Rhode Island Reading Room
These documents are made available free to the public by the Rhode Island USGenWeb Project

The Narragansett Historical Register,

Volume I. April, 1883. No. 4.

A magazine devoted to the antiquities, genealogy and historical matter illustrating the History of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. James N. Arnold, Ed.
Narragansett Historical Publishing Co., Hamilton, R. I.
E. L. Freeman & Co., Printers, Central Falls, R. I. 



A List of Slaves Enlisted in to the Continental Army.
To whom belonged, with their value, in the year 1778, from Kings County.  Value in Pounds.

p. 313:

A List of Slaves Enlisted in to the Continental Army.

Date          Slave's Name          Master's Name	             Value

Feb. 25       Dick Champlain        Stephen Champlain, S. K.    130 
Feb. 25       Jack Champlain        Stephen Champlain, S. K      110 
Apr. 2        Jack Fones            Daniel Fones, N. K.          100 
Apr. 3        Cudjo Carpenter       Heirs of Ann (widow), S.     120 
Apr. 3        Ceaser Wells          James Wells, Jr., Hop.       100 
Apr. 3        Cuff Gardiner         Chris. Gardiner, S. K.       120 
Apr. 3        Sharper Gardiner      Benj. Gardiner, S. K.        120 
Apr. 3        Prince Hammond        Wm. Hammond, N. K.           120 
Apr. 3        Quam Tanner           Joshua Tanner, Hop.          120 
Apr. 3        Prince Bent           John Bent, Hop.              120 
Apr. 11       York Champlain        Robert Champlain, S. K.      120 
Apr. 23       Isaac Rodman          Daniel Rodman, S. K.         120 
Apr. 24       Brittan Saltonstall   Dudley Saltonstall, West.    105 
May 8         James Clarke          Gideon Clarke, S. K.         120 
May 8         Mintel Gardiner       Henry Gardiner, S. K.        110 
May 8         Moses Updike          Lodowick Updike, N. K.        93 
May 8         Ceaser Updike         Lodowick Updike, N. K.       120 
May 8         Garrett Perry         Benj. Perry, S. K.           120 
May 8         Sampson Saunders      Steph'n Saunders Heirs, West. 90 
May 8         Ruttee Gardiner       Nick's Gardiner, Ex           30 
May 28        Ceaser Sheldon        Palmer Sheldon, S. K.        120 
May 29        Fortune Watson        Sam'l Watson, N. K.          120 
June 6        Ceaser Rose           John Rose, S. K.             120 
June 6        Edward Rose           John Rose, S. K.             120 
June 6        Peter Hazard          Rob't, of Rich. Hazard, S. K.110 
June 6        Primus Babcock        Samuel Babcock, Hop.         120 
July 2        Prince Rodman         Rob't Rodman, Jr., S. K.     120 
July 2        Mingo Rodman          William Rodman, S. K.        120 
July 2        Jacob Hazard          Carder Hazard, S. K.         110 
July 16       Primus Gardiner       Nich's Gardiner, S. K.       105 
July 16       Peter Hazard          Joseph Hazard, S. K.         120 
July 16       Mingo Robertson       Sylv'r Robinson, S. K.       120 
July 16       William Greene        Henry Greene, S. K.          120 
July 31       Prince Vaughn         Jonathan Vaughn, N. K.       114 
Sept. 5       July Champlain        Stephen Champlain, S. K.     120 
Sept. 28      Hercules Gardiner     Ezekiel Gardiner, N. K.       60 
Sept. 28      Philon Phillips       Chris. Phillips, N. K.       120 
Oct. 14       Newport Champlain     Jeffrey Champlain, S. K.     120 

NOTE. - Ex., Exeter; S. K., South Kingstown; N. K., North Kingstown; Hop., Hopkinton; and West., Westerly.


The Narragansett Historical Register,

Volume IV. October, 1883. No. 2.

A magazine devoted to the antiquities, genealogy and historical matter illustrating the History of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. James N. Arnold, Ed.
Narragansett Historical Publishing Co., Hamilton, R. I.
E. L. Freeman & Co., Printers, Central Falls, R. I.


Improved Order of Red Men.

Contributed by Fred. J. Smith, Providence, R. I.

pp. 186 - 189.

This organization, known as the Improved Order of Red Men, is a fraternal and benevolent institution, of purely American origin.  The exact date of its origin is not known, as evidence can be traced back to a period previous to the Revolution.  But documents in possession of the Great Council of the United States, tell us that in the year 1813, a society of Red Men was formed at Fort Mifflin, on the Delaware River, then garrisoned by American troops; after peace was declared, members of the society became widely scattered, but being much impressed with the customs and habits, also the pleasant memories of its existence, formed new Societies, under the same laws and with the same intentions of the Society of Fort Mifflin.  In the year 1835 we find many council fires kindled throughout the country, and in May of the same year, delegates from different jurisdictions convened at Baltimore, and adopted substantially the Ritual, Laws, and Regulations that govern it to-day.  Since which time the organization is known as the Improved Order of Red Men.  Its growth has been slow but sure, until now nearly every State in the Union contains Tribes and Great Councils, in full fellowship with the Great Council of the United States.  The order is founded on the manners and customs of the Indian Race, and its Ritual perpetuates the memory of the forms and religious ceremonies peculiar to that unfortunate people.  They belive in a Great Spirit who governs the world, so any one joining this Order much declare his belief in the Great Spirit, the Creator and Preserver of the universe.  The subordinate branches or primary assemblies of the Order are denominated Tribes.  The Ritual is divided into four Degrees:  Adoption, Hunter's, Warrior's and Chief's; and for beauty and originality they are unsurpassed.  The Supreme Body of a State is known by the title of Great Council of the United States.  The forms, ceremonies and lectures used in the adoption of members and conferring of degrees are interesting and instructive, and free from anything frivolous or disagreeable.  The meetings are held for the transaction of business of a moral, benevolent and charitable character, and everything partaking of levity, or political or sectarian tendencies, is excluded therefrom.

Its objects are to promote among men the exercise and practice of the true principles of benevolence and charity; the care and protection of the Widow and Orphans and the cultivation of friendly relations among mankind, in short the Motto -- "Freedom, Friendship and Charity" -- indicates quite clearly the objects and aim of the Brotherhood, whilst the preservation from oblivion of much that relates to one of the declining Races of mankind, and which will prove interesting to the student and antiquarian, may not be considered unimportant results of the organization, and it now has an existence in more than thirty-five jurisdictions; in some of these it equals the strongest of kindred societies in zeal and prosperity, and in many of them has a nucleus both healthy and promising.

The Order is not very strong in the Eastern States.  It was first introduced into Rhode Island on the 4th day of September, 1871, at which time instituted King Philip Tribe No. 1, at Olneyville, when the following Chiefs were raised up to their respective stumps:  Sachem, Sr. Sagamore, Jr. Sagamore, Chief of Records, Keeper of Wampum, First Sanop, Second Sanop, Guard of the Wigwam, Guard of the Forest.

The Tribe increased rapidly in membership and in a very short time numbered over a hundred members.

Canonicus Tribe No. 2, of Phenix, also Miantonomah Tribe No. 3, of Providence, was instituted the following year.  On the 5th day of August, 1872, Great Incohonie William B. Eckert, assisted by Morris H. Gorham, instituted the Great Council of the State at Miantonomah Wigwam No. 41, Weybossett Street, when the following Great Chiefs were raised up to their respective stumps:

Great Prophet, John L. Perrin.
Great Sachem, W. V. Slocum.
Great Sr. Sagamore, Andrew McKenzie.
Great Jr. Sagamore, N. R. Tilton.
Great Chief of Records, H. B. Winslow.
Great Keeper of Wampum, A. R. Sherman.
Great Sanop, S. R. Nicholas.
Great Guard of Forest, H. L. Howard.
Great Guard of Wigwam,  ----- ------.

Shortly after the institution of the Great Council the following tribes were instituted:  Wampanoag No. 4, of Pawtucket; Narragansett No. 5, of Natick; and Red Jacket No. 6, of Newport.  In 1874 Wamsutta Tribe No. 7, was instituted, but owing to the financial depression of the times they did not prosper, and in 1876 they surrendered their Charter to the Great Council.

There is [are] six Tribes in the State at the present time (1878) with a membership of a little less than four hundred, the most prosperous of which is King Philip No. 1, of Providence, Canonicas No. 2, of Phenix, and Narragansett No. 5, of Natick.

The following are the present Great Chiefs of the Great Council of the State:
Great Prophet, Fred. J. Smith, No. 1
Great Sachem, Hiram L. Howard, No. 4.
Great Sr. Sagamore, H. C. Burdick, No. 6.
Great Jr. Sagamore, Fred A. Knight, No. 3.
Great Chief of Records, John Wells, No. 5.
Great Keeper of Wampum, O. D. Tillinghast, No. 5.
Great Sanop, John Gallington, No. 1.
Great Mishenawa, A. E. Spencer.
Great Guard of Wigwam,  S. A. Ballou.
Great Guard of Forest, Earl Fenner.


These documents are made available free to the public for non-commercial purposes by the Rhode Island USGenWeb Project. Transcription  2004 by Beth Hurd
Mail e-mail