Newspaper & Documents write-ups about Carleton County People

Carleton County HomePage

The Carleton Sentinel, The Dispatch and The Press Newspapers were published
in the Town of Woodstock, N.B.

Page 42

Press Newspaper Dec 19, 1887
A bad smash-up occurred at Jacksonville Wednesday afternoon. William True was driving up the Third Tier Road with a team and truck, when a dog ran out and frightened the horses, and started them off on the run, jerked the reins from the driver's hands and threw him and two small children who were on the wagon with him out. C. W. Connell was driving out the same road in a light wagon, and the team ran up before he saw them and crashed into the hind part of his carriage, broke the hind wheels and smashed the seat and box. Mr. Connell was leaning forward for his whip at the moment, and thereby narrowly escaped being seriously hurt.
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Press Newspaper Dec 19, 1887
COUNTY COURT
Court was opened Tuesday, 13th instant, Judge Stevens presiding.
The Grand Jury were Geo. W. Melville, forman: Nelson Baker, H. R. Baird, John Van, William Gibson, Bradford Palmer, William Skillen , James Rankin, Archibald Ebbett, Thomas Brooks, Francis Cluff, Charles Grant, John A. Shea, John J. Rogers, William Taylor, Robert Stephenson, Leonard Cronkhite, Thomas Duncan, Alexander Kearney, David Hemphill.
The first criminal case was the
Queen vs. John Norman Watson. There were three indictments against the defendant for obtaining goods under false pretences: 1st, from Small & Fisher; 2nd, Marshall A. Smith; 3rd, George N. Clark; upon all true bills were found. The defendant pleaded not guilty. Application was made by defendants counsel to put off trial, on the ground of want of material witnesses, and trial was postponed till March Term. S. B. Appleby for the Crown, and J. R. Murphy for defendant.
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CIVIL DOCKET
Frederick W. G. Brock and Robert B. Patterson vs. Carrie Dawson. Murphy & Foster file writ. S. B. Appleby for defendant. Verdict for plaintiff, $55.56.
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J. N. W. Winslow
vs. C. P. Nevers. Plaintiff enters writ. This case was settled without being brought to trial.
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J. N. W. Winslow
vs. Sidney Hubble. Settled.
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George Connell
vs. F. R. J. Dibblee. Plaintiff enters writ. Struck off the docket for non-appearance when called upon.
...
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Frank Bradley
vs. Geo. W. Boyer. D. McLeod Vince enters writ. Wm. M. Connell for defendant. Writ withdrawn and settled.
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Charles S. Simonds vs. Wm. Weade. Action of trespass for overflow of water on plantiffs land by dam built by defendant. One of the defences was, that although the dam was built by defendant, yet it did not cause the damage claimed, but that it was caused by plaintiffs own act. Verdict for defendant. Fisher & A. B. Connell enter writ. A. B. Connell counsel for plaintiff. D. McLeod Vince counsel for defendant.
.....
Application was made by
Joseph W. Curtis, formerly of the State of Maine, now of the Parish of Kent, for naturalization under Chap.113, Rev. Statutes of Canada. Upon presenting the affidavits and certificates required by the Act, and upon motion of Wm. M. Connell as counsel for applicant, a certificate of naturalization was granted.
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Press Newspaper Sept 27, 1887
UPPER WOODSTOCK
(Excerpts)
Hubert Brown, who for the past two months has been at work on the Goverment stables in Fredericton, returned home Saturday. Mr. B. informs us that the stables are about completed.

Napier Hartley, son of Rev. G. T. Hartley, and who for some time has been head clerk for G. R. Ketchum, M. P. leaves on Wednesday for Fredericton, where he purposes taking a course of instruction in the University.

Wm. McIntosh, of this place, raised one of the finest squash vines in the county this season. Of several of its progeny, one was a mammoth squash, weighing 46 lbs. and measuring 55 inches one way and 52 the other, in circumference.

Joshua Crawford, one of our highly esteemed citizens, whose veracity we cannot for a moment question, has discovered what he claims to be a fresh water lobster, in Sisson Brook, just below this village. Since discovery Mr. Mr. C. pays frequent visits to the brook, hoping, no doubt, by a more intimate acquaintance he may persuade his crustacean friend to accompany him to the coming County and Provincial Exhibition.
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Press Newspaper Sept 27, 1887
Andrew Murdoch has added a new attraction to his Shooting Gallery on Queen street; it is a New York novelty , and known as the Fountain or Fly Glass Ball Battery.
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Press Newspaper Sept 27, 1887
William H. Nelson has opened a Barber Shop on Queen St., next to the Press office.
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Press Newspaper July 12, 1887
Marriages
Strickland-Ross.-
At Bangor, Me., June 28, by the Rev. John McGan Foster,
Franklin V. Strickland, Woodstock, to Miss May Ross, of Bangor, Me.
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Press Newspaper July 12, 1887
Clark-Ebbet.-At the residence of the bride's father, Ashland, June 25th, by Rev. A. H. Hayward, Mr. John H. Clark , of Ashland, Carleton Co., and Miss Ella M. Ebbet, of the same place.
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Press Newspaper July 12, 1887
McDougall-Scott.-At the residence of Mr. Albion C. Tompkins, in the Parish of Aberdeen, Carleton Co., on the 6th inst., by the Rev. J. K. Beairsto, Mr. John F. McDougall of Woodstock, to Miss Mary E. Scott, of Glassville.
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DEATHS
Press Newspaper July 12, 1887
Rockwell.-At Waterville, Carleton Co., on the 19th of June, Mary Ann Rockwell, wife of Alexander Rockwell in the 64th year of her age, leaving a husband , three sons and two daughters to mourn their loss.
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Press Newspaper July 12, 1887
Shaw.-At Victoria Corner, Carleton Co., on the 5th inst., of typhoid fever, Mary, wife of E. M. Shaw, and oldest daughter of the late John McLeod, of Cardwell, Kings Co., aged 45 years and 7 months.
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Press Newspaper Sept 27, 1887
Fire caught in the barn of Joseph Robinson, Newburgh Junction, last Monday afternoon. There being no means of extinguishing the flames, the fire soon caught in the other buildings, and all were consumed. The buildings burned included house, barn, granery and hog-pen. Two hogs perished in the flames. The barn was full of hay and grain, and in the granery Mr. Robinson's lumbering kit, worth about $400, was stored, and all was lost. The total loss was between $2500 and $3000. He was insured in the Liverpool, London and Globe on the property burned for $1200.
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Press Newspaper Nov 8, 1887
Peter Ryan's barn at the Lower Corner took fire about 3:30 p.m., Sunday afternoon, and before it could be reached by the firemen was too far gone to be saved, though they were promptly on the ground. It contained about forty tons of hay, all of which was burned or destroyed. There was no insurance. It is supposed to have caught from matches, with which children were playing near the barn. The members of the Hose Company wish us to return thanks on their behalf for courtesies extended to them by the citizens in the vicinity of the fire.
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Press Newspaper Sept 27, 1887
Joshua Corkery informs us that he intends reopening his Meat Shop at the old stand on Main St., the latter part of the week, and will be prepared to supply his customers with all the choicest meats that the country can produce. He desires to correspond with any one having good fat animals to dispose of.
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Press Newspaper Nov 8, 1887
A COMFORTABLE STABLE
One of the neatest and most comfortable stables that we know of is that of
Wellington B. Belyea, which he recently had fitted up under the architectural attention of Mr. Swyney, The whole interior of the building is finished with spruce, matched, beaded and stained; the walls and ceiling of the same material. The carriage room is capacious and neat. The boxes are roomy and fitted up with cast iron feed boxes, a barred window in each to admit sufficient light, and a cast iron grating on the sides of the entry admits a free circulation of air. The feed slides extend three feet above the upper floor to prevent dust from sifting in the stalls. A store room and harness room complete the apartments. In the whole arrangement good taste is displayed by the proprietor and good workmanship by the contractor.
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Press Newspaper Aug 22, 1892
Marriages
Ledingham-Roberston.-
At the Manse Kincardine on the 4th inst., by Rev. A. F. Johnson, Peter Ledingham of Kintore, to Isabelle Elizabeth Robertson, of Kintore Abredeenshire, Scotland.
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Press Newspaper Aug 22, 1892
Cronkite-Rolston.- At Woodstock, on the 8th inst., by Rev. C. T. Phillips, Mr. Fred Cronkite and Miss Lizzie Rolston, both of Northampton, York County.
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Deaths
Press Newspaper Aug 22, 1892
Scott.- At Glassville, August 12th, of inflamation of the brain, Bessie Mabel, daughter of Robert and Susan M. Scott, aged 3 years, 3 months and 19 days. " Suffer the little children to come unto me, and forbid them not; for such is the Kingdom of God."
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Press Newspaper Aug 22, 1892
McNichol.-At Kincardine, on 5th inst., of Senitr Decay, James McNichol, late of Aloa Scotland, in the 67th year of his age.
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Press Newspaper Aug 22, 1892
Whorton.-At Maple Hurst, in the Parish of Kent, on the 10th inst., of Diabetes, Mr. Spencer Whorton, in the ?0th year of his age.
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Press Newspaper Aug 22, 1892
Dingee.-At East Glassville, August 15th, of Billous Fever,
Philomeda, daughter of Arrard Dingee, aged 34 years. She bore her severe sufferings during her protracted illness with Christian fortitude, and died trusting in Jesus.
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Press Newspaper Aug 22, 1892
Kitchen.-At the residence of his sister, Jesse Snow, on the 8th of August, Samuel B. Kitchen, of Bloomfield, Carleton County, in the seventy fifth year of his age.
Asleep in Jesus, blessed sleep,
From which none ever wake to weep.

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Press Newspaper Aug 22, 1892
Armstrong.-At Perth, Victoria County, on Aug.1st, Mr. Stillman Armstrong, aged 77 years. He was born in Nova Scotia and came to the province when he was 17 years of age. A widow and nine children survive him. He was a kind husband and father, and the large number present at his funeral showed that he was esteemed as an honest and good neighbor. ( Intelligencer and Sentinel please copy. )
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Press Newspaper Aug 22, 1892
Chipman.- At Fountain, Colorado, U. S. A., on the 17th inst., F. McC. Chipman, aged 27, oldest son of Rev. Alfred and Alice Shaw Chipman.
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Press Newspaper Aug 22, 1892
Brooks.-At Lower Brighton, on the 3 rd inst., Norman L., infant son of Leonard and Lizzie Brooks, aged three weeks. " Of such is the the Kingdom of Heaven." ( Intelligencer and sentinel please copy.)
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Press Newspaper Aug 22, 1892
Brown.- At Lower Brighton, on the ?th inst., Alice J., aged sixteen months, only daughter of Norris Brown.
" Safe in the arms of Jesus." ( Intelligencer and Sentinel please copy.)
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Press Newspaper July 25, 1892

TOWN TAXES 1892   Those Who Contribute to The Town Fund,
to the Amount of $30.00 or More, This Year
.
 
Balmain Bros. $51 00 ...Thos. J. Boyer $45 70
Wm. Forest $65 10 ...James Dugan $45 70
J. Ebbett $36 54 ...Patrick Gillen $96 70
C. Estey $32 44 ...Hugh Hay 170 16
James Hayden 350 70 ...W. Fisher $34 99
W. F. Glidden $34 48 ...John Loane $40 60
Wm. Loane $46 72 ...Mrs. Munro $49 47
Forester McLean 176 26 ...John McLauchlan $76 30
C.P.R. Co. $51 00 ...Merchants Bank $45 90
Dr. Smith (estate) 131 58 ...Albert H. Sawyer $71 40
Jas. H. Wilbur $88 54 ...Geo. N. Saunders $47 74
John Walker $31 42 ...Ansley Watson $44 68
J. T. Allan, Est. $80 58 ...Robt. Brown $40 80
W. B. Belyea 107 92 ...Jas. Boyd $56 92
Mrs. Boyer $34 68 ...Bank of Nova Scotia $45 90
C. Connell, Est. 391 17 ...G. H. Connell, Est. 131 07
Wm. M. Connell 153 82 ...C. P. Connell, M.D. $44 68
A. B. Connell $37 54 ...N. R. Colter, M.D. $40 60
J. Corkery $41 62 ...J. C. Cole $65 59
Jas. Carr $37 54 ...E. J. Clarke $41 62
T. Duncan $49 80 ...Herbert Dibblee $46 21
Thos. Donoho $43 66 ...L. P. Fisher 938 62
John Fisher 186 97 ...A. Gilman $48 76
A. Henderson $44 68 ...R. K. Jones 137 50
R. B. Jones $43 66 ...George R. Kitchen $51 00
Wm. Lindsay 177 30 ...J. S. Leighton, Est. $68 34
Abram Marsten $56 92 ...J. C. Milmore $82 93
Mrs. R. Maxtead $37 74 ...J. R. Murphy $40 60
B. B. Manzer 175 75 ...Hugh Montgomery $44 88
M. McManus $39 07 ...John McDonagh $33 97
John McCormac $36 52 ...John McAffee $39 58
Wm. McDonald $48 76 ...H. N. Payson $37 03
W. S. Saunders $86 50 ...Mrs. Trewan $40 80
W. B. Taylor $36 52 ...Chas. Turner $32 44
Daniel Thompson 104 86 ...Rev. T. Todd $40 80
Jas. Watts $34 48 ...John Whenman $50 80
James Wolverton $33 22 ...R. S. Bull $74 26
C. H. Bull, Est. $46 92 ...E. M. Boyer $36 01
Geo. Bull, Est. $51 00 ...John Connor $36 01
H. A. Connell 227 26 ...W. P. Craig $30 40
E. H. Craig $39 58 ...W. F. Dibblee 147 72
Charles D. Dickenson $57 94 ...J. T. Allen Dibblee $84 46
Duncan Dickenson 137 50 ...James E. Drysdale $30 40
W. T. Drysdale $91 60 ...Mrs. Hugh Davis 102 00
Electric Light Co. $61 20 ...W. H. Everett $72 22
D. A. Grant $73 24 ...John Graham 108 94
Hilman Hanson $32 44 ...W. B. Jewett $70 80
Owen Kelly $44 70 ...R. B. Ketchum $43 86
D. F. Merritt $38 56 ...Fred Moore $70 38
Miles C. Moore $83 44 ...Mrs. D. F. Merritt $35 70
P. McAnna $38 56 ...B. H. Smith $127 32
Duppa Smith $49 78 ...G. W. Slipp $49 78
Henry Upham $105 37 ...G. W. Vanwart 152 80
Chas Vanwart $33 46 ...E. W. Williams $55 90
J. N. W. Winslow 120 14    

Press Newspaper Jan 16, 1888
While Daniel Appleby was working behind a horse in his brother's stable, near the corner of Main and Albert streets, Wednesday noon, he received a very serious kick in his face and throat. His lower jaw was badly smashed___one piece, with three teeth, being knocked out___and the jaw bone splintered up. His face was fearfully cut, and a bad gash cut across his throat. Drs. Sprague and Smith attended him, and succeeded in getting the bones wired into place. He is doing well as can be expected, and it is hoped that he may recover. The horse, it is said, is a quiet one, but it is supposed that the tine of the fork, with which Mr. Appleby was working, must have reached his heels.
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Press Newspaper Jan 2, 1888
John McGuire, Newburg, while hauling logs Friday, Dec. 23 rd, got his leg broken. Peter Gallagher, of the same place, on Saturday, 24th, fell on the ice and broke his arm. Dr. Colter attended both cases.
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Press Newspaper Jan 2, 1888
Bradford Walker was tried before police magistrate Dibble Friday, for stealing one dollar out of the cash till in the store of W. F. Dibblee & Son, found guilty and sentenced to three months in jail.
Alex.
McIntyre, and William Albert were tried by the same for attempting to rescue Walker from the constable, found guilty and also sentenced to three months each in the County jail.
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Press Newspaper Jan 30, 1888
Last Monday morning while Fred, son of Charles Good, Lindsay, was hitching a team in a sled, he received a severe kick on the head, which fractured the skull. He was unconscious until Dr. Colter arrived and took out several pieces of bone, and relieved the pressure on the brain. He is recovering.
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Press Newspaper Jan 30, 1888
Lewis Smith, who has been ailing since the Annual Drill at St. Andrews last Summer from a fracture of the ankle received at that time, left last Wednesday morning for Boston to receive medical treatment.
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Press Newspaper Jan 30, 1888
Mrs. W. F. Glidden was the lucky winner of the silver tea service ( four pieces ) given by the Wizard Oil Co. at their concert Friday evening. The service is valued at $40, and without doubt, is the handsomest present given away by the Company while here.
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Press Newspaper Nov 15, 1887
DROWNING ACCIDENT
Whilst
James Morrisey, aged 13 years, with some of his playmates, were skating on the Creek opposite the upper end of Connell St., last Wednesday morning about half past seven o ' clock, the ice gave way, and he went under and was drowned. An alarm was quickly given, and the father of the lad, who was first at the scene succeeded, though with great difficulty, in finding the body, and with great risk of his own life on the tender ice, got it to land. Medical aid was immediately summoned and every possible effort made to revive life, but all in vain.
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Press Newspaper Oct 18, 1887
Last Thursday morning, while Willie McDonagh was attempting to mount the cowcatcher of a train on which he was brakeman, he slipped and fell on the track and broke his leg. He narrowly escaped being run over.
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Press Newspaper Oct 18, 1887
Two barns on the Cunningham place, Jacksonville, belonging to Barry Emery, were burned Sunday about 10 o'clock, a.m. The barns were filled with hay and grain, and Mr. Emery's loss will be heavy. No insurance.
On the afternoon of the same day fire caught in the roof of
Thomas H. Sawyer's house, but was extinguished before much damage was done.
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Press Newspaper Aug 1, 1892
Marriages
Caldwell-Hamilton.-
At Champion, Mich., July 11th, by Rev. J. Betts,
Miss Blanche Hamilton, formerly of Florenceville, N.B. to Casper Caldwell of Matchwood, Mich. They have left for Matchwood where they intend to reside.
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Press Newspaper Aug 1, 1892
Deaths
Tompkins.-
15th inst.,
Edgar, infant son of Murray and Hannah Tompkins, aged one year and two months.
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Press Newspaper Aug 1, 1892
McLean.-At Woodstock, on the 27th June, after a long illness, Alice, aged 16 years and seven months, second daughter of James and Kathleen McLean. This young sister made a public profession of faith in Christ more than a year ago, and until to ill and weak to attend prayer-meeting and Y. P. C. E. was always ready to testify her love for the Saviour. A general favorite among her young friends and in her home, many were the prayers offered for her recovery, but God gave her a better gift than health, He gave her life forevermore.-C.T.P.
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Press Newspaper Aug 1, 1892
Norrish.-At Eau Claire, Wisconsin, July 1?th, 1892, Carrie E. Norrish, aged 18 years 8 months, 29 days; youngest daughter of Rufus and Caroline Snow, formerly of Middle Simonds, Carleton County, N.B.
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Press Newspaper Aug 1, 1892
Crangle.-At Everett, Mass., Saturday, July 18th, William Crangle, aged 84 years.
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DEATHS

Press Newspaper June 27, 1892
Jenison.-At New Bedford, Mass., on the 25th May, after a lingering illness, Annie M. beloved wife of Charles ? Jenison, aged 31 yrs, and 11 mo. leaving a husband and three children to mourn their loss, deceased was a daughter of Frederick and Margaret Shaw of Lower Wakefield, N.B. ( Sentinel please copy.)
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Press Newspaper June 27, 1892
Fletcher.- At Newburg on the 21 st. inst., Mr. Daniel Fletcher aged 78 years. He was honest, faithful and esteemed by all who knew him. He was faithful over a few things he will he made ruler over many things.
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Press Newspaper July 19, 1887
COUNTY COURT
The County Court for Carleton County opened Tuesday, Judge Stevens presiding. There were only three cases brought up for trial, and they occupied the Court only till Wednesday noon.
The Grand Jury were__
Alexander G. Lindsay, foreman; Bradford Palmer, Charles H. Bull, Wm. Kennedy, Matthias Watson, Wm. Taylor, Benjamin Everett, Amos W. Rideout, W. B. Belyea, John C. Gibson, John Hamilton, Robert B. Jones, William Glidden, Geo. Wolhaupter, James Harvey, George Brewer, Bedford Manzur, Hugh Davis, Albert Brewer, Frederick Dickinson and Alexander Gillmor.
A true bill was found against Francis Terry for larceny.
CRIMINAL DOCKET
The
Queen vs. Francis Terry. Indictment for stealing $34 from the dwelling house of Cyrus Vanwart. The prisoner was found guilty, and sentenced to three years in the Dorchester Penitentiary. S. B. Appleby for the prosecution.
CIVIL DOCKET
Charles A. Harmon vs. Samuel Rideout. Verdict for plaintiff amount of claim, $174.52. D. McLeod Vince for the plaintiff; undefended.
The Queen, at the instance of the
Overseers of the Poor, vs. Wellington Hannington. The court refused to hear the cause, on the ground that the authority from the Overseers to make the complaint and issue the warrant should appear on the face thereof, which the Justice who issued the paper had failed to insert. Wm. M. Connell for the Overseers, and D. McLeod Vince for the defendant.
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Press Newspaper June 28, 1887
Wedding Bells
On Friday evening last the ceremony that joined together in holy wedlock,
Mr. B. Rrock Vail, of Jacksonville, and Miss Hannah E. Mallory, only daughter of John Mallory, Esq., was solemnized at the residence of the bride's father, Jacksontown. The attendants of the bride and groom were Miss Ethel Riley and Mr. Arch Plummer, Jr. At 8 o'clock as the bridal party, who looked beautiful, proceeded down stairs and through the hall, a wedding march was rendered. Rev. George Howard performed the ceremony in the presence of a large number of invited guests. The bride wore a cream colored nun's veiling with train, festooned with satin and oriental lace, with corsage and sleeves trimmed with the same material. A long tulle veil with natural flowers, with gold ornaments, completed the charming costume. The bridesmaid wore a white dress, with lace trimmings and white flowers. After the ceremony, and a short season for the usual congratulations, the guests sat down and partook of an excellent wedding feast. After spending a pleasant social evening, and the many beautiful presents inspected and admired, the guests dispersed, wishing the happy couple every enjoyment and success through life. As the happy couple left the house to take their carriage, they were showered with rice. Much credit is due to Mrs. Henrietta Churchill, whose skill as a dressmaker was well shown in the style of dress.
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Press Newspaper Aug 23, 1887
More Mysterious Fire
Hanford Wolhaupter, of Bloomfield, writes us date of August 13th:
"In your issue of the 9th instant I read with much interest of the mysterious fire that occurred lately in the house of R. C. Hoyt, Woodstock. It brings vividly to my mind a subject of which I was an eye witness. My father's family consisted of seven persons. I was at the time I have reference to nearly twenty years of age, and remember the circumstance as well as though it happened yesterday. It occurred in the year 1834, I think; we resided in Richmond, Carleton County. There would be fire start up in four, five or six places, all at once, in different parts of the house, up in the chamber and in different rooms. We all took part in extinguishing these at the time, and in a few minutes we would observe a number more in different parts of the house. At last we all became quite alarmed, and could not arrive at any conclusion of the cause. Rev. Samuel Joll was stationed Wesleyan Minister at Woodstock at the time, and expressed the belief that these singular fires would be followed by strong spiritual manifestations, which soon proved to be the case."
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Carleton Sentinel Newspaper August 27, 1887
The Boston Provincialist of last week says:
Woodstock, N.B. gave the Boston Herald material for a half column article this week, in which it was stated that the town was excited over a haunted house. Woodstock has been troubled with all the isms and ists in existence in the past few years, and it is time for the spooks to come. But we are convinced the spooks went from Boston two weeks ago on a fishing excursion. Humbuggery is their stock in trade.
Our contemporary is rather gratuitous in his flings. If Woodstock has been at all troubled in the direction mentioned more than other towns, it is because of its proximity to the United States, and as regards the gentlemen apparently referred to, they came to Woodstock after the last fire manifestation in the " haunted house , " so that they could not have raised but may have laid the Ghost.
Perhaps the Provincialist don't like the gentlemen, because most of them are Provincialists.
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Press Newspaper Aug 2, 1887
THE BURGLARS ARRESTED
Tuesday was a busy day in police circles. On Monday evening
Town Marshal Snow received a telegram from Detective Ring, St. John, requesting him to arrest three young suspicious looking boys, who were wanted in the city for various high crimes and misdemeanors. The Marshall quiclky " spotted " the culprits, and they were soon lodged in the improvised Lock-Up on Water street. Detective Ring arrived in the morning, and was much gratified to learn that his birds were caged. Even robbers must eat___consequently the Town Marshal escorted the three notable juveniles to the W. C. T. U. Coffee Room, where they made havoc with all edibles within their grasp. Up to this time everything was running smoothly according to standard time, and had it not been for the kindly consideration of the Marshall, the worthy trio might have sooner arrived in the " city of fog." The Marshall, deeming the cell they had occupied not well ventilated and rather limited in dimensions, had them placed in a large and airy cell. Lodged in their new and comparatively comfortable quarters, the three St. John notables began to reconnoitre, and soon discovered that the wicket offered a favorable means of egress for the smallest of their number. Herbert Smith, who had seen ten Summers come and go, instantly passed through the portal of hope, secured the key, which was hanging ready, released his companions, who unscrewed the inside bolts of the main door, and their's was freedom. Consternation was visible on the faces of the Town Marshal and St. John Vidocq, when they discovered that the prisoners had escaped.
An immediate chase was the result. A posse of constables was mustered and a search was instituted in every direction, over highway, byway, intervale, woodland, and highland. All the efforts of the searchers proved unavailing. Carriages were secured, and numerous excursions made in the suburbs and surrounding rural districts with the same lamentable result__failure to discover the where-abouts of the quondam prisoners. Finally intelligence reached Detective Ring that the culprits had travelled a circuitous route, skirted the woods, crossed over to Grafton, had stolen a boat, and were then slowly drifting with the tide towards Fredericton. With renewed hope and courage Detective Ring, accompanied by Detective Gaynor, drove down the main river road. When some four miles below Town, the team was stopped, and Detective Gaynor jumped out to interrogate a farmer, when he perceived three heads slowly emerging from a field adjoining the road.
In stentorian tones he informed Detective Ring that he had discovered the objects of their search, started in immediate pursuit, and collared two of the desperadoes. Detective Ring, as soon as he had recovered from the effects of the amazing intelligence, uttered a war-hoop, and started at a fearful gait after the most diminutive of the trio, whom he soon nabbed.
The gang were taken to Woodstock, and Detective Ring, whose confidence in the retaining capacity of the lock-up had been somewhat shaken, determined for the future to keep the desperadoes under his individual surveillance. A room in the third storey of the Wilbur House was engaged for their sole use, where they were safely incarcerated. Detective Ring, still mistrusting their mischievous proclivities, removed their clothing; and left them attired in Nature's garb. The worthy trio concluded that to attempt an escape in such plight would be futile, and they betook themselves on an excursion into slumberland. In the morning they were manacled together, and under the charge of the Detective, whose vigilance after his story experience in Woodstock never relaxed, boarded the morning Express for St. John, where they safely arrived.
The names of the young law breakers are :
John Ward, Walter Currie and Herbert Smith, aged respectively seventeen, sixteen and ten years. They are accused of burglarizing the stores of Chas. Baillie and Mr. Rogers, situated respectively on Charlotte and Dorchester streets, St. John on or about the 1st of July. Hearing that Detective Ring was on their trail, the decamped for Bangor, where they pilfered a watch and some money from the cabin of a schooner. After many adventures and delays they reached McAdam on their return, and untimately concluded to try their fortunes in Woodstock with above narrated result.
It was a melancholy sight to see culprits so young in the custody of the law. The many crimes commited by juveniles in the Province demonstrate clearly the New Brunswick sorely requires a juvenile reformatory, where culprits so young will not be exposed to futher temptation, or rendered worse in their downward career by their contact with hardened criminals in the penitentiary and jails. The time is also meet for the Town to erect or provide a suitable lock up, as the place at present utilized for a jail is insecure and altogether unadapted for the purpose.
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Press Newspaper July 12, 1887
Stephen Jones' mill at Upper Woodstock was burned down last Friday about noon. The fact that the mill had not been operating during the season, and was advertisesd for sale at the public auction, under a mortgage, at the hour the fire occurred causes comment. Mr. Edgecombe, the mortgagee, came up from Fredericton on Saturday, and had Mr. Jones arrested on suspicion of incendiarism. He was brought before Police Magistrate Dibblee Monday morning at 10 o'clock; Messrs. Murphy & Foster appeared for the complainant, and A. B. Connell for the prisoner. On application of Mr. Connell the case was adjourned till Tuesday morning at 9.30 o' clock.
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Press Newspaper July 19, 1887
The examination of Stephen Jones at the Police Court last week, for setting fire to his mill, resulted in his discharged from arrest.
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Press Newspaper July 26, 1887
Gillmor's mill, near Bristol, was totally destroyed by fire last Tuesday. The loss will be severely felt in the locality, as well as being a severe blow to the owners. The property was valued at $7,000, and had $2,500 insurance.
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Press Newspaper July 19, 1887
The Gibson House is now under the management of J. H. Wilbur. The name of the hotel is changed to the Wilbur House. Mr. Wilbur, who is a native of Bathurst, has had many years experience in the hotel business, and is well and favorably known by the travelling public. We bespeak for the new house the same liberal patronage extended for so many years to the long established Gibson House.
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Press Newspaper July 26, 1887
As Daniel Lee stepped from his carriage at the Wilbur House, last Monday, his foot lit on a small round stone, turned quickly, and broke his ankle. He has to use crutches and an accident insurance policy now.
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Press Newspaper July 26, 1887
Jeremiah Holt, conductor on the Northern Division of the N. B. R., has received the lantern which he won at the Catholic Bazar held at Vanceboro last year. It is unique in design and finish, and cost about $50.
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Press Newspaper July 26, 1887
Sabine, the eleven year old son of James Carr, went to spend his Summer holidays with his uncle, John McBride, in North Richmond, and had a happy time till Wednesday morning, when coming too near the mowing machine which a young man was operating in the field, his foot caught in the cutter-bar and was badly mangled, and nearly severed from the leg. He had to be brought home, a distance of fifteen miles, before surgical aid could be procured. Doctors Connell and Colter were summoned, andd found it necessary to amputate the foot about an inch above the ankle. Though the poor little fellow's suffering must have been intense, he bore it all very manfully. He is now doing as well as could be hoped for, and looks pleasantly at his misfortune.
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Press Newspaper July 19, 1887
Whilst Charles Scott, Hartford, was mowing Thursday morning, the machine struck a stone, tipped and threw Mr. Scott on the cutter bar. Fortunately a hammer for which he was reaching at the moment, caught in the gear and broke it, preventing the cutters from doing him serious injury. He was very badly-bruised, and his left arm was pierced by a guard. he held on to the reins with one hand, and stopped the horses after going about fifteen rods.
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Press Newspaper July 19, 1887
Messrs. Patrick and Vincent Kelly are erecting a large three story building on the vacant lot adjoining the Town Scales on Broadway.
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Press Newspaper July 19, 1887
Dr. Smith lost a horse last Sunday week from conjestion of the lungs, brought on by being over-heated riding in a close car from Camp St. Andrews.
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Press Newspaper July 19, 1887
Joseph R. Porter's fine residence at River de Chute was destroyed by fire last week. Insured in the London and Mercantile for $1000.
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Press Newspaper July 19, 1887
The masonry surrounding the entrance to the Post Office is now completed, and presents a solid and attractive appearance. Hugh Hay, Esq., was the contractor.
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Press Newspaper July 19, 1887
H. A. Savage, of Williamstown, and Isaac Stephenson, Woodstock, after spending four weeks in their native province, start for the West again today.

Press Newspaper Aug 9, 1887
MYSTERIOUS FIRE
Is It Spontaneous Combustion
The people of this town are greatly excited over the strange and inexplicable scenes which for the past three days have been enacted in a little
two story frame dwelling, on Victoria street occupied by Reginald C. Hoyt, a picture frame dealer who does business on Main street, a few doors above the Wilbur House. His family consisting of his wife, five children and two neices, are in a state of mental fear, dread and anxiety. Since eleven o'clock Friday morning no less than forty fires have broken out in various parts of the house, and bedding, furniture, window shaded, clothing and various household articles partially destroyed. Only a untiring vigilance has prevented the house and its contents from being burned to the ground, and this would also have caused the destruction of other wooden buildings in the vicinity. These fires can be traced to no human agency and even the scientists are staggered. Without premonition and with no lamps, lights or stoves in use, various articles would burst out into flames. Now it would be a window curtain high up out of reach, then a bed quilt in another room would begin to smoke and smoulder and as if to still further nonplus the theorists a carpet covered lounge was found to be all afire underneath among the jute stretched above the springs. A basket of clothes in the shed burst into flames and the basket itself was partially consumed. A little child's dress hanging on a rack, a feather bed, a straw mattress, and other articles in the same room were ignited and would have been consumed but for the water copiously poured upon them. The news spread quickly that Hoyts house was haunted and great crowds flocked to the scene.
It became the all absorbing subject of conversation, and all sorts of theories were hastily set up as to the cause, but most of them were as hastily swept away.
The mysterious fire catching was witnessed by several citizens whose authority may be relied upon as to the actual outbreaking of fire without any visible cause.
Saturday afternoon a Boston Herald reporter arrived in town and at once proceeded to investigate the mystery. He was accompanied by half a dozen gentlemen who were detailed to interview the various members of the family separately and to examine every nook and corner of the house and every article in it. These gentlemen were Mr. A. C. Titus of Newport, R.I., Mr. Charles M. Raymond and Mr. D. G. Markham of Providence, R. I., Mr. C. M. Raymond, H. G. Wells, George J. Raymond, H. C. Anderson and Max J. Raymond of Boston. The search was thorough and revealed a strange sight. In every room partially burned garments, sheets and articles of furniture were lying around drenched with water and walls and ceilings blackened and smoked. The children were huddled about their mother, everyone dreading another visit from the fire spook and anxiously glancing about. There was no evidence, whatever, discovered of human agency in any of these fires nor could the Herald reporter by a most rigid cross questioning elicit any information tending to clear up the mystery. On the contrary it was discovered that fire had on one occasion broken out when no one was in the house, Mr. Hoyt returning home from a neighbors, where he had taken his family, to find a bed on fire.
Mr. Hoyt is a sober industrious man and bears a good reputation. His property is not insured and he seems greatly agitated over the strange visitations of fires which have ruined his home and are literally driving him out of doors. The house is insured but is not owned by Mr. Hoyt.
The most satisfactory explanation of the origin of the mysterious fire would seem to be this. A few weeks ago an inmate of the house is said to have been attacked with typhoid fever and after recovery, quantities of sulphur were used as a disinfectant up to a recent period. The fumes from the burning sulphur impregnated the cotton articles around and bad ventilation and the peculiar state of the atmosphere contributed to bring about the mysterious breaking out of fire in sundry articles A paralell case occurred in a provincial town in the north of England some years ago.
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Press Newspaper Aug 16, 1887
Reginald Hoyt, whose residence on Victoria street was the scene of the recent mysterious fires, states that since the 7th instant he has been un molested by the fire spooks.
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Press Newspaper Aug 9, 1887
DROWNED
A sad drowning accident occurred here on Tuesday morning. It appears from facts gleaned that
Frank Mott, Havelock Ervin and Arthur Hay, aged respectively eleven, ten and seven years, were bathing in the river, near the Boat House, when Frank Mott, who was unable to swim, got beyond his depth. Ervin instantly jumped in, and heroically swam out to save his companion, who, having lost his presence of mind, seized him with desperate energy around the body, and both sank. Hay, who was surprised at the disappearance of his companions beneath the surface, waited a few moments, hurriedly dressed, and gave an alarm. Chas. English, who resides in the neighborhood, immediately sprang in, and after diving, succeeded in recovering the body of Ervin. A large concourse of people had now assembled on the scene. The Boat House was broken into, a boat launched, and the other body, which was in deep water, brought to the surface and rescued by Mr. English. Both bodies were placed on the shore, and among the first arrivals were the agonized fathers of the drowned boys. Medical assistance was summoned, and Drs. Connell, Smith and Sprague were soon in attendance. Every effort, however, to reanimate the cold and lifeless bodies proved unavailing. The unfortunate boys were the sons of A. S. Mott, merchant, and Leonard Ervin, locksmith.
The funerals were held simultaneously on Wednesday afternoon, and were largely attended. The deceased were members of the Methodist Sunday School and Juvenile Templars, and over a hundred children representing those bodies, were in attendance. Impressive services were conducted by Revds. T. J. Deinstadt and C. T. Phillips. In the cemetery each of the children present placed a beautiful floral offering on the graves of their former companions.
The parents of the deceased have the sympathy of the whole community in their sad bereavement.
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Press Newspaper July 26, 1887
James E. Parker, who had been doing an apparently thriving business here in gents' furnishing goods for the last two years, has not been around since the 15th inst. The stock was held under bill of sale by his two brothers until last Saturday morning, when the Sheriff, on behalf of D. Magee's Sons, St. John, and under the authority of an order from Judge Palmer, made seizure and closed the shop. The amount of his indebtedness, though not yet definitely known, is said to be large.
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Press Newspaper Aug 9, 1887
The Sheriff held an Inquisition in Cole's Hall, on Tuesday last, to determine whether or not the claimant, John T. Parker, had any right or title to the goods seized by him for the creditors of James E. Parker. C. A. Stockton, Esq., appeared for the creditors, and A. B. Connell, Esq., for J. T. Parker.
The following Jury was sworn and empanelled : Col. C. W. Raymond, P. Gillin, Jas. Boyd, E. Williams, J. T. Fletcher, C. H. Bull and Hugh Montgomery. After claimant had closed his case, the Court was, on motion of Mr. Stockton, adjourned until Wednesday. Mr. Stockton produced considerable circumstantial evidence tending to show that it was impossible for J. T. Parker to accumulate any money, and the Jury found adversely to his claim.
On Thursday the claim of
Hedley Parker in re James E. Parker, an absconding debtor; was inquired of. C. A. Stockton and A. B. Connell appeared respectively for creditors and claimant.
The Jury empanelled were: Chas. McLean, foreman; Geo. Hale, Jonathan Harding, John Fisher, Jas. Campbell, W. H. Everett and James Drysdale. The Jury, after a short deliberation, found for the creditors. Both matters will be brought before the Supreme Court by certiorari.
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Press Newspaper Sept 6, 1887
William Magee, Lower Brighton, on going to his stable Sunday morning, Sept 28th, found that some one had been there before him, and taken his mare, a very valuable one, and buckboard and harness. He afterwards ascertained that a person well known in the vincinity by the name of Joseph Wyman, had been seen with the rig the previous evening about 11 o'clock, that he had met with an accident by which he had to leave the vehicle, but proceeding he got another from the premises of Mr. Bradley, and went on his way. Mr. Magee started in pursuit, and after pretty thoroughly searching the upper part of Carleton and adjacent parishes of Victoria, found that he had very nearly reached his man at Gordonville. On Wednesday morning he came, weary but still resolute, to Woodstock, and was getting out a warrant for the miscreant, when a telegram was received that the horse and wagon were captured. We understand that Mr. Wyman is also wanted to answer for a similar depredation committed in Limerick, Me., some months ago.
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Press Newspaper Sept 6, 1887
Two noticeable additions to the local fleet of pleasure boats are being made.
Alexander Dunbar
is building a neat little steam yacht, 20 feet keel and 4 1/2 feet beam; it will be propelled by a three-horse power engine, which will drive it quite fast enough for pleasure. Mr. Dunbar and son are doing all the work about the boat and machinery, except the propeller and other castings.
S. T. Baker is building a canoe, which will be a model of beauty and lightness; the ribs are made of white ash and the covering is basswood; it is 16 1/2 feet long, 3 feet wide, and will weigh when completed only about 75 lbs.
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Press Newspaper Aug 9, 1887
Samuel Watson, constable, Upper Woodstock, was taken suddenly ill Wednesday evening, and continued getting worse till Saturday morning, when he died. The funeral took place Sunday afternoon, when the body was followed by a very large procession to its final resting place. Mr. Watson was a prominent member of the Orange fraternity.
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Press Newspaper Aug 9, 1887
Edward Craig has secured the contract for the erection of the new Roman Catholic Church at Houlton, Me., and has commenced operations.
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Press Newspaper Aug 9, 1887
John Belyea, Upper Woodstock, who has been employed for some time in St. John, was summoned home by telegraph on Wednesday last, on account of his sick child. Before he arrived on the evening train the little one died. Much sympathy is felt for the parents, who have so suddenly been bereft of their only child.
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Press Newspaper Sept 6, 1887
Timothy Collins, South Richmond, who was a few years ago sentenced to fourteen years confinement in Dorchester Penitentiary, died at the institution of cholera a few days ago.
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Press Newspaper Aug 16, 1887
A Cheese Factory will soon be erected at the junction of the Connell Road with the Seventh Tier Road, on Hazel Brook, near the residence of Daniel McGrath. Cheese factories have proved paying investments throughout the County.
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Press Newspaper Aug 9, 1887
A new post-office has been established at Bull's Creek, about four miles below Woodstock, and Byron Bull appointed postmaster. The Lower Woodstock post-office is moved two miles further down, with A. Wilmot Hay as postmaster. James Broad has been appointed postmaster at Holmesville.
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Press Newspaper Aug 23, 1887
Marriages
Smith-Morehouse.-In the Methodist Church, Perth, on the 24th inst., by Rev. W. E. Johnson, B.A.,
Mr. George E. Smith, of Woodstock, to Mary H. daughter of Augustus Morehouse, Esq. Perth, Victoria Co.
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Press Newspaper Aug 23, 1887
Deaths
McCormic.-At Charleston, Carleton Co., on the 23rd inst.,
Merril, beloved child of Geo. and Angeline McCormic, aged 3 mos. and 10 days.
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Press Newspaper Aug 23, 1887

W. E. Crandlemire Business Ad, Mount Pleasant .
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Press Newspaper Sept 20, 1887
Hugh McCain's barn, Chester, was destroyed by fire on Tuesday last, with fifty tons of hay and four hundred and fifty bushels oats. No insurance.
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Press Newspaper Sept 20, 1887
Fred. G. Foster, son of Geo. F. Foster, Deputy Sheriff, who went to Washington Territory last February, writes home very encouragingly, and sent his father a birthday present of $100.
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Press Newspaper Sept 20, 1887
A horse belonging to W. F. Thornton, of Hartland, strayed from his pasture on the west side of the river Saturday. Any information leading to his recovery will be suitably rewarded.
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Press Newspaper Sept 20, 1887
George Mallory, Jacksontown, sold a valuable three-years old colt last week to J. A. S. Mott, of St. John. Mr. Mallory has raised several fine horses lately, and made very satisfactory sales.
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Press Newspaper Sept 20, 1887
Julius S. Hartt, formerly of Upper Woodstock, son of Rev. Aaron Hartt, has been elected to a Music Professorship in the Ontario College of Southern California. He left Old Orchard on the 8th inst. for his new charge.
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Press Newspaper Sept 20, 1887
Stephen Flewelling, who was much injured in the knee by a fall while working on the new building of F. Moore, is steadily recovering, and it is hoped after a few weeks will fully recover. Dr. Connell is in attendance.
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Press Newspaper Sept 20, 1887
A fire alarm was sounded at noon Saturday, caused by a spark catching on the roof of the residence of W. White, Central street. The Hose Company were quickly on the scene, but the fire had been extinguished before they got there.
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Press Newspaper Sept 20, 1887
William H. Boyd and wife, of Kings Lynn, Norfolk, England, were at the Wilbur House Thursday and Friday. They occupied their time in viewing the country, and were pleased with the beautiful scenery and evidences of fertility that they witnessed.
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Press Newspaper Sept 6, 1887
John McBride, Oakville, got the fore finger of his right hand caught in the cogs of his reaper last Wednesday; it was jammed so badly that he had it taken off at the first joint. Dr. Hanson, of Houlton , dressed the wound.
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Press Newspaper Sept 6, 1887
The Silver Caster for the best three shots during the month of August, at A. Murdoch's Shooting Gallery, on Queen street, was won by Allan Emery with a score of 30 points, the highest possible score that could be made. The prize for Sept. will be a handsome oil painting, framed in black walnut.
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Press Newspaper Sept 6, 1887
Mr. Tattersall, of Woodstock, and Miss Fannie Murdock, St. Stephen, were made one in the latter place last week. The St. Croi? Courier wonders at the success of our young men with the fair sex of Charlotte. It is easy when you know how.
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Press Newspaper Aug 16, 1887
The Drinking Fountain is now in course of erection in the centre of Main street, at the junction of Water and King streets. The fountain is of Dorchester freestone, and was constructed by J. S. Seaton, St. John, in accordance with designs made by W. B. Chapman, of Woodstock. A golden Victoria Cross will surmount the fountain, which will be about 12 feet in height, and from the angles of the cross the jets will fall. Owen Kelly has the contract for laying the foundation, and J. Gallagher & Son are superintending its erection. In a future issue we may give an accurate description of the fountain, which owing to Councillor Doherty's untiring exertions, is a fait accompli.
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