Rhode Island Reading Room
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History  of the state of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations: Biographical

NY: The American Historical Society, Inc. 1920



p. 10 - 11:

HENRY LATIMER BALLOU --  A gentleman of refinement, culture and polish, a business man of integrity and ability, Henry Latimer Ballou will live in the hearts of his fellowmen more for his broad mind and vision, in reference to public affairs, than as banker or manufacturer.  He was affiliated with the Republican party from youth, and labored earnestly for party success, but it was a cardinal principle of his political faith that a party should stand for a great deal more than success at the polls. His influence was State-wide and was always exerted to hold the party to higher aims.  He firmly believed in the might of right, and with broader vision than most men, led in many popular movements, although he never hesitated to identify himself with a morally just cause, although it might be an unpopular one. He championed the Bourn amendment for the extension of the suffrage movement, the ten-hour law, temperance legislation, and convenient hours at polling places.  He was faithful to every trust and duty, administered every official office to which he was appointed as a public trust, was wise and judicious in counsel regarding investments, bestowing his counsel in so kindly a manner that his sincerity could not be doubted.  He was rarely blessed in his home life, his wife, Susan A. (Cook) Ballou, being a woman similar to himself in taste and disposition.  A woman of culture and strong character, she is a potent influence for good, and in a practical way aids in movements destined to advance the public good.  Her work for philanthropy has been far-reaching, and one of her favored objects has been the children of the Woonsocket Day Nursery and the Children's Home, of which she was president since its organization in 1889.  For years she has been a member of the Woonsocket Board of Education; is past regent of Woosocket Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution; past regent of the Rhode Island State Daughters of the American Revolution; a frequent delegate to national conventions of the order of the Daughters of the American Revolution, and past president of the State Federation of Women's Clubs of Rhode Island. She continues to occupy the handsome family residence on Harris avenue, Woonsocket, her only daughter sharing her home.

Henry Latimer Ballou traced his lineage to Maturin Ballou, who was first of record in Providence, R. I., in 1646, the line being continued, through his son James, his son Obadiah, his son Ezekial, his son Levi, a Revolutionary patriot, his son Levi (2), his son Latimer Whipple Ballou, LL. D., bank cashier and treasurer, presidential elector on the Lincoln and Hamlin ticket (1860), member of the Forty-fourth, fifth and sixth Congresses; his son, Henry Latimer Ballou, to whose memory this tribute to a useful life is offered.

Henry Latimer Ballou, son of Latimer Whipple and Sarah A. (Hunnewell) Ballou, was born at Cambridge, Mass., October 14, 1841, died at his home in Woonsocket, R. I., May 22, 1889.  While he was still very young, Woonsocket became the family home and here his after life spent.  He was educated in the grade and high schools of the city, his public school courses being supplemented by Boston Commercial School study, and by a wide course of private study and reading.  At the age of twenty he entered the employ of the Woonsocket Institution for Savings, of which his father was treasurer from 1850 until 1887.  He began as a clerk in 1861, his duties being in both the Woonsocket National Bank and the Institution for Savings, and in 1876 he became assistant cashier of the bank and assistant treasurer of the institution.  During the years of his father's Congressional service, the son filled his place as cashier and treasurer.  This responsibility greatly developed the young man, and he continued in office until his death.  He acquired other important business interests, and was one of the men of his city who could be depended upon to support every worthy enterprise. He was one of the incorporators of the Woonsocket Rubber Company, a director of the American Worsted Company, the Woonsocket Wringing Machine Company, formerly the Bailey Wringing Machine Company.  He was a member of the Woonsocket Business Men's Association from its beginning, was treasurer of the Woonsocket Hospital Corporation, and for many years served the Consolidated School District as treasurer.

A Republican in politics, Mr. Ballou was chosen a delegate to the national convention of 1888, to be held at Chicago.  He made every preparation to attend, but his health was failing so rapidly that at the last moment he notified his alternate that he would be unable to act.  He bravely fought the malady which had laid hold on him, seeking relief in Southern California, but to no avail.  He was a long time member of the Universalist church, was assistant superintendent of the Sunday school, of which his father was superintendent for half a century, and when finally, on May 22, 1889, the end came, the city mourned the loss of a Christian gentleman, whom all delighted to honor. His father, with whom he had so long and intimately been associated in business, survived him until May 9, 1900, not quite one year.

Mr. Ballou married, October 6, 1868, Susan A. Cook, who yet survives him (1919), daughter of Willis and Cyrena (Thayer) Cook, and a descendant of Walter Cook, who settled at Weymouth, Mass., in 1643.  The line of descent from Walter Cook is through his son Deacon Nicholas Cook, his son Elder Nathaniel Cook, his son Deacon Ariel Cook, his son Colonel Levi Cook, his son Willis Cook, a successful business man and eminent citizen, his daughter Susan A. Cook, now the widow of Henry Latimer Ballou.  Mr. and Mrs. Ballou were the parents of two sons and a daughter:  1.  Latimer Willis, born in Woonsocket, R. I., Oct. 8, 1872, a graduate Bachelor of Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, class of '95; post-graduate of Cornell University, class of '96; agent of the Guerin Spinning Company, a man of influence and high standing in his city.  2.  Marie Louise Ballou, wife of Frank Sewall Bowker, of Wooster [sic], Mass., is graduate Bachelor of Arts, Smith College, residing with her widowed mother in Woonsocket.  3. Roland Hunnewell Ballou, a graduate Bachelor of Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, class of '94; now treasurer of the Manhasset Auto Tire Fabrics Company, of Connecticut, with headquarters at Providence.

Mrs. Ballou and her children are members of the Universalist church, as the husband, father and grandfathers had been, and like them Mrs. Ballou is active in church work.



p. 10 - 11:

HENRY LATIMER BALLOU --  A gentleman of refinement, culture and polish, a business man of integrity and ability, Henry Latimer Ballou will live in the hearts of his fellowmen more for his broad mind and vision, in reference to public affairs, than as banker or manufacturer.  He was affiliated with the Republican party from youth, and labored earnestly for party success, but it was a cardinal principle of his political faith that a party should stand for a great deal more than success at the polls. His influence was State-wide and was always exerted to hold the party to higher aims.  He firmly believed in the might of right, and with broader vision than most men, led in many popular movements, although he never hesitated to identify himself with a morally just cause, although it might be an unpopular one. He championed the Bourn amendment for the extension of the suffrage movement, the ten-hour law, temperance legislation, and convenient hours at polling places.  He was faithful to every trust and duty, administered every official office to which he was appointed as a public trust, was wise and judicious in counsel regarding investments, bestowing his counsel in so kindly a manner that his sincerity could not be doubted.  He was rarely blessed in his home life, his wife, Susan A. (Cook) Ballou, being a woman similar to himself in taste and disposition. A woman of culture and strong character, she is a potent influence for good, and in a practical way aids in movements destined to advance the public good.  Her work for philanthropy has been far-reaching, and one of her favored objects has been the children of the Woonsocket Day Nursery and the Children's Home, of which she was president since its organization in 1889.  For years she has been a member of the Woonsocket Board of Education; is past regent of Woosocket Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution; past regent of the Rhode Island State Daughters of the American Revolution; a frequent delegate to national conventions of the order of the Daughters of the American Revolution, and past president of the State Federation of Women's Clubs of Rhode Island. She continues to occupy the handsome family residence on Harris avenue, Woonsocket, her only daughter sharing her home.

Henry Latimer Ballou traced his lineage to Maturin Ballou, who was first of record in Providence, R. I., in 1646, the line being continued, through his son James, his son Obadiah, his son Ezekial, his son Levi, a Revolutionary patriot, his son Levi (2), his son Latimer Whipple Ballou, LL. D., bank cashier and treasurer, presidential elector on the Lincoln and Hamlin ticket (1860), member of the Forty-fourth, fifth and sixth Congresses; his son, Henry Latimer Ballou, to whose memory this tribute to a useful life is offered.

Henry Latimer Ballou, son of Latimer Whipple and Sarah A. (Hunnewell) Ballou, was born at Cambridge, Mass., October 14, 1841, died at his home in Woonsocket, R. I., May 22, 1889.  While he was still very young, Woonsocket became the family home and here his after life spent.  He was educated in the grade and high schools of the city, his public school courses being supplemented by Boston Commercial School study, and by a wide course of private study and reading.  At the age of twenty he entered the employ of the Woonsocket Institution for Savings, of which his father was treasurer from 1850 until 1887.  He began as a clerk in 1861, his duties being in both the Woonsocket National Bank and the Institution for Savings, and in 1876 he became assistant cashier of the bank and assistant treasurer of the institution.  During the years of his father's Congressional service, the son filled his place as cashier and treasurer.  This responsibility greatly developed the young man, and he continued in office until his death.  He acquired other important business interests, and was one of the men of his city who could be depended upon to support every worthy enterprise.  He was one of the incorporators of the Woonsocket Rubber Company, a director of the American Worsted Company, the Woonsocket Wringing Machine Company, formerly the Bailey Wringing Machine Company.  He was a member of the Woonsocket Business Men's Association from its beginning, was treasurer of the Woonsocket Hospital Corporation, and for many years served the Consolidated School District as treasurer.

A Republican in politics, Mr. Ballou was chosen a delegate to the national convention of 1888, to be held at Chicago.  He made every preparation to attend, but his health was failing so rapidly that at the last moment he notified his alternate that he would be unable to act.  He bravely fought the malady which had laid hold on him, seeking relief in Southern California, but to no avail.  He was a long time member of the Universalist church, was assistant superintendent of the Sunday school, of which his father was superintendent for half a century, and when finally, on May 22, 1889, the end came, the city mourned the loss of a Christian gentleman, whom all delighted to honor.  His father, with whom he had so long and intimately been associated in business, survived him until May 9, 1900, not quite one year.

Mr. Ballou married, October 6, 1868, Susan A. Cook, who yet survives him (1919), daughter of Willis and Cyrena (Thayer) Cook, and a descendant of Walter Cook, who settled at Weymouth, Mass., in 1643.  The line of descent from Walter Cook is through his son Deacon Nicholas Cook, his son Elder Nathaniel Cook, his son Deacon Ariel Cook, his son Colonel Levi Cook, his son Willis Cook, a successful business man and eminent citizen, his daughter Susan A. Cook, now the widow of Henry Latimer Ballou.  Mr. and Mrs. Ballou were the parents of two sons and a daughter:  1.  Latimer Willis, born in Woonsocket, R. I., Oct. 8, 1872, a graduate Bachelor of Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, class of '95; post-graduate of Cornell University, class of '96; agent of the Guerin Spinning Company, a man of influence and high standing in his city.  2.  Marie Louise Ballou, wife of Frank Sewall Bowker, of Wooster [sic], Mass., is graduate Bachelor of Arts, Smith College, residing with her widowed mother in Woonsocket.  3. Roland Hunnewell Ballou, a graduate Bachelor of Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, class of '94; now treasurer of the Manhasset Auto Tire Fabrics Company, of Connecticut, with headquarters at Providence.

Mrs. Ballou and her children are members of the Universalist church, as the husband, father and grandfathers had been, and like them Mrs. Ballou is active in church work.



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HON. ROBERT LIVINGSTON BEECKMAN.  -- Among the figures that have stood out with especial prominence in the political affairs of Rhode Island of recent years, and who have risen to positions of great esteem in the regard of the people of this State, that of the Hon. Robert Livingston Beeckman is particularly noteworthy.  Mr. Beeckman is a member of an ancient Dutch family, and is descended from several lines which have taken a prominent part in American affairs since the early Colonial period.

Robert L. Beeckman is a son of Gilbert Livingston and Margaret (Foster) Beeckman, and was born April 15, 1866, in New York City, where his parents were then residing.  As a lad he came to Newport, R. I., and it was in the public and private schools of this city that he secured his education. After completing his studies at these institutions Mr. Beeckman entered business life and soon proved himself to have an unusual grasp of practical affairs and a keen business judgment and foresight.  He eventually became a member of the firm of Lapsley, Beeckman & Company, bankers and brokers. He was a member of the New York Stock Exchange from 1897 until 1906, when he retired in order to devote himself to his interests in Rhode Island.  Since that time he has made his home in the city of Newport, and became very prominent in the general life of the community.  He is a director of the Industrial Trust Company of Providence, the Newport Trust Company of  Newport, and ex-officio member of the board of directors of the Rhode Island Hospital Trust Company of Providence, and of the St. Vincent de Paul Infant Asylum, and a trustee of the Rhode Island School of Design, and the International Silver Company.  Since early youth Mr. Beeckman has been a staunch supporter of the principles and policies of the Republican party, and has taken an active part in the Republican politics for a number of years.  He was soon recognized as a possible leader in this State, and was elected to the Rhode Island House of Representatives in the year 1908. Since that time he has been continuously in the public eye, and rapidly reached a position of great influence in party affairs.  He was returned to the State Legislature in 1910 and 1911, and in the following year was elected State Senator, and continuously served on that body during that year and the three years following.  So admirable was the record that he made for himself as a legislator and so valuable were his services both to this party and to the community-at-large that he was honored in 1914 with the Republican nomination for governor of the State.  He was successfully elected in the campaign which followed and reelected in 1916 and 1918, and has held this high office with the greatest efficiency ever since.  He has given Rhode Island a splendid business administration, and has been associated with much of the most important legislation which has been enacted in the State for many years.

Governor Beeckman is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church, and attends Grace Church at Providence and Trinity Church at Newport.  He is also associated with a number of important organizations, both religious and philanthropic, and is a well known figure in social and club circles in Providence and Newport.  He is a member of the Newport Reading Room Club of Newport, the Hope Club of Providence, the Knickerbocker, Racquet and Tennis clubs of New York City, the Metropolitan Club of Washington, D. C., and the Travelers' Club of Paris, France.  Governor Beeckman has always been a keen lover of all out-of-door sports and pastimes, a fact which is illustrated in his clubs, and his favorite recreations are tennis, golf, yachting and riding.

Robert Livingston Beeckman was united in marriage, October 8, 1902, with Eleanor Thomas, daughter of General Samuel and Ann Augusta (Porter) Thomas, of New York.

illustration on facing page: photo, Robert L. Beeckman



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GENERAL JOHN GARDINER HAZARD --  There are but few names more closely identified with the life and history of Rhode Island, especially that part of it connected with the industrial growth and development of recent years, than that of Hazard, a family which from the earliest Colonial times has held a high place in the regard of the community and in its various branches is related to many of the best houses in the region.  In industrial, civil, commercial, judicial and military affairs, as well as many other departments of social activity, it has contributed distinguished figures which have upheld its honor as well as that of the community with the highest credit and success.

(I)  Thomas Hazard, born in 1610, appears first of record in America in Boston in 1635, and was admitted a freeman there in 1638, and two years later of Portsmouth, R. I.  He was one of the founders and first town officers of Newport, along with Coddington, Easton, Coggeshall, Brenton, the Clarkes, Bull and Dyer.  Mr. Hazard was made a freeman of Newport in 1639, and in 1640 was appointed a member of the General Court of Elections. His first wife, Martha, died in 1669, and he married (second), Martha, widow of Thomas Sheriff.

(II)  Robert Hazard, son of Thomas and Martha Hazard, was born in 1635.  He was admitted a freeman of Portsmouth, R. I., in 1665, and from that time until 1698 his name often appears in the records as chosen to fill some important position.  In 1671 he bought five hundred acres of land in Kings Town, and in 1687 he was taxed in that town; and not long thereafter he built his home there.  This house was still standing in the early part of the nineteenth century.  In 1695 he gave to his son, George, the larger part of his Kings Town purchase.  In 1710, a short time before his death, Robert sold to his son, Robert, the remaining part of his farm, with 'my manor house where I now live', and the latter, in 1718, gave it by will to his son, Robert (3), after his mother's death, making three Roberts who had successively owned the old house.  The last, upon the death of his grandmother in 1739, sold to his uncle George the remaining part of the farm; it went next in 1743 to George's son Colonel Thomas, who in 1748 sold it to John Rose.  In 1695 Robert Hazard gave his son, Jeremiah, two hundred acres of land in Tiverton.  Robert Hazard died in 1710.  He married Mary Brownell, born in 1639, daughter of Thomas and Anne Brownell, who lived to be one hundred years old, dying January 28, 1739, her obituary setting forth that she was accounted a very useful gentlewoman.

(III)  Robert (2) Hazard, son of Robert and Mary (Brownell) Hazard, died in 1718, his will being proved in November of that year.  He married Amey ----- , who died in 1718, a few months prior to her husband.  His will gave to his son Jeffrey, three hundred acres of land, which he called 'the farm where I now live'.  It was probably in that part of Kings Town which became Exeter. To his son, Thomas, he gave two hundred acres in Kings Town, and one hundred and sixty acres in Westerly.  To his son, Robert, he gave the old manor house, and one hundred and twenty acres, given him by his father; but Robert was not to be in possession of the house and twenty acres until after his grandmother's death.  To each of his daughters he gave, when of age, one hundred pounds.

(IV)  Robert (3) Hazard, son of Robert (2) and Amey Hazard, was born June (or January) 19, 1703, died in 1775.  Early in life Mr. Hazard removed to East Greenwich, in which town are recorded the births of all his children. In 1739 he sold the old homestead with one hundred acres to his uncle George.  By the terms of his father's will he was to have possession of the old home only after the death of his grandmother, which occurred in 1739. He married, in March, 1727, Martha -----, and the event is recorded in North Kings Town.

(V)  Jeremiah Hazard, son of Robert (3) and Martha Hazard, was born July 25, 1736, and died in 1773.  In his will written in that year, he gave to his son, Jeffrey, 'all my lands lying in Exeter and in West Greenwich; to wife Phebe, all lands lying in Coventry (one hundred and fifty acres); to daughter Abigail, etc.  The will was submitted to probate December 14, 1773. He married, November 6, 1760, Phebe Tillinghast.

(VI)  Jeffrey Hazard, son of Jeremiah and Phebe (Tillinghast) Hazard, was born in 1762,  died in December, 1840.  He was Lieutenant-Governor of Rhode Island from 1833 to 1835, and again from 1836 to 1837.  He was also for many years a representative in the General Assembly, and Chief Justice of the Court of Common Pleas, and Judge of the Supreme Court from 1810 to 1818.  He married Amey Tillinghast, born in 1773, daughter of Thomas Tillinghast.  She died June 3, 1870.

(VII)  John Hazard, son of Jeffrey and Amey (Tillinghast) Hazard, was born in 1804, died in Providence, January 7, 1885. Mrs. Hazard survived her husband, and died on May 12, 1888, aged eighty-one years.  John Hazard was a farmer in early life, and resided in Exeter, R. I.  Later he removed to Providence, where he was engaged in mercantile pursuits.  He was a Democrat in political sentiment, and at one time was a representative from Exeter to the General Assembly.  He married Margaret Crandall, daughter of Robert Crandall.

(VIII)  General John Gardiner Hazard, son of John and Margaret (Crandall) Hazard, was born April 15, 1832, in the town of Exeter, R. I., died May 15, 1897, in Providence.  He was one of Rhode Island's foremost citizen-soldiers. The breaking out of the Civil War found him engaged in mercantile pursuits at Providence.  His patriotism and the stirring events of the spring and summer of 1861 led him to tender his services to his country.  He was commissioned first lieutenant, First Rhode Island Artillery, August 8, 1861; assisted in the organization of Batteries B and C; accompanied the latter to Washington, and was soon after transferred to Battery A.  He was ordered to accompany General Williams' brigade to Ball's Bluff on the day of the battle there, and arrived on the ground at daylight the following morning.  The day was spent in getting canal boats in readiness, and putting on board the battery and horses.  After dark he was ordered to unship, as the troops already across were ordered back to Maryland's side of the Potomac.  This move of crossing to the Virginia side of the river was simply a feint to prevent the enemy making another, prior to our troops returning, which could only be done under cover of night.  The following day the battery returned to its old camping ground at Darnstown. About the first of November, Lieutenant Hazard was ordered to report to General Charles P. Stone, at Poolesville, Md., where his battery remained during the winter, sending out a section weekly to do picket duty.  During the great portion of the winter Lieutenant Hazard was in command of the battery, Captain Tompkins being absent on sick leave.  Early in the spring the battery accompanied General Sedgewick to Harper's Ferry, from which point two or three expeditions were made up the valley to Charlestown and Winchester, resulting only in slight skirmishes.  In April the battery was ordered to Washington to ship for Fortess Monroe.  Arriving at that point, the division was united to Sumner's Corps, the Second.  Lieutenant Hazard accompanied the battery up the peninsula, and was almost daily engaged in the siege of Yorktown.  At the raising of the siege it was put on shipboard on the York river and landed at West Point, where it joined the main part of the army again at Camp Winfield Scott.  June 30, crossing the Chickahominy, it was engaged in the battle at Fair Oaks, after which it remained in this work until the retreat was ordered to the James river.  The battery was engaged almost constantly, as was the entire army, from the time it started until it reached the river, - more severely for the battery, perhaps, at Peach Orchard, White Oak Swamp and Glendale.  At Malvern Hill it was not ordered into the fight, yet sustained loss from the enemy's artillery.

On August 20, 1862, Lieutenant Hazard was commissioned captain of Battery B, and took command September 1, at Alexandria, on its arrival from the peninsula.  It then rejoined the Second Corps, and accompanied it through Maryland, South Mountain, thence to the battle of Antietam.  From here the army went into camp in and about Harper's Ferry, to refit and reorganize. The battery at this time was in a particularly bad condition, horses worn out, men were ragged, and from constant marching day and night, the men had become slack in discipline.  These evils, with the assistance of Lieutenant George W. Adams, Horace S. Bloodgood and G. Lyman Dwight, were speedily overcome.  In October, 1862, Captain Hazard proceeded with the army to Warrenton, and from there, after the change in command to Falmouth, opposite Fredericksburg, where the battery remained in camp until ordered into the battle of Fredericksburg.  On the 12th he was engaged from daylight until late in the day in shelling the same.  On the morning of the 13th he was ordered across the river to report to Major-General O. O. Howard, commanding Second Division of the corps. The infantry having been repulsed again and again by many hard hours of fighting, it was decided to send Battery B to the extreme front in a very exposed position, within one hundred and fifty yards of the enemy's line and under a heavy crossfire of their artillery. Their orders were to go in on the run or they would never succeed in getting into position at all.  They did so, but remained there only about twenty minutes, when they were ordered out, with a severe loss of men and horses. General Couch afterward told Captain Hazard that he did not expect to see him get out without losing his command, but that he considered the sacrifice called for, as the infantry were getting much demoralized.  The horses of Captain Hazard and Lieutenant Bloodgood were shot under them during the battle.

In April, 1863, Captain Hazard was made chief of artillery of the corps. At the same time a complete change was made in the organization of the artillery of the Army of the Potomac.  The artillery of each corps was taken from the division and made into a separate brigade by itself, and placed under the sole command of the chief of artillery, who was made, by the order, a brigade commander.  After the fatal blunder of General Hooker, at Chancellorsville, the enemy left our front on their memorable campaign into Maryland and Pennsylvania.  Captain Hazard's brigade accompanied the Second Corps on the chase after Lee to the battle of Gettysburg, where, after three days' terrific fighting, Lee retreated across the Potomac.  After following him to Falling Waters our army was put in motion for Virginia, and struck the enemy again near Culpeper.  The Second Corps had been in a severe fight with a portion of the enemy at Auburn Hill and Bristoe Station, Captain Hazard's command taking a very important part in the result of the day.

Soon after, the army went into winter quarters on the Rapidan.  In April, 1864, Captain Hazard was made major of his regiment, and assigned to the command of the Second Brigade of the Artillery Reserves.  When the army broke camp on the 4th of May, he accompanied his brigade to the Wilderness; thence to Spottsylvania, where the brigade was attached to that part of General Tidball's, of the Second Corps, with which he continued through the battle of the Po, Mattapony, North Anna and Cold Harbor, to Petersburg.  On July 1, 1864, General Tidball was ordered to West Point as Commander, and the consolidated brigade was placed under Major Hazard's command.  The brigade was engaged almost daily from May 5 until August 1; from that time, until about September 1, it remained quiet, with the exception of the battle of Deep Bottom, and the unfortunate repulse at Ream's Station, where he lost eight guns and all the officers of Battery B, captured by the enemy.

On August 8, Major Hazard was made lieutenant-colonel by brevet, for 'gallant and meritorious services'.  During the fall and winter of 1864 his command occupied various forts in the works in front of Petersburg, at times withdrawing a few batteries for some of the winter.  Most of the time he occupied the line, Colonel Hazard had in his command nineteen light, four heavy and six mortar batteries, stationed at the most important points and requiring the greatest care and watchfulness.  On March 28 the brigade broke camp and moved with the corps across Hatcher's Run, where they engaged the enemy, in connection with the grand advance of the whole army.  Richmond and Petersburg falling, they pursued the enemy to Appomattox Court House, their corps being immediately on the heels of Lee's army.  They were constantly skirmishing with them to the very hour of their surrender.  The last battle engaged in was at Farmersville, April 7 and 8.  On May 3, 1865, Lieutenant-Colonel Hazard was made colonel and brigadier-general by brevet 'for meritorious service during the war'.  He was recommended for these brevets by his superior officers several months prior.  He accompanied his brigade from Virginia to Washington, and participated in the Grand Review. At the disbanding of the artillery, he was ordered to report with his regiment (Colonel Tompkins having been mustered out) to Rhode Island, and on July 1 was mustered out.  On July 11, General Hazard was commissioned colonel of the Fifth United States Volunteers, retaining his brevet rank of brigadier-general, and ordered by the Secretary of War to make his headquarters at Fort Wadsworth, S. I., New York harbor, and he commanded that post until March 9, 1866, when his regiment was mustered out of service.  After the war the greater part of the active business life of General Hazard was passed in the South, making his headquarters at New Orleans, engaged in the cotton business.  He made a number of business trips abroad.

General Hazard died May 15, 1897, in Providence, R. I.  His funeral took place from Grace Episcopal Church, May 18, there being present besides friends a large representation of the Loyal Legion, of which the deceased had been a member.  The interment was at Swan Point Cemetery, Providence. The Providence 'Daily Journal', in its issue for May 19, 1897, said:

'The reputation which General Hazard earned by his valor during the struggle of the Rebellion was well sustained by his upright life in the time of peace which followed its close.  That he held the love and respect of all who knew him was fully evidenced by the large number of friends who gathered in the church to pay the last tribute possible to the deceased.'

The Providence 'News', for May 18, 1897, also paid him a tribute:

'The late John Gardiner Hazard, to whose memory the last tribute are to-day paid, was one of Rhode Island's gallant soldiers during the War of the Rebellion, and though his business career was made outside the home boundaries, he had a large acquaintance here and was greatly liked and esteemed in many circles.  His sudden death was a shock to these many friends, for though the severe service of the soldier had undoubtedly had its effects on his physical constitution, he had all the spirit of young manhood, and was a charming associate wherever he moved.'

illustration on facing page: photo: John G. Hazard


p. 14 - 15:

LAURISTON HARTWELL HAZARD.  --  In 1894 the Hazard Cotton Company was organized in the city of Providence, Captain Jeffrey Hazard, president; Lauriston H. Hazard, treasurer.  Captain Hazard, a brave officer of the Union, has long since gone to his reward, but his son, Lauriston H., still holds the position to which he was elected in 1894.  He is a grandson of John and Margaret (Crandall) Hazard (q. v.), whose two sons, General John Gardiner Hazard and Captain Jeffrey Hazard, were two of the gallant sons of Rhode Island, who won fame in the war between the States.

General Jeffrey Hazard, second son of John and Margaret (Crandall) Hazard, and brother of General John G. Hazard, was born in Exeter, R. I., September 23, 1835, and died in Providence, R. I., November 21, 1911.  He was educated in the graded and high schools of Providence, and began business life in the Manufacturers' Bank, holding the position of teller at the time he enlisted for service in the Union army, October 5, 1861. He went to the front as second lieutenant, Battery A, First Rhode Island Light Artillery.  Later he was commissioned first lieutenant, and appointed regimental adjutant.  With Battery A he saw hard service and in many battles won high praise for his bravery.  He fought at Ball's Bluff, Yorktown, Fair Oaks, Malvern Hill, and Antietam, the only battery officers preent at the last-named battle being Lieutenants Hazard and Mason.  But the battery covered itself with glory, and on October 10, 1862, Lieutenant Hazard became captain, and was assigned to Battery H, Rhode Island Light Artillery, a battery recruited in Providence.  He commanded Battery H until August 17, 1863, when he resigned and returned to Providence.

After his return from the war, Captain Hazard entered the employ of the American Wood Pulp Company, at Providence, later going with William H. Reynolds, a cotton broker, with whom he remained until 1868.  In that he year he formed a partnership with A. Duncan Chapin, and as Hazard & Chapin the firm conducted a successful cotton brokerage business for a period of twenty-six years, 1868-94.  In the last-named year the Hazard Cotton Company was incorporated, Captain Jeffrey Hazard, president; Lauriston H. Hazard, treasurer; F. O. Allen, secretary.  As executive head of the company bearing his name, Captain Hazard had greater scope for his business ability, and until death, seventeen years later, he continued the active, resourceful, successful business man.  At the time of his death he was the coldest cotton merchant in Providence in active business.

The family politics had hitherto been Democratic, but Captain Hazard opposed his father and brother and acted with the Republican party, although he had no desire for political office, nor did he accept one during his entire lifetime.   He was a campanion of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, Massachusetts Commandery; member of Prescott Post, No. 1, Grand Army of the Republic, of Providence; member of the Maine Artillery Veteran Corps of Providence; member and vestryman of Grace Protestant Episcopal Church; member of the Providence Art Club, Squantum Association and Hope Club.  He was a man highly esteemed socially, and was universally admired for his genial, manly nature and disposition.

Captain Hazard married, October 20, 1865, Anna Hartwell, daughter of John B. and Harriet (Hall) Hartwell, of Providence. Mr. and Mrs. Hazard were the parents of:  Lauriston Hartwell, of further mention; John Hartwell, died young; Margaret Crandall, died young; Marion, married Leland H. Littlefield, of Providence; Harriet Hall, married William H. Dixon; Anna Rosalind, married William H. Barnum.

Lauriston Hartwell Hazard was born in Providence, R. I., November 22, 1866, and is a 'true native son', one of the city's successful business men.  He was educated in private schools, Providence High School, and Brown University, receiving his Bachelor's degree from Brown with the graduating class of 1889.  The business in which his honored father was engaged appealed to him, and immediately after leaving the University he entered the employ of the cotton brokerage firm, Hazard & Chapin.  When in 1904 the business was incorporated as the Hazard Cotton Company, he was elected treasurer, a post he has most ably filled for fourteen years.  The company is an important factor in the cotton market, has widely-extended connections and transacts a large business.  In club and social life Mr. Hazard is very popular, belonging to the Agawam Hunt Club, Providence Art Club, and Hope Club, of which he is president, and to the Squantum Association.  His favorite philanthropy is the Rhode Island Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, of which he is an ex-president, and since 1913 he has been a trustee of Butler Hospital.  Member of Rhode Island Board of Parole, appointed by Governor Beeckman, when the board was instituted.  He is a vestryman of Grace Protestant Episcopal Church, an office his father also held, and in politics he is a Republican.

Mr. Hazard married, June 19, 1907, Elizabeth Paine Sackett, daughter of Adjutant-General Frederic Mosley and Emma Louise (Paine) Sackett, and a granddaughter of Adnah Sackett, who came to Providence when a lad, became head of the jewelry manufacturing firm Sackett, Davis & Company, and was one of the leading Democrats of the State and twice party candidate for Governor.  Mr. and Mrs. Hazard are the parents of two daughters:  Elizabeth and Marion.

illustration on facing page: photo, Jeffrey Hazard


Continued


These documents are made available free to the public for non-commercial purposes by the Rhode Island USGenWeb Project. Transcription and pictures 2001-2 by Beth Hurd


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