades, and which is all manufactured by the firm themselves; the assortment shown in the custom department embraces all the latest novelties, in imported and domestic novelties - fancy cassimeres, cloths, serges, checks, plaids, stripes and stylish fabrics in great variety.


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I. M. LINCOLN, Wholesale Dealer in Fresh and Salt Beef, No. 223 Canal Street, Box 857. -- The trade in fresh meats is one of the most important branches of business in any city, and as a rule is conducted by men of capital and ability of a high order.  One of the leading and largest houses in the wholesale trade in fresh and salt beef in Providence is that of Mr. I. M. Lincoln, whose headquarters are located at No. 223 Canal Street, with branch store at No. 330 Canal Street, styled the Kansas Store.  Mr. Lincoln is the only wholesale butcher in the city that kills his own beef, and he mades a specialty of the very primest and choicest beef, of which he is an expert judge.  This prosperous business was established in 1872 by the present proprietor, and his long and honorable career in this line has been marked by the most assiduous attention to the interests of his patrons; and his liberal and straightforward methods of transacting business, coupled with his unlimited resources and facilities, have resulted in the present influential business, which is one of the largest in this line in the State. At the slaughter-houses, which are located on Charles Street (formerly Louisquissit Pike), two carloads of cattle are killed every week and are used mostly by the Hebrews for Koscher beef.  The house also handles three carloads per week of Western dressed beef and at the Kansas Store four carloads are handled each week.  Beef is sold directly from the slaughter-house, where Mr. Lincoln has an ice-house with a capacity of 3,000 tons.  In addition to this he has a farm of one hundred acres, on which he last year raised 1,200 bushels of corn and where cattle are allowed to graze and fatten into prime condition before killing for the market.  In fact his facilities are not surpassed by any competitor in this line of trade, and his home-dressed meats, for exclusively fine trade, are the choicest that can be procured.  The store at No. 223 Canal Street - and also the Kansas Store at No. 330 on the same street, which was established two years ago- are both 25 x 100 feet in dimensions, and include every facility for the handling, receiving, shipping and preservation of stock, the former containing an ice box with a capacity of 275 tons of ice, while the latter has an ice box with a capacity of twenty tons.   Home-slaughtered beef is sold also direct from the slaughter-house, where ten hands are constantly employed, sixteen men being also given employment at the two stores, while twelve wagons and twenty horses are kept in constant use.  The original establishment of the business was on Canal Street, the present premises having been occupied about seven years.  A large stock is at all times carried and orders of any magnitude are filled with promptness and despatch, and a large and influential patronage is enjoyed from the best trade, including the best hotels, restaurants, etc., which handle only the choicest beef, which is obtained here at reasonable prices, taking the quality into consideration.  Mr. Lincoln is a native of Massachusetts, but has resided in this city for the past twenty-five years where he has built up an enviable reputation and a flouishing business.  He is a type of New England's enterprising business men, whose capacity and ability permanently retains to this section its due share of national trade supremacy.


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INDUSTRIAL TRUST COMPANY, No. 57 Westminster Street. -- During the last few years a class of institutions has sprung up in the United States intended to meet the requirements of holders of property, for their 'better protection during life', and the more certain and speedy transmission of property to heirs at death.  These trust companies not only receive money on deposit like banks, but also securities and other articles of value, and are besides authorized to act as trustee, executor, administrator, etc.  Being corporations, they never die.  The Industrial Trust Company, of Providence, whose offices and banking-rooms are eligibly located at No. 57 Westminster Street, was incorporated June 9, 1886, and began business in August, 1887. It has a cash capital of $500,000, and is officered as follows, viz: President, Samuel P. Colt; vice-president, Albert L. Calder; treasurer, J. M. Addeman; directors, James M. Kimball, Providence; Geo. L. Littlefield, Pawtucket; Joshua Wilbour, Providence; Albert L. Calder, Providence; Sterus Hutchins, Providence; John P. Campbell, Providence; Horace M. Barns, Bristol; Leander R. Peck, Providence; Enos Lapham, Centerville; Newton D. Arnold, Providence; Henry R. Barker, Providence; Olney T. Inman, Pascoag; Henry B. Winship, Providence; Geo. Peabody Wetmore, Newport; Hezekiah Conant, Pawtucket; George T. Bliss, New York; Wm. C. Osborn, New York; Sam'l P. Colt, Bristol.  The company's cash department is a thoroughly organized banking institution, affording every facility to patrons.  Loans are made on approved collateral and mortgage of real estate; first-class commercial paper is discounted, and the collection of notes, drafts, coupons and interest is made on the most favorable terms, through its correspondents, who include the First National Bank, and Morton, Bliss & Co., New York; and the National City Bank, Boston.  The company acts as agent for the transferring and registering or countersigning of certificates of stocks, bonds or other obligations of any corporation, association, State, or public authority, and also undertakes the execution of trusts in any State of the Union, all trust funds being kept separate from the assets of the company and invested in the names of the parties for whose benefit they are held. Here is offered to executors, administrators, and trustees of estates, as well as to ladies unaccustomed to the details of business, and to religious and benevolent institutions, the finest possible facilities for the transaction of their business.  That these facilities are duly appreciated and promptly availed by our citizems is evidenced by the statement of the company made February 1, 1892, which shows individual deposits amounting to $1,328,455.07; participation account deposits, $1,237,960.48; loans and discounts, $940,382.24; investment securities and mortgages, $1,725,164.89; profit on hand, $61,035.46; total resources, $3,339,416.17.  President Colt is one of the best-known citizens of Rhode Island, president also of the National India Rubber Company, identified with numerous enterprises, and a tower of strength to all.  The vice-president, Mr. Calder, is widely known as the manufacturer of Calder's Dentine.  The treasurer, Mr. Addeman, was Secretary of State for Rhode Island for fifteen years, and is eminently qualified as the custodian of the finances of this powerful institution; while the Board of Directors comprises much of the financial solidity and business talent of the city and State.


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ARTHUR W. JOYCE, Pension Attorney and Agent, No. 18 Custom House Street. -- None but those who are entitled to the pensions granted by the United States Government, and have tried to have their claims properly laid before and adjusted in the United States Pension Office, are aware of the annoyances, vexatious delays and difficulties encountered, unless they have been wise enough to procure the services and advice of a thoroughly experienced attorney and agent.  The fact that the Government has granted pensions to the deserving soldiers, soldiers' widows, and their dependent children, is evidence that it desires that they should be remembered, and are entitled to the amount allowed them.  A well-known and responsible house devoted to this line of professional industry in Providence, and that has been of great benefit to all who have engaged its services, is that of Mr. Arthur W. Joyce, pension agent and attorney, centrally located at No. 18 Custom House Street, room No. 13, lock box No. 681.  This old-established concern was founded originally in 1865, by Major William H. Joyce, who was late major of the Seventh Rhode Island Volunteer Infantry, who first enlisted under President Lincoln's call for 75,000 men at the outbreak of the late civil war, in April, 1861, to serve for three months, and at the expiration of that time, he re-enlisted as a private, and during the remainder of the war, from 1862 to 1865, was promoted step by step, until he became major of his regiment.  From the start the business has met with uninterrupted success, and its patronage now extends to all parts of the United States.  Owing to his untimely and deeply  lamented decease in 1890, the business of the concern passed into the control of his son, under the present title, who had an experience of over six years in the business, and is thoroughly familiar with all its details.  His office is amply spacious and commodious and provided with every convenience for the transaction of business and the comfort of clients.  He is prepared to transact a general pension business, and possesses special advantages and qualifications to accurately advise applicants and frame cases so that they may be promptly adjusted and pass through the Pension Office with the least possible delay.  He is well versed in all laws governing the business and those having claims of any sort to make, for back pay, bounty, extra duty, commutation of rations, clothing, disabilities in consequence of wounds, sickness or old age, also the dependent widows and minor children of soldiers and sailors, together with requests for removal of charges of desertion, correction of muster, re-opening of old cases for re-rating, etc., should place them in his hands without delay, when they will receive his prompt and personal attention. Mr. Joyce is a young man, active, energetic, and is highly respected by all with whom he has any business relations.  Mr. Joyce also holds position as Clerk of Senate Committee on Corporations of the Rhode Island Assembly.


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WALDRON, WIGHTMAN & CO., Wholesale Grocers, Nos. 7 to 15 Pine Street, and Harkness Court. -- In the wholesale grocery trade, applying the broadest sense of the term, no house is more thoroughly representative of modern progress and intelligently directed enterprise in this section of the country than that of Messrs. Waldron, Wightman & Co., located at Nos. 7 to 15 Pine Street, and Harkness Court.  This house was founded October 7, 1858, by Messrs. Waldron & Wightman, and in 1866 the present style was adopted. The business premises comprise an entire six-story building fronting 100 feet on Pine Street, 50 feet on Harkness Court and 125 feet deep; (also basement of an adjoining building, 60 x 125 feet each, owned by them); while the interior arrangements leave nothing to be desired, every convenience and facility being accorded for the acceleration of business.  No pen can do justice to the magnificent array of food products of every conceivable description that is here displayed in such an attractive manner.  This firm rank among the leading wholesalers of groceries in New England buying in both home and foreign markets, and receiving only the purest and best in every line.  They are among the heaviest jobbers of domestic products in the State, purchasing so extensively as to afford unequalled inducements to buyers as regards both reliability of goods and liberality of terms and prices.  Their stock is immense and varied in all departments, and includes the finest teas and coffees, the purest spices, the finest sugars and syrups, and the best brands of flour and farinaceous goods; also select olives and olive oils in class and bulk, capers and sauces, imported consomme, pickles and preserves, jams and jellies, potted meats, Swiss cheese, French and German vegetables in class, canned soups and fish, fruit flavors, essences and extracts, macaroni and manioc, chocolates and cocoas, cider and vinegar, fancy soaps, wrapping paper, and wooden ware.  The establishment is completely stocked from cellar to roof with the choicest food products that the earth yields, and the most extensive orders from the most critical buyers can always be promptly filled.  The leading retailers in Providence, Pawtucket, Woonsocket, Newport, Westerly, Bristol, Lincoln, and other towns in Rhode Island, as well as all through Eastern Connecticut and Southern Massachusetts, depend on this house for their regular supplies, and are never delayed or disappointed.  A corps of expert salesmen represent the interests of the house to the outside trade, and are prepared to guarantee the prompt and perfect fulfilment of all orders, as well as entire satisfaction in all transactions.  The founders and active members of this firm are Messrs. Nathan B. Waldron and William B. Wightman, well-known citizens and natives of this State; while Hon Nelson W. Aldrich, United States Senator from Rhode Island, has been a partner in the house since 1866.  The fame and facilities of this old and honored house are so familiar to the public that further comment upon our part in unnecessary; and the city of Providence is to be congratulated upon having in her midst such a thoroughly representative and important house and one contributing so largely to her facilities as a source of supply.


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PROVIDENCE SASH & BLIND CO., Dealers in Doors, Sash, Blinds, Window Frames, Door Frames, Brackets, etc., No. 663 Broad Street, Corner of Pearl. -- In a relatively short period the Providence Sash and Blind Company, located in this city at 663 Broad Street (corner of Pearl), have sprung into prominence among similar houses here; and they now occupy a foremost position as a leading source of supply for the building and carpentering trades throughout Rhode Island, Eastern Connecticut, and Southern Massachusetts.  This distinct success cannot fail to be regarded as a substantial tribute to the company's ability to place before users the best qualities of goods at rock-bottom figures; and this fact is attested by the many facilities they possess for drawing their supply at first hand, directly from mills, upon the most advantageous terms.  The enterprise was established at the same location two years ago by the present sole proprietor, Mr. Walter R. Stiness.  The chief lines dealt in are all the usual sizes of doors, sash, blinds, window frames, door frames, brackets, etc., as well as plate and French window glass, flock and stained glass.  Of the whole of these a heavy and very complete stock is always carried, and goods of special sizes or patterns are supplied at short notice.  The premises utilized comprise a building of three floors, each 40 x 100 feet in area, well fitted and fully equipped throughout; as well as storehouses of three spacious floors on Central and Pearl streets.  Mr. Walter R. Stiness is a native of this city and still a young man.


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HENRY WILLIAMS & CO., Manufacturers of Fine Rolled Plated, Seamless Wire and Sterling Silver Chains, No. 27 Page Street. -- In that branch of the great jewelry industry of Providence devoted to the manufacture of chains of various kinds, a prominent place is occupied by the old and responsible house of Henry Williams & Co., located at No. 27 Page Street, who are the centre of a large and far-reaching trade consisting in the supply of retailers all over the United States.  This important enterprise was established in 1865 in quite a small way, and was conducted with steady and continuous success up to 1882, when Mr. Henry Williams assumed sole control of affairs; and during this last decade the development in both the volume and scope of the business has been more pronounced than before.  The chief lines of manufacture are fine roll plated, seamless wire chains and sterling silver chains in all the standard patterns and of the latest styles and designs, as well as spring swivels, rings, bars, and bracelets; besides a number of minor lines far too numerous to mention.  The firm's manufacturers are now freely recognized throughout the trade as a standard made of fine chains of uniformly high quality, and the steady influx of orders from all over the country necessitates the constant employment of twenty-five skilled assistants, whilst two active travellers are retained to faithfully and accurately interpret customers' orders and detailed instructions.  The factory, 25 x 100 feet in size, on the fourth floor at the location indicated, which has been maintained there for the past four years, is furnished with a complete modern equipment of machines, appliances, tools, and accessories for turning out the finest work in the shortest space of time; steam-power being the motive force used.  The experienced proprietor, Mr. Henry Williams, is a native of this city and now in the prime of life.


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RICHARD THORNLEY, Wool, Wool Waste, Shoddy, Flocks, Etc., No. 9 Exchange Place.  -- The trade in wool, wool waste, etc., has its most prominent representative in Rhode Island in the establishment of Mr. Richard Thornley, whose headquarters are located at No. 9 Exchange Place.  This enterprise dates its inception from 1869, when it was founded at East Greenwich, R.I., by the present proprietor, Mr. Thornley, who removed to Providence and to his present address twelve years ago.  Since the business was founded a large, flourishing trade has been developed, extending to all sections of the New England, Middle and Western States, and a traveling salesman is constantly kept busy in the tributary territory.  Mr. Thornley is a general merchant in wool, wool waste, shoddy, flocks, etc., and deals principally in products of the Eastern and Middle States, buying and selling in lots of from one bag to several carloads.  The premises occupied consist of the four upper floors of a five-story building, each loft having an area of 30 x 100 feet, and affording ample accommodation for the storage and handling of a large stock, such as is all times carried.  The connections of the house are of the most influential character, and all the demands of the trade are met upon the most satisfactory terms.  Mr. Thornley, the subject of this sketch, is a native of Pawtucket, R.I., and one of Rhode Island's most prominent citizens.  He is a leader in public affairs, is one of the Board of World's Fair Managers for Rhode Island, president of the Town Council of East Greenwich, where he resides, is an ex-state senator, was delegate-at-large to the last Columbus anniversary held in New York City, and enjoys the honorable distiction of having been a delegate-at-large and the nominator of Benjamin Harrison for President of the United States.  In all the walks of life he enjoys the consideration of his fellow-citizens, and has amply demonstrated his ability in every position to which he has been elected.


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JAMES G. WHITEHOUSE, Enamel Manufacturer, Office, No. 9 Custom House Street. -- One of the representative industries of Providence is that conducted so successfully by Mr. James G. Whitehouse, as an enamel manufacturer, at No. 9 Custom House Street.  Mr. Whitehouse established his business here in 1869, and has continued it with marked ability and steadily increasing success down to the present time.  He occupies commodious and well-equipped quarters and possesses every modern facility for insuring rapid and perfect production and for conducting all operations under the most favorable conditions and upon the largest scale.  The enamel manufactured by him is of various colors, and is used by jewelers and monogram manufacturers, and in the making of advertisements on windows; also for use on gold, silver and metal.  The greatest care is exercised in all processes of manufacture to improve the quality and enhance the value of the output, without increasing its cost, and the results have been extremely gratifying.  The product is widely preferred by jewelers, sign-painters and others, to all similar goods, by reason of its uniform excellence and perfect merits, and the trade is brisk and lively at all seasons.  Orders are filled with great promptness and care, and prices are placed at the lowest point of moderation.  Mr. Whitehouse is a native of Rhode Island, in the active prime of life, and an expert authority in his special branch of industry.  He was the founder of the Royal Society of Good Fellows, and was made Premier in 1882, and on September 25, 1891, was made Supreme Treasurer for the United States.  He is also a member of the Elmwood Club, the Knights of Pythias, the Knights of Honor, the order of Knights and Ladies of Honor, the New England Order of Protection, the American Legion of Honor, the Royal Arcanum, the Royal Arch Chapter and Calvary Commandery Knights Templar.  Mr. Whitehouse was also a member of the City Council for five years, during which time he was chairman of the Committee on Highways for three years and other important committees, among which may be mentioned the special committee which reported upon the adoption of the present plans for the sewerage of Providence, and has also been sent as a delegate to State and municipal conventions many times and is honored and esteemed by his fellow-men in all the various relations of life.


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GEO. L. CLAFLIN & CO., Wholesale Druggists, Nos. 56 to 66 South Main Street. -- The oldest, largest and best-patronized wholesale drug house in Rhode Island is that of Geo. L. Claflin & Co., located at Nos. 56 to 66 South Main Street.  This veteran establishment was founded in 1817, by Mr. J. Balch, and in 1872, Mr. Geo. L. Claflin and two other gentlemen became the proprietors and jointly conducted the business for two years, when Geo. L. Claflin became the sole owner and proprietor.  In 1885, his son, A. W. Claflin, was admitted and in 1891, W. L. Claflin, another son, became a partner.  Geo. L. Claflin died in 1886, but the business has been conducted to the present under his name as a firm-title.  The main building is five stories high, 50 x 60 feet in dimensions, and comprising not only a large wholesale house, but also one of the finest retail drugstores in the city, while a large storehouse is also occupied for surplus stock.  The firm put up a general line of pharmaceutical compounds, made tinctures and give special attention to the production of fluid extracts; while they handle all domestic and foreign drugs and chemicals, essential oils and essences, full lines of patent medicines and many valuable pharmaceutical specialties, and a general assortment of druggists' sundries, toilet articles and fancy goods, together with a large line of surgical instruments, trusses, crutches, etc.  The stock is selected with sound judgment and the utmost care, and is always choice and comprehensive, including the rarest drugs and chemicals, and meets the wants and requirements of first-class druggists all through New England.  The proprietors are possessed of a wide range of experience and a thorough knowledge of the trade and have rendered theirs a model house, one where all orders to the largest can be promptly filled, and where purity, strength and accuracy are in all cases guaranteed.  The Messrs. Claflin are natives of Rhode Island, trained in this business from early youth, and young men of large business experience.


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MERCANTILE TRUST COMPANY, Capital, $500,000, No. 28 Market Square. -- During the last few years a class of institutions has sprung up in the United States intended to meet the requirements of holders of property, for the better protection of such property during life and its more certain and speedy transmission to heirs at death.  These trust companies not only undertake the execution of trusts of all kinds but also do a general banking business.  Being corporations, they never die.  In this connection special reference is made to the Mercantile Trust Company, whose banking-rooms are located at No. 28 Market Square.  This company was incorporated in 1888, with a capital of $500,000, and is officered as follows, viz.: President, Fred B. Evans; treasurer, Robert L. Keach; secretary, John W. Angell; directors, James S. Phetteplace, Benjamin W. Persons, John W. Angell, John Austin, Edwin Barrows, Arthur E. Austin, Hezekiah W. Church, J. Howard Manchester, Edwin A. Burgess, John D. Lewis, Frank M. Burrough, Geo. W. Holt, Michael Fitzgerald, Lincoln T. Seagrave, Chas. R. King, Ezra Dixon, Fred B. Evans.  The company's cash department is a thoroughly organized banking institution, affording every facility to patrons.  Deposits are received subject to check at sight, and interest is allowed thereon; loans are made on approved collateral, and collections of drafts, notes, coupons and interest are made on the most favorable terms.  The company attends carefully to the execution of all manner of trusts, the management and settlement of estates as executor, administrator, assignee, receiver, trustee, guardian, agent or attorney.  It acts as agent for the transfer and registering or countersigning of certificates of stocks, bonds or other obligations of any corporation, association, State, or public authority.  It undertakes the execution of trusts in any State of the Union, all trust funds being kept separate from the assets of the company and invested in the names of the parties for whose benefit they are held.  A thorough system of organisation pervades the whole of the departments and the prompt and efficient manner in which this extensive business is transacted is in the highest degree creditable to the management.  The president, Mr. Evans, is a prominent business man, highly esteemed for his executive ability, enterprise and public spirit.  The treasurer, Mr. Keach, is an expert and talented bank official, eminently fitted as the custodian of the company's funds and the active manager of the business.  The secretary, Mr. Angell, is the well-known cashier of the Lime Rock National Bank; while the Board of Trustees comprises much of the business talent and financial solidity of this community.


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HAZARD & CHAPIN, Cotton Merchants, No. 11 Market Square. -- One of the largest and most representative houses in Providence engaged in the cotton industry is that of Hazard & Chapin, No. 11 Market Square.  This business was established in 1874 by Jeffrey Hazard and A. Duncan Chapin, both of whom have a wide range of practical experience in the industry, coupled with an intimate knowledge of the wants of manufacturers and dealers, while they have always been noted in the trade for carrying one of the largest and most desireable stocks in the market.  Their facilities for handing all kinds of cotttons are perfect, while their connections are of a most influential character, representing as they do, a number of desirable accounts.  They are represented all over the the cotton-growing South, are general dealers and brokers, and buy on their own account, as well as on order.  All goods sold by them are of the best grades and purchasers can always rely upon the ability of the partners to make such selections as the best of judgment would recommend.  Mr. Hazard is an ex-president of the Board of Trade, a commissioner of the World's Fair, and director of the Manufacturers National Bank.  Mr. Chapin is a member of the Board of Trade, as is also his partner and a director of the National Bank of North America.


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HENRY CLEWS & CO., Bankers.  Stocks, Bonds, Grain, Provisions, and Petroleum Bought and Sold, Strictly on Commission, for Cash or on Margin; Manager, Arthur G. Webster, No. 62 Westminster Street. --  The New York Stock Exchange is to-day what its leading members have made it, and all honor is due to those bankers and brokers who have reared it upon such an impregnable basis of honor and integrity.  Prominent among the members to whom deserved credit attaches in this connection, is Mr. Henry Clews, the popular representative banker, who has been closely identified with the growth of that organization for the past quarter of a century.  To-day, as of old, no one stands higher, either on 'Change in New York or in financial circles throughout the country, than Henry Clews.  The present firm of Henry Clews & Co. established an office in Providence, in 1886, which is located at No. 62 Westminster Street, and which for the past four years has been managed by Mr. Arthur G. Webster, with consummate ability and skill.  Here is offered to the public every possible facility in the stock, produce and petroleum markets, while this office is noted for receiving the earliest, as well as the most reliable, information concerning the stock, grain and oil markets that reaches this city.  Stocks, bonds, grain, provisions and petroleum are bought and sold, strictly on commission, for cash or on margin; interest is allowed on daily balances, and a specialty is made of investment securities.  Mr. Webster has had an extended and varied experience in financial affairs, and his career has been marked by that display of tact, energy and appreciation of opportunity so essential to permanent success in the 'city'.  He keeps a keen eye upon the market, and is considered a reliable authority upon values of securities, while his extended and influential connection enables him to secure much inside information of mutual benefit to his large clientele, and the firm he so well represents.  This office has direct connections with the principal cities of the Union, is open daily from 9 to 4, and is the favored resort for leading capitalists and investors in this city and throughout the State. Mr. Webster is a native of Providence, and a young man of large business experience, wide acquaintance and sterling personal worth, eminently deserving of every confidence.


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PRESTON & BROWN, Foreign and Domestic Fruits, Nuts and Vegetables, Nos. 89 and 116 Dyer Street. -- The trade in general produce is undoubtedly one of the most important in Providence, and the city is well represented in this respect by a large number of responsible and reliable houses devoted to this branch of commerce.  Among this number Messrs. Preston & Brown rank high for sterling integrity of purpose and their chief aim has ever been to give their patrons the best goods at the lowest prices consistent with quantity and quality.  Their business is located at No. 89 Dyer Street, where they have a number of stores, basements and storage houses of immense proportions.  On Water Street they have a storage house situated right on the water, where their produce, which is consigned from the South, West and adjoining States, can be loaded and unloaded.  Messrs. Preston & Brown are heavy receivers of all kinds of fruits, vegetables, nuts, etc., but are known by all as the largest handlers of apples in this section of the country.  They have handled as many as 12,000 barrels a year.  They sell carloads of apples and vegetables each day, which they are in a very central location to do by the natural advantages at their command and the promptness with which their heavy stock enables them to fill orders with.  They are active and the only members in Providence of the Boston Fruit Exchange and thus give customers the benefit of the widest range on the market.  The firm, which was originally Preston Bros., commenced business on North Main Street in 1858, and changed the firm-name twice, until four years ago when the present members formed this co-partnership.  Mr. A. H. Preston is a native of Connecticut and has lived in Providence for the last thirty-four years, having been in business here since 1853.


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C. F. WILCOX, Architect, Atlantic Building. -- Among the leading architects of this city there is not one who is more widely or more favorably known than C. F. Wilcox, whose offices are located in the Atlantic Building (elevator, No. 6 Exchange Street).  He has been for years at the head of his profession, and many notable structures throughout New England attest his skill.  Mr. Wilcox, who is a gentleman of middle-age, active and energetic, was born in Georgia, but has resided in Providence since infancy.  He comes of sturdy Puritan stock, and traces his American ancestry back to the earliest settlement of this place, being a descendant of a branch of the Roger Williams family who settled here in 1636.  Mr. Wilcox is a man of stamp, as well as exceptional skill in his art, of which he is a thorough master, and is a member of the American Institute of Architects.  He has been established since 1873, occupying the present quarters about fourteen years, and has an extensive patronage.  Mr. Wilcox occupies a commodious and handsome suite of offices, and employs an efficient staff of draughtsmen. He is prepared to make plans for all classes of buildings, furnishing designs, specifications, etc., at short notice, and guarantees satisfaction in every instance.  Special attention is given to churches, suburban villas and high-class residences generally, while construction is personally supervised; and all work undertaken by this gentleman is certain to be performed in the most expeditious as well as most competent and trustworthy manner.  Among the more noteworthy  pieces of architecture to which Mr. Wilcox may point with pardonable pride as evidence of his ability, can be named the Union Baptist Church, South Baptist Church, Providence; the Baptist Church, at East Greenwich, R.I., and the residence of Hezekiah Conant; the Congregational Church at Dudley, Mass.; the residences of Wm. A. Chapman and Roscoe S. Washburn, Providence; residence of Mr. J. C. Hartshorn, at Newton Centre, Mass.; the residence of Mrs. R. S. Burrough, Pomfret, Conn., and a great number of other structures equally worthy of mention all over New England.


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RHODE ISLAND GAS SAVING COMPANY, No. 345 Westminster Street. -- To obtain the greatest light from the smallest amount of gas is one of the problems of the age, and has engaged the attention of experts and scientists ever since its introduction.  When gas rushes from the burner under high pressure a great quantity is wasted while the atmosphere becomes vitiated by the incomplete combustion.  The best solution of the problem yet introduced is the National Automatic Gas Saving Governor, for sale in Providence by the Rhode Island Gas Saving Company, whose office and show-room are eligibly located at No. 345 Westminster Street.  This governor equalizes the pressure at the meter to five-tenths, whether street pressure is ten-tenths or thirty-tenths, or whether one or one hundred burners are lighted.  The automatic action of valve cuts off street pressure, when lights are extinguished, thus preventing all wastage and bad odors from leaky pipes; insuring greater brilliancy, steadier flame, security against fire, no blowing or smoking burners, no broken globes, while insurance risks are greatly reduced; and there are no poisonous vapors from unconsumed gases, no vitiated atmosphere and no smoked up walls, paintings or drapery.  These governors are simple in construction, perfect in operation and with proper care will last a lifetime.  Over eight thousand are now in successful use and patrons are guaranteed a reduction of fifteen to forty per cent in gas bills.  In a word, this invention is the acme of simplicity, efficiency and durability.  They have recently been introduced here by Mr. C. H. Burt, who has purchased the right for Rhode Island, and has organized the Rhode Island Gas Saving Company for the purposes of the business.  Mr. Burt is a native of Rhode Island and has been a well-known business man in this city and State for the past thirty years.  He served during the war in the Tenth and Eleventh Rhode Island Regiments, is a member of Prescott Post, No. 1, G. A. R.,  and the I. O. O. F., and of excellent repute and standing in the business world.


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GEORGE H. BURNHAM, Real Estate, No. 3 Custom House Street. --  Of the many solid citizens of Providence engaged in real estate and kindred operations, there is not one who is better known or stands higher in public esteem than the gentleman whose name heads this sketch.  He has a well-appointed office on the second floor of No. 3 Custom House Street, and employs several clerks, giving close personal attention himself to every detail of the business.  Mr. Burham, who is a qualified notary, is a general real estate broker, auctioneer and agent, buying, selling and exchanging city and country realty of every description, both improved and unimproved.  He does a very large business, his transactions extending throughout the entire State, and numbers in his clientage some of the wealthiest property owners in the community, and investments are desirably placed, also.  Special attention is given to auction sales of realty, and appraisements are made for intending purchasers, likewise.  He is a director in the Roger Williams Savings Fund and Loan Association, the first cooperative bank in the State and the largest in the country save two, and has been from the beginning the chairman of its Security Committee.  Mr. Burnham is an excellent judge of the present and prospective values of property in and around Providence. Attests, affidavits and other legal papers are carefully and accurately drawn up in like manner, and loans and mortgages are negotiated on most favorable terms.  Mr. Burnham is a gentleman of middle-age, active and energetic, and was born in New Hampshire, but has been a respected resident of this city since 1858.  He is a man of entire probity of character as well as of energy and sagacity, thoroughly conversant with every feature and detail pertaining to the purchase, sale, transfer and management of real estate, and is deservedly esteemed in business circles and in public life. He served in the City Council for five years, being president of that body for a year; was an alderman for seven years, and is at present commissioner of licenses (saloon).  This old and well-known real estate agency was established in 1841 by A. B. Dike, who was succeeded in 1860 by Doyle & Joslin, and in 1870 came into control of Mr. Burnham, under whose efficient managment the business has since been conducted with eminent success, moving from the Washington Building, where the office was formerly located, to the present place about seventeen years ago.  Mr. Burnham has been somewhat prominently identified with the Masonic Fraternity, having been Master of the Ancient Lodge of Saint John, which was organized in 1757, Grand Secretary of Grand Royal Arch Chapter of Rhode Island, Commander of Saint John's Commandery Knight's Templar and Grand Commander of that order in Massachusetts and Rhode Island.  He is President of the Freemasons' Hall Co., which is owner of the fine block wherein are all the Masonic headquarters of the city and State, accommodating all the Masonic organizations of the city.


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GRANITE STATE PROVIDENT ASSOCIATION, Manchester, N. H., Assets, $500,000. J. C. Moore, President, H. F. Morse, Secretary, H. D. Upton, Treasurer, No. 65 Westminster Street. -- No corporation of its kind in the country has a more favorable record than the Granite State Provident Association, the largest building and loan association in New England.  Its headquarters are at Manchester, N. H., and it is represented in Providence, by Mr. Thomas Barker, as manager for Rhode Island, with office at No. 65 Westminster Street.  It was chartered by a special act of the Legislature in 1881, and has authority under its charter 'to acquire by purchase, lease, mortgage or otherwise, and hold absolutely and unconditionally lands, real estate and personal property, and to sell, alienate, transfer, mortgage, lease, convey or in any way dispose of the same and otherwise act as a building association, enabling its members to purchase or build their own homes.'  It is conducted entirely upon the mutual plan, each member having one vote and no member being personally liable for the debts of the association, and is operated upon new and particularly attractive plans.  It has always strongly enlisted public confidence and its steady growth and wonderful success is rapidly placing it among the leading financial institutions of New England. January 1, 1888, its assets were nothing.  Four years from that date they amounted to over $620,000.  As regards prudence and ability of management we know of no corporations so highly to be congratulated as the Granite State. Its officers and directors are as follows, viz.:  president, Hon. J. C. Moore; secretary, H. F. Morse; treasurer, Hon. H. D. Upton; directors, Hon. Joseph C. Moore, president, People's Fire Insurance Company, Manchester, N. H.; Hon. Hiram D. Upton, president New Hampshire Trust Company, Manchester, N. H.; H. Frank Morse, secretary, Manchester, N. H.; Hon. Eli V. Brewster, vice-president Dover National Bank and president Dover Gas Light Company, Dover, N. H.; Hon. S. M. Bernard, attorney-at-law, Sup. Solicitor Knights of the Golden Rule, Louisville, Ky.; G. Loring Pierce, M. D., New York; Hon. D. M. Shapleigh, town clerk, Kittery, Me.; Philip Carpenter, cousellor-at-law, Potter Building, N. Y.; Geo. M. Stearns, Springfield, Mass.; Frank S. Streeter of the firm of Chase & Streeter, Concord, N. H.; Hon. Frank C. Churchill, manufacturer, Lebanon, N. H.  The manager for Rhode Island, Mr. Barker, is a native of England and accepted his present position here in January, 1892.  He is a member of the Amoskeag Veterans, of Manchester, N. H., and a gentleman of wide acquaintance and high repute in his native State.  He has been identified with this association nearly four years, and under his vigorous management this branch has become one of the most prolific in new business of any in the country.  The association is winning friends throughout the city and State, and is a solid financial bulwark to all who seek through it to provide a home for themselves and those dependent upon them.  Mr. Barker is a member of the Knights of Pythias.


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J. M. ALPAUGH & CO., Wholesale Dealers in Paper Hangings, Window-Shades, Shade Rollers, Brass and Nickel Shade Trimmings, Hollands and Upholsterers' Hardware, No. 30 Exchange Place. -- Art in paper hangings and mural decorations is as surely present to-day as it was during the palmiest days of ancient Athens, and the highest degree of artistic taste and practical skill is called into requisition by the manufacturers of wall-paper to secure complete effects.  This statement is clearly verified by an inspection of the goods to be found at the various establishments engaged in their sale.  The largest and leading house, in this line in Providence, is that of Messrs. J. M. Alpaugh & Co., located at No. 30 Exchange Place.  This firm are wholesale dealers in paper hangings, window-shades, shade rollers, brass and nickel shade trimmings, Hollands and upholsterers' hardware, and established their business here in July, 1890, bringing to bear large practical experience, widespread and influential connections, and a thorough knowledge of the wants and requirements of the trade.  The house at once met with popular favor among the trade, resulting in a very large and active business all through New England, such as is not often accorded to much older houses in the same line of trade, and which is steadily increasing in proportions and influence.  The business premises are spacious in size, suitably arranged for inspection and sale, and stocked to repletion in all departments with new, choice and reliable goods.  The assortments embrace all grades of foreign and domestic paper hangings, gold and silver and highly colored and tinted parlor and drawing-room papers; special designs for libraries, dining-rooms and halls; Lincrusta Walton, plain and embossed flocks, with beautiful dadoes, friezes, centerpieces, moldings and borders, while extremely fine effects are noticeable among the less expensive varieties.  This house also leads the trade in plain and fancy window-shades, fixtures of all descriptions, fringes and upholsterers' hardware.  The connections of the firm with manufacturers of the highest repute both at home and abroad are such that they are enabled to offer unsurpassed inducements to dealers in both quality and prices, while the superiority of their goods and stock is conceded by all.  They are now handling half a million rolls of wall-paper per year, and enjoy a large and influential trade throughout all the New England States.  The individual members of the firm are Messrs. J. M. Alpaugh, W. J. Bicknell and Geo. F. Harding.  Mr. Alpaugh was born in Hunterdon Country, N. J., and had been engaged in this line of business in Connecticut for upwards of thirty years previous to settling here.  Mr. Bicknell is a Providence man by birth and has been trained in this business from his youth up, being twenty-five years in the house of Armstrong & Burlingame.  Mr. Harding is a native of Maine, formerly with Cushman Bros. & Co., Boston, and has the management of the shade department.  These gentlemen devote their entire attention to the promotion of the best interests of their patrons, by securing the very latest and most approved novelties and offering the same on the most liberal terms.


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WM. SMITH & CO., Manufacturers of Gold and Silver Chains, Jewelry, etc., Manufactory, No. 61 Peck Street; Office, Nos. 5 and 7 Malden Lane, New York. -- Prominent among the representative and enterprising members of the jewelry trade in Providence is the firm of Messrs. Wm. Smith & Co., of No. 61 Peck Street.  The business is very old established, having been founded some forty years since by Mr. Wm. Smith under the same firm name.  This gentleman enjoyed the very highest reputation for sterling honesty of purpose, and by his close attention to the smaller details of the business placed this house on a firm basis.  Mr. Smith died three years ago, and was succeeded by his sons William, Jr., and David N., active, energetic young business men, who followed in their father's footsteps and still further increased the business.  Both as regards experience, perfected  facilities and character they stand at the head of their line in Providence.  They have occupied for the past eighteen years their present quarters, having removed here from Dorrance Street.  An average force of one hundred skilled hands are employed by them in the manufacture of gold and silver chains and other styles of jewelry of every description.  The Messrs. Smith exercise the greatest care in the selection of all materials, and maintain the highest standard of excellence for workmanship and finish, and are justly celebrated for the originality and artistic beauty of their new syles.  Their goods compare favorably with any others in this line made in Providence.  The jobbers throughout New England handle their goods and speak highly of them. The firm have a branch office at Nos. 5 and 7 Malden Lane, New York. Messrs. Smith are members of the Providence Board of Trade, and have developed an industrial and commercial interest of the first magnitude and one creditable to their ability and enterprise.


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THE LADD WATCH CASE COMPANY, Manufacturers of the Ladd Patent Standard Stiffened Gold Watch Cases; New Factory and Salesroom, No. 70 Richmond Street; Branch Office, No. 11 Malden Lane, New York. -- Providence has long been a leading centre of the jewelry manufacturing industry, while in the Ladd Watch Case Company it has a powerful competitor in the watch-case trade of the world.  This company is deservedly prominent as manufacturer of the Ladd Patent Standard Stiffened Gold Watch Cases, with new factory and salesroom at No. 70 Richmond Street.  The business was originally established in 1866 by J. A. Brown & Co., and in 1883 the present company was incorporated, with a capital stock of $200,000.  They are the oldest manufacturers of gold-filled watch cases in the United States.  On the first of January, 1892, they took possession of their new building, which is six stories high, 40 x 131 feet in dimensions, and equipped in the manufacturing department with the finest improved machinery, operated by a 75-horse-power engine, and steady employment is given to one hundred and seventy-five skilled hands.  The capacity of the factory admits of the production of four hundred watch cases per day.  The output comprises the finest gold filled watch cases on the market to-day, and in the watch trade the stamp of this house is acknowledged to be the standard of excellence.  These cases have all the appearance of solid gold; being in every respect carefully finished, and having various improvements not to be found in the products of any other manufacturer.  They include beautifully engraved ornamental patterns, alike durable and adapted to casing all the principal American and foreign movements.  They are in heavy and increasing demand not only in all parts of the United States, but also in Canada and South America, and orders of whatever magnitude are filled promptly on terms which are eminently fair and satisfactory.  A corps of talented salemen represent the interests of the house upon the road, and a branch house is operated at No. 11 Malden Lane, New York.  The officers of this company are as follows:  Frank Hail Brown, president; Geo. S. Ladd, vice-president; Alfred Stone, treasurer; Wm. E. Peck, secretary.  The president, Mr. Brown, is also treasurer of the Cutler Manufacturing Company of Warren, R. I., and was called to the head of this corporation in April, 1892.  The vice-president, Mr. Ladd, was superintendent of the factory fourteen years, suceeding to his present position in October, 1891, on the death of his uncle, one of the honored founders of the house.  Mr. Peck was made secretary in 1889, and Mr. Stone became treasurer in January, 1892.  All are energetic men, whose operations are a lasting source of credit to them and of the utmost value to the commerce of this city.


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J. A. GOWDEY & SON, Manufacturers of Reeds and Harnesses, and Dealers in Mill Supplies, No. 40 Clifford Street. -- The veteran house of J. A. Gowdey & Son, at No. 40 Clifford Street, holds a representative position in the industrial world, as the oldest and largest in the manufacture of reeds and harnesses, for woolen, silk and cotton mills, in the United States.  It was founded in 1834, by James Allen Gowdey, and in 1847 the son, Mr. David Gowdey, succeeded to the control.  He had been in the house since 1842, working his way up from the bench, and long ago became noted for his genius, energy and skill as a designer and manufacturer.  From small beginnings the business has grown at a rapid ratio, and is one of the best illustrations of industrial progress in the State.  The business premises comprise a workshop, 50 x 125 feet in size, fully equipped with new and improved machinery and ample steam-power, and every modern facility is at hand for insuring rapid and perfect production.  The reeds manufactured here are the standard wherever introduced, and received the only gold medal ever awarded for this class of products at the American Institute, New York, in 1852. They are in preferential demand by the wool, silk and cotton mills throughout the United States and Canada, and are supplied on terms that are invariably satisfactory to buyers.  Mr. Gowdey is of Scotch descent, a resident of Providence since 1832, and one of its representative manufacturers.  He is the recognized authority upon all matters connected with this branch of industry, and has exceptional facilities at command for supplying the trade with both reeds, harnesses, and mill supplies, in quantities to suit, at the shortest notice, and of a quality which cannot be duplicated by rival concerns.


Continued

These documents are made available free to the public for non-commercial purposes by the Rhode Island USGenWeb Project. Transcribed 2000 by Beth Hurd
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