The Annals of Mide and Brega
The Middle Kingdom


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Background on Mide and Brega

The Middle Kingdom refers in this context to the ancient Irish territories referred to as Mide and Brega, which very roughly equate to the modern counties of Meath and Westmeath respectively.


Mide & Brega - The Annals

The annals cite:
  • For 432, Ath Truim was founded by St. Patrick, it having been granted by Fedhlim, son of Laeghaire, son of Niall, to God and to him, Loman, and Fortchern.
  • For 453, A great defeat was given by Laeghaire to the Leinstermen.
  • For 457, The battle of Ath Dara was fought against the Leinstermen by Laeghaire, son of Niall. Laeghaire was taken in that battle; and Laeghaire took oaths by the Sun and the Wind, and all the elements, to the Leinstermen, that he would never come against them, after setting him at liberty.
  • For 458, After Laeghaire, the son of Niall of the Nine Hostages, had been thirty years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he died by the side of Caissi, between Eire and Alba, i.e. two hills which are in Uí Faelain; and it was the Sun and the Wind that killed him, because he had violated them.
  • For 475, Conall Cremhthoinn, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages, from whom are sprung the Clann Colmain, and race of Aedh Slaine, died.
  • For 478, After Oilioll Molt, son of Dathi, son of Fiachra, had been twenty years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was slain in the battle of Ocha, by Lughaidh, son of Laeghaire, and Fearghus Cerrbhel, son of Conall Cremththainne, among others.
  • The first year of Lughaidh, son of Laeghaire, in sovereignty over Ireland.
  • For 489, The battle of Tailtin against the Leinstermen, by Cairbre, son of Niall.
  • For 492, The battle of Sleamhain, in Meath was fought by Cairbre, son of Niall, against the Leinstermen.
  • For 494, The battle of Ceann Ailbhe by Cairbre, son of Niall, against the Leinstermen.
  • For 496, The battle of Druim Lochmaighe was gained by the Leinstermen over the Uí Neill.
  • For 500, The battle of Lochmagh by the Leinstermen, against the Uí Neill.
  • For 501, The battle of Freamhain, in Meath, against Fiacha, son of Niall, by Failge Berraidhe.
  • For 503, After Lughaidh, son of Laeghaire, had been twenty five years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was killed at Achadh Farcha, being struck by a flash of lightning, by the miracles of God, on account of the insult which he had offered to St. Patrick.
  • For 506, The battle of Luachair was fought by Cucorb against the Uí Neill.
  • For 507, The battle of Druim Deargaighe was gained against Foilghe Berraidhe, by Fiacha, son of Niall. From that time forward the land extending from Cluain In Dibhair to Uisneach belongs to the Cinel Fiachach.
  • For 513, The battle of Dedna, in Droma Breagh, by Muircheartach mac Earca, and by Colga, son of Loite, son of Crunn, son of Feidhlimidh, son of Colla Dachrich, chief of Airghialla, where Ardghal, son of Conall Creamhthainne, son of Niall, was slain.
  • For 524, The battle of Ath Sighe was gained by Muircheartach (aka Mac Earca), son of Muireadhach, son of Eoghan, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages; against the Leinstermen, where Sighe, the son of Dian, was slain, from who Ath Sighe is called.
  • For 528, The first year of Tuathal Maelgarbh, son of Cormac Caech, son of Cairbre, son of Niall, in the sovereignty of Ireland. The battle of Luachair Mor between the two Invers, which is called the battle of Ailbhe, in Breagh, by Tuathal Maelgarbh, against the Cianachta of Meath.
  • For 558, After Diarmaid, the son of Fearghus Cerrbheoil, had been twenty years in sovereignty over Ireland, he was slain by Aedh Dubh, son of Suibhne, King of Dal Araidhe, at Rath Beag, in Magh Line. His head was brought to Cluain Mic Nois, and interred there, and his body was interred at Connor.
  • For 565, A sea fleet was brought by Colman Beg, son of Diarmaid, son of Fearghus Cerrbheoil, and by Conall, son of Comhgall, chief of Dal Riada, to Sol and Ile, and they carried off many spoils from them.
  • For 572, The battle of Doete, which is called Bealach Feadha, by Aedh, son of Ainmire, against the men of Meath, where fell Colman Beg, son of Diarmaid.
  • For 595 AD, The first year of Aedh Slaine, son of the son of Diarmaid, son of Fearghus Cerrbheoil; and of Colman Rimidh, in the (joint) sovereignty of Ireland.
  • For 596, Suibhne, Lord of Meath, was slain by Aedh Slaine, at Bridamh. Suibne was the son of Colman Mor mc. Diarmoda Deirgh mc. Ferghusa Cerrbeoil mc. Conaill Cremhtainne mc. Neill Naoighiallaigh.
  • For 597, The battle of Sleamhain, in Meath, was fought by Colman Rimidh against Conall Cu, son of Aedh, son of Ainmire; and Conall was defeated.
  • For 600, After Aedh Slaine, son of Diarmaid, and Colman Rimidh, son of Baedan, son of Muircheartach, son of Muireadhach, son of Eoghan, son of Niall, had been six years in the sovereignty of Ireland, Colman Rimidh was slain by Lochan Dilmana, and Aedh Slaine was slain by Conall Guithbhinn, son of Suibhne, son of Colman Mor (or Beg), son of Diarmaid, son of Cearthall, at Loch Semhedidhe. Aedh Gustan, the foster brother of Conall, and Baethghal Bile, wounded him.
  • For 600, Conall Guithbhinn, son of Suibhne, son of Colman Mor, or Beg, son of Diarmaid, son of Cearthall, slew Aedh Roin, chief of Uí Failghe, at Faithche Mic Mencnain, and Aedh Buidhe, chief of Uí Maine, on the same day on which Aedh Slaine was slain by him.
  • For 604, Aedho Slane mc. Diarmoda Deirg mc. Fearghusa Cerrbheoil mc. Conaill Cremhthainne mc. Neill Naoighiallaigh.
  • For 607, The battle of Odhbha, by Aenghus, son of Colman, wherein was slain Conall Laegh Breagh, son of Aedh Slaine, with a great number about him.
  • For 613, Fearghus, son of Colman Mor, Prince of Meath, was slain by Anfartach Ua Meascain, of Muintir Blaitine.
  • For 616, Aenghus, son of Colman Mor, chief of the Southern Uí Neill, died.
  • For 628, The battle of Ath Goan, in Iarthar Liffe, by Faelan, son of Colman; by Conall, son of Suibhne, chief of Meath; and by Failge, or Failbhe Flann, King of Munster, wherein was slain Crimhthann, son of Aedh, son of Seanach, King of Leinster, with many others along with him.
  • For 630, The two sons of Aedh Slaine were slain by Conall, son of Suibhne, at Loch Trethin, at Freamhain, namely, Congal, chief of Breagh, ancestor of the Uí Conaing, and Ailill Cruitire i.e. the Harper, ancestor of the Sil Dluthaigh.
  • For 630, The battle of Cuil Caelain, by Diarmaid, son of Aedh Slaine, where the two sons of Aenghus, son of Colman Mor, namely, Maelumha and Colga, and some others along with them, were slain.
  • For 630, Conall, son of Suibhne, chief of Meath, and Maelumha, son of Forannan, were slain by Diarmaid, son of Aedh Slaine.
  • For 634, The battle of Magh Rath was gained by Domhnall, son of Aedh, sovereign of Ireland, and the sons of Aedh Slaine, over Congal Claen, son of Scannlan, King of Ulidia, where fell Congal, and the Ulidians and foreigners along with him.
  • For 645, The battle of Carn Conaill was gained by Diarmaid, son of Aedh Slaine against Guaire.
  • For 647, Dunchadh and Conall, two sons of Blathmac, son of Aedh Slaine, were slain by the Leinstermen, in the mill race of the mill of Maelodhran, son of Dima Cron. Marcan and Maelodhran mortally wounded the two.
  • For 649, Maeldoid, son of Suibhne, chief of Meath, died.
  • For 654, Diarmuid mc. Aedha Slaine.
  • For 656, After Conall and Ceallach, the two sons of Maelcobha, son of Aedh, son of Ainmire, had been seventeen years over Ireland, Conall was slain by Diarmaid, son of Aedh Slaine; and Ceallach died at Brugh Mic An Og.
  • For 657, The first year of Diarmaid and Blathmac, two sons of Aedh Slaine, son of Diarmaid, son of Fearghus Cerrbheoil, in the sovereignty of Ireland. Dunchadh, son of Aedh Slaine, died.
  • For 658, Ailill, son of Dunchadh, son of Aedh Slaine, died. Eochaidh, son of Blathmac son of Aedh Slaine, died.
  • For 660, A battle was gained at Ogamhain, at Ceann Corbadain, by the people of Diarmaid, son of Aedh Slaine, namely, Onchu, son of Saran, Maelmilchon, and Cathasach, son of Eimhin, over Blathmac, son of Aedh Slaine, in which were slain Conaing, son of Conall, son of Aedh Slaine; Ulltan, son of Ernaine, chief of Cianachta; Ceannfaeladh, son of Geirtidi, chief of Cianachta Arda; and Faelchu, son of Maelumha.
  • For 663, Cearnach Sotal, son of Diarmaid, son of Aedh Slaine, died, together with the aforesaid persons, of a mortality which arose in Ireland, on the Calends of the August of this year, in Magh Itha, in Fotharta.
  • For 664, A great mortality prevailed in Ireland this year, which was called the Buidhe Connail. After Diarmaid and Blathmac, the two sons of Aedh Slaine, had been eight years in the sovereignty of Ireland, they died of the plague.
  • For 665, The first year of Seachnasach, son of Blathmac, in the sovereignty of Ireland.
  • For 669, After Seachnasach, son of Blathmac, had been five years in sovereignty over Ireland, he was slain by Dubhduin, chief of Cinel Cairbre.
  • For 670, The first year of Ceannfaeladh, son of Blathmac, in the sovereignty of Ireland.
  • For 673, After Ceannfaeladh, son of Blathmac, son of Diarmaid, had been four years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was slain by Finnachta Fleadhach, in the battle of Aircealtair, at Tigh Ua Maine.
  • For 674, The first year of Finnachta Fleadhach, son of Dunchadh, son of Aedha Slain, in sovereignty over Ireland.
  • For 675, A battle was fought between Finnsneachta and the Leinstermen, by the side of Loch Gabhair; and the battle was gained over the Leinstermen.
  • For 683, The devastation of Magh Breagh, both churches and territories, by the Saxons, in the month of June precisely; and they carried off with them many hostages from every place which they left, throughout Magh Breagh, together with many other spoils, and afterwards went to their ships. For 693, After Finachta Fleadhach, son of Dunchadh, had been twenty years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was slain by Aedh, son of Dluthach, son of Ailill, son of Aedh Slaine, chief of Feara Cul, and Congalach, son of Conaing, son of Congal, son of Aedh Slaine, in a battle at Greallach Dollaith. Breasal, son of Finachta, also fell in this battle along with his father.
  • For 710, A battle was fought between two parties of the race of Slaine, wherein Niall, son of Cearnach, was slain by Flann, son of Aedh, son of Dluthach.
  • For 713, Murchadh, son of Diarmaid, son of Airmeadhach Caech, chief of Uí Neill of Clann Colmain, was slain by Conall Grant Ua Cearnaigh.
  • For 716, The battle of Ceanannus (Kells, in Meath) by Conall Grant (i.e. the Grey) Ua Cearnaigh, wherein were slain Tuathal Ua Faelchon, and Gormghal, son of Aedh, son of Dluthach, and Amhalgaidh Ua Conaing, and Fearghal, his brother.
  • For 719, Fogartach, son of Niall, son of Cearnach Sotal, was in the sovereignty of Ireland this year, until he fell in the battle of Delgean, by Cinaeth, son of Irgalach.
  • For 732, A battle was fought between two parties of the race of Aedh Slaine, wherein Cathal, son of Aedh was slain, on the east side of Lic Ailbhe, by Conaing, son of Amhalgaidh.
  • For 733, Cearnach, son of Foghartach, son of Niall, son of Cearnach Sotal, son of Diarmaid, son of Aedh Slaine, was slain.
  • For 738, The battle of Damh Dearg, in Breagh, by Indreachtach Ua Conaing, in which were slain Dungal, son of Flann, Lord of Feara Cul; and Fearghus, son of Oisteach, with many others.
  • For 739, The first year of Domhnall, son of Murchadh, son of Diarmaid, over Ireland; he was the first king of the Clann Colmain.
  • For 746, Fearghus son of Fogartach, Lord of Southern Brega, died.
  • For 758, After Domhnall, son of Murchadh, son of Diarmaid, had been twenty years in sovereignty over Ireland, he died. He was the first king of Ireland of the Clann Colmain, and he was buried at Dearmhagh Durrow with honour and veneration.
  • For 759, The battle of Dun Bile was gained by Donnchadh, son of Domhnall, over the Feara Tulach (Fartullagh).
  • For 760, The battle of Carn Fiachach was fought between the two sons of Domhnall, i.e. Donnchadh and Murchadh, and Aelghal, lord of Teathbha, wherein Fallomhan, son of Cucongalt, was slain by Donnchadh, and Murchadh was also slain, and Aelghal was defeated.
  • For 761, A battle was fought between the men of Meath and the men of Breagh, in which were slain Maelumha, son of Toithil, and Dongal, son of Doireith.
  • For 763, Niall, son of Diarmaid, lord of Meath, died.
  • For 766, Cairbre, son of Fogartach, lord of Breagh, died.
  • For 766, The first year of Donnchadh, son of Domhnall, in sovereignty over Ireland. There arose a dissention between Ceallach, son of Donnchadh, King of Leinster, and the monarch Donnchadh, son of Domhnall. Donnchadh made a full muster of the Uí Neill and marched into Leinster. The Leinstermen moved before the monarch and his forces until they arrived at Sciath Neachtain. Donnchadh, with his forces, remained at Aillinn; his people continued to fire, burn, plunder, and devastate the province for the space of a week, when the Leinstermen at length submitted to his will. Also in this year, Cairbre, son of Fogartach, lord of Breagh, and Becc, son of Connla, lord of Teathbha, and Aenghus, son of Fearadhach, lord of Cinel Laeghaire, and Artghal, son of Conall, lord of Cairbre Teathbha, all died.
  • For 770, Donnchadh, son of Domhnall, King of Ireland, mustered an army and marched it into Munster. Munster was devastated by him, and great numbers of the Munstermen were slain on that expedition. They afterwards gave him his own demand.
  • For 773, The same war continued between Donnchadh and Conghalach, during which fell Congalach, son of Conaing, chief of Breagh. Alos in this year, Niall, son of Conall Grant, chief of South Breagh, died.
  • For 774, A hosting was made by Donnchadh, son of Domhnall, into the North, so that he brought hostages from Domhnall, son of Aedh Muindearg, lord of the North.
  • For 781, The battle of Ath Liacc Finn between Donnchadh, son of Murchadh, and the race of Aedh Slaine, wherein was slain Fiachra, son of Cathal, chief of Feara Cul.
  • For 789, A hosting was made by Donnchadh, to protect Leinster against the Munstermen.
  • For 792, Donnchadh, i.e. the son of Domhnall, son of Murchadh, reigned twenty seven years, when he died, after the victory of penance, in the sixty fourth year of his age.
  • For 792, Cumascach, son of Fogartach, lord of South Breagh, died in religion.
  • For 793, Aedh Oirdnidhe devastated Meath, until it submitted to him.
  • For 794, The battle of Finnabhair, in Teathbha, by Muireadhach, son of Domhnall, in which many chiefs were slain along with Fearghus, son of Ailghil, lord of Cinel Cairbre, with Duibhinnreacht, son of Artghal, with Muireadhach, son of Connmhach, and with Cosgrach, son of Ceithearnach.
  • For 797, Muiredhach, mac Domhnaill, thigerna Midhe, died.
  • For 797, Aedh Oirdnidhe went to Meath, and divided Meath between the two sons of Donnchadh, namely, Conchubhar and Ailill.
  • For 798, The battle of Rubha Conaill, between the two sons of Donnchadh, in which Ailill was slain by Conchubhar.
  • For 802, Muiredach m. Domnaill, ri Midhe.
  • For 803, A hosting by Muirgheas, son of Tomaltach, with the Connaughtmen about him, to assist Conchobhar, son of Donnchadh, son of Domhnall, to destroy the men of Meath, and they arrived at Tir An Aenaigh. The king, Aedh, came to protect the men of Meath; and he drove Conchobhar and his forces to flight out of it, as if they were goats and sheep. He afterwards burned that part of the country of Meath which was dearest to Donnchadh.
  • For 810, Conall, son of Niall, lord of South Breagh, died. Focharta, son of Cearnach, half chieftain of South Breagh, died.
  • For 810, A battle between the men of South Breagh and the Cianachta, in which many of the Cianachta were slain.
  • For 818, The first year of Conchobhar, son of Donnchadh, son of Domhnall, in sovereignty over Ireland.
  • For 819, An army was led by Conchobhar, son of Donnchadh, to Ard Achadh of Sliabh Fuaid, and all the Airtheara were devastated by him, as far as Eamhain Macha.
  • For 820, An army was led by Murchadh, son of Maelduin, having the men of the North with him, until he arrived at Ard Breacain. The men of Breagh and the race of Aedh Slaine went over to him, and gave him hostages at Druim Fearghusa.
  • For 824, Diarmaid, son of Niall, lord of South Breagh. Niall, son of Diarmaid, lord of Meath, died.
  • For 825, The destruction of the fair of Tailltin, against the Gaileanga, by Conchobhar, son of Donnchadh, on which occasion many were slain.
  • For 828, Aenghus, son of Donnchadh, lord of Tealach Midhe, died.
  • For 829, Feidhlimidh, son of Crimhthann, with the forces of Munster and Leinster, came to Finnabhair Breagh, to plunder the men of Breagh; and the Liffe was plundered by Conchobhar, son of Donnchadh, King of Ireland.
  • For 831, After Conchobhar, son of Donnchadh, had been fourteen years in the monarchy of Ireland, he died, after the victory of penance.
  • For 833, Cinaedh, son of Conaing, Iord of Breagh.
  • For 834, The plundering of Meath by Niall Caille, sovereign of Ireland; and it was burned by him as far as the house of Maelconoc, lord of Dealbhna Beathra, at Bodhammair.
  • For 836, Another fleet of sixty ships (Viking) on the Abhainn Liphthe. These two fleets plundered and spoiled Magh Liphthe and Magh Breagh, both churches and habitations of men, and goodly tribes, flocks, and herds. A battle was gained by the men of Breagh over the foreigners in Mughdhorna Breagh; and six score of the foreigners were slain in that battle. A battle was gained by the foreigners, at Inbhear Na mBarc, over all the Uí Neill, from the Sinainn (Shannon) to the sea, where such slaughter was made as never before was heard of; however, the kings and chieftains, the lords and toparchs, escaped without slaughter or mutilation.
  • For 839, Feidhlimidh, King of Munster, plundered Meath and Breagh; and he rested at Teamhair, after having in one day taken the hostages of Connaught.
  • For 840, A battle was gained over Maelruanaidh, son of Donnchadh, i.e. the father of King Maelseachlainn, by Diarmaid, son of Conchobhar; and Diarmaid was slain on the same day by Maelseachlainn.
  • For 842, Maelruanaidh, son of Donnchadh, King of Meath, the father of Maelseachlainn, died.
  • For 843, Tuirgeis (of the Vikings) was taken prisoner by Maelseachlainn, son of Maelruainaidh; and he was afterwards drowned in Loch Uair, through the miracle of God and Ciaran, and the saints in general. Also in this year, The plundering of Donnchadh, son of Follamhan, and of Flann, son of Maelruanaidh, by Maelseachlainn, son of Maelruanaidh.
  • For 845, The first year of Maelseachlainn, son of Maelruanaidh, over Ireland. The demolition of the island of Loch Muinreamhar by Maelseachlainn, son of Maelruanaidh, against a great crowd of sons of death i.e. malefactors of the Luighni and Gaileanga, who were plundering the districts at the instigation of the foreigners; and they were destroyed by him.
  • For 846, A battle was gained by Maelseachlainn, son of Maelruanaidh, over the Danes, at Forach, where seven hundred of them were slain by him.
  • For 847, The plundering of Duibhlinn by Maelseachlainn, son of Maelruanaidh, and by Tighearnach, lord of Loch Gabhar. A fleet of seven score ships of the people of the king of the foreigners came to contend with the foreigners that were in Ireland before them, so that they disturbed Ireland between them.
  • For 847, Conaing, son of Flann, lord of Breagh.
  • For 848, Cinaedh, son of Conaing, lord of Cianachta Breagh, rebelled against Maelseachlainn, son of Maelruanaidh, and went with a strong force of foreigners, and plundered the Uí Neill from the Sinnainn to the sea, both churches and territories; and he plundered the island of Loch Gabhor, and afterwards burned it, so that it was level with the ground. They also burned the oratory of Treoit, within which were three score and two hundred persons.
  • For 849, Cinaeth, son of Conaing, lord of Cianachta Breagh, was drowned in the Ainge by the people of the king, Maelseachlainn, and Tighearnach, lord of Loch Gabhor, to revenge upon him the evils he had committed against the laity and the Church.
  • For 850, A slaughter was made of the foreigners in the east of Breagh; and another slaughter was made of them at Rath Aldain, by the Cianachta, in one month.
  • For 852, Maelseachlainn, King of Ireland, proceeded into Munster, until he arrived at Indeoin Na nDeisi; and he enforced hostages and submission from them, for they had given him opposition at the instigation of the foreigners.
  • For 856, Maelseachlainn, son of Maelruanaidh, with all the men of Ireland, except the Munstermen, went into the territories of Munster, and tarried ten nights at Emlidh Emly; he burned and plundered Munster as far as the sea in one day.
  • For 858, A hosting of the men of Leinster, Munster and Connaught, and of the southern Uí Neill, into the North, by Maelseachlainn, son of Maelruanaidh; and he pitched a camp at Magh Dumha, in the vicinity of Ard Macha. Aedh Finnliath, son of Niall, and Flann, son of Conang, attacked the camp that night against the king, and many persons were killed and destroyed by them in the middle of the camp; but Aedh was afterwards defeated, and he lost many of his people; for Maelseachlainn and his army manfully defended the camp against the people of the North. Aedh Dubh, son of Dubh Dabhoireann, lord of Uí Fidhgeinte, died, after being wounded.
  • For 859, The plundering and devastation of Meath by Aedh Finnliath, the son of Niall Caille. An army was led by Cearbhall into Meath, to assist Maelseachlainn against Aedh, son of Niall, and Amhlaeibh, where Ruarc, son of Braen, was slain by the Uí Neill.
  • For 860, Aedh Finnliath, son of Niall Caille, and Flann, son of Conang, went with the lord of the foreigners to plunder Meath, and committed great depredations there. Also in this year, Maelseachlainn, son of Maelruanaidh, son of Donnchadh, Monarch of Ireland, died on the thirteenth day of November precisely, on Tuesday, after he had been sixteen years in the sovereignty.
  • For 862, Lorcan, son of Cathal, lord of Meath, was blinded by Aedh Finnliath, northern Uí Neill sovereign of Ireland. Conchobhar, son of Donnchadh, the second lord that was over Meath, was drowned in a water at Cluain Iraird, by Amhlaeibh, lord of the foreigners.
  • For 866, Flann, son of Conaing, lord of all Breagh, collected the men of Breagh and Leinster, and the foreigners, to Cill Ua nDaighre,---five thousand was the number of his forces,---against the king, Aedh Finnliath. Aedh had only one thousand, together with Conchobhar, son of Tadhg Mor, King of Connaught. The battle was eagerly and earnestly fought between them; and the victory was at length gained, by dint of wounding and fighting, over the men of Breagh, the Leinstermen, and the foreigners; and a slaughter was made of them, and a great number of the foreigners were slain in that battle. There were slain therein Flann, son of Conaing, lord of Breagh; Diarmaid, son of Ederscel, lord of Loch Gabhar; and Carlus, son of Amhlaeibh, i.e. son of the lord of the foreigners.
  • For 868, Maelseachnaill, who was lord of half South Breagh, was slain by the foreigners.
  • For 877, The first year of Flann Sinna, the son of Maelsechlainn, in sovereignty over Ireland. Munster was plundered, from Boraimhe to Corcach, by Flann, son of Maelseachlainn.
  • For 879, A hosting was made by the king, Flann, son of Maelseachlainn, with the Irishand foreigners, into the North; and they halted at Magh Eitir Di Glais, so that Ard Macha was plundered by some of the troops; and he took the hostages of the Cinel Conaill and Cinel Eoghain on that expedition.
  • For 880, Ainbhith, son of Mughron, lord of Mughdhorn Breagh, was slain.
  • For 885, Tolarg, son of Ceallach, the second lord that was at that time over South Breagh, died. Tolarg. Ruadhachan, son of Cathan, lord of Feara Cul, and Innreachtach, son of Maelduin, lord of Caille Follamhain, were slain in Ossory, in the army of Maelruanaidh, son of Flann, and of the son of Imhar.
  • For 885, A battle was gained over Flann, son of Maelsechnaill, by the foreigners of Ath Cliath, in which were slain Aedh, son of Conchobhar, King of Connacht.
  • For 889, Conghalach, son of Flannagan, lord of Breagh, died after a good life.
  • For 890, Ceallach, son of Flannagan, lord of Breagh, was treacherously slain by Foghartach, son of
  • For 892, The plundering of Connaught by Flann, son of Maelseachlainn; and their hostages were taken.
  • For 894, An army was led by the Connaughtmen into Westmeath. A victory was gained on the same day over the Connaughtmen, at Ath Luain, by the men of Westmeath, and a slaughter of heads left behind with them.
  • For 896, Maelruanaidh, son of Flann, son of Maelseachnaill, was killed (i.e. he was burned in a house set on fire), by the Luighne, i.e. by the sons of Cearnachan, son of Tadhg, and by the son of Lorcan, son of Cathal, lord of Meath.
  • For 899, The profanation of Ceanannas by Flann, son of Maelseachlainn, against Donnchadh, his own son; and many others were beheaded on that occasion.
  • For 902, Another army was led by Cormac and Flaithbheartach against the Uí Neill of the South, and against the Connaughtmen; and they carried away the hostages of Connaught in their great fleets on the Shannon, and the islands of Loch Ribh were plundered by them. Other citations in the Annals for the Mide and Brega area
  • For 964, Ferghal ua Ruairc, king of Connacht, was slain by Domhnall mac Conghalaigh, tighearna Breacch (Breagh), & Cnoghbha.
  • For 974, Domhnall, mac Conghalaigh, tigherna Bregh, died.
  • For 1023, Dúnchadh ua Duinn, tigherna Bregh.
  • For 1025, Gearr Gaola, tigherna Brecch (Bregh), was slain.
  • For 1025, Maol Sechloind Gott tigherna Midhe.
  • For 1027, Ruaidhri mac Foghartaigh, tigherna Deisceirt Bregh.
  • For 1027, Dhúnchadh, mac Duinn, tigherna Bregh.
  • For 1028, Flandacan h-úa Cellaig, rí Bregh.
  • For 1029, Mathghamhain Ua Riagáin, tigherna Bregh.
  • For 1030, Maol Sechlainn ua Maol Ruanaidh, tigherna Midhe & Cremthainne.
  • For 1030, Domnall Got, rí Midi, was slain.
  • For 1033, Giolla Seachnaill, mac Giolla Mo Chonna, tigherna Deisceirt Bregh, do mharbhadh la Fiora Rois.
  • For 1034, Giolla Colaim h-Ua Riaccáin, tigherna Deiscceirt Bregh.
  • For 1034, Giolla Fulartaigh, tigherna na n-Déisi Bregh.
  • For 1048, Gairbhith h-Ua Cathasaigh, tigherna Bregh.
  • For 1053, Maol Crón, mac Cathail, tigherna Deisceirt Bregh, was slain by h-Ua Riagain.
  • For 1059, Conchobhar Ua Maoileachlainn, tighearna Midhe.
  • For 1060, Flaithbhertach Ua Ceallaigh, tigherna Bregh, died.
  • For 1061, Flann Ua Ceallaigh, adhbhar tigherna Breagh, do mharbhadh dona Saithnibh.
  • For 1061, Gairbhith Ua Cathasaicch, tigherna Bregh, died.
  • For 1073, Maol Mordha Ua Cathasaigh, tigherna Bregh.
  • For 1086, An Sionnach Fionn .i. Tadhg Ua Catharnaig, tigherna Tethbha, was slain.
  • For 1087, Mael Sechlainn mac Concobair rí Temrach.
  • For 1090, Domhnall mac Floint Uí Maoilechloinn, tigherna Mídhe.
  • For 1093, Trenfer h-Úa Cellaig, rí Bregh.
  • For 1121, Cu Gaileng Mac Giolla Seachnaill, tigherna Deisceirt Bregh, was slain.
  • For 1129, Flann Ua Ceallaigh, tigherna Fear m-Bregh.
  • For 1130, Diarmuid h-Úa MaelSéchlainn, rí Airrthir Midhi.
  • For 1130, mac Mic Giolla Fhulartaigh, tigherna Deisceirt Bregh.
  • For 1144, Mac Mic Maoláin, tigherna Gaileang Breagh, was slain.
  • For 1146, Cellach h-Úa Cellaigh, rí Fer m-Bregh, tigherna Breagh, was slain by Flaithbheartach Ua Cathasaigh & lá Gallaibh Atha Cliath.
  • For 1153, Maoil Seachlainn mac Murchadha Uí Mhaoileachlainn, rí Midhe.
  • For 1155, Donnchadh mac Domhnaill Uí Mhaoil Seachlainn, rí Midhe.
  • For 1160, Domhnall Mac Giolla Sechnaill, tigherna Deisceirt Breagh, was slain by Muirchertach, mac Domhnaill Uí Mhaoileachlainn gan chionaid.
  • For 1161, Muirchertach Ua Ceallaigh, tigherna Bregh.
  • For 1170, Donnchadh Ua Ceallaigh, tigherna Bregh.
  • For 1171, Maol Crón mac Giolla Seachnaill tigherna Desceirt Bregh, died.
  • For 1171, Domhnall Breghach, tigherna Míde.


    Further Midhe Reference: Kingdom of Midhe * Kings and Dynasties * Map

    Further Province Reference: Index * Connacht * Leinster * Mide * Munster * Ulster


    Further Reference at this site:
    Ireland History in Maps - Home Page
    Old Irish Surnames
    Kingdoms and Clans



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