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 Cornwall Cheese and Butter Board

 

HISTORY OF THE CORNWALL CHEESE AND BUTTER BOARD
 

      Mr. Benning has been a member of the Cornwall Cheese and Butter Board since it was organized, twenty-one years ago, and has been a patron of the Glendale Cheese Factory. He has lately been shipping his milk to Montreal. His cattle give a daily average yield of 6,000 pounds of milk throughout the season.
       Mr. Benning's well-known sales of Ayrshire cattle are the largest and best attended cattle sales in this part of the country and are looked forward to with unfailing interest by farmers and buyers as a splendid feature in the successful breeding of high-class Ayrshire cattle.
       A glance at the accompanying photographs of the home, farm buildings and cattle of Mr. Benning, taken at "Glenhurst," his home, is ample visual evidence of the great success that has attended the efforts of our subject in his chosen calling.
       The Ayrshire breed of cattle originated in the County of Ayr, which is in Southwestern Scotland. The early history of Ayrshire reveals the fact that they were developed under adverse conditions. Much of this district is rough and


Carriage Shed and Hen House, "Glenhurst"
Carriage Shed and Hen House, "Glenhurst"

hilly, feed was scarce, pastures scant, and little care was given to livestock. These conditions resulted in the development of a hardy, thrifty type of cattle, as only the more vigorous animals were able to exist. The native stock was improved by crossing with other breeds and by the selection of the best of these. It is claimed that Dutch cattle were first used with a view of increasing the milk flow; later, Shorthorn and Alderney blood was infused, which improved the breed in respect to smoothness of form and quality of milk.
       The color and general characteristics of this breed are quite distinct. Red and white, or brown and white, is the prevailing color. The two colors are distinct and do not blend to form a roan. The very striking feature of the Ayrshire is the rather long, large horns, which, as a rule, curve outwards and upwards, and, in most cases, slightly backwards.
       The size of the Ayrshire is medium, ranking between the Jersey and Holstein- Friesian. Mature cows will weight about 1,000 pounds and. upwards, and bulls approximately 1,500 pounds.
       Cows of this breed have produced excellent yields of milk, and Mr. Benning's Torrs Connie 3rd shown in the photograph is a superior type of this breed. Ayrshires are also noted for the splendid quality of their milk. Coupled with this

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