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Second Rhode Island Regiment:
A Narrative of Military Operations
by Augustus Woodbury; Providence: Valpey, Angell & Co., 1875


p. 411: Private Wilson ALDRICH was a resident of Scituate, was drafted and mustered into Company I, July 9th, 1863.  He was by occupation a farmer, and was twenty-eight years of age.  He was badly wounded on the second day of the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864.  He was transferred to Company C of the Battalion, but his active service was ended.  He died in hospital at Washington, July 7th, 1864.

p. 393 - 394: Private Matthew ALGER enlisted from Olneyville in Company C, and was mustered, August 1st, 1861.  He was an operative by occupation, and at the time of enlistment was twenty years old.  He was wounded in the battle of Salem Heights, May 3rd, 1863, and died in hospital, May 14th.

p. 391: Private George M. ALLEN was one of the original members of Company B, and enlisted from Providence.  He was a jeweler by occupation, and was twenty-three years of age at the time.  He contracted disease on the Peninsula, and died in hospital, David's Island, New York, September 4th, 1862.

p. 408: Private Asa ANDREWS enlisted and was mustered into Company H, August 25th, 1862.  He contracted disease during the following winter, and died in hospital at Portsmouth Grove, Rhode Island, March 31st, 1863.

p. 387: Private James ARMSTRONG was a native of Ireland, enlisted from Providence in Company A, and was mustered, October 24th, 1861.  He was a laborer by occupation, thirty-five years old, of bright, quick wit, of soldierly bearing, and a good comrade.  He was mortally wounded in the battle of Seven Pines, June 25th, 1862, and died soon after the battle.

p. 411: Private Leander A. ARNOLD was one of the original members of Company I. He was a resident of Woonsocket, was a painter by occupation, and was twenty-two years of age.  He was killed at the battle of Salem Heights, May 3rd, 1863.

p. 403: Private William A. ARNOLD was drafted from Jamestown, and was mustered into Company F, July 20th, 1863.  He was a laborer by occupation, and was twenty-one years of age.  He was transferred to Company B of the Battalion. The army life weakened his health, he fell sick, and died, July 7th, 1864, at DeCamp Hospital, David's Island, New York.

p. 396: Private George B. ATWOOD was one of the original members of Company D, and enlisted from Providence.  He was a cigar-maker, twenty-nine years old at the time of enlisting.  He was captured after the battle of Bull Run, while attending to the wants of the wounded, and was carried to Richmond and thence to Salisbury, North Carolina.  He was released in May, 1862, and on the 29th of that month he was lost overboard from the transport Cossack, while on his voyage north.

p. 407: Sergeant Charles E. BAGLEY was one of the original members of Company H. He enlisted from South Kingstown, was a teacher by occupation, and was twenty-two years of age.  He was at once appointed corporal, and afterwards, as it appears, sergeant, although no date is given.  The promotion was doubtless made on the 3rd of July, 1861, to fill the vacancy caused by the discharge of Sergeant James E. Weaver.  He was a brave and faithful soldier, an honorable and intelligent man.  He was killed at the battle of Bull Run, July 21st, 1861.

p. 372 - 373: Major Sullivan BALLOU, the son of Hiram and Emeline (Bowen) Ballou, was born at Smithfield, Rhode Island, March 28th, 1829.  In 1846 he entered Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts, and in 1848, Brown University, Providence, and remained there two years, when he entered the law school at Ballston, New York.  In March, 1853, he was admitted to the Rhode Island bar, and practiced law in Pascoag, Woonsocket and Providence, winning an excellent reputation as an able and successful lawyer.  He was clerk of the House of Representatives of Rhode Island during the years 1854, 1855 and 1856, and speaker of the same in 1857.  He was married in the summer of 1855 to Miss Sarah Hart Shumway of Poughkeepsie, New York.  He accepted the post of major of the Second in the most conscientious and patriotic spirit, and early in his military career, although without previous experience, he developed a capacity and exhibited gifts and aptitudes for the profession of arms which would doubtless have given him high rank in the service.  He died as he had lived, a calm, courageous, faithful, Christian man, and his comrades and friends cherish his memory with a grateful pride in the manliness and nobility of his life.

p. 410: Corporal Thomas H. BARKER enlisted from Providence, and was mustered into Company I, December 23rd, 1861.  He was by occupation a jeweller, and was twenty-three years of age at the time of enlistment.  He was appointed corporal, May 25th, 1862.  He fell a victim of typhoid fever upon the Peninsula, and died, July 24th, 1862.

p. 396: Private Reuben BARTLETT enlisted in Company D from North Providence, and was mustered in, June 6th, 1861.  He was instructed in Mr. Mowry's select and classical school at North Providence, which he left at the age of nineteen, to join the Regiment.  He was a youth of excellent promise.  He was shot dead at the very outset of the battle of Bull Run, July 21st, 1861, the first, or among the first, to fall.

p. 391: Private Joseph BARTON enlisted from Providence, was mustered, October 15th, 1862, and assigned to Company B.  He was a fisherman by occupation, and was twenty-one years of age.  He was a native of Nova Scotia.  He was wounded at the battle of the Wilderness, May 5th, 1864.  At first it was thought, that his injury was slight, and he was transferred to Company A of the Battalion, but dangerous symptoms afterwards appeared, and he sank beneath his wound, dying, September 27th, 1864.

p. 382: Second Lieutenant Clarke E. BATES, son of Daniel and Hannah Bates, was a native of North Kingstown, at the time of the organization of the Regiment a resident of Warwick, and was an operative by occupation.  He enlisted in Company A, and was made first sergeant upon the discharge of Sergeant Wilson, July 13th, 1861.  In this difficult position he remained for nearly two years, faithfully and diligently performing its duties.  On the 22nd of February, 1863, he was promoted to second lieutenant of Company I, and advancement which he had fairly earned by his gallant bearing in battle and his intelligent and thorough fidelity.  He received a severe wound in the leg at the battle of Salem Heights, May 3rd, 1863, and was obliged to undergo amputation.  Although of a robust constitution, he gradually failed from the effects of the wound, and died on the 18th of July.  He is spoken of as generous, fearless, firm, of good judgment, and possessing all the qualities of a good soldier.  A wife and one child survived to mourn his death.

p. 386: Corporal William P. BENTLEY of Company A was one of the original members of the Regiment, and was a musician by occupation.  He was a genial, generous and helpful man, of cheerful disposition, and a favorite among his comrades. He was mortally wounded at the battle of Seven Pines, June 25th, 1862, having both legs shot off, and died soon after the battle.  He met his death as cheerfully and bravely as he lived, leaving a large circle of friends to mourn his fall and cherish his  memory.  He was twenty-one years of age at the time of his death.

p. 414 - 415: Sergeant Ebenezer Johnson BLAKE, the son of Joseph A. and Sarah P. Blake, was born in Providence, April 1st, 1837.  He was by occupation a clerk.  He enlisted, April 16th, 1861, in the first battery, but, as that was full, he was ordered to Fort Adams, then garrisoned by a company under the command of Captain C. W. Turner.  This company formed the nucleus of Company K, which was mustered, June 5th, 1861.  Corporal at first, he was promoted to sergeant, July 22nd, 1861, and to first sergeant, October 5th, 1862.  He was in Rhode Island on recruiting service from August 10th to October 30th, 1862.  He was taken prisoner in company with Corporal Richard Greene of Company B, May 15th, 1864, by the rebel cavalry, and taken South.  He was at Camp Sumter from June 3rd to September 13th, when he was taken to Florence, South Carolina, remained there until December 7th, when he was taken to Charleston, and was finally released on the 11th.  While in captivity he kept a diary, which gives an interesting account of the exposures, hardships, privations and sufferings of the prisoners in the South.  His health seems to have entirely broken down under the treatment to which he was subjected at Andersonville and Florence, and he died at Annapolis, Maryland, on the 16th of February, 1865, of pneumonia.  He was a man of genial and happy temperment, possessing the faculty of making friends. While in captivity he received tokens of kindness, both from his captors and fellow prisoners.

p. 415: Sergeant Henry T. BLANCHARD enlisted from Providence, and was mustered into Company K as corporal, June 5th, 1861.  He was by occupation a machinist, and was twenty-one years of age.  He was promoted to sergeant, October 5th, 1862.  He went bravely and creditably through the earlier campaigns of the Regiment, and was killed at the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864.

p. 393: Corporal John BLAIR of Providence was one of the original members of Company C.  He was nineteen years old, and was a sawyer by occupation.  He was appointed corporal, December 22nd, 1862.  He was killed on the first day of the battle of the Wilderness, May 5th, 1864.

p. 377: Assistant Surgeon Lucius S. BOLLES, the son of Rev. Lucius S. and Sarah (Noyes) Bolles, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, April 21, 1837.  He was educated at the University Grammar School and Brown University, Providence, graduating in 1859.  He studied medicine with Doctors Okie and Wilcox and at the medical school of the University of Pennsylvania, receiving his degree of doctor in medicine in 1861.  He was appointed assistant surgeon in the Second Regiment, March 9th, 1863, but was obliged to resign, September 10th, on account of the death of a brother, which called him home.  Settling in Philadelphia, he was attached to one of the military hospitals in that city till the close of the war.  In June, 1865, he married Gertrude, daughter of Dr. B. S. Janney of Philadelphia.  A man of delicate constitution, he was hardly fitted to endure the hardships of military service.  But he was very faithful to all his duties, and by the kindness of his heart, a genial temper, and great social gifts, he endeared himself very warmly to the officers and men of the Regiment during his brief term of service.  He died in Philadelphia, August 15th, 1873.

p. 400: Private John G. BRAMAN was one of the original members of Company E, and enlisted from South Kingstown.  He was over fifty years of age at the time, but, at the personal solicitation of Captain Rodman, he was accepted. He did his duty faithfully while belonging to the Regiment, but on the Peninsula contracted a disease which soon unfitted him for active service, and he was discharged, September 16th, 1862.  He died, February 21st, 1874.

p. 404: Private Gardner J. BRAYTON was a resident of Portsmouth, Rhode Island, at the time of the organization of the Regiment, and was twenty-eight years of age at the time of his enlistment.  He enlisted and was mustered into Company G, June 6th, 1861.  After the battle of Bull Run he was seized with typhoid fever, which proved to be of a malignant type.  Care and medical treatment were unavailing, and he died in hospital at Camp Sprague, August 19th, 1861.  Chaplain Jameson speaks of his 'excellent religious character' and of the  high esteem in which he was held by his comrades.

p. 390: Corporal John BURKE was a native of Ireland, was a sailor by occupation, and was twenty-two years of age.  He was conscripted in the draft of 1863, and was mustered into Company B on the 12th of August of that year.  He was wounded severely in the battle of Spottsylvania, May 12th, 1864.  Recovering from his injury, he was transferred to Company A of the Battalion.  He is recorded as corporal, but the date of his appointment is not given.  He was severely wounded once more in the battle of Sailor's Creek, April 6th, and of his injuries he died, April 30th, 1865.

p. 404: Private William B. BURNS was one of the original members of Company G, and enlisted from Bristol.  He was a seaman by occupation, and was twenty-four years of age.  He was transferred to the Western gun-boat flotilla, February 18th, 1862, and is reported to have died at Philadelphia.

p. 424: Private James D. BUTLER (Veteran) was mustered into Company H, February 10th, 1865. He was a farmer by occupation, and was eighteen years of age.  He died in hospital, June 3rd, 1865.

p. 387: Private James CALLIGAN (Veterans) enlisted from Providence, and was mustered into Company A, September 29th, 1862.  He was tranferred to Company A in the Battalion that remained in the field, on the return of the Regiment.  He was taken prisoner early in the campaign of 1864, and was carried to Camp Sumter, Andersonville, Georgia.  Here exposure, heat, scanty rations and insufficient shelter brought on disease, from which he died, August 27th, 1864.  He was a teamster by occupation, and eighteen years of age at the time of his enlistment.

p. 408: Private Peleg W. CARD enlisted from Coventry, and was mustered into Company H, June 19th, 1861.  He was a laborer by occupation, and was twenty years of age at the time of enlistment.  He was killed at the battle of Bull Run, July 21st, 1861.

p. 393: Corporal Thomas O. H. CARPENTER enlisted from Providence, and was mustered into Company C, June 5th, 1861.  He was a teamster by occupation, and at the time of enlistment was twenty-two years old.  He was appointed corporal and assigned to the color-guard.  His position naturally made him a mark for the enemy's bullets at the battle of Bull Run, and he was mortally wounded and died before the day had passed.  He fell bravely defending the flag, and his memory is honored as a gallant and fearless soldier.

p. 381: First Lieutenant Thomas H. CARR, born in Providence, May 2nd, 1826, was the son of Samuel and Mary T. Carr.  He was instructed at the academies in Plainfield, Connecticut, and Uxbridge, Massachusetts.  Previous to the war he was engaged in business pursuits.  He entered the army as second lieutenant of Company E in the Second, November 7th, 1861.  He was promoted to first lieutenant of Company H, January 24th, 1862.  He faithfully performed the duties of his office, in the different service which the Regiment performed, and is spoken of as 'a brave, efficient and worthy officer and soldier'.  His military life and the privations connected with it impaired his health, and he returned home on sick leave in the autumn of 1862.  He gradually failed in strength, and died on the 1st of January, 1863.

p. 410 - 411: Corporal Patrick CARROLL (Veterans) enlisted from Greenville (Smithfield), and was mustered into Company I, August 21st, 1862.  He was an operative by occupation, and was nineteen years of age at the time of his enlistment.  He was transferred to Company C of the Battalion at the time of the reorganization, and was subsequently appointed corporal.  He was wounded severely at the battle of Sailor's Creek, April 6th, 1865, and on the 16th died from the effects of his wound, in hospital at Annapolis, Maryland.

p. 409: Sergeant Bradford CHAMBERLAIN enlisted from Smithfield, and was one of the original members of Company I.  He was at once appointed corporal, and was promoted to sergeant, April 21st, 1863.  He was at the time of enlistment twenty-seven years of age, and was a mason by occupation.  He reenlisted, December 28th, 1863, and was killed at the battle of Spottsylvania, May 12th, 1864.  He was buried at Fredericksburg.

p. 383: First Lieutenant Isaac M. CHURCH entered the service as second lieutenant of Company E.  He was a clergyman by profession, and was at one time pastor of the Baptist church in Wakefield, (South Kingstown).  He represented the town of South Kingstown in the General Assembly in 1860.  At the battle of Bull Run he was taken prisoner, and continued in the hands of the rebel authorities at Richmond for a considerable period.  Meanwhile, he was promoted to first lieutenant of Company H, September 28th, 1861.  After his release he was appointed captain of Company G, Fourth Rhode Island, August 27th, 1862, and resigned, December 27th, 1862.  His health was impaired by his captivity, and he never fully recovered his former strength.  He died at North Kingstown, October 27th, 1874.

p. 405: Private Isaac N. COBB was born in Lyme, Connecticut, March 3rd, 1829.  He commenced a seafaring life at an early age, and while quite young became a master mariner, commanding vessels in the coasting trade.  He was thus engaged at the outbreak of the rebellion, when he enlisted in Captain Goff's company, and was mustered in on the 6th of June, 1861.  He was wounded in the groin at the battle of Bull Run, was captured, taken to Richmond and imprisoned in the 'Libby'.  His wound was very painful, and he lingered in great suffering until August 12th, 1861, when death released him.  He was married, first to Miss Frances E. Wood of Essex, Connecticut, who died, leaving one daughter; a second time, to Miss Elizabeth M. Sayer of Bristol, who, with two daughters, survived his death.  He was a brave and ardently patriotic soldier.

p. 394: Private Alfred C. COLE was a resident of Seekonk, Massachusetts, was mustered into Company C, June 6th, 1861.  He was shot, and died from his wounds, on the morning  when the Regiment marched out of the trenches at Cold Harbor to return home, June 5th, 1864.  He was a farmer by occupation, and at the time of his death was twenty-two years of age.

p. 403: Sergeant Henry J. COLE was also a resident of Bristol, and one of the original members of Company G.  He was a machinist by occupation, and was nineteen years of age at the time of enlistment.  He was appointed eighth corporal, and on the 18th of March, 1862, was promoted to sergeant.  He was killed at the battle of Seven Pines, June 25th, 1862.

p. 381 - 382: First Lieutenant Moses W. COLLINS was appointed second lieutenant and assigned to Company B, July 30th, 1861, and promoted to first lieutenant, July 24th, 1862.  He was by occupation a printer, and was before the war publisher and editor of the Phenix Weekly Journal.  He passed through the Peninsular campaign, and won the reputation of a very intelligent and brave officer.  But his physical strength was insufficient for a soldier's life, and he resigned, December 27th, 1862.  He was, however, indisposed to give up the service, and obtained an appointment as second lieutenant, Third Rhode Island Cavalry, August 18th, 1863.  He remained in this office, on duty with his regiment in Louisiana, until December 27th, 1864, when he was honorably discharged and returned to Rhode Island.  But his health was shattered, and he died at Phenix after his return home.

p. 403: Private Thomas COOPER enlisted from Pawtucket, and was mustered into Company F, June 6th, 1861.  He was an engraver by occupation, and was thirty-seven years of age at the time of his enlistment.  He contracted sickness on the Peninsula, and died in hospital, October17th, 1862.

p. 385 - 386: Sergeant James H. COYLE (Veterans) was one of the original members of Company A.  He was a laborer by occupation, and was twenty years old at the time of his enlistment.  He enlisted from Coventry, and after passing creditably through his three years of service, reenlisted, December 26th, 1863, and was appointed corporal and afterwards sergeant in Company A of the Veteran organization.  He was wounded at the battle of Opequan, September 19th, 1864, and again at the battle of Sailor's Creek, April 6th, 1865.  Of the injuries received in the last named fight he died, May 2nd.  He was very generous and helpful to his fellow soldiers, and proved to be one of the best men in his company.

p. 400: Private Thomas DAGNAN enlisted from Johnston, and was mustered into Company E, January 22nd, 1862.  He was a laborer by occupation, and was forty-two years of age.  He was transferred to Company B, Veteran organization, and died at the hospital on David's Island, New York, June 16th, 1864.

p. 410: Corporal Albert F. DAVIS was a resident of Glocester.  He enlisted and was mustered into Company I, August 1st, 1861.  He was by occupation a farmer, and was twenty-six years of age at the time of enlistment.  He was appointed corporal, July 25th, 1862, at the close of the Peninsular campaign.  The exposures and privations of the campaign induced disease, and he died of fever in hospital at Chester, Pennsylvania, August 30th, 1862.

p. 391: Private Henry M. DAVIS enlisted from Scituate, and was mustered, November 4th, 1862.  He was twenty-one years of age, and was a farmer by occupation. He soon contracted sickness, and died in hospital, April 5th, 1863.

p. 421: Veteran. Private James W. DEWHURST enlisted from Providence, and was mustered into Company E, September 1th, 1864.  He was a laborer by occupation, and was eighteen years of age.  He went unhurt through the winter campaign, but was killed at the battle of Sailor's Creek, April 6th, 1865.

p. 411 - 412: Private John DONNOVAN enlisted from Providence, and was mustered into Company I, December 16th, 1861.  He was a laborer by occupation, and was nineteen years of age.  He was killed, May 3rd, 1863, at the battle of Salem Heights.

p. 396: Private James DUGAN was drafted and mustered into Company D., October 8th, 1862.  Hew was killed at the battle of Spottsylvania, May 12th, 1864.

p. 424: Private John EARLE (Veteran) was a resident of Somerset, Massachusetts, and was mustered into Company H, February 18th, 1865.  He was a farmer by occupation, and was nineteen years of age.  He died at New Haven, march 7th, never having joined the regiment.

p. 405: Private Ludwig EHLERT was a native of Germany.  He was drafted in the conscription of 1863, and was assigned to Company G, into which he was mustered, July 10th.  He was a clerk by occupation, and was twenty-one years of age.  He was killed at the battle of the Wilderness, May 5th, 1864.

p. 416: Corporal Thomas H. B. FALES enlisted at Washington, soon after the arrival of the Regiment at that place, and mustered into Company K, July 15th, 1861. He was by occupation a printer, and was nineteen years of age.  He was appointed corporal, October 5th, 1862.  He was killed at the battle of Salem Heights, May 3rd, 1863.

p. 394: Private John FARRELL enlisted and was mustered into Company C, August 24th, 1862.  He was wounded during the early Virginia campaign of 1864, and died from his injuries on the 5th of June, as his comrades were taking their departure for Rhode Island.

p. 403: Private John FARRELL was drafted in the conscription of 1863, and mustered into Company F, August 19th of that year.  He was wounded severely in the leg at the battle of the Wilderness, May 5th, 1864, and suffered amputation, from the effects of which he died at Washington on the 6th of June.

p. 387 - 388: Private Michael FAY enlisted from Providence in Company A, December 5th, 1861, and, after passing through the Peninsular campaign, was taken sick and died in Downesville, Maryland, September 27th, 1862.  He was by occupation a moulder, and was thirty-six years of age at the time of his enlistment.

p. 403 - 404: Private Augustus B. FRANKLIN, the son of William A. and Martha S. (Barney) Franklin, was born at North Swansey (sic), Massachusetts, February 3rd, 1840.  He enlisted in Company F, and was mustered, June 6th, 1861.  He contracted disease in the service, and was discharged, December 2nd, 1862. He died, December 15th, 1864.  Captain Sears writes of him, that he was "one of the best men in the company, and did duty for months with a dysentery for which the surgeon could find no remedy.  He never recovered from the disease, but wasted away.  He was always ready to do more than he was able to do with safety."

p. 410: Corporal John FORD was the comrade of Corporal Kelley, enlisting at the same time and from the same place.  He was an operative by occupation, and was thirty-seven years of age.  His appointment as corporal was immediately made, and he had in him the promise of a good soldier.  He fell by the side of Coporal Kelley, at the battle of Bull Run.

p. 390: Corporal Tobias A. GOLDSMITH enlisted and was mustered, August 3rd, 1862. He was a clerk by occupation, and was at the time thirty years of age.  He was assigned to Company B, and was promoted to corporal, November 13th.  At the battle of Salem Heights, May 3rd, 1863, he was reported missing.  He was probably killed in the battle.  By his fidelity and bravery he had won the good will of his comrades and the confidence of his officers.

p. 393: Corporal Richard M. GRANT enlisted in Company C from Providence, and was mustered, June 5th, 1861.  He was at this time nineteen years of age, and was a laborer by occupation.  He was also a member of the color-guard, but came unscathed from the battle in which his associate met his death.  He served faithfully through the early campaigns, but was killed at the battle of Wilderness, May 5th, 1864.

p. 416: Private Samuel W. GRAVES enlisted from Apponaug (Warwick), and was mustered into Company K, June 5th, 1861.  He was a farmer by occupation, and was nineteen years of age.  He was wounded at the battle of Bull Run, July 21st, 1861, was taken prisoner and carried to Salisbury, North Carolina. Released, May 22nd, 1862, he returned to duty with the Regiment, and went safely through the campaign of 1863.  He was killed at the battle of Spottsylvania, May 12th, 1864.

p. 409: Sergeant Henry A. GREEN was one of the original members of Company I.  He enlisted from Woonsocket, was by occupation a clerk, and was twenty-six years of age at the time of enlistment.  He was appointed first corporal, and was promoted to sergeant, August 3rd, 1862.  He was killed at the battle of Salem Heights, May 3rd, 1863.  He was a good soldier and a brave and faithful man.

p. 390 - 391: Corporal William GREEN enlisted from Scituate, and was mustered into Company B, June 6th, 1861.  He made a good soldier, and was promoted to corporal, November 1st, 1861.  He fell fighting bravely in the battle of Spottsylvania, May 12th, 1864.  He was operative by occupation, and at the time of his death, May 26th, was about thirty-nine years of age.

p. 408: Private Daniel GREENE was one of the original members of Company H, and enlisted from Warwick.  He was by occupation a laborer, and was twenty-four years of age at the time of enlistment.  He passed unhurt through the campains of the Regiment until that of 1864, in the course of which he fell into the hands of the enemy.  Captivity with its attendant exposure and privations broke his strength, and he died at Camp Sumter at some time in the month of August, 1864.

p. 407: Corporal Francis C. GREENE was one of the original members of Company H, enlisted from Warwick, and was mustered as corporal.  He was reported as missing at the battle of Bull Run.  He was taken prisoner and carried to Richmond, but beyond that he was not heard from.  He was accordingly dropped from the rolls of the Regiment as having died in the hands of the enemy.

p. 413: Private George W. GREENE enlisted from Glocester, was mustered into Company F, August 1st, 1861, and afterwards transferred to Company I.  He was by occupation a farmer, and was nineteen years of age.  He reenlisted, December 26th, 1863.  He was killed in the battle of May 18th, 1864, in front of Spottsylvania Court House.

p. 390: Corporal Richard GREENE enlisted from Scituate, and was mustered into Company B, June 6th, 1861.  He was a laborer by occupation, and was twenty-six years old at the time of his enlistment.  He was appointed corporal, October 12th, 1861.  He was taken prisoner early in the campaign of 1864, and was carried to Camp Sumter, Andersonville, where he died in August, 1864.

p. 420: Corporal Willis P. GREY (Veteran) enlisted from Providence, and was mustered as corporal of  Company E, September 15th, 1864.  He was by occupation a painter, and was eighteen years of age.  The hardships of the service broke his health, and he died in hospital at City Point, April 27th, 1865.

p. 399: Corporal John G. GRINNELL (Veteran) enlisted from South Kingstown, and was mustered into Company E, June 6th, 1861.  He was twenty-four years of age, and was a laborer by occupation.  He reenlisted, December 26th, 1863, and on the organiation of the Battalion he was transferred to Company B as corporal.  He was wounded at the battle of Opequan, September 19th, 1864, and died of his wounds, October 5th, 1864.

p. 403-404: Corporal Charles A. HAILE was a native of Ashtabula, Ohio, but at the time of his enlistment resided in Warren, where he pursued the occupation of a jeweller.  He was the son of Slade and Mary Haile.  He was one of the original members of Company G, and was twenty years of age at the time of his enlistment.  He was appointed corporal, September 30th, 1863.  He went safely through the early campaigns of the Regiment, but was shot through the left lung in the battle of the Wilderness, May 5th, 1864.  He was carried to the hospital of the 2nd division, Sixth Corps, near Fredericksburg, where he died on the day of the battle.

p. 401-402: Sergeant John C. HALL was one of the original members of Company F, and enlisted from Smithfield.  He was by occupation a machinist, and at the time of enlistment was nineteen years of age.  He was wounded at the battle of Bull Run, July 21st, 1861.  Recovering from his injury, he was promoted to corporal, October 11th, 1861, and, assigned to the color-guard, went bravely through the Peninsula campaign.  He was promoted to sergeant, February 22nd, 1863.  Soon afterwards he was taken sick, and died on the 16th of March.

p. 384: Second Lieutenant Charles D. HAMMETT, Jr., was born in Jamestown, Rhode Island, March 29th, 1843.  He was appointed acting master's mate in the United States navy in the summer of 1861, and was on board the steamer Winona at the passage of Forts St. Philip and Jackson and the capture of New Orleans.  He was also present at the passage of Vickburg, in the summer of 1862.  Mr. Hammett resigned his position in the navy, October, 1862.  He was drafted in the summer of 1863, and was assigned to Company D in the Second, being mustered, November 19th of that year.  He was discharged from the Second, April 11th, 1864, and was commissioned second lieutenant in the Third Rhode Island Cavalry, to date from March 18th.  He proceeded to Louisiana to join his regiment, but was never mustered.  He fell sick, and died in St. James Hospital, New Orleans, September 13th, 1864.

p. 409: Private Patrick HEAVEY enlisted from Providence, and was mustered into Company H, December 6th, 1861.  He was a laborer by occupation, and was thirty-eight years of age.  He died, October 23rd, 1863.

p. 408 - 409: Private Thomas HENNESSY enlisted from East Greenwich, and was mustered into Company H, June 6th, 1861.  He was a laborer by occupation, and was twenty-seven years old at the time of enlistment.  He fell ill of disease of the lungs in the winter of 1861-62, and died at Camp Brightwood, February 4th, 1862.  He was buried with military honors.  Chaplain Jameson speaks of him as having been 'esteemed a good soldier by his officers and comrades.'

p. 405: Private Albert HINDS enlisted from North Kingstown, and was mustered into Company G, March 5th, 1862.  He was a farmer by occupation, and forty-two years of age.  He was killed at the battle of Spottsylvania, May 12th, 1864, after passing unhurt through the earlier campaigns.

p. 391 - 392: Private Albert B. HUNTER enlisted from Providence, and was mustered, October 6th, 1861, and was assigned to Company B.  He fell a victim to the severities of the Peninsular campaign, contracted typhoid fever, and died at Harrison's Landing, Virginia, August 9th, 1862.  He had the best of care, but his strength was too much exhausted to throw off the disease.  He bore the reputation of a true man and a good soldier.

p. 399: Corporal Stephen HOLLAND was one of the original members of Company E.  He was a weaver by occupation, and enlisted from South Kingstown.  He was at once appointed corporal.  He was killed at the battle of Bull Run, July 21st, 1861.  He was thirty-four years of age.

p. 400: Private Job H. HUNT enlisted from North Kingstown, and was mustered into Company E, June 12th, 1861.  He was a peddler by occupation.  He died at Hagerstown, Maryland, November 4th, 1862, at the age of twenty years.

p. 416: Corporal John W. HUNT was one of the original members of Company K, and enlisted from East Greenwich.  He was at once appointed corporal.  He was by occupation a farmer, and was nineteen years of age.   He went safely through the campaigns of 1861 and 1862, and died of disease, April 11th, 1863.

p. 411: Corporal George Barney HUTCHINSON, the only child of Cyrus B. and Mary A. (Dodge) Hutchinson, was born at Slatersville (North Smithfield), March 12th, 1840.  He enlisted at Woonsocket, and was mustered into Company I as corporal, June 6th, 1861.  The exposure and fatigue attending the battle of Bull Run, July 21st, 1861, proved to be too severe for his strength, and he was accordingly discharged on account of physical disability, on the 13th of October following.  He returned to Slatersville, where he died of consumption, August 15th, 1862, and was buried with military honors in the village cemetery.

p. 416 - 417: Private Patrick ISLAND enlisted from Smithfield, and was mustered into Company K, October 29th, 1861.  He was a farmer by occupation, and was twenty-two years of age at the time of enlistment.  He spent the winter at Camp Brightwood, was taken down with typhoid fever at the beginning of the Peninsular campaign, and died in Washington, May 29th, 1862.

p. 400: Private Henry L. JACQUES enlisted from South Kingstown in Company E, and was mustered, June 6th, 1861.  He was a fisherman by occupation, and was forty-three years of age at the time of his enlistment.  He was wounded and taken prisoner at the battle of Bull Run, and soon afterwards died, as is supposed, at Richmond.

p. 388: Private James B. JORDAN enlisted from Warwick, and was mustered into Company A., June 5th, 1861.  He was killed in the battle of Seven Pines, June 25th, 1862, by a bullet which struck his breastplate and drove it into his breast.  He was a very quiet, inoffensive man, faithfully doing his duty without forwardness or pretension of any sort.  He was a farmer by occupation, and at the time of his death was twenty-nine years of age.

p. 420: (Veteran) Private William JORDAN enlisted from Providence, and was mustered into Company D, October 31st, 1864.  He was by occupation a laborer, and was eighteen years of age.  The exposure of military life impaired his health, and he died in hospital at Baltimore, February 10th, 1865.  He was buried at Baltimore.

p. 409 - 410: Corporal Thomas J. KELLEY was one of the original members of Company I, and enlisted from Woonsocket.  He was a tinman by occupation, and was twenty-six years old at the time of his enlistment.  He was at once appointed corporal. But his military life was of short duration.  He was killed at the battle of Bull Run, July 21st, 1861.

p. 392 - 393: Sergeant Caleb B. KENT, son of Hezekiah and Celia B. Kent, was born in Seekonk, Massachusetts, (now East Providence) April 12th, 1840.  At the opening of the war he was a teamster by occupation, and twenty-one years old.  He was one of the original members of Company C, and enlisted at Providence.  He was appointed corporal, August 1st, 1861, and sergeant, May 17th, 1863, for gallant conduct at the battle of Salem Heights, May 3rd, 1863.  In the skirmish between the outposts at Funkstown, Maryland, July 12th, 1863, he was badly wounded, and was taken to the hospital at Frederick City, where he died, July 25th.  His parents attended upon him while at the hospital, and had the satisfaction of being present at the time of his death.  He was a brave and faithful soldier.

p. 407: Sergeant James A. KING (Veterans) was also one of the original members of Company H, and was mustered, June 6th, 1861.  He enlisted from Warwick.  He was by occupation, a laborer, and was twenty-three years of age.  He was appointed corporal, April 1st, 1863.  He was wounded at the battle of Salem Heights, May 3rd, 1863, and on recovery was assigned to the color-guard, November 17th, 1863.  He reenlisted, December 26th, 1863, and, upon the organization of Captain Rhodes's Battalion, he was transferred as corporal to Company C.  He was promoted to sergeant, December 16th, 1864.  Sickness came upon him during the winter or early spring, and he died in hospital at Philadelphia, May 15th, 1865.  His promotions and reenlistment are the testimony to his faithfulness.

p. 388: Private Ambrose W. LAWTON enlisted in Company A from Warwick, was mustered, June 5th, 1861, at the age of thirty years.   He was an operative by occupation, went unwounded through the battles of the first two years, and was killed at the battle of Spottsylvania, May 12th, 1864.  He is described as a willing and kindhearted man.

p. 388: Private Henry C. LAWTON enlisted in Company A from Scituate, Rhode Island, and was mustered, June 5th, 1861.  He was a farmer's boy, but eighteen years of age.  He was wounded in the battle of Bull Run, July  21st, recovered and returned to his duty.  He died April 7th, 1863, of chronic diarrhea.

p. 388: Private John F. LAWTON enlisted in Company A from Scituate, and was mustered, August 11th, 1862.  He was eighteen years of age, and like his comrade came from the farm.  His bodily strength was unequal to the demands of a soldier's life, and he died, November 12th, 1862.

p. 405: Private James E. LEWIS was one of the original members of Company G, and enlisted from Bristol.  He was a mason by occupation, and was thirty-four years of age.  He went faithfully through the campaigns of the Regiment in 1861, 1862 and 1863, but was killed on the second day of the battle of the Wilderness, May 6th, 1864.

p. 409: Private Thomas LEWIS, the son of Foster and Phebe Lewis, was born, March 8th, 1841.  He enlisted in Company G of the Ninth Rhode Island, May 26th, 1862, and after being mustered out, September 2nd, 1862, at the expiration of his term of service, returned to peaceful pursuits.  He was drafted in the conscription of 1863, and was mustered into Company H, July 9th.  Upon the reorganization he was transferred to Company B.  He was severely wounded at the battle of Opequan, Sepember 19th, 1864, and died of his wounds in the course of the following night.  A letter published in the Providence Journal of the 8th of October speaks of him as follows: 'Private Lewis was a quiet, unassuming young man, and, during his fourteen months with us, he, by his gentlemanly deportment in camp and his true soldierly bearing upon the battlefield, won for himself the esteem and respect of both officers and men of his Regiment.'  His loss was deeply and sincerely deplored.

p. 392: Private William D. LITTLEFIELD was one of the original members of Company B.  He was a laborer by occupation, and at the time of enlistment was twenty-one years of age.  He enlisted from Scituate, and passed unhurt through the campaigns of 1861 and 1862, until the battle of Salem Heights, May 3rd, 1863, where he was killed while bravely fighting.

p. 406: Private Jerry LUTHER, Jr., enlisted from Bristol, and was mustered into Company G, June 5th, 1861.  He was a cooper by trade, and was nineteen years of age at the time of his enlistment.  He was a youth of rare intelligence and fine character, and at the beginning of the Peninsular campaign was detailed to the corps of engineers, as an assistant to Lieutenant O. G. Wagner.  While standing near a table on which Lieutenant Wagner was making drawings, in front of the enemy's works at Yorkstown, April 18th, 1862, a shell from one of the enemy's guns struck near the table, and, on exploding, a fragment wounded young Luther so severely as to cause his death in the course of a few hours.  He was taken to the hospital of the 26th Pennsylvania regiment, and every possible care was given him, but without avail.  His body was interred near the lines.  He was a young man of excellent promise.

p. 419: Private Hugh MALCOLM was a resident of Cranston, and was mustered, September 2nd, 1862.  He died on the 30th of the same month, while on the way to Washington.  He was a laborer by occupation, and was forty years of age at the time of his death.

p. 383: First Lieutenant Joseph S. MANCHESTER, born in Bristol, the son of Luther and Sarah P. Manchester, was one of the original members of the Regiment, and on being mustered in was appointed first sergeant of Company G.  He was promoted to second lieutenant of the same company on the 22nd of July, 1861, and resigned on the 11th of December in the same year.  He reentered the service, September 6th, 1862, as sergeant-major of the Seventh Rhode Island, was severely wounded in the battle of Fredericksburg, December 13th, 1862, was promoted to second lieutenant of Company B, January 7th, 1863; to first lieutenant, March 1st, 1863, and resigned, July 26th, 1864.  He died in Providence, of consumption, May 4th, 1872.  As his strength permitted, he was a gallant and faithful soldier.

p. 420 - 421: (Veteran) Corporal James MANSELL enlisted from Providence, and was mustered into Company E, September 15th, 1864.  He was a laborer by ocupation, and eighteen years of age.  The record does not give the time of his appointment as corporal.  He was severely wounded at the battle of Sailor's Creek, April 6th, 1865, and died of his injuries two days after the battle.

p. 388: Private George MARDSEN was one of the original members of Company A, and enlisted from Coventry.  He went safely through the service until the last compaign.  He was killed at the battle of Spottsylvania, May 12th, 1864.  He was twenty-nine years of age at the time of his enlistment, and was by occupation a weaver.

p. 406: Private Henry MARLAND was a native of England.  He enlisted and was mustered into Company G, June 6th, 1861.  He was an operative by occupation, and was thirty-one years of age.  He belonged to the pioneer corps in the autumn of 1863.  He passed unhurt through the early campaigns, but was killed at the battle of the Wilderness, May 5th, 1864.

p. 413: Private James MARTIN was one of the original members of Company I, and enlisted from Albion (Lincoln).  He was an operative by occupation, and at the time of his enlistment was nineteen years of age.  He went unhurt through the early campaigns of the Regiment, but was dangerously wounded at the battle of Spottsylvania, May 12th, 1864, and died on the 15th in hospital.

p. 389: Private Harrison G. MATTESON (Veteran), brother of Corporal Matteson before mentioned, enlisted at the same time with his brother.  He went faithfully through his three years of service, reenlisted and was transferred to Company A of the Battalion.  He was wounded at the battle of Spottsylvania, May 12th, 1864, and was mustered out of service, December 27th, 1864.  He has died since the war, from the effects of his injuries.

p. 386: Corporal Stillman T. MATTESON of Company A was a resident of Scituate, and enlisted, August 1st, 1861.  He was a clerk by occupation, and twenty-four years of age at the time of his enlistment.  He was appointed corporal, August 20th.  He died in hospital in the city of New York, June 9th, 1862. He is described as an intelligent man, a good comrade, and, as a soldier, remarked for his quiet and unobtrusive faithfulness.

p. 400: Private George H. MAXFIELD enlisted from Bristol, and was mustered and assigned to Company E, November 15th, 1861.  He reenlisted, December 26th, 1863, and was killed, May 5th, 1864, at the battle of the Wilderness.  He was a laborer by occupation, and was eighteen years old at the time of his enlistment.

p. 394: Private James McCABE enlisted from Olneyville in Company C, and was mustered, June 5th, 1861.  He was an operative, and was twenty years of age at the time of enlistment.  He was wounded at the battle of Bull Run, July 21, 1861, and was taken prisoner.  Released in May, 1862, he returned to duty with the Regiment.  He was afterwards reduced by sickness, and died, November 15th, 1863.

p. 417: Private William McCANN enlisted from Newport, and was one of the original members of Company K.  He was an operativve by occupation, and was twenty years of age.  He was wounded at the battle of Bull Run, July 21st, 1861, was taken prisoner and carried to Richmond, where he died on the 31st of July.

p. 420: (Veteran) Private John McELROY enlisted from Providence, and was mustered into Company D, October 31st, 1864.  He went safely through the winter campaign, but was killed in the battle of Sailor's Creek, April 6th, 1865.  He was a laborer by occupation, and was eighteen years of age at the time of his death.

p. 377: Captain Joseph McINTYRE was a resident of Pawtucket, and entered upon military service as second lieutenant of Company H, in the Fifth Rhode Island Heavy Artillery, November 11th, 1862.  He was promoted to first lieutenant, February 14th, 1863, and on the 17th of the same month was promoted to Captain, transferred to the Second, and assigned to the command of Company E.  He was with the Regiment during the campaigns of 1863, and fell at the battle of the Wilderness, May 5th, 1864.  His military record was honorable, and he died calmly and bravely, with his face to the foe.

p. 404: Private Thomas McKAY, 2nd, was a native of Ireland, was drafted and mustered into Company F, July 10th, 1863.  He was a laborer by occupation, and was twenty-one years of age.  He was transferred to Company B of the Battalion, was taken prisoner in the campaign of 1864, and died in July of that year at Camp Sumter, Andersonville.

p. 394: Private Andrew McLANE enlisted from the same place with private Murphy, and was mustered into Company C on the same day.  He was a seaman by occupation, and was twenty-one years of age.  He was killed at the battle of Salem Heights, May 3rd, 1863.

p. 392: Private William H. MEDBURY was also one of the original members of Company B, and enlisted from Foster.  He was a jeweller by occupation, and was twenty-eight years of age at the time of enlistment.  He went safely through the battle of Bull Run and the Peninsular campaign, but at the battle of Malvern Hill, July 1st, 1862, he was taken prisoner.  He was carried to Richmond, where he afterwards died.

p. 421: (Veteran) Corporal Alexander MILLS was a native of Canada, and served nine months, from October, 1862, to July, 1863, in the Twelfth Rhode Island.  He was mustered into Company E, September 15th, 1864.  He was an operative by occupation, and was eighteen years of age.  The time of his appointment as corporal does not appear upon the record.  He was killed while gallantly advancing to the assault of Petersburg, April 2nd, 1865.

p. 389: Private Christopher MINER enlisted in Company A from Warwick, and was mustered, June 5th, 1861.  The severities of the Peninsular campaign were too much for his physical strength.  He died in hospital at Washington, District of Colombia, November 18th, 1862.  He was an operative by occupation, and was nineteen years of age at the time of his enlistment.

p. 385: Sergeant Sanford E. MOON of Campany A enlisted as a private from Warwick, and was mustered in, June 5th, 1861.  He was promoted to corporal, August 20th, 1861, and to sergeant, February 22nd, 1863.  He was a fearless and gallant soldier, and, always ready for duty, did not hesitate in times of emergency to volunteer for any perilous service that was required.  He was shot in the battle of Salem Heights, May 3rd, 1863, and was at first reported missing.  But he was never seen alive by his comrades afterwards, and doubtless died before the battle was over.  He was a farmer by occupation, and at the time of his enlistment was twenty-two years of age.

p. 417: Private Edward T. MORSE was also one of the original members of Company K, and enlisted from Providence.  He was nineteen years of age at the time of enlistment.  He was killed on the 21st of July, 1861, at the battle of Bull Run.

p. 417: Private Daniel MOWRY enlisted from Providence, and was mustered into Company K, October 16th, 1861.  He was a sailor by occupation, and was nineteen years of age.  He died in Washington, December 18th, 1863.

p. 417: Private Patrick J. MULLEN was mustered into Company K, June 18th, 1861.  He enlisted from Providence, was a bricklayer by occupation, and was nineteen years of age.  He was killed at the battle of Bull Run, July 21st, 1861.


Second RI Regiment Continued


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