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We usually meet in the fellowship hall at
Peace United Church of Christ located at 2714 West Market Street
in Greensboro just off W. Wendover Avenue. The fellowship hall is located in the rear of the building.
Park in the back and enter the door nearest N. Lindell Road. Click here for a map showing our meeting location.

Meetings are held at 10:00 a.m. on the third Saturday of the month, January through May and September through November. GCGS's genealogical exchange journal library is open for members to check out some other societies' journals from 9:00 a.m. until noon on meeting days. Regular meetings usually conclude about 11:30 a.m. Non-members are always welcome to attend these free programs.
In case of bad weather see our Inclement Weather Notice on our home page.



Scheduled GCGS Meetings:

  • 19 November 2016 - Peggy Johnson will perform "My Name's Elizabeth: The Story of a War Mother, 1861-1863." Peggy, dressed in period costume, becomes her ancestor, Elizabeth, and tells her captivating story based upon letters from those years. She comes to us highly recommended, so you won't want to miss a dynamic performance.

    December - no meeting




Other Genealogical Events of Interest:
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  • 14 January 2017 (Saturday), 10 am to noon - "March on an All-American City", Lecture Gallery, High Point Museum, 1859 E Lexington Ave, High Point, NC 27262. Phyllis Bridges, noted local historian, will talk about how the Civil Rights Movement unfolded in the city of High Point. She will approach the subject by explaining the different roles assumed by African Americans as they mobilized to advance the cause of equality. Her short presentation will be followed by an encore showing of her documentary film The March on an All-American City (released in November) which emphasizes the irony of a national honor being awarded the city at the same time that gross injustices were highlighted by civil rights activists. For further information, contact the Museum at (336) 885-1859
  • 21 January 2017 (Saturday), 3:00 to 4:00 pm - "Allen Jay and The Underground Railroad", The Heritage Research Center of the High Point Public Library, 1st Floor Morgan Room, High Point Public Library. Josh Brown, minister at Springfield Friends and editor of the Autobiography of Allen Jay, will explain how the noted Quaker luminary was inspired to become involved in the Underground Railroad and the defeat of the slave system. Quakers were active in helping escaped slaves through and out of Piedmont North Carolina to find safe haven elsewhere. After the War, Jay promoted education for the freedmen and encouraged Quaker social activism in many other areas. Jay's name is commemorated in the name of a local school and rec center. Learn about the ideas that inspired a young man to take risks for others and promote freedom and equality. For further information, contact the library at (336) 883-3637.
  • 27 January, 10 February, 3 March 2017, 10:30am to noon - WINTER BOOK CLUB - "A Traffic in Souls: The Inhuman Business of Slavery", The Heritage Research Center of the High Point Public Library, Book Lover's Room, 3rd Floor. It is impossible to understand the durability and the heartlessness of slavery without understanding the economic situation driving it. How did the institution hold on for so long in America in spite of democratic ideals? Money and the profit motive had a great deal to do with it. Participants will read Master of the Mountain, which looks at the slaveholding of Thomas Jefferson from a business standpoint, and/or The Half Has Never Been Told. Contact Larry at (336) 883-3637 or larry.cates@highpointnc.gov before January 15, 2017 to get involved.
  • 12 February 2017 (Sunday), 3:00 to 4:00 pm - "Slave Research: An In-Depth High Point Case Study", The Heritage Research Center of the High Point Public Library, 1st Floor Morgan Room. HRC staff will focus on a family who settled in High Point just after slavery ended and trace it back to its plantation roots (along with the white slaveholding family) while providing historical context for the great changes that shaped the destiny of newly-freed people. The idea is to empower participants with knowledge about how to analyze plantation, estate, court, deed, and other records in order to develop a fuller picture of pre-1865 African American ancestors. Illustrated with charts and photographs. For further information, contact the library at (336) 883-3637.
  • 15 February 2017 (Wednesday), 10:00 to 11:00 am - "Slavery and the Mendenhall Plantation", Lecture Gallery, High Point Museum, 1859 E Lexington Ave, High Point, NC 27262. George C. Mendenhall of Jamestown inherited slave property through his wife's relations. But his conscience directed him to find a way to help them gain skills and find freedom. Mary A. Browning, prominent local historian and genealogist, will discuss Mendenhall's struggle to disentangle himself from slavery in spite of restrictive laws enacted in North Carolina, widespread hostility of fellow citizens, and divisions within the Mendenhall family. She will also discuss efforts to trace Mendenhall's freedmen and their descendants. Sponsored by the Museum Guild. Free and open to the public.
  • 25 February 2017 (Saturday), 1:00 to 2:00 pm - "The Digital Library on American Slavery",Lecture Gallery, High Point Museum, 1859 E Lexington Ave, High Point, NC 27262. The Digital Library on American Slavery contains unique, detailed information extracted from legislative and county court petitions, runaway slave ads, slavery-era insurance registries, slave deeds, and slave trade voyages. Buried in these documents are names and other data on over 200,000 individuals including slaves, free people of color, and whites. In his presentation, Richard Cox, Digital Technology Consultant at UNC-Greensboro Libraries, will demonstrate how to search the database and review what can be found within all of that information, as well as answer any questions participants may have about the contents and use of the database.
  • 25 March 2017 (Saturday), 2:00 to 4:00 pm - "Genetic Genealogy: Basic Science and Real Life Case Studies", Lecture Gallery, High Point Museum, 1859 E Lexington Ave, High Point, NC 27262. Bryana Campbell of 23andMe presents hour one with a basic overview of the science behind genetic genealogy and how it can be useful in overcoming some of your brick walls. She will also introduce participants to the 23andMe DNA test offerings. Larry Cates follows in hour two with a series of case studies taken from his own research using his own and his father's autosomal DNA results. Y-DNA results will also be used to show how he reached certain genealogical conclusions using the test results of total strangers.
  • 21 April 2017, 5 May 2017, and 26 May 2017, 10:30 to noon - SPRING BOOK CLUB, "Southern Friends: The Call to Conscience in a Hostile World", The Heritage Research Center of the High Point Public LibraryBook Lover's Room, 3rd Floor. Many areas of the South were at first seen as a refuge for Quakers escaping persecution in New England and Great Britain, but Southern ideas about hierarchy, gender roles, deference, and slavery ultimately drove a deep wedge between the Church and society. This session will examine the strategies Quakers used to remain true to their ideals while living in a sometimes hostile world. Contact Larry at (336) 883-3637 or larry.cates@highpointnc.gov to get involved.
  • 24 April 2017 (Monday), 6:30 to 7:30 pm - "Thomas Day, Cabinet Maker: Man in the Middle", The Heritage Research Center of the High Point Public Library, 1st Floor Morgan Room. Thomas Day (1801-c. 1861) was a highly-successful free African-American cabinet maker based in the Piedmont of North Carolina. His striking and innovative designs still inspire awe among furniture and antiques collectors. But his life and work were complicated by many competing antebellum social forces: black and white, slave and free, North and South, Africa and America, art and craft. This dynamic presentation by Laurel B. Sneed, film-maker, educator, and researcher, will analyze the historical evidence, savor Day's legacy in wood, and explore the mystery of Thomas Day and his workshop. This program is sponsored by the North Carolina Humanities Council and the National Endowment for the Humanities. For further information, contact the library at (336) 883-3637.
  • 7 May 2017 (Sunday), 3:00 to 4:30 pm - "Roads Less Traveled" - (Basic Genealogy III), The Heritage Research Center of the High Point Public Library, 1st Floor Morgan Room. Expert genealogist Timothy Rackley, well-known for his publications concerning the Tar River section of North Carolina, will lead us through a variety of sources that are frequently overlooked by genealogists including county court records, tax records, school censuses, coroner's records, and others. For further information, contact the library at (336) 883-3637.
  • 10 - 13 May 2017 - STOP THE PRESS! HOLD THE PHONE! The National Genealogical Society Conference is coming to Raleigh in 2017. Stay tuned here and to the NGS website.
  • 5 June 2017 (Monday), 6:30 to 7:45 pm - "Military Records for Genealogy" (Basic Genealogy IV), The Heritage Research Center of the High Point Public Library, 1st Floor Morgan Room. Military records exist at both the state and national levels and include a great variety of document types from combined service records to unit diaries and log books to pension files, bounty land grants, muster rolls and pay rolls. Learn the basics with Marcellaus Joiner of the HRC. For further information, contact the library at (336) 883-3637.
  • 19 June 2017 (Monday), 6:30 to 7:45 pm - "Suspicion and Sacrifice: High Point During World War I", The Heritage Research Center of the High Point Public Library, 1st Floor Morgan Room. 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of America's entry into World War I. Discover the surprising facts about High Point's mobilization. The war effort brought out valor, thrift and self-sacrifice among those who remained at home, but it also agitated suspicions and tensions among various social groups, dampened free speech, and involved a great deal of propaganda and lock-step regimentation. High Point's experience was similar to that of the nation at large. Learn the surprising facts with Larry Cates of the HRC. For further information, contact the library at (336) 883-3637.
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