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 Obituaries and Death Notices
in Pulaski County, Illinois Newspapers

 

The Mounds Independent and

The Pulaski Enterprise

1 Jan. - 27 Dec. 1926

Mound City, Pulaski County, Illinois


Transcribed and annotated by Darrel Dexter

darreldexter@hotmail.com

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 1 Jan 1926:
John Little

John Little, son of James and Nancy Little, who died December 25, 1925, at his home in Pulaski, Ill., age 57 years, 1 month and 16 days, was born November 9th, 1868.  He was the oldest of a family of four children, one of these dying in infancy.

His mother died when he was 8 years of age, at which time he was taken into the home of J. B. Kennedy, of Pulaski, where he resided until manhood.  His father moved to Texas, where he died many years ago.

Herman, a brother of Mr. Little, was reared in the home of George Richardson.  While serving in the Spanish-American War, in the Philippine Islands, he contracted a fever and later died in Washington, D.C.

Will, another brother, was adopted by Mr. and Mrs. Robinson, who later moved to Milan, Tenn., where he now lives.  He was with his brother during the last days of his illness.

On September 21, 1890, he was married to Mary A. Needham.  Four children were born into this home, Mrs. O. L. Hughes, Mrs. George Hardesty and Floyd, of Pulaski, and Mrs. B. M. Peek, of West Frankfort, Ill.  L. M. Needham, of Ullin, a brother of Mrs. Little, also shared this home until early manhood.

Mr. Little united with the church of Christ in 1903 and lived a consistent Christian life, dying with the Christian hope.  He has been in failing health for about five years, but bore his afflictions with patience.

Besides his wife and children, he leaves three grandchildren and many relatives and friends to mourn his departure.

Funeral services were held at the Christian church at Pulaski, Sunday afternoon amid a large assembly of people.  Rev. T. C. Hollaman, pastor of the Christian Church, officiated.   Funeral arrangements were conducted by Undertaker W. H. Aldred.

(John Little married Mary Needham on 21 Sep 1890, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Rose Hill Cemetery reads:  John Little 1868-1925.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Josephine Bierbaum

Mrs. Josephine Bierbaum, wife of Barney Bierbaum, died suddenly December 22, 1925, at the home of Mrs. Carl Mikken, while on the way home from Olmstead.  She is survived by 3 daughters, and one son.  The daughters are Mrs. R. Moorehouse, of Ashton; Mrs. J. A. Klein, of St. Louis, and Miss Amelia Bierbaum, of St. Louis, and her husband, Joseph Bierbaum, of Olmsted.

Funeral services were held at St. Mary’s Church in Mound City, conducted by Father Traynor.  Remains were taken to St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds for interment.

(Her marker in St. Mary’s Cemetery reads:  Josephine Bierbaum 1867-1925.—Darrel Dexter)
 
John Hauf Dies Suddenly Following an Operation

John Hauf died suddenly at St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo at 10 o’clock, Monday morning.  He was taken ill several days ago with symptoms of “flu” and an abscess had formed in his ___d.  He was removed to the hospital Sunday and an operation performed from which he was unable to rally.  He was 22 years old, past of age, and leaves a wife and an eight-month-old son, also two brothers, Tillman, of Cairo, and William, of this city, and a sister, Mrs. Bess Wilkinson, of Chattanooga, Tenn.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the residence on Commercial Avenue.  Rev. Roy N. Kean, conducting the service.  Interment in Beech Grove Cemetery. G. A. James being the funeral director in charge.
 

The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 7 Jan 1926:
Death of Aged Resident of Ullin

Richard Hickman, was born at Preston, Union County, Illinois, May the 10th, 1851, and died in Ullin, Ill., January 5, 1926.  He moved to Ullin in 1857, where he spent his boyhood days.  In 1859 he went to southwest Missouri, where he was married to Ellen Ora Tingle.  To this union were born, while living in Cherokee City, Ark., two children, a son, Frank, now living in Ullin, Illinois, and a daughter, who died in infancy.

Mr. Hickman was engaged in the grocery business while living in northwest Arkansas.  In 1874 he returned with his family to Ullin, Illinois, where he has continued to reside.  Upon coming to Ullin, Mr. Hickman took charge of the James Bell General Store, which he managed for a number of years.  Later he embarked in the timber, mercantile and various other business enterprises.

His wife preceded him in death one year and eight months ago, having died on April the 30th, 1923.  He leaves to mourn his death, one son, Frank, and his wife and three granddaughters, Alberta, Dorothea Belle and Frances Kate.  Three little grandsons preceded him several years ago.  Father and grandpa will be greatly missed by all who knew him.

Funeral services were held at the home Thursday at 2 p.m. Rev. Mrs. Reise of the Ullin M. E. Church officiated.  Burial was in Ullin Cemetery.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to express our thanks to the neighbors and friends who so kindly assisted us in the sad hours of bereavement and to the donors of the floral offerings.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hickman and family.
 
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 8 Jan 1926:
Mrs. James L. Cannon was called to Kansas City Monday to attend the funeral of a friend.  (Olmstead)
 

 

The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 14 Jan 1926:
Well Known Woman Dies

Died at St. Mary’s Infirmary Sunday night, Mrs. Alice Lane DeGilder, of Beech Ridge, Ill.  The body was bought to Beech Grove Cemetery for interment Tuesday.

Mrs. DeGilder was 74 years old and had been afflicted with heart trouble for some time.  She had many friends and acquaintances in Mounds.  She has been interested in the growth of Mounds, owning as she did considerable property to the south of our city.

(George P. DeGilder married Alice M. Lane on 14 Dec 1887, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Matilda Clanton Passed to Great Beyond

Mrs. Matilda Clanton, who for a number of years a resident of Mounds, passed away on Saturday, Jan. 9, 1926, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Bertha Skyles.  Funeral services were held at the home Monday morning at 10 o’clock.  Burial at Liberty Cemetery east of Pulaski.  Elder H. C. Croslin, pastor of the First Baptist Church preached the funeral.

Matilda Caroline Spence Clanton, daughter of William J. and Christiana Spence, was born at Olmstead, Ill., Nov. 8, 1846.  Died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Bertha Skyles on Jan. 9, 1926, age 79 years, 1 month, and 21 days.  She was married to Lewis L. Clanton on May 2, 1867.  To this union were born seven children, namely a son, who died in infancy, and Amanda, who died at the age of 16; William Clanton, Mrs. Bertha Skyles, Mrs. Lizzie Daniels, all of Mounds, Ill., James Clanton, of Stockton, and Mrs. Mary Talbott, of San Francisco, Calif.  Besides the above named loved ones, she leaves to mourn their loss, Mrs. Henrietta Clanton, a sister, and Judge Albert Spence, a brother, both of Mounds, seventeen grandchildren and ten great-grandchildren and many friends.

(Lewis L. Clanton married Matilda Spence on 2 May 1867, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  George G. Skyles married Bertha Clanton on 1 Jan 1893, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Charles Daniels married Lizzie Clanton  on 20 Apr 1892, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Liberty Cemetery reads:  Matilda C. Clanton 1846-1926 Mother of Ada Skyles.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Among out of town guests who attended the funeral of Richard Hickman last Thursday were Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Baggott and Mr. Shick, of Anna, Mrs. Dixon, of Vancouver, Wash., Mrs. Minnie Cox, of St. Louis, Mo., and Ed Gore, of Olmstead.
 
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 15 Jan 1926:
The remains of Wash Virginia, well known negro of this vicinity (Grand Chain) was brought here for burial from Tennessee last week.

(Washington Virginia married Sarah Connor on 6 Oct 1878, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Captolia Redden has returned from Murphysboro where she attended the funeral service of her brother-in-law, the late Frank Walker. (Grand Chain)
 
Two Babies Perish in the Fire

James Collins and William Edward Modglin, 20 and 3 months old, respectively, perished in a fire which destroyed the home of their father, Louis Modglin, in Cobden last Sunday.  Two children, 4 and 5 years old, escaped.  Neither parent was at home.
 
Old Resident of Mound City Passes Away in the West

The Los Angeles (Cal.) Times, of Dec. 11, in relating the death of Frederick P. Gregson, formerly of this city, and a brother of Miss Laura Gregson, says:

“Funeral services for Frederick P. Gregson, traffic manager and secretary of the Associated Jobbers and Manufacturers of Los Angeles, and traffic adviser of the chamber of commerce, will be conducted at 2 p.m. today at the chapel at Nordquiet and Peterson, 935 West Washington Street.  Mr. Gregson, one of the foremost traffic experts of the west, is credited with being the principal moulder of the rate structure of western railroads.  He was born in New York City and was 64 years of age.

“His first railroad experience was gained in Cairo, Ill., as a messenger of the Illinois Central.  He came to Los Angeles in 1887 with the advent—as the Southern California railroad—of the Santa Fe until 1908, when he founded the traffic bureau of the Associate Jobbers.

“A telegraphic resolution adopted by the San Francisco chamber of commerce and received here yesterday, read:

“The transportation committee of the St. Francis chamber of commerce expresses sincere regret and sympathy at the passing of Frederick P. Gregson.  The shippers of all California have suffered a grievous loss.  He was a traffic expert of wide knowledge and experience and was in all subjects guided by sound economic thought.”

Former Native of Pulaski County Dies in Murphysboro

From the Murphysboro Independent we note the death of a former Pulaski County resident and the member of an old Southern Illinois family.

“William Franklin Walker expired at his home at 2108 Herbert Street, Wednesday morning, Jan. 16, at 1:50.  Death was due to flu pneumonia.

“Deceased was born at Caledonia, Ill., Pulaski County, Oct. 13, 1871.  He was married December 19, 1897 to Mrs. Minnie Wagner.  No children were born to this union.  He was aged 54 years, two months and 23 days.

“Mr. Walker was converted at the Hamilton meeting here in 1915.  He has been employed at the M. & O. shops for the last fourteen years as a car repairer.  He worked up until the Wednesday before Christmas, and was then laid off.  Eight days ago he was confined to his bed suffering with flu-pneumonia and had not been up since that time.

“Mr. Walker’s disposition was such that won him many friends.  He was a member of the Odd Fellows Lodge here, the Lincoln Encampment and a member of the Carmen’s Union.

“The surviving relatives are:  his widow, and one adopted son, Edgar, of Lakewood, Florida; one sister, Harriet Jane Ostrander, of Los Angeles, Calif., and one half-brother, Walter Walker.

“The funeral was held Friday afternoon at 2:30.  The services being held at the home of 2108 Herbert Street, Odd Fellows had charge.  Rev. H. T. Abbott, of the Baptist Church, officiated.  Burial in Tower Grove Cemetery.”

(Frank Walker married Minnie A. Wagner on 18 Dec 1897, in Jackson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 
The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 21 Jan 1926:
Aged Woman Dies at Home of Daughter

Mrs. Mary E. Childers, aged 72 years, died Saturday, Jan. 17, 1926, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Charles Whiteaker on the Meridian Road east of Mounds.

Mrs. Childers is survived by four daughters, Mrs. Whitaker, Mrs. Gertrude Bowers, and Mrs. Ella Calvert, of Miller City, and Mrs. Cora Mowery, of Tamms, and a son, Walter E. Childers, of Olive Branch.

Funeral services were held at the home of Mrs. Whiteaker Tuesday morning at 10 o’clock.  Rev. Connett, pastor of the M. E. church of Cairo, officiated.  The funeral cortege, directed by G. A. James, went by automobile to Diswood where burial services were conducted in the family cemetery.
 
Mrs. Lucy Chance Dies at Home of Daughter

Mrs. Lucy Chance, who has made her home with her daughter, Mrs. Seth Titus, of Spencer Heights, for a number of years, died Tuesday evening, January 19th, at 6:30 o’clock.  She had reached the age of 75 years and leaves a well spent life behind her.

Mrs. Chance was the mother of former Mayor George E. Chance, Mrs. Seth Titus, Mrs. Clyde Titus, and Mrs. E. W. Park, all of Mounds.  Another son, Martin Chance, is a resident of Portland, Ore., and a daughter, Mrs. Charles Mann, lives in Flora.

The deceased had lived many years in Flora, Ill., and the body was taken there for burial.  Funeral services were held there Thursday afternoon.

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 22 Jan 1926:
Mrs. Edna Little left Tuesday for Anderson, Ind., where she was called on account of the death of her aunt, Mrs. Len Fleet.  Mrs. Fleet passed away Jan. 19.
 
Mrs. Childers Passes Away at Home of Daughter

Mrs. Mary E. Childers died Sunday afternoon at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Charles Whiteaker, on the Meridian Road, two miles north of this city.  She was 72 years old.

Besides the daughter, she leaves a son, Walter E. Childers, who resides near Olive Branch.

Mrs. Childers was a woman highly esteemed by all who knew her.

The funeral took place Tuesday morning at 10 o’clock from the home of Mrs. Whitaker.  After the services at the house, the funeral cortege left in autos for Diswood where the body was interred in the family cemetery.  G. A. James of this city was the funeral director.

(William Childers married Mary Boyd on 19 Oct 1885, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Aged Woman Dies in Mounds

Mrs. Lucy Chance, aged 75 years, of Mounds, Ill., formerly of Cairo, died Tuesday evening at 6:30 o’clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Seth Titus, at Spencer Heights, Mounds.  The body was taken to Flora Thursday and funeral services and interment taking place Thursday afternoon.
 

The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 4 Feb 1926:
Body of Infant Brought from St. Louis

The body of the five-day-old infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Lum Jordan, of St. Louis, Mo., was brought here today (Thursday) and taken to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Sylvester Clanton.  Short funeral services were conducted at 1:15 p.m. by the Rev. G. B. Waldron, at the home.  Burial was in Beech Grove Cemetery.


Card of Thanks

We desire to thank the friends who offered the use of their cars, those who sang, and those who in any way rendered assistance at the funeral of our infant on and nephew.
Mr. and Mrs. Lum Jordan
Mr. and Mrs. Sylvester Clanton
 
Death of Young Child

Lillian, the 5-month-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. Michaels, died Sunday afternoon, January 31st at 4:10 o’clock of pneumonia.  The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon, February 2nd, at 2:30 o’clock at the home.  The Rev. L. A. Crittenden of the Church of the Redeemer, Cairo, officiated.  Burial was in Beech Grove Cemetery.

The baby was the first born of Mr. and Mrs. Michaels and the parents are grief stricken.
 
Death of Pulaski Resident

Mrs. Joe Wallace, of Pulaski, passed from this life to eternity on Wednesday, Feb. 3rd, at 3:30 p.m.
Myrle Aldred was born Sept. 22, 1901, and sat the time of her death had reached the age of 24 years, 4 months and 12 days.  She was married to Joe Wallace of Pulaski, on Aug. 11, 1920.

Funeral services will be held in the Christian church of Pulaski on Friday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock.  Burial will be in Beech Grove Cemetery Mounds.

(Her marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Myrtle W. wife of Joe Wallace 1901-1926.—Darrel Dexter)
 
W. S. Sandeson and Miss Mary Ann Sheerer have returned to their homes in this city (Mound City) after attending the funeral of Mr. Wakeland in St. Louis, Monday.
 
Audrey Mae, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Modglin, died Monday, Feb. 1st, after an illness of several days with pneumonia.  Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church with burial in Rose Hill Cemetery. (Pulaski)
 
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 5 Feb 1926:
Mrs. A. P. Smith Passes Away at Age of 86

Mrs. Grace Quincy Smith, age 86, widow of A. P. Smith, died in Middleton, Mass., Monday, Jan. 25th.  She is survived by her children, Mrs. W. A. Montgomery, Mrs. Alice B. Martin and Miss Louise Smith.

Deceased and her husband were former residents of this city.  Mr. Smith being superintendent of the National Pump Factory, coming with this organization from Hickman, Ky., in 1887.  Mrs. Smith was a devoted member of the Episcopal Church and during her residence here was a diligent church worker.  Mr. Smith and family left here in 1895, going to Florence, Ala., where he was engaged with a manufacturing company.  Later locating in Memphis with a larger manufacturing concern.  Mr. Smith passed away in 1917.  Many of our readers will remember this family.
 

The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 11 Feb 1926:
Eliza Bartleson Tarr Called by Death
In Her 94th Year and Hale and Hearty to the Last

Mrs. Eliza Bartleson Tarr died at the Soldiers and Sailors Home, Quincy, Illinois, of pneumonia, on Sunday morning, Feb. 7, at 6:30 o’clock at the age of 93 years, 9 months and 5 days.

Mrs. Tarr was born in Ohio, May 2, 1832, and was the daughter of John and Mary Chapman Bartleson.  At the age of 3 years she came with her parents down the Ohio River on a flatboat to Old Caledonia Landing in this county.  Her father bought land near Grand Chain and settled there.  He was killed in service during the Mexican War.

Mrs. Tarr was twice married.  Her first husband, Mr. Esque died young, leaving her with two small children.  In 1855 she was married to N. P. Tarr.  After 45 years of life together, death called Mr. Tarr from her side in 1900.

Mrs. Tarr is survived by three sons, James Esque, of Chicago.  Dr. A. W. Tarr, of Johnston City, Ill., and David, Tarr, of Quincy, Ill., one daughter, Mrs. Stella Gaunt, of Bloomington, Texas, one brother, J. W. Bartleson, of Beloit, Kansas, several grandchildren, great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild.  Mrs. F. C. Schoenfeld, of this city is a granddaughter and for several years Mrs. Tarr has made her home with Mr. and Mrs. Schoenfeld.  For the last two years she had spent the winter months at the Soldiers and Sailors Home Quincy.

Mrs. Tarr was a remarkable woman, retraining strong mentality and physical strength up to her last illness.  She never took medicine until stricken with pneumonia.  She raised her own family of children and two sets of grandchildren.

Her body was brought to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Schoenfeld Monday night.  Funeral services were held at the Christian church in Grand Chain at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. For many years Mrs. Tarr had belonged to this church.  One of her grandsons, Elder Chester Esque, is a minister of that denomination.  Interment was in Grand Chain cemetery.

Among those from out of town who attended the funeral were J. W. Bartleson, Beloit, Kan., Mrs. Amanda Renaud, Tulsa, Okla., G. A. Bartleson, Muskogee, Okla., J. W. Esque, and Mrs. Maud ____, Chicago, Dr. and Mrs. A. W. Tarr, Johnston City, Elder Chester Esque, Washington, Ind., and Mrs. Ella Gaunt, Mt. Carmel, Ill.

Elizabeth Jane Hooppaw

Elizabeth Jane Hooppaw was born Sept. 20, 1841, near Vandalia, Fayette Co., Ill., and died at the home of her son, Thomas Hooppaw, east of Pulaski, Feb. 5, 1926, at the age of 84 years, 4 months and 16 days.

She came to Pulaski County just after the beginning of the Civil War and later married David Hooppaw, a physician and merchant of Villa Ridge.

To this union were born five children, two of whom died in infancy and one at middle age, leaving one son, Thomas Hooppaw, and one daughter, Ettie Ledbetter, nineteen grandchildren, twenty-five great-grandchildren and many other relatives and friends.  Her husband preceded her in death about twenty-eight years ago.

Mrs. Hooppaw was a devout Christian.  She was converted and joined the Methodist Church at the age of fourteen and she retained her faith to the end.

Funeral services were conducted at Liberty Church at 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 7, Rev. T. A. Shaffer, of Villa Ridge officiated.  Interment was in Liberty Cemetery.

Tragic Death of World War Veteran

On Sunday afternoon, Feb. 7th, at about 5 o’clock, Charles Emory, of Anna, Ill., tried to board a moving freight train at the Main Street crossing in Anna.  Failing in the attempt, he fell under the wheels of the train and was terribly mangled.  Both of his legs were cut off and the back of his head was laid bare.  Death occurred almost instantly.

Mr. Emory was about 30- years old and was a veteran of World War.  He leaves a wife and one child.

It is surprising to see what a large crowd can assemble in an incredibly short space of time.  People were going in all directions when the tragedy occurred and a great crowd soon gathered.  In it were not only Anna people, but many others from up and down the line of the Illinois Central Railroad and Route No. Two.

One of the sad features of a case like this is the fact that the accident was avoidable.  No one needs to attempt to board a moving train and warnings against doing so have been given over and over.

(His marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Charles C. Emery 1887-Feb. 7, 1926 Illinois Pvt. 310 Engrs. 85 Div.  Mamie G. Emery 1886-1958.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Koonce attended the funeral of Mrs. Jane Hooppaw at Liberty Church Sunday.
 
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Britt were called to Eastwood Saturday by the death of the latter’s grandmother, Mrs. Jane Hooppaw.
 
H. C. Moore was in Grand Chain Tuesday in attendance at the funeral services of the late Mrs. Eliza Tarr.
 
Mrs. F. C. Schoenfeld was called to Quincy, Ill., Saturday morning by the illness and death of her grandmother, Mrs. Eliza Tarr.
 
Mrs. Minnie Brown and her daughter, Mrs. E. Logue, of St. Elmo, Ill., who were called to Pulaski County to attend the funeral of Mrs. Jane Hooppaw, visited Sunday evening with their cousins, Postmaster George Schuler and sister, Miss Kate Schuler.
 
Among those who attended Mrs. Eliza Tarr’s funeral in Grand Chain Tuesday were Mr. and Mrs. W.I. Connell, and Mesdames A. S. Calhoun, George Schuler, L. Hode, E. C. Fletcher, and F. P. Head.
 
Mrs. Bertha Sichling and Miss Mary Aden of Ullin attended the funeral of Mrs. Joe Wallace here (Pulaski) Friday.

 
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 12 Feb 1926:
Er. Smith and family attended the funeral of Grandma Tarr held at Mounds afternoon.  (Karnak)


Mrs. Jane Hoopaw Passes Away at 84

Mrs. Jane Hoopaw, age 84 years, died at the home of her son, Thomas Hoopaw, four miles ____ of Pulaski Friday night, February 5th.  She was the widow of the late David Hoopaw, for many years a merchant and citizen of this county.

Funeral services were held at the ____ church Sunday afternoon and interment in Liberty Cemetery.   Rev. T. Schaffer of ____ conducted the services ___ and Alfred was the funeral director in charge.

The funeral was attended by a large crowd of relatives and friends to whom Mrs. Hoopaw has always been known as “Grandma.”  She was one of the oldest women in Pulaski County and had lived there for more than 60 years, migrating from near Vandalia, during the Civil War when Pulaski County ___ wilderness.

Among those who attended “Grandma’s” funeral were 16 of her children.

(Thomas Hoopaw, 26, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., son of David Hoopaw and Miss Tursey, married Burdie Baker, 20, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., daughter of James Baker and Miss Hawkins, on 6 Aug 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Liberty Cemetery has no death date, but reads:  E. Jane wife of David Hooppaw Born Sept. 20, 1841.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Death Calls Another Good Woman
Mrs. Eliza Tarr, One of Grand Chain’s Most Loved Ladies Dies

He who doeth all things well ___ interposition has deemed ___ to remove from among us and take beyond the confines of the earth Mrs. Eliza Madison Tarr, deceased who spent the greater part of her life in this community died at 6:30 Sunday morning at the Soldiers’ Home in Quincy, Ill., at the age of 95 years.  The remains were brought to the home of her granddaughter, Mrs. F. ___en Field, in Mounds, Monday morning and Tuesday morning were taken to Grand Chain, her former home.  Funeral services were conducted at the Christian church at 1 o’clock Tuesday  ___ and interment in the ____ cemetery.
Surviving Mrs. Tarr are here children, Dr. Willard Tarr, of ___on City, and M. Esque, of ___, daughter, Mrs. Stella ____, of Texas, a brother, John Bartleson, of Kansas, and many grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

(S. O. Field married Flora B. Tarr on 16 Oct 1888, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  T. M. Gaunt married Stella Tarr on 3 Oct 1888, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 18 Feb 1926:
Fatal Automobile Accident at Dongola Friday Night

Ullin Youth Killed and Villa Ridge Boy Seriously Injured.  Others Sustain Slight Injuries.

Russell Ulen, of Ullin was killed and Robert Gunn, of Villa Ridge was seriously injured in an automobile collision Friday night, Feb. 12, at Dongola.  Strange to say all the participants in the collision were basketball players returning from games.

The accident occurred on a curve in the state highway near the elevator at Dongola when a Ford, driven by Ulen and occupied by five other boys, Robert Gunn, and Stewart Crisman, of Villa Ridge, Fred Ulen, brother of Russell, Robert Carson, and Clyde Lackey, of Ullin, collided with a Hudson coach driven by Picola Greer, colored, who was accompanied by Prof. Rogers, Russell Grimm, Rupert Stokes, Emery Hudson, James Taylor, and Robert Banks, all colored of Carbondale.

An injury on the head killed Russell Ulen in the crash and Robert Gunn sustained a fractured skull and was unconscious for several days after being removed to St. Mary’s infirmary, Cairo, where he is now recuperating.  Others of the Ullin players suffered slight injuries.

The Ullin team was returning from a game at Alto Pass.

The Carbondale team, colored, had played at Mounds and was bound for Carbondale.

At the coroner’s inquest, which was held after the accident, the colored boy was exonerated.  But he was taken to Jonesboro and placed in the Union County jail.  Latest reports say that he has been charged with murder.

Russell Ulen’s funeral at Ullin on Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock was one of the largest ever held in Pulaski County.  He was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Ulen and was 16 years old.
 
Waldo Britton Dies in St. Louis Hospital

A message was received by E. G. Britton Sunday morning which conveyed the sad news of the death of his nephew, Waldo Britton.

Mr. Britton was a brilliant young man 26 years of age and was a student at the University of Illinois.  He had gone to East St. Louis to visit his sister, Mrs. Lucille McKnight during the semester vacation and evidently had been sick suddenly.  He died in St. Luke’s Hospital St. Louis, Mo., Saturday night.

He was the son of the late Rev. Joseph Britton and a nephew of E. G. and R. L. Britton, of Mounds, B. J. Britton, of Villa Ridge, and C. S. Britton, of Cairo.  His brother, Floyd Britton, was formerly a resident of Mounds.

He was buried in Bone Gap, Ill., Tuesday, Feb. 16th.
 
J. W. Bartleson, of Beloit, Kansas, who was called here by the death of his sister, Mrs. Eliza Bartleson Tarr, returned home Sunday.
 
Jesse Goddard and C. A. Ragsdale attended the funeral of Amry Brown, of Cabool, Mo., who was buried east of Anna Wednesday.  Mr. Brown was killed in an automobile accident.

(His marker in Trinity Cemetery reads:  Amry A. Brown 1884-1926 Effie S. Brown 1886-1975.—Darrel Dextr)
 
Mrs. Edd Saltzman, of Charleston, Mo., who is Mrs. Fred Ulen’s sister, came to attend the funeral of her nephew.
 
Sam Ulen and sons of Missouri were called her by the sudden death of the former’s nephew, Russell Ulen.
 
Miss Alta Peeler, a student nurse of Anna, attended the funeral of Russell Ulen.  They were classmates in high school.
 
Miss Eunice Train, of Cairo, attended the funeral of Russell Ulen. She was a classmate of Russell’s.
 
Little Katherine Black, 4 years old, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Black, was seriously injured Friday while playing in a hole cut in a bank by older children.  The earth caved in on the little one and buried her under several hundred pounds of dirt. (Ullin)
 
The community (Ullin) was shocked by the sudden death of Russell Ulen, which occurred Saturday night while returning home from Alto Pass where the Ullin basketball team played against Alto Pass.  Russell was killed in a head-on collision between two automobiles.
 
Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Johnson and Mrs. L. G. and Mrs. L. G. Westerman attended the funeral of Russell Ulen in Ullin Sunday.
 
C. F. Melton and daughter Miss Ruth were in Ullin Sunday in attendance at the funeral of Russell Ulen.
 
Hugh Rhymer and daughter, Vera, and Miss LaVern Caudle attended the funeral of Russell Ulen, of Ullin Sunday.
 
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Wright were called to Villa Ridge last week by the death of the former’s mother, Mrs. Rosella Wright. (Pulaski)
 
Among those who attending the funeral of Russell Ulen in Ullin Sunday afternoon were:  Messrs. R. L. Spaulding, Stewart Crisman, Leslie Vick and Lewis Hoffner.  (Villa Ridge)
 
The funeral of the 20-month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bolten was held Monday afternoon in the Baptist church.  Immediately after the services were held, the cortege left for Beech Grove Cemetery. (Mound City)

(The 25 Feb 1926, issue gives his name as Bobbie Bolton.—Darrel Dexter)
 
  
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 19 Feb 1926:
Jamie Bartleson and Mrs. Amanda Renard were called here (Grand Chain) on account of the death of Mrs. Tarr last week returned to their home in Kansas City Saturday.
 
Mrs. Maude Burns who was called here (Grand Chain) by the death of her grandmother, Mrs. Eliza Tarr, returned to her home in Chicago Thursday.
 
Matilda Fields

Matilda Metcalf Fields, ___ Tuesday morning__ at her home three miles ____ Grand Chain.  She had ___ her 85th birthday.  She is survived by three sons, ____ of Greenville, Miss., ____ Arkansas City, Ark., ____ of Grand Chain.

Funeral services were held at ____ church, of which she was a member, Wednesday ___ burial in the Masonic Cemetery.  Rev. William A. Hart___ conducted the services.

(August Fournie married Indiana Fields, 17, born in New Grand Chain, daughter of Ezekiel Fields and M___ B. Metcalf, on 12 May 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Malinda Field Born Feb. 4, 1841 Died Feb. 9, 1926.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Eliza Tarr
___ded the old Soldiers and Sailors Home at Quincy, ___ Mrs. Eliza Tarr, passed away February 7, 1926, aged 93 years.  She was well known in this county, having lived most of her life here.  A ___ usefulness and un___ seeking many near ____ friends who quickly ___ to pay their last respect to her memory.  She was a member of the Christian Church at Grand Chain, being among the charter members, ___ the Lord, she loved ____ giving thanks each ____ blessing of health ____ which for her age was unusually good.

She was united in marriage to ___cker Eskew.  Two children were born to this union, __ W.  Mr. Eskew Sr., ____.  In 1887 she was married to Nathaniel P. Tarr.  ___ were born to this union, Willard, Stella, Flora, and ____ She is survived by three ____ W. Tarr, of Johnson ___ Tarr, of Quincy, and ___rd of Chicago, a daughter, Mrs. __ M. Gaunt, of Bloomington, and a brother, J. W. Bartleson, of Beloit, Kansas.  Al ___ her relatives including __ great-grand and ____ grandchildren.  Funeral services were held at the ___ church Tuesday afternoon, Feb. 9th, conducted by ___ing with burial in ____ cemetery.

Mrs. A. W. Tarr, of ___, David Tarr, of ___ S. Bartleson, of Beloit, Kansas, J. W. Eskew, of ___ were here for the funeral and burial of Mrs. Tarr last week.
 
Frank Mosely Dies this Week

Frank Mosely, age 53, and a well-known colored resident of this city, passed this week after an ___ of pneumonia.  The funeral was held Wednesday and the ___ with which he had been affiliated escorted the remains to the cemetery.
 
Little Son Dies of Pneumonia

Neal Robert, the 22-month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bolton, passed away at their home Saturday morning, after a brief illness of pneumonia.  The funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the Baptist Church, Rev. Overby the pastor conducting the funeral.  Interment in Beech Grove Cemetery.  G. A. James, had charge of the funeral arrangements.
 
Joe Blum Passes Away in St. Louis Sunday

Joseph Blum, well known here, died in St. Louis Sunday, Feb. 14th.  He was the husband of the late Carrie J. Blum, father of Mrs. D. F. Diecke, Hessie and Adolph Blum.  He is also an uncle to Messrs. Jake, Sam and Ben Blum, and Mrs. George Eichhorn, of this city.  Deceased at one time resided here and was in business.  He often visited here, having made a recent visit here not over two weeks ago.  Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon from the Rindskoff Chapel, 5256 Delmar Boulevard.  Mrs. Eichhorn and brother, Ben Blum, attended the funeral.

___ KILLED IN CRASH ANOTHER BADLY HURT
Colored Boy Exonerated by the Coroner’s Inquest
Boy in Hospital Improving

___ basketball teams returning from playing games met with ___ sad experience last Friday night when the automobiles in which they were riding collided in a head on collision just out Dongola on the State Road.  Russell Ulin, 16, was instantly killed and Robert Gunn rendered unconscious as a result of the accident.  The other three occupants of the car escaped with minor injuries.  Five players and ___ders composed the occupants of the other car a Hudson ___ driven by Picola Greer ____.
 
Death of Two Colored Residents

Bennett Williams, colored, aged 67, died at his home Sunday morning of bulbar paralysis.  He had been a resident of Mound City for the past 20 years.  Funerals services were held at Mound City Tuesday with interment at Grand Chain.

(This may be the same person as Bennett Williams who married Melissa Brown on 25 Nov 1888, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. Eva Jones, colored, age 44, died at her home Sunday evening of Bright’s disease.  She was the wife of Rev. Robert Jones and had resided here for the past 22 years.  Funeral was held last week and interment made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.
 
James Dugan Passes Away

William James Dugan, 70 years of age, died at his home in Mound City Monday at 9 p.m. after a lingering illness of several weeks of diabetes.  He had been a resident of Cairo for the past 25 years until moving to Mound City one year ago.  While living in Cairo he was engaged in the blacksmith business located on 19th Street.  He leaves besides his wife two children, W. T. Dugan and Mrs. J. T. Brentlinger, of Dexter, Missouri.  His remains were taken to St. Louis Thursday by Undertaker G. A. James, where the body will be cremated.
 

The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 25 Feb 1926:
G. A. James, undertaker, has been in St. Louis where he took the body of James Dugan, of Mound City for cremation.
 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Schwartz, Mrs. Walter Schnaare and Mrs. Walter Jackson attended the funeral of little Bobbie Bolton in Mound City Monday afternoon.
 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hoffner and daughter, Dorothy, were called to Mountain Glen, Sunday, by the sudden death of Mrs. Hoffner’s niece, Miss Avis Lasley, who was killed in an automobile accident Sunday.  She was buried Tuesday at Dongola.  (Ullin)

(Her marker in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Anice Louise Lasley Born March 15, 1910 Died Feb. 21, 1926.—Darrel Dexter)
 

 

The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 4 March 1926:
Charles Whiteaker Dies at Home East of Mounds

Charles Fletcher Whitaker died at his home east of Mounds on Thursday afternoon, February, 25th, after a brief illness with pneumonia.

Mr. Whitaker was forty-five years old.  He was an employee of the Illinois Central Railroad at this place, but lived on a farm east of here.  He is survived by his wife and six children, two girls and four boys, two brothers, Dr. George Whitaker, of East Prairie, Mo., and Jesse E. Whitaker, of Miller City, three sisters, Mrs. John Newell, of this city, Mrs. Dee Souterland, of Hollywood, Calif., and Mrs. Chester Webb, of Elco.

The funeral was held at the home at 2 p.m. Sunday, Rev. O. E. Connett, of the Cairo M. E. church officiated.  Interment was in Spencer Heights Cemetery with undertaker G. A. James in charge.

(His marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Charles F. Whitaker Born Feb. 11, 1880 Died Feb. 25, 1926.  Martha E. Whitaker Born July 18, 1882 Died Dec. 27, 1951.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mr. and Mrs. G. L. Mowery, of Tamms, were here on Friday, called by the death of Charles Whitaker, a brother-in-law, of Mrs. Mowery.
 
Mr. and Mrs. Will Oller and Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Oller of Tamms attended the funeral services of the late Charles Whitaker here Sunday.
 
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 5 Mar 1926:
Charles Whitaker Dies After Brief Illness

Charles Fletcher Whitaker, age 45 years, died Thursday afternoon, Feb. 25, at 4 o’clock at his home on the Meridian Road, three miles north of Mound City.  He had been sick for several days of bronchial pneumonia.

The deceased leaves a widow and six children, the oldest, William Whitaker, being employed at the Cairo post office.  Mr. Whitaker was employed in the Illinois Central yards at Mounds, while living on the farm.

He leaves three sisters Mrs. Mary Newell, of Mounds, Mrs. Margaret Webb, of Elco, and Mrs. Olive Sutherland, of California, and two brothers, Dr. George Whitaker, of East Prairie, and Jesse Whitaker, of Miller City.

Funeral services were held at the family residence, four miles north of this city on the Meridian Road, Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock and were attended by a large company of friends and relatives.  Rev. O. E. Connett, pastor of the First Methodist Church of Cairo conducted the services.  The remains were taken to the new cemetery in Spencer Heights for interment.

(His marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery reads:  Charles F. Whitaker Born Feb. 11, 1880 Died Feb. 25, 1926  Martha E. Whitaker Born July 18, 1882 Died Dec. 27, 1951.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 

The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 11 Mar 1926:
Eight-Month-Old Baby Dies Suddenly

Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Mattson returned Wednesday from Detroit, Mich., where they had been called by the sudden death of a grandchild, the eight-month-old baby of Mr. and Mrs. H. O. Perry.  The child had not seemingly been sick and the sudden passing was a great shock to the parents.  Mrs. Perry will be remembered as Miss Flora Mattson.
 
Edna Irene, ten-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Shifley, passed away Friday night, March 12.  Edna has been an invalid for several years suffering from leakage of the heart.
 
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 12 Mar 1926:
OBITUARY

Little Otis Layton, son of Henry and Ollie Schultz, was born September 13, 1925, and departed this world March 7th, 1926; he was 6 months and 4 days old.  He leaves to mourn his death, a father and mother, three brothers and one sister, a grandfather and grandmother, Mr. and Mrs. D. N. Schultz, and several uncles and aunts.  He was a little one that was willing to give everybody a smile and little hands to be taken.  He was ill only a few days when God took him to that beautiful home above.

The funeral was preached at Mt. Pisgah Lutheran Church on March 8th, at 2 o’clock by Rev. Millhouse, of Jonesboro.  The little one was laid at rest in the Mt. Pisgah Cemetery.

(His marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug reads:  Otis L. Schultz Born Sept. 3, 1925 Died March 7, 1926.—Darrel Dexter)
 
We were sorry to note the death of Johnnie Kessler, which occurred ___ Friday morning.  Funeral services were held at Mt. Zion ___ Dan Williams.  The body was laid to rest in the cemetery nearby.  ___ took his own life.  ___ troubles is said to be the cause.  (Maple Valley)

(His marker in Mt. Zion Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Johnnie Kesler 1897-1926.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Schrart of St. Louis were called here (Grand Chain) Sunday due to the death of the latter’s father, Norvel Holder.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank everyone for the kindness and help that was rendered us during the brief illness and death of our dear little baby, Otis Layton Schultz and for the many flowers that were given.
Henry and Ollie Eastwood Schultz and little children. 

 

Mrs. Alex Petras who accompanied the remains of her husband from St. Louis coming here for the funeral, spent several days here a guest at the home of Mr. and Mrs. John Read.  Mrs. C. J. Nesselrod, her daughter, and Mr. D. Nesslerod, of Cypress, were also called here on account of the death of Mr. Petras.

 

Alex Petras, Former Resident, Passes Away in St. Louis

Alex Petras, age 71 years, and a former resident of this city, died in St. Louis, Thursday, March 4th, having a heat stroke while in a toilet, and passed away at a hospital a few hours later.  The remains were brought to this city and the funeral conducted at the Congregational Church, Sunday at 1:30 p.m.  Rev. Roy N. Kean, pastor of the Methodist church conducting the funeral.  He is survived by his widow, who accompanied the remains from St. Louis, and a daughter, Mrs. A. J. Nesselrod, of Grand Forks, N. Dakota, who also arrived to attend the funeral.

Deceased was a resident here for 23 years and was in the employ of the old furniture factory.  He and his widow have resided in St. Louis for over twenty years.

The members of Mound City Lodge K. of P. No. 197 attended the services in a body and extended the last rites at the burial. Deceased being a charter member of the lodge.
 


The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 19 Mar 1926:
Edna, the nine-year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Shifley, died at the home of her parents, Friday.  Funeral services were conducted at the home Sunday at 11 o’clock.  (Ullin)
 
Mrs. Alex Petras, of St. Louis, and daughter, Mrs. A. J. Nesselrod, of Grand Forks, N. D., who accompanied the body of their husband and father to this city for burial last week, left Monday for St. Louis, where Mrs. Petras will settle up her affairs, then she will accompany her daughter, Mrs. Nesselrod to her home in Dakota where she will reside.
 
James Gaines, of Galesburg, was called here to the bedside of his brother, Y. G. Gaines, who passed away Monday after a brief illness.
 
Mrs. Thomas Gaines, of Galesburg, was called here on account of the death of her brother-in-law, Y. G. Gaines.
 
Confederate Veteran Dies

J. M. Moore, Sr., 86-year-old Confederate veteran and prominent Mason, died last week at his home in La Center.
 
Y. G. Gaines Died Monday after a Brief Illness

Y. G. Gaines, age 34 years, died at his home on the Painter farm, just outside the levee, at 5:30 Monday evening.  He had been ailing with influenza and on Wednesday of last week was stricken with a cerebral hemorrhage and never rallied.  Mr. Gaines is survived by his wife, three sons, Robert, William and Jack, and a daughter, Lillian.  Also his father, who resides in Galesburg, a sister, Mrs. O. J. Jackson, of this city, and two brothers, Harvey, of this city, and James, of Galesburg.  Deceased operated a truck and was both industrious and was popular among a large circle of friends.

Funeral services were held at the Methodist Church at 2 o’clock Thursday afternoon, Rev. Roy N. Kean, the pastor, conducting the service.  Interment in Beech Grove Cemetery, the cortege moving in automobiles to the burial place.  G. A. James was the director of the funeral.
 

The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 25 Mar 1926:
Prominent Woman of Villa Ridge Dies

Mrs. Helen J. Weiting, widow of the late J. H. Weiting, died at her home near Villa Ridge this morning at 8 o’clock.

She is survived by three daughters, Mrs. J. W. Cheniae, of this city, Mrs. Clifford Gunn, and Miss Beulah Weiting, of Villa Ridge, and two sons, Joseph Weiting, and Villa Ridge, and Harry Weiting, of Howley, Fla.

Funeral arrangements have not been completed but it is probable the funeral will be held Sunday. 

 


The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 26 Mar 1926:
Miss Inez Paisley received a message from Metropolis, announcing the death of Grandmother Paisley, but she was too ill to attend the funeral.  Her father, Oscar Paisley, and brothers, William and Loren, attended the funeral.  (Grand Chain)
 
Burial of Mrs. Womac, who died at her home east of Karnak this week, was made in the Masonic Cemetery Wednesday afternoon.  The deceased was the mother of Mrs. Ruth Berry Womac, formerly of Grand Chain.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank the friends and neighbors and Rev. Koan for the kindness during the illness and death of our loved one, also those who furnished cars and sent flowers.
Mrs. Edith Gains and Children
R. R. Gains
J. H. Gains
Mr. and Mrs. O. J. Jackson


Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Miller, daughter Inez, of this city, and Mrs. E. L. Crain, of Villa Ridge, were called to Jonesboro Sunday to attend the funeral of their cousin, Mrs. Mattie Lee.

(Her marker in Jonesboro Cemetery reads:  Mattie Lee Born March 4, 1879 Died March 17, 1926.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Alma Ashworth Dies

Mrs. Alma Ashworth, wife of George Ashworth, passed away at her home on N. Commercial Avenue, Tuesday evening, March 23, at the age of 36 years.  Double pneumonia was the cause of her death and she was ill only a few days.  She leaves, besides her husband, to mourn her loss, her mother and several aunts and uncles.  Short funeral services were held at the residence at 11:30 Thursday morning, March 25th.  The remains were then taken to the Salem Church north of Grand Chain where services were held at 2 o’clock Thursday afternoon with interment in the Salem Cemetery.  G. A. James was the undertaker in charge.
 

 

The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 1 Apr 1926:
Mrs. J. H. Weiting

Helen Jane Atherton Weiting, daughter of Alanson and Susan Atherton, was born in Shiloh district west of Villa Ridge, Illinois, October 6th, 1866, and died at her home north of Villa Ridge, March 25, 1926, aged 59 years, 5 months and 19 days.  Helen Atherton was united in marriage to Joseph H. Weiting, March 9, 1886.  To this union five children were born, all of whom survive her.  They are Miss Beulah Weiting, Mrs. Clifford Gunn and Joseph Henry Weiting, of Villa Ridge, Mrs. Joe Cheniae, of Mounds, Illinois, and Harry Weiting, of Howley, Fla.  In early life Mrs. Weiting became a Christian by confession of faith and October 31, 1905, united with the Shiloh Baptist Church of which she has since been a consistent member.  Beside the immediate family of children she leaves six grandchildren, one sister, Mrs. A. Jones, of Alexander Co., a brother, Aaron Atherton, of Shiloh, two half-sisters, Mrs. Edith Parker, of Pulaski, Illinois and Mrs. Lee Watson, of Miller city, a half-brother, Jack Johnson, of Shiloh, and a host of friends to mourn the loss of a Christian woman, a devoted mother and a noble friend.  Her husband, Joseph H. Weiting, preceded her in death one year and three months, having died Dec. 28, 1924.

Funeral services were conducted by Elder H. C. Croslin, at the Shiloh Baptist Church Sunday, March 28th, 2:30 p.m.  A quartette composed of Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Atherton, Mrs. George Titus, and Mr. Hugh Rhymer sang.  Mrs. Lily Rife sang “Face to Face,” by request.  Interment was in cemetery nearby.

(J. H. Wieting married H. J. Atherton on 9 Mar 1886, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  R. J. Johnson married Mrs. Susannah A. Atherton on 29 Feb 1872, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Called to Anna by Death of Relative

Mrs. Ida Weaver and daughter, Mrs. F. D. Horner, were called to Anna today to attend the funeral of the former’s cousin, William N. Corliss.  Mr. Corliss was a prominent wholesale fruit dealer of Anna.

(William Newton Corliss married Margaret Burns on 11 Jul 1888, in Union Co., Ill.  His marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  William N. Corlis Born Jan. 4, 1854 Died March 30, 1926.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Former Pulaski County Resident Dies

Mrs. L. D. Henley, of Golconda, died Sunday night after a lingering illness. Mrs. Henley was a stepdaughter of James Scruggs, of Eastwood, and a sister of Mrs. Roy Britt, of this city.

(James Scruggs married Mrs. Julie Curry on 20 Jul 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 2 Apr 1926:
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to extend our sincere thanks to our many friends, who were so kind to us dung the illness and after the death of our beloved wife and daughter.  Especially do we wish to thank Rev. Roy Kean and those who contributed their sympathy in these sad hours.
George Ashworth
Mrs. Annie Mangren Shelton

CARD OF THANKS

We wish to extend our most sincere thanks to our many friends for the kindness shown us during the sickness and death of our dear wife and mother, Mrs. S. L. Womack.  Also for the floral offerings.
S L. Womack and Family

Former Resident Here Dies in California

Word was received in this city this week of the death of James H. Cloud, which occurred March 16, at his home in Los Angeles, Cal.  Mr. Cloud, who was better known here as “Jim,” had many friends in this city and throughout the county, who deeply regret to hear of his death.  Deceased at the time of his death was employed as conductor on the interurban line running from Los Angeles to suburban towns.  He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Elva Cloud, and two grown sons, Fowler and Lester, and a sister, Mrs. Jennie Hart, of Oklahoma.

Prominent Villa Ridge Woman Passes Away

Mrs. Helen J. Weiting, age 59, widow of the late J. H. Weiting, passed away Thursday morning, March 25th, at 8 o’clock at the family home near Villa Ridge where the family has been prominent for the past half century.  Mrs. Weiting was born and reared in the vicinity in which she died and had a wide acquaintance throughout that section.  Mrs. Weiting was a woman of charming personality and had endeared herself to the entire community through her long residence in that section.  Her death will be a matter of the most profound and sincere sorrow to hosts of friends who have known and loved her through the many years she has contributed to the community life in such a large measure.

She is survived by Mrs. J. W. Cheniae, of Mounds, Mrs. Clifford Gunn, of Villa Ridge, and Miss Beulah Weiting, daughters; and sons, Joseph Weiting, of Villa Ridge, and Harry Weiting, of Howley, Fla.  The funeral was held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at Shiloh Baptist Church, near Villa Ridge.  Rev. H. C. Crosland, pastor at Mounds, conducted the services.  The cortege leaving the family home at 2 o’clock.

(A marker in New Shiloh Cemetery near Villa Ridge reads:  Joseph H. Weiting 1858-1924.  Helen J. Weiting 1866-1916.—Darrel Dexter)


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 8 Apr 1926:
Harry H. Weiting arrived Saturday from Howley, Florida, having been called here by the death of his mother, Mrs. Helen Weiting.  Mr. and Mrs. George W. Gunn and Mrs. Mary Dalton, of Mound City, attended the funeral of Mrs. Helen Weiting, Sunday.
 
Mrs. Edith Parker was called to Villa Ridge last week by the death of her sister, Mrs. Weiting. (America)
 
Mrs. H. S. Cruse was called to Tamms Friday by the death of her sister, Mrs. Miller.  (America)
 
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 9 Apr 1926:
OBITUARY

Orilla, wife of S. L. Womack, departed this life March __, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. R. L. Douglas, of near ___, at the age of seventy years, two months and four days.

She was the daughter of James and Edith P. Rose, and was born near Eddyville, Pope County, Illinois, on January 9, 1856.

She was united in marriage to S. L. Womack March 19, 1870.  To this union were born eleven

children, five of whom have preceded her to the “Great Beyond” and six are left to mourn their loss.  A devoted husband, one son, ___ Womack, of Chicago and ___ ___  __burg, Mrs. R. H. Douglas, Mrs. C. J. Douglas, both of Karnak, Mrs. W. B. Alleman, ____, ____ Shields, of ___ Dakota, and one brother, ___ Rose, of Cairo, fifteen grandchildren and a host of relatives and friends.

She made a goodly confession and was baptized into Christ in ____ 1913, and placed her membership with the Church of Christ at Belknap, Ill., and remain _____.

___ steadfast in the faith ever ____ mother, a faithful friends and she was a devoted wife, a lov___ ___ and was loved by all who knew her.

Funeral services were held March ___, conducted by Re. C. F. Cor___, of El Dara.  A short song and prayer service at the home at ___ o’clock followed by a beautiful and impressive services at the M. E. Church at Karnak.  The choir sang very beautifully her favorite hymns of the departed and Mrs. Jesse Seilbeck of ___ sang very sweetly “Beautiful Garden of Prayer,” accompanied at the piano by her mother and the minister read the 90th Psalm and spoke many comforting words to the family and friends.
The many beautiful floral f ___ were mute evidence of the ___ and esteem in which she was held.
In the past several years the ___ has suffered much and has traveled extensively in ____ effort to regain her health.

She was a patient sufferer and ___ many times of late that ____ waiting only for God to call her home from the pain and suffering that she had endured.  We know that our loss is her gain and the God will wipe away all tears from their eyes; there shall be no more death, nor sorrow nor crying, neither shall there be any more pain.”  Interment in the Masonic Cemetery at Grand Chain.

(Shepard L. Womack married Sarah S. Boaz on 19 Mar 1870, in Pope Co., Ill.  James A. Rose married Edith P. Watkins on 17 Aug 1844, in Pope Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 15 Apr 1926:
Young Man Killed in Yards Still Unidentified

             On Tuesday morning at about 5 o’clock, a young man of perhaps 22 years, was instantly killed by a freight train in the yards at this place.

             The youth was apparently beating his way north from the south and must have fallen beneath the train while asleep or in an attempt to get off the train.  He was cut in two when the train passed over him.
Nothing can be found that pointed to any means of identification.
 
Mrs. William Albert Spence

Mrs. Nannie Spence, wife of William Albert Spence, was born June 5th, 1856, and died at her home in Mounds, Illinois, April 9th, 1926, at the age of 69 years, 10 months and 4 days.

Since her marriage to Mr. Spence on Oct. 7, 1914, she has made her home in Mounds, during which time she had made many warm friends, a large number of whom are grief stricken because of her departure.

She united with the Christian Church of Creal Springs, Ill., a number of years ago, and only but twenty four hours before her death expressed herself as being “perfectly satisfied.”

On Saturday, April 10, all that was mortal was taken by motor to Carterville to the home of a daughter, Mrs. Frank Sizemore. The funeral was held from this home at 2 p.m. Sunday and was conducted by the Carterville Eastern Star Chapter at the request of the Mound City Chapter.

Mrs. Spence left to mourn her departure her husband, three daughters, by a former marriage, Mrs. Frank Sizemore, of Carterville, Mrs. Roll Womack, of Anna, and Mrs. Logan Frailey, of Murphysboro, and two sisters, Mrs. Torie Lawler and Mrs. Emma Lawler, of Herrin, Illinois.
 
Card of Thanks

We wish to express our sincere thanks to everyone who had any part whatsoever in relieving the suffering of our companion and mother, Mrs. Spence, in her last illness and for the many kind words of sympathy and condolence since her death, especially do we make mention of Rev. H. C. Croslin, pastor of First Baptist Church, of this city, who, by his unselfish services rendered has won a warm place in our hearts and lives.
William Albert Spence
Mrs. Frank Sizemore
Mrs. Rolla Womack
Mrs. Logan Frailey
 
Mrs. A. A. Thomas returned Monday from Dyersburg, Tenn., where she was called by the illness and death of a nephew.
 
Among those who attended the funeral of Mrs. A. Spence in Carterville Sunday were Mrs. R. C. Smith, L. H. Frizzell, Miss Ida Hickam, Miss Laura Blanckertz, Miss Lela Bailey and Mr. and Mrs. George Sitter.
 
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 16 Apr 1926:
Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Jones were called to Terre Haute last Saturday morning on account of the death of the latter’s father, Mr. Rivers, who passed away at the Soldiers’ Home at Danville last week.  The remains were taken to Terre Haute for burial.

WIFE OF JUDGE ALBERT SPENCE PASSES AWAY LAST WEEK

Mrs. Nettie Spence, wife of Judge Albert Spence, of Mounds, died at the family home Friday morning, at the age of 64 years.  She had been ill for several days with bronchial pneumonia.  The remains were taken to Carterville, to the home of her daughter, Mrs. Frank Lizemore.  The funeral being conducted Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock and burial in the cemetery at Carterville.  The burial was conducted by the Eastern Star.  G. A. James was the undertaker in charge.


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 29 Apr 1926: 
Death of Nephew of Mrs. A. A. Thomas

The following clipping from the State Gazette of Dyersburg, Tenn., tells of the death of Leonard Johnson, a nephew of Mrs. A. A. Thomas, of this city.  Leonard, his mother and his sister have been frequent visitors here and their many friends deeply regret his early demise.

“John Leonard Johnson, 18 years old, son of Mrs. Jennie Johnson, died Thursday morning shortly before 11 o’clock at the home of his mother, on Cherry Street, after a long illness.  Young Johnson had been in bad health for a year and made a brave, but futile fight to life.

“Funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon at the home at 2 o’clock. The Rev. M. D. Clubb will officiate at the services.  Burial will take place in Fairview Cemetery.

“His death had not been altogether unexpected, but the family had returned hopes that the young man might live.  He was taken to Memphis to a specialist some time ago in hopes of finding a cure, but to no avail.  He lingered on for months until a few weeks ago when his condition became critical and all hopes for his life was abandoned.

“John Leonard, as he was happily called, by his hundreds of friends in the city, was an unusually good boy.  His father died several years ago and it interrupted the young man’s life for a time.  He attended school regularly and ranked high in his class work.  He was always cheerful and bright, and will be greatly missed by his wide circle of friends.

“Besides his heartbroken mother and his only sister, Laverne, he leaves a number of distant relatives and the entire city to mourn his early departure.”

Clementine K. Miller

Clementine K. Miller was born in North Carolina in 1847.  She came to Illinois about sixty years ago.  She was married to Calvin Braddy.  To this union was born one son, Calvin Braddy, who preceded her to the great beyond several years ago.  Her husband died in the army some time during the Civil War, while in the service.

She was married to Cruso Waller in 1869.  To this union were born nine children, five boys and four girls.  Six have preceded her in death.

She was a member of the Lutheran Church and has always lived an upright Christian life.  She leaves to mourn her demise, one son, Charles Waller, of Mounds, two daughters, Mary Moore of Mounds, and Etta Cotilla, also of Mounds, and several grandchildren.

(Calvin M. Brady married Clementine C. Miller on 14 Jul 1861, in Rowan Co., N.C.  Crusow Waller married Mrs. Clementine Braddy on 4 Feb 1869, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 30 Apr 1926:
Former Resident of County Dies in Tennessee

Word has been received of the death of Sam Spaulding who formerly lived here with his mother and sisters, Anna and Maude, and later moved to Cairo where they resided for several years then went to Knoxville at which place he was living when death occurred on March 31 following an attack of influenza.  He was 32 years of age and is survived by his mother and one sister, Mrs. E. P. Weston, his younger sister, Maude, having preceded him in death a few years ago.


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 6 May 1926:
Daniel Joseph Horner

Daniel Joseph Horner, son of Abraham and Sarah Horner, was born near Anna, Ill., Sept. 24th, 1867.
On Jan. 1st, 1889, he was married to Hattie F. Lentz, of Wetaug, and to this union were born seven children—Charlie, deceased, Dillard and Claude, who reside near Villa Ridge, Eugene, Mildred, Inez and Joseph, all of Mounds.

He placed his trust in Christ and was united with the Methodist Church of Mounds.

After a lingering illness of almost three years, he died, surrounded by his family, May 4th, at 1:54 a.m. at the age of 58 years, 7 month and 10 days.

He leaves to mourn his loss his loving wife, the above mentioned children, and in addition one grandchild, Edna Horner, also three brothers and three sisters, namely Isaac M., of Cairo, Ill., Thomas W., of near Villa Ridge, John R., of Olive Branch, Ill., and Mrs. G. W. Hendricks, of Malden, Mo., Mrs. John Vonnida, of Cairo, and Mrs. Albert Miller, also of Cairo, in addition to a large number of other relatives and a host of friends.

A short prayer service as held at the home Wednesday at 1 p.m.  Immediately afterward the funeral cortege left by automobile for Mt. Pisgah Church, Wetaug, Ill., where funeral services were held.  Rev. J. S. Dever, pastor of the M. E. church officiated.  He was assisted by Rev. H. C. Croslin, of the Baptist Church.  Howard Copeland sang a solo and a quartette also sang.  Burial was in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery.

Among those from a distance who attended the funeral were Mrs. G. W. Hendricks, Malden, Mo., Mrs. and Mrs. John Ragsdale, Bismarck, Mo., Mrs. A. G.  Miller, Cairo, Ill., Mrs. John Vonnida, Fayette Vonnida, Phyllis and Chris Vonnida, of Cairo, Mrs. M. Mason, Cairo, Mr. Ike Horner, Cairo, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Houston, Kalamazoo, Mich., Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Lentz, Mattoon, Ill., Mr. John Baine, Olive Branch, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Baine, Pulaski, Mr. and Mrs. John Kelley, Anna, Mrs. Iva Corzine, Anna, Mr. and Mrs. William Horner, Anna, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Free, Chaffee, Mo., and Mrs. D. J. Hurley, St. Louis.

(Daniel Horner married Hettie Lentz on 1 Jan 1889, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  George William Hendrix married Rebecca Horner on 2 Feb 1898, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug reads:  Daniel J. Horner 1867-1926,—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lentz, of Mattoon, were called here Tuesday by the death of D. J. Horner.
 
Mrs. E. R. Britton substituted in the second grade of Thistlewood School Tuesday and Wednesday for Mrs. E. D. Horner, who was absent on account of the death of Mr. Horner’s father, D. J. Horner.
 
Mr. and Mrs. John Call, of this city (Mound City), were called to Wickliffe, Sunday to attend the funeral of Mrs. Call’s aunt, Mrs. Margaret Murrie.
 
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 7 May 1926:
Aged Man Baptized

William Wilson, age 86, was baptized by immersion at the New First Baptist Church of Whitehall, Illinois.  Rev. L. W. Wilson said he was the oldest man he ever baptized.

Cyrille Cloud Exonerated from Death of Mother-in-law.
Find Mother-in-law’s Death not Due to Violence.

Cyrille Cloud was released from the county jail Wednesday evening when the coroner’s jury returned the verdict that Mrs. Betty Toney died “as a result of a fall at the home of her son-in-law Cyrille Cloud while attempting to separate her daughter and sons-in-law who were quarreling at the time and not as a result of her having been shoved or hit by Cloud as was charged of having done.

The verdict followed a report from the post mortem examination conducted by Coroner O. T. Hudson, of Mounds, and aided by Dr. W. R. Swesenberg of this city, who examined the body for marks of violence but found none.

Mrs. Toney had attempted to interfere in a quarrel between Cloud and his wife it is alleged.  Over the punishment of one of the children.  It was said at the time of his arrest that Cloud had violently shoved Mrs. Toney away from him and that she had walked into another room and died.  At the inquest, Mrs. Cloud nor any other witness gave evidence substantiating this statement.

Immediately after the accident, Cloud was arrested by Sheriff Ira J. Hudson and held pending investigation by the coroner’s jury.

The remains of the deceased were taken to Lilbourn, Mo., for interment.

Mrs. Homer Williams Dies

Mrs. Homer Williams died at her home on Fourth Street Wednesday night.  She recently became the mother of a little son what proved to be the dawn of day of larger happiness with the coming of her infant son proved to be the evening twilight of a brief but happy year of married life, as the out walking of God’s plan the little one came in the world as the mother was entering the land of eternal rest.

Colored Woman Near 109 Year of Age

Mrs. Rebecca King better known as Aunt Betty, an aged negress, is in very feeble health at her home in this city.  According to her manumit papers she will be 109 years old in July.  She was born in 1817 and her freedom papers were issued July 6, 1849, and at that time she was 32 years of age.  She is well known here among many of her residents having served as a helpful servant in many of the homes.  She has been a servant in Mrs. Annie Higgins’s home being faithful and dutiable.


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 13 May 1926:
Sophia Axley

Mrs. Sophia Axley, daughter of Sullivan and Mary Fehrnbach, was born six miles west of Mounds, Illinois, Dec. 10, 1866, and died at her home five miles west of Mounds, May 7, 1926, aged 59 years, 4 months and 27 days.  She was married to William Axley, of Mounds, Illinois, in 1888.  To this union were born three children, namely Oscar and William Jr., who remain in the home and Mrs. Grace Wilson, who lives nearby.

Mrs. Axley was converted and united with the Shiloh Baptist Church about 1887, since which time she has lived a consistent Christian life.  Her husband preceded her in death 25 years having passed on in 1901.  She leaves to mourn her departure, the above children, three grandchildren, Helen, Wilma and Elsworth Wilson, and a large circle of friends.

The funeral was conducted last Sunday afternoon at 4:30 at Shiloh Baptist Church by Eld. H. C. Croslin, of Mounds.

(William Axley married Sophia A. Fehrenbach on 14 Jul 1889, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
C. H. Oakes was called to Joppa Sunday night on account of the death of his mother, Mrs. C. E. Culver, who died suddenly at 8 p.m. of heart trouble.  Mrs. Culver’s husband was the brother of Rev. Culver, formerly of Mounds.
 
Mr. and Mrs. George Williams and family of Cypress attended the funeral of the former’s niece, Mrs. Homer Williams, here Sunday.  (Mound City)
 
Mrs. Homer Williams, age 22 years, passed away at her home on High Street (Mound City) Thursday morning at 3:30 o’clock after an illness of three weeks.  She leaves to mourn her death her husband, an infant son two weeks old and an aged father who made his home with his daughter, also three sisters.  Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the Methodist church and burial was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.  G. A. James was the undertaker in charge.
 
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 14 May 1926:
Funeral of Mrs. Williams Held Sunday Afternoon

Mrs. Homer Williams, age 22, passed away at her home on Fourth Street Thursday morning, May 6, at 3:30 o’clock after an illness of only a few weeks.  She leaves to mourn her death her husband and infant son two weeks old and an aged father, Mr. Garrett, who made his home with his daughter.  Mrs. Williams was of splendid character and one who made many close friends.  Funeral services were held at the Methodist church Sunday afternoon and burial in Beech Grove Cemetery.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

Mrs. Axley Passes Away

Mrs. Sophia Axley, 59 years old, died of paralysis at her home four miles west to Mounds, Friday evening.  She was a lifelong resident of Pulaski County, having been born and reared near the place where she died.  Her husband, William Axley, died 26 years.

Funeral service were held at Shiloh Church Sunday afternoon at 4:50 o’clock.  Interment in Shiloh Cemetery.  Surviving Mrs. Axley are a daughter and two sons, Mrs. Grace Wilson, Oscar Axley and William Axley, Jr. and three grandchildren, all residing in the neighborhood in which she died.

(William Axley married Sophia A. Fehrenbach on 14 Jul 1889, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Taken to Missouri for Burial.

The remains of Mrs. Betty Tony, who died at the home of her son-in-law, Cyrell Cloud, 507 Commercial Avenue, Tuesday night, May 4th, at 8 o’clock was taken to her home in Lilburn, Mo., Thursday morning, where funeral services and interment were held.


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 20 May 1926:
Death of Infant

Elizabeth Royall Rife, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Rife, of Villa Ridge, died Tuesday, May 18.  She was born on Monday, April 12, and was one month and six days old.

After a short service at the home of the tiny body was laid to rest in Villa Ridge cemetery Wednesday afternoon.
 
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 21 May 1926:

___d Larner, age 46 years, died at his home west of town (Ullin) Monday night after a lingering illness. Interment was in the Ullin Cemetery Wednesday afternoon.

(Grand Larner married Mit Bell on 5 Jan 1896, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. Hanley Dies Here

Mrs. Hattie Hanley died Tuesday morning at the home of her mother, Mrs. Fannie Merchant, age 40 years.  She had been ill for several years with tuberculosis.  Deceased is survived by her husband, three children and her mother.

Funeral was held Thursday at 1:30 at the M. E. Church, Rev. Roy N. Kean conducting the services.

Mrs. Fred Settlemoir, of Murphysboro, was called here Tuesday on account of the death of her ____.

Jack Lawler Dies Thursday

             Jack Lawler who has been ill for some time, died at his home in this city Thursday afternoon.  

Deceased was about 56 years of age.  He had been an employee of the marine ways for a number ____.


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 27 May 1926:
James Homer Galbraith

James Homer Galbraith, son of Logan and Laura Galbraith, was born in Villa Ridge, Ill., on July 24, 1889, and died May 24, 1926, at the age of 36 years and 10 months.

Mr. Galbraith began service in the United States Army in July 1918 and was honorably discharged in December of the same year.

He united with the Shiloh Baptist Church in 1905.

He was first married to Miss Vera Mitchell. To this union was born one daughter, Julia, who survives.  He was married a second time to Mrs. Ethel Reed.  To this union was born one child who died in infancy.

Mr. Galbraith had been a cripple for more than three years caused by an accident in youth.

He leaves to mourn his sad death his father, mother, three brothers, Miles, of Mounds, Ray and Wilbur, of Cairo.  He was a free-hearted man and had many friends.

Funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church, Mounds, at 3 p.m. Tuesday, May 25th.  Rev. H. C. Croslin officiated at these services.  Burial was in Oak Grove Cemetery.
 
Card of Thanks

We desire to extend our sincere thanks to all who ministered to us in any way during our recent bereavement in the death of our brother, James Homer Galbraith,  Especially to we thank Rev. H. C. Croslin, Mrs. M. Lily Rife, and the neighbor who sent flowers.
J. M. Galbraith and wife
 
Three Men Lose Lives in Automobile Wreck

About one o’clock Monday morning, Herbert Neff, of Cairo, sighted a wrecked car just north of the interurban crossing on Route 2 between Cache Bridge and Cairo.  He heard a voice calling for help and upon investigation found James P. Carroll, of Mound City, lying in the grass nearby.  Near him was Samuel H. Cagle, who was dead, and in the wrecked car sat the body of James Homer Galbraith, the driver of the ill-fated Ford roadster.

Carroll who was able to give the names of his dead companions and to identify himself, was taken to St. Mary’s Infirmary, where he lived about an hour and a half.

No one saw the accident and the coroner’s jury could only render a verdict of accidental death, as follows:  “Death was due to an accident caused by an automobile striking a tree on the side of the hard road in District No. 7.”

Galbraith was 36 years old and left a daughter.  Carroll was 44 years of age and is survived by his widow.  Cagle, who was 45, leaves a wife and grown daughter.

Funeral services were held Tuesday in the First Baptist Church of this city for Homer Galbraith, James P. Carroll was buried from his home in Mound City Wednesday morning at 11 o’clock and Samuel H. Cagle was buried Wednesday at 2 p.m. from his home in Mound City.
 
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Aldred and Mr. and Mrs. Will Atherton were called to Mounds Monday by the death of Homer Galbraith, a nephew of Mrs. Aldred and Mr. Atherton.
 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 28 May 1926:
John Fray, Former Resident, Killed by Bandits at Benton

Henry Kirkham, 21 years old, and Elmer Neunlist, 23, are being held in the Franklin County jail, charged with the murder of John Fray, a former resident of this city, who was fatally wounded by a revolver shot fired by the pair in a holdup May 19th at Benton.  Kirkham confessed the slaying, authorities say.

Fray died on Thursday in the Dr. Moore Hospital at Benton, of the wounds.

John Fray was for several years an employee at the Polk Canning plant as a general handyman and was industrious and harmless, also a favorite among his coworkers.

Funeral of Jack Lawler Held Saturday Afternoon

Funeral services for Mr. Jack Lawler, who passed away at his home on Fourth Street Thursday afternoon, May 20th, were held Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, Father Eugene Traynor officiating.  Special interurban cars conveyed the funeral cortege to Beech Grove Cemetery where interment was made.  Undertaker G. A. James had charge of the funeral arrangements.

Mr. Lawler had been employed at the Marine Ways until his health began failing him.  He was one of the oldest employees of that concern.  He had never married and resided with his sisters, Misses Mayme and Carrie Lawler.  Other than his sisters, he is survived by two nieces, Mrs. Edna Little and Miss Dorris Derr, of Mound City, and a nephew, Gilbert Derr, of Memphis.

(William Derr married Emma Lawler on 9 Jun 1890, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

THREE MEN KILLED WHEN AUTO STRIKES TREE ON CAIRO ROAD
Funeral Services Held Here for Two of the Victims

An accident that cost three men their lives occurred on the Mound City-Cairo road just ___ hundred yards north of ___ urban tracks, early Sunday.  Junction of the road and the ____ when a Ford roadster driven by Homer Galbraith ran into a tree.  Those killed were Homer Galbraith, 25, ___ and driver of the car, Sam ____ Cagle, 45, and James Carroll, ___ of Mound City.  The car had been traveling north on the ___ at a very high rate of speed when it struck the tree, according to statements made by persons who viewed the wreck after the accident.  The car was bent in a particular shape around the tree.  One door was so securely ___ed that it was loosened only with much force.

Robert Neff, of Cairo, was the only person to pass the scene of the accident after it has happened. ___ing to investigate the wreck, Neff found Galbraith still in the driver’s seat in a sitting position, but dead.  Hearing a cry in the ditch below, for ___ Neff found Cagle dead and Carroll in a dying condition.  Carroll was immediately rushed to St. Mary’s Infirmary at Cairo, where he died an hour later.  The only ___ as to how the accident happened was given by Carroll just before he passed away.  He said they just ran off the road and ___ giving the names of the other occupants of the car no statement could be obtained ___ at the Egyptian Country ___ death car had been in two previous accidents, one in which ___ top of the car was destroyed and had never been replaced.

Galbraith was a World War I veteran and had been made a ___ple since being discharged.  The bodies of the victims were sent to Cairo for the coroner’s inquest held by Dr. __ M. Dickerson Monday afternoon.  After the inquest the bodies of Cagle and Carroll were brought to Mound City.

Funeral services were held at the Methodist church here at 11 o’clock a.m. for Carroll and at ___ o’clock p.m. for Cagle.  Rev. Rose conducting both.

Carroll leaves a wife and family and Cagle a wife and daughter.

Funeral Director G. A. James was in charge of both funerals.


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 3 Jun 1926:
Frank J. Tobin Dies by Own Hand

Frank J. Tobin, of Cairo, eldest son of Mrs. C. B. Kilpatrick, of this city, shot himself Saturday about 12 o’clock noon.

Mr. and Mrs. Tobin had been out driving in the Drainage District.  They had turned toward home when Mr. Tobin requested his wife to stop the car.  He then left the car and walking to a tree beside the road, shot himself.  The bullet entered his left temple and caused instantaneous death.

Mr. Tobin had been in failing health for several months.  Of late he had been somewhat improved until the advance of the hot days.  News of his sudden death was a great shock to his relatives and friends.
He was 41 years old and had been a salesman for Scudder-Gale Grocery Company for many years.  He had a wide acquaintance and was well liked by all.  He was a Mason and an Elk.

Mr. Tobin is survived by his wife, his mother, Mrs. C. B. Kilpatrick, four sisters—Mrs. I. E. Koonce, of this city, Mrs. Ward Cotter, of Cairo, Mrs. A. H. Laws, and Mrs. Wesley Baker, of East St. Louis, and seven brothers, W. L. and Clyde Tobin, of Mounds, Ernest and Jesse, of Chicago, and Edgar, John and Clarence Tobin, of Los Angeles, Calif.  His father died several years ago.

Funeral services were held at the family home Monday, May 31, at 9 o’clock.  The Rev. J. Turner of the Presbyterian Church, Cairo, officiated.  Burial was in Calvary Cemetery, Villa Ridge.

(His marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  James Franklin Tobin 1885-1926.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Card of Thanks

We desire to extend our heartfelt thanks and appreciation to our friends and neighbors for their kindness and sympathy after the death of our beloved son and brother.  Especially do we thank the Rev. J. Turner, the donors of the beautiful floral offerings and those who offered the use of their cars.
Mrs. C. B. Kilpatrick and family
 
Called to Louisiana

Mrs. G. V. March received a message Sunday which conveyed to her the sad news of the sudden death from heart trouble of her mother, Mrs. Anna Chiasson, of Patterson, La.  Mrs. March and children, Frank and Ruther Avery, left at once for the south, arriving at Patterson at 2:30 Monday in time for the funeral services, which were held at 5 o’clock that evening.  Mr. March will join his family in Louisiana at the time of his July vacation.
 
Body of Young Man Found Near Villa Ridge

Early this morning the body of a young man was found in the deep cut near Villa Ridge, about 50 feet east of the I. C. R. R. track.  Deep cuts were on both inner arms just above the elbow and there were pools of blood all the way from the railroad track to the body.  Around the man’s neck was a numbered army tag with the name something like “Cutler” inscribed thereon and a Catholic emblem. In his pockets were an open pen knife, a cheap watch and $5.36 in money.  A strip of wrapping paper which was pinned to the ground by a stick bore the inscription “My insurance to my wife.”

The man perhaps was 30 years of age.  In case the body is not identified, the Winifred Fairfax Warder Post of American Legion will bury him.

(The 10 Jun 1926, issue identified him as John P. Cutrell.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 4 Jun 1926:
Farmer Dies from Rat Bite

Bitten three weeks ago by a rat while he was pitching hay, A. M. Engstrom, 81 years old, Bureau County farmer, died at his home in Princeton Saturday.

Old Massac Resident Dies

Felix Mathis, 84 years old and who resided on the same farm just 15 miles north of Metropolis for 59 years, died last Friday.  A widow and several children survive.

“Aunt” Beck King, 109 Years Old, Dies

“Aunt” Becky King, aged 109 years, and believed to be the oldest colored woman in this state, died at her home here Sunday May 30.  She was born in slavery on a plantation in Maryland.  She was a mature woman when the Civil War started.

This aged negro woman was born in 1817 and granted freedom papers in the year 1849 at this time she was 32 years old.

Aunt Becky came to this county soon after the Civil War ended by the family of James Weaver.  Later she was employed by Mrs. Nannie Higgins, where she has remained for some 30 years and until her aged condition forbade further work, Mrs. Higgins has provided for since then.

Funeral services were held at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday at the A. M. E. Church.  Interment was made at Beech Grove Cemetery.

(A photograph of Becky King was published with the obituary.—Darrel Dexter)

Becomes Despondent Shoots Self in Temple

Despondent over ill health and the fear that he could not recover caused Frank Tobin to end his life Saturday afternoon by shooting himself though the left temple.  He died almost instantly.

The deceased is about 42 years of age and is survived by his wife and son Bethel.  He had been a salesman for the Scudder Gale Grocery Company for a number of years and was one of the best known and most popular salesmen.

Mr. Tobin had been out riding with his wife in the drainage district.  They were returning to Cairo when he asked her to stop the car a minute.  He walked over to a tree by the side of the road and fired the fatal shot.

The deceased is survived by his mother, Mrs. Kilpatrick, of Mounds; four sisters, Mrs. T. E. Koonce, of Mounds, Mrs. A. H. Ward Cotter, of Cairo, and Mrs. Laws, of East St. Louis, Mrs. Wesley Baker, of East St. Louis.  Seven brothers also survive him.  They are Will and Claude Tobin, of Mounds; Edgar, John and Clarence Tobin, of Los Angeles; and Ernest and Jesse, of Chicago.  His father passed away a number of years ago.

The last sad rites over the remains of Mr. Tobin were held at nine o’clock Monday morning at the family residence at 2505 Holbrook Avenue conducted by Rev. Turner Hood pastor of the Presbyterian Church.

The house was filled with many friends of the deceased who gathered to pay final tribute to a young man who was held in the highest esteem by all who knew him.  Many beautiful floral offerings conveyed to him the silent message of love and esteem.

The remains were taken to Calvary Cemetery Villa Ridge by automobile where brief services were conducted.

(His marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  James Franklin Tobin 1885-1926.—Darrel Dexter)

Former Mound City Man Passes Away at Memphis

Hallie Goldsmith, a former resident of Mound City, died at his home in Memphis, Thursday, May 27, after a prolonged illness.

He is survived by his wife and seven children, a brother, Mason Goldsmith, of Cairo, a sister Miss Belle Goldsmith, and a brother, Sam Goldsmith, of Mound City.  Funeral services were held in Memphis Saturday afternoon.  His sister was at his bedside when he died, having been called there some time ago by his illness. Mr. Goldsmith was born and reared in Mound City and was married here.


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 10 Jun 1926:
Fatal Accident Near Country Club Thursday Night
One Dead, Another at the Point of Death and Maurice Alexander Injured

Shortly after 12 o’clock last night an Oakland sedan owned by Maurice Alexander and a Ford occupied by Henry Kennedy and Chester Boyden, of Cairo, collided at the Beech Ridge junction of Route 2 at the Country Club corner.  Kennedy was killed, Boyden was probably fatally injured and Maurice Alexander was severely hurt.

Boyden and Alexander were rushed to St. Mary’s Infirmary, Cairo, where the former lies unconscious and in a precarious condition.  Alexander was to be x-rayed this morning on account of injuries to his dead.

The Oakland sedan was occupied by four young men and four young women.  Kennedy and Boyden were the only occupants of the Ford.  The dead man was an employee of the Singer Manufacturing Company.  Young Boyden is an employee of the C. I. P. S. Co. at the Cairo plant.  Maurice Alexander is a mechanic for the Illinois Central at this place.  His Oakland sedan was a late purchase.
 
Death Claims Brother of Mrs. C. F. Melton

Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Melton and daughter, Miss Ruth, were called to Fulton, Ky., last week by the illness and death of Mrs. Melton’s brother, Boyd McWherter, who was taken suddenly ill on Thursday and died on Saturday morning.  Funeral services were held Monday June 7.  Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Atherton also attended the funeral.  Mr. McWherter was an uncle of Mrs. Atherton.  He left a wife and two children.
 
Death of Young Child

Paul Eugene Mathis, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mathis, was born in Mounds, Ill., March 15, 1925, and died June 8, 1926, at the age of one year, two months and twenty days.

He leaves to mourn his departure, his father, mother, two sisters and four brothers, namely:  Lilly Gertrude, Mary Christine, Homer Wesley, Russell B., Earl William and Charles Leo.  His mother is very ill and was unable to attend the funeral services which were held at the Baptist church Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock, Elder H. C. Croslin officiating.  Interment was in Titus Cemetery.

(His marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Paul Eugene Mathis Born March 15, 1925 Died June 8, 1926.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Card of Thanks

We desire to extend sincere thanks and appreciation to our neighbors and friends for their assistance and sympathy during the illness and after the death of our beloved little son and brother.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mathis and Family
 
Mrs. Anna Folse Chiasson

The death of Mrs. Anna Folse Chiasson, aged 59 years, occurred suddenly at her residence early Sunday morning, May 30. Mrs. Chiasson had been in apparently good health until about a week previous to her death, when she had been confined to her bed for several days.

The deceased was a lifelong resident of this community and was held in the highest esteem by all who knew her.  Her entire life was devoted to those she loved and to her religion, the Catholic Faith being that which she professed.

The funeral was held from St. Joseph’s Catholic Church Monday evening at five o’clock, interment being in the Catholic cemetery.

Besides her husband, Mrs. Chiasson is survived by eight children, Mrs. J. J. Richard, Mrs. Howard Moore, Mrs. Duke Viguerie, and George Chiasson, of this city, Mrs. George Marsh, of Mounds, Ill., Mrs. Russell Breaux, of New Orleans, Eugene Chiasson, of Jacksonville Fla. and Earl Chiasson, of Auburn, Ga., and three sisters, Mrs. C. N. Vetter, and Mrs. J. J. Broussard, of Patterson, and Mrs. L. Larraway, of Plafuemine.  To all of these we extended our deepest and most heart-felt sympathy.—Patterson (La). Tribune.
 
On Friday of last week, Mr. and Mrs. R. T. Broyhill received word of the serious illness of Mrs. Broyhill’s father, M. S. Starr, of Carpentersville, Ill.  They departed immediately for his bedside but when they arrived the found he had already passed away.  He was 78 years of age.

(Richard T. Broyhill married Harriet Starr on 15 Apr 1900, in Kane Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Dead Man Identified by Number on Army Tag

The identity of the man whose body was found between here and Villa Ridge last Thursday was disclosed through his army tag.  Members of the American Legion telegraphed to Washington, D.C., and found that the man was John P. Cutrell, of DuQuoin.  Late Saturday afternoon relatives came from DuQuoin and claimed the body which was taken to DuQuoin for burial.  The corner’s jury had rendered a verdict of suicide.
 
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 11 Jun 1926:
Rev. Gray Called to Deathbed of Brother, Sunday

Rev. Thomas Gray, pastor of Pilgrim Congregational Church this city, left Sunday afternoon for Chanute, Kan., being called there by the death of his brother, John Gray.  Rev. Gray conducted the regular morning service and in the evening Mrs. Gray gave a most interesting missionary talk.


To Visit Mother in Scotland

Mrs. Harry Horsefall, of Villa Ridge, will leave June 19th for Dollar, Scotland, to visit her mother whom she has not seen for 18 years.  Mrs. Margaret Boyd, of St. Louis, a sister will accompany her.

Former Mound City Resident Passes Away in Cairo

Fred William Tinnemeyer, age 76 years, died Monday morning at 4:30 o’clock at his home, 219 Twelfth Street, Cairo, following a sudden illness of hemorrhage of the brain.

Mr. Tinnemeyer was a former Mound City resident coming here immediately after the furniture factory was established and was a cabinet maker.

He was born August 14, 1850, in Germany coming to this country when a lad, and has spent almost all of his life in Mound City and Cairo.  He was a lifelong member of the Lutheran Church and a member of the Lutheran Brotherhood of Cairo.

Surviving him are two sisters, of Herman, Mo., a daughter, Mrs. G. C. Artey, a son, Fred Tinnemeyer, a granddaughter, Mrs. Charles Metheney, and a great-grandson, Craige Forest Metheny, all of Cairo.  He also leave other distant relatives.

Funeral services were held at the Lutheran Church on Douglas Street, Tuesday afternoon, June 8, at 1:30.

(His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Frederick W. Tinnemeyer Born Aug. 14, 1850 Died June 7, 1926 Father.  Matilda M. Tinnemeyer Born Jan. 16, 1854 Died Dec. 13, 1929 Mother.  Frederick C. Tinnemeyer Born June 13, 1878 Died June 24, 1928 Brother.—Darrel Dexter)

HENRY KENNEDY KILLED IN COLLISION
Two Cars Crashed on Hard Road Near the Country Club

Henry Kennedy, formerly of this city, and who has been a resident of Cairo for a number of years, passed into eternity at 12 o’clock this morning as the result of a collision which occurred at the junction of the County Club and the hard road.  His companion Chester Boyden, of Cairo, lies in St. Mary’s Hospital in a serious condition.

Kennedy and Boyden were riding north in a Ford on the concrete road when they crashed into an Oakland owned by J. M. Alexander, of Mounds.  Eight persons are said to have been in the Oakland, four young women and four young men.  George Alexander was probably the most seriously injured of the eight persons in the Oakland, however, his condition is not considered serious.  Several of the girls who were in the accident were suffering from shock, but were believed to be otherwise uninjured.


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 17 Jun 1926:
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Phelps, of Vienna, attended the funeral of their aunt, Mrs. Anne Wilkinson, whose body was brought here (Villa Ridge) from Cairo last Friday for burial.

(Her marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Anne E. Wilkinson Born June 7, 1850 Died June 10, 1926.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 18 Jun 1926:
Mr. and Mrs. Loy Bagby attended the funeral of Mrs. Bagby’s mother, Mrs. Wilkerson, last Friday.  (Cross Roads)

Mrs. Dennison Passes Away

Funeral services of Mrs. Mary Dennison will be held at the First Baptist Church at Marion at 1:30 o’clock this afternoon and will be conducted by Dr. A. E. Prince, the pastor, assisted by other ministers.  Interment will be made in Rose Hill Cemetery near Marion.

Mrs. Dennison died in Texas after a prolonged illness of several months.


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 24 June 1926:
Mrs. Anna Barth

             Mrs. Anna Barth died in Chicago June 17, at the age of 52 years.  The body arrived here Saturday noon on Nov. 25 and was taken to the cemetery by Undertaker G. A. James.  Elder H. C. Croslin of the First Baptist Church had charge of the funeral services.
 
Mrs. L. C. Perks, Mr. and Mrs. G. J. Murphy, Mrs. Jennie Murphy and Mrs. Barney Burns, from Mound City, attended the funeral of Mrs. Shelton, who was brought here from Anna for burial Monday.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 1 Jul 1926:
Drowned In Ohio River at Mound City

Frank G. Hunt, of Cincinnati, Ohio, was drowned about 12 o’clock last night when he fell from a government dredge boat on which he was employed.

Mr. Hunt as 31 years of age and is survived by his wife who is in Mound City.

The body was in the water between two and three hours before it was recovered. It was placed in charge of undertaker G. A. James and it will be taken to Cincinnati via the Big Four this afternoon.
 
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 2 Jul 1926:
Rejected Suitor Ends Life

Clifford Misenheimer, 22 years old, a farmer of the Mill Creek section north of Cairo, shot himself in the heart Tuesday dying almost instantly.  By the side of his body was found a note addressed to Miss Florence Davis, of the same neighborhood, which read:  ”You have broken my heart.  Life to me is no longer a pleasure.”  A note to his parents stated that the girl had rejected his attentions.

(His marker in St. John’s Cemetery near Mill Creek reads:  Clifford C. Meisenheimer Born Nov. 17, 1902 Died June 28, 1926.—Darrel Dexter)

Some people of here (Karnak) attended the funeral of Mrs. Watkins, of Villa Ridge, last Friday.  She formerly was a resident of here before her marriage and her parents still live west of town.

Young Man Falls off Dredge Boat, Drowns

Frank Hunt, 25, assistant engineer on the U. S. Dredge Boat H. G. Harris, fell into the river last night, drowning before aid could be given him.  Hunt according to reports was on the east side of the boat, attending to some fish lines when the accident happened.  A number of pontoon barges are fastened to that side of the dredge.  Hunt fell between these barges and the dredge.

The body was recovery about an hour and a half after the accident.

After recovery the corpse was taken to the undertaking establishment of G. A. James, where it was prepared to be shipped to Fernbank, O., for burial.

Hunt was from Auburn, N.Y.  He is survived by his wife, of some ten months.  He was well liked by all members of the boat’s company.

 

The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 8 Jul 1926:
Dies from Infected Tooth

Lester Grandstaff received a message today announcing the death of his niece, Nellie Grandstaff, five-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Grandstaff, of Oklahoma City.  The child’s death was caused by an infected tooth.
 
Dies in Tucson Arizona

Word has been received of the death of Mrs. Lee Henderson in Tucson, Arizona, on Wednesday morning, July 7th.

Mr. and Mrs. Henderson resided here until a few months ago when Mrs. Henderson went to Arizona thinking the change might benefit her health. Later Mr. Henderson joined her in the West.  Her many friends will regret to hear of her untimely death.
 
Mother of C. E. Ferrill Dies at Age of 86

Mrs. H. E. Ferrill, aged 86 years, died at her home in Cobden at 2:00 o’clock Tuesday after an illness with heart trouble.  The funeral was held at the family home in Cobden Wednesday afternoon.

Mrs. Ferrill had been in failing health for some time.  She was a lifelong member of the Baptist Church at Makanda.

She is survived by her husband, who is 89 years old and quite feeble, and the following children:  Mrs. Chamness, East St. Louis; Mrs. Roy Lamer, Cobden; William and James Ferrill, Carbondale; Clovis Ferrill, Mounds; Thomas Ferrill, Shreveport, La., and Frank Ferrill, of Cobden, two sisters, Mrs. S. A. Trial, of Portland, Oregon, and Mrs. N. Minton, of Carbondale, also survive.—Carbondale Herald.

(Henry E. Ferrill married Permelia Shepherd on 28 Oct 1858, in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker in Cobden Cemetery reads:  Permelia Ferrill 1839-1925.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 9 Jul 1926:

Takes Remains Away Friday for Burial

Mrs. Frank G. Hunt accompanied the body of her husband to Cincinnati for burial Friday afternoon, leaving on the 4:07 train over the Big Four railroad.  Mr. Hunt was accidentally drowned Friday morning while on duty on the dredge boat as assistant engineer.


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 15 Jul 1926:
Among those who attended the funeral of Mrs. Lee Henderson in Bardwell, Ky., Sunday were Mrs. W. M. Kekow, Mrs. Leslie Wise, Clarence Taylor and Miss Theresa Bucher, Mrs. R. C. Smith, Mrs. Fred McIntire, Mrs. J. P. Roberts, and Mrs. H. A. Hamlett.
 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Stern, Hugh Atherton and Mrs. Lena Black on Sunday attended the funeral of Mrs. Lee Henderson, who was brought from Tucson, Ariz., to Bardwell, Ky., for burial.
 
Attends Husband’s Funeral One Day—Buried by His Side the Next

Mrs. Mary Lucas, whose home was near Miller City, Alexander County, attended the funeral of her husband, M. T. Lucas, at Beech Grove Cemetery, in this city, on Thursday morning at 11 o’clock. On Friday morning at the same hour, her body was lowered into a grave by his side.

Mr. Lucas was fatally injured in a runway accident when he was crushed by a wagon loaded with hay and he lived only about 15 minutes after the accident.

Mrs. Lucas was a sufferer from goiter and her husband’s sudden and tragic death, combined with her nervous condition, proved too much for her to bear.  It was said that she was advised not to attend the funeral services at the cemetery, but that she insisted on so doing.  She collapsed upon reaching her home and died at 2:30 p.m. that afternoon.  She was 58 years old and was born in Owensville, Ind.

Death separated the couple only 48 hours and the grave separated them only 24.
 
Mrs. Virginia Henderson

Mrs. Virgie Jennings Henderson was born near Arlington, Ky., on December 8, 1898, and died in Tucson, Ariz., on July 6, 1926, at the age of 27 years, 6 months and 28 days.  She professed faith in Christ at the age of 15 years and united with the Baptist Church.  She was married to Mr. Lee Henderson on June 6, 1925.  To this union were born two children, James, age 10, and Mildred, age 5. In January 1918, Mr. and Mrs. Henderson came to Mounds to make their home.  In March 1926, Mrs. Henderson went to Tucson, Arizona, for the benefit of her health.

Besides her husband and children, she leaves a sister, Mrs. Lynn Hinkle, of Cairo, and a brother, M. C. Jennings, of Seattle, Wash.

Her body was brought to Arlington, Ky., her old home.  She was buried at Bardwell, Ky., on Sunday, July 11.  Funeral services were conducted at the grave with the Ladies Auxiliary to Brotherhood of Railway Trainman in charge.  A large number of friends form Mounds attended the funeral.
 
Two Well-Known Colored Residents Die
Elmo Allen

The death of Elmo Allen, an old and respected citizen of Mounds, occurred at the Soldiers’ Home in Danville, Ill., Friday, July 9th.  He had been in the Home for about three months.

Funeral services were conducted Tuesday afternoon by Rev. Dotson, of Dyersburg, Tenn., at St. John Baptist Church, of which Mr. Allen had been a member for many years, serving on the deacon’s board.
He leaves his wife, Mrs. Lucinda Allen, a stepson, and daughter and many friends to mourn his demise.

He was a soldier in the Spanish American War and was buried in the National Cemetery between here and Mound City.
Robert Chandler

Robert Chandler, familiarly known as “Bob,” died suddenly of heart disease on Sunday evening in front of B. A. Braddy’s store while on his way to call a doctor to attend his daughter who had been run over by an automobile.

Mr. Chandler was a consistent Christian and was a member of the Salem Free Baptist Church. 

Funeral services were held at this church Thursday afternoon, Rev. McCanley delivering the sermon.  He is survived by five children and many friends.

             (Elmore Allen married Melvina Case on 2 May 1888, in Alexander Co., Ill.  He served in Co. M 8th Illinois Infantry and filed for a pension in 1901.  His widow, Lucinda Allen, filed for a widow’s pension in 1926.  He is in the 1920 census of West Blanche Street, Mounds, Ill.:  Elmo Allen, 62, born in Kentucky; wife Lucinda Allen, born in Tennessee; and stepson, Charles Futua, 33, born in Kentucky.  Private Elmore Allen, U.S. Army, died 9 July 1926, and was buried in Section F, grave 4964Q in Mound City National Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

 
Mrs. J. K. Mitchell was called to Kankakee, Ill., Friday, July 9th by the death of her son, Berry Mitchell. The body was brought to Mounds Wednesday where funeral services were held at St. Raphael’s Church with interment in St. Mary’s Cemetery.

(His marker in St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Barry A. Mitchell 1901-1926.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 16 Jul 1926:
Former Mound City Resident Dies in California

Mrs. Laura A. Richards, a former resident of this city, died Tuesday, July 6th, at her home in Los Angeles, Calif.  Mrs. Richards is survived by two sisters living in Cairo, Mrs. Mary Milford and Mrs. Anna Burgess, and four brothers, Charles Richards, of St. Louis, Harry Richards, of Chicago, Ralph Richards, of Denver, and Donald Richards, of Los Angeles, with whom she made her home.

The funeral was held in Los Angeles, Thursday, July 8.

R. C. Magill received a message Friday afternoon, stating that his brother, William Magill had passed away at his home in Texarkana, Ark.  He left Saturday to attend the funeral.

Charles Duncan Killed in Accident at Erie, Pa.

The body of Charles Duncan, colored, arrived here Tuesday from Erie, Pa., and after the funeral services was taken to Beech Grove Cemetery for burial.  Deceased was instantly killed by a centerpole falling on him during a storm while he and his wife were attending the “101 Ranch” shows at Erie, his home.  His wife who was walking beside him, miraculously escaped uninjured. He was about 40 years of age and this city was his birthplace.  Besides his widow, he leaves among his mourners, his mother, Mrs. Persia Duncan Kirkpatrick, also two sisters.

Miss Sarah Hileman Dies

Miss Sarah Hileman, 49 years of age, passed away Sunday night at 8:30 at her home near Olmstead.  She had been ill for several months.  Surviving her is her mother, Mrs. Jane Hileman, and a brother, Henry Hileman, of Olmstead, besides many other relatives and friends.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the residence, Rev. C. Robert Dunlap, pastor of the Lutheran Church at Cairo officiating.  Interment at Concord Cemetery, Olmsted, G. A. James in charge.

(Thomas Hileman married Jane Cline on 14 Jan 1872, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Concord Cemetery near Olmsted reads:  Sarah A. Hileman 1876-1926.—Darrel Dexter)

Father Dies in Doctor’s Office Securing Aid for Daughter.

An 11-year-old colored girl, the daughter of Robert Chandler, while walking along the concrete road just north of Pulaski Sunday afternoon, was struck by a car driven by Dr. A. W. Springs, of Williamson County.  She was rushed to her home in Mounds for medical attention.  Her father rushed to Dr. Seely’s office for treatment of his daughter, and the doctor seeing the father was in a serious condition from excitement, said he would see the girl, but must first give the father a hypodermic injection.  The doctor, leaving the father, went into another room to get the hypodermic needle.  When he returned a few seconds later Chandler was dead.

Colored Lad Exonerated on a Manslaughter Charge

A boy who was driving a car returning from Mounds to Carbondale with a colored basketball team which collided with a fatal result at Dongola, February 12, with a machine from Ullin containing white basketball players returning from a game at Alto Pass, was finally acquitted.  In the accident, Russell Ulen, of Ullin, lost his life and Robert Gunn, of Villa Ridge, was badly injured.  The driver of the Carbondale car, Percolier Greer, colored, was exonerated a few days ago.  The Anna Talk contained the following concerning the case:

“The trial of Percolier Greer, colored, on a manslaughter charge, when Russell Ulen was killed in an auto collision at Dongola, February 12, was the most unusual in that if Greer had been found guilty, he could not have been legally sentenced.  A member of the jury tried him on the manslaughter charge was also a member of the grand jury that indicted him, which would have caused the court to set aside a verdict of guilty.  Greer, however, was acquitted and turned loose.  The evidence failed to show that he was at fault.  Just why the grand jury man was accepted in such a case as a trial juror, is not known.  P. E. Hileman, of Anna, and Floyd M. Bradley, of Carbondale, were Greer’s attorneys.

(His marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug reads:  Russel Ulen 1909-1926—Darrel Dexter)


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 22 Jul 1926:
Helen Graves Elmore

Helen Mildred Graves, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Graves, was born July 4, 1904, and died July 19, 1926, at the age of 22 years and 15 days.  She was married to Jack Elmore some four years ago.
Mrs. Elmore had been in failing health for some time and had spent several months in the west.  She died at the home of her parents, west of Mounds, after all had been done for her that living care could do.
Besides her husband and parents, she leaves several sisters and brothers.

Funeral services were held at the home Wednesday at 2:30 p.m. conducted by Rev. G. B. Waldron, of the Congregational Church.  Burial was in Beech Grove Cemetery.
 
Former Mounds Resident Meets Sudden Death
I. C. Fireman Accidentally Killed While on His Run

R. M. Franklin, a former resident of Mounds, met a sudden death Sunday, July 18, at 6:30 p.m., while on his regular run on the Illinois Central railroad.

Franklin was firing engine No. 1845 and the train was near Makanda when he noticed a noise that seemed to come from under the tender of the engine.  He started to try to locate the trouble and, according to trainmen, stepped out on the lower step of the locomotive and learned over the track.  The train, a southbound one, was traveling at a fair rate of speed.  While crossing the iron bridge just north of Makanda, Franklin was hit on the head by one of the bridge girders.  Instantly death resulted from the blow and his body fell to the water below.

Mr. Franklin was twice a resident of Mounds.  He was twice married and he leaves a ten-year-old daughter by his first marriage.

The body was taken to Centralia where he resided at the time of his death and from there to his old home in Bone Gap, Ill., for burial.
 
 
The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 29 Jul 1926:
Card of Thanks

We desire to extend our sincere thanks to all those who have shown kindness and sympathy during the long illness and after the death of our beloved daughter and sister, Helen Graves Elmore.  Especially do we wish to thank Rev. G. B. Waldon, the choir, all friends, the switchmen and the donors of flowers.
Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Graves and family

Death of Little Girl

Eileen Titus, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Seth Titus, of Spencer Heights, died Monday, July 26, at 5 a.m. at St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, at the age of 3 years, 3 months and 28 days.

The little girl had been ill for some time, having had the measles, followed by the mumps and later sickness incident to hot weather.  She was taken to St. Mary’s Friday, but grew steadily worse until the hour of death.

Funeral services were held at the Methodist Episcopal Church at 2 p.m. Tuesday, conducted by Rev. J. S. Dever.  Burial was in Titus Cemetery.

(Her marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery reads:  Eileen Titus 1923-1926.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Fatal Accident Friday Night
One Killed, Three Seriously Injured on Route 2 between Here and Cairo

Alonzo Keaton, of Cairo, is dead, Clement Marchildon, of Thebes, Margaret Rust, of Cairo and Claudia Thomas, of this city, are seriously injured as the result of an automobile accident, which occurred Friday night at 10:20 o’clock on Route 2 between here and Cairo.

The young people were coming north from Cairo in a Buick coupe driven by Alonzo Keaton, owner of the coupe.  A switch engine was standing still, directly across the hard road at the Bruce Lumber plant crossing.  The young people evidently did not see the engine for the driver failed to slow up and the crash came with terrific force.

Alonzo Keaton was so badly crushed that he died about 1 a.m.  Young Marchildon sustained a fractured skull.  Miss Rust a fractured left thigh, Miss Thomas a fractured bone just above the ankle of right leg and a laceration of the left leg just above the back of the knee.

The young people were taken immediately to St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, and relatives were summoned.  As the night wore on a large crowd gathered on the hospital ground waiting for reports from the wounded.  One man in the crowd fainted.

Miss Thomas was brought home Sunday afternoon and is doing as well as could be expected.  The latest reports tell of improvement in the condition of Miss Rust and Mr. Marchildon and hopes are entertained for their ultimate recovery.


The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 30 Jul 1926:
Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Clifford and family, Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Keller and daughters and Mrs. Vines were called to Anna last week on account of the death of the nine-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jake Vines.


Taken to Grand Chain for Burial Friday.

Funeral services over the remains of Mrs. Callie Chamberlain who passed away at her home in this city Thursday of ___ week after a prolonged illness was held Friday afternoon at __ o’clock at the First Baptist Church.  Interment was made in ___ Cemetery near Grand Chain, ___ James, undertaker, in charge.

(Her marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Allie Chamberlain Born Dec. 18, 1865 Died July 22, 1926.—Darrel Dexter)

THREE AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS IN WEEK
Two Dead, Others Seriously Injured in Collision with Steam Engine

Alonzo Keaton, 23, was killed and Clement Marchildon, 23, Miss Margaret Rust, 21, and Miss Claudia Thomas, 16, were seriously injured last Friday night at eleven o’clock when the Buick coupe in which the four were riding crashed into a switch engine at the crossing near the Bruce wood working plant.  Keaton died after an hour had been spent by doctors at St. Mary’s Hospital in an attempt to revive him.  The other victims were immediately rushed to the hospital at Cairo in cars where medical treatment was rendered them.  They were later removed to their respective homes.

The parents and relatives of the four young people were notified as quickly as possible after the accident.

The party had attended the picture show at Cairo and were driving north on the concrete slab when the accident occurred.  The car struck the engine about midways of its length, the impact was so great that the auto telescoped, pushing its engine back and down under the driver’s seat.  A large bar on the side of the locomotive was so bent that it had to be loosened before the tracks could be cleared.

When the accident occurred, the switch engine had just crossed the road and had been brought to a standstill.  The fireman, E. Mulchay, states that he saw the car was going to hit the engine and shouted to the engineer, R. Whimpie, who brought it to a stop.  A wrecking crew was summoned to take the locomotive away.

These three and one half miles of concrete road is beginning to be a very bloody history.  Several negroes were killed at the same crossing two years ago.  Their car crashed into a string of box cars that were blocking the road.  Chester Minton was killed near the same scene two months ago, when a car hit him while he was changing a tire.  Several other accidents in which one or more persons were killed have occurred on this road in the past six months.

Charles LaMar, of Dongola, died at St. Mary’s Infirmary this ___ as a result of an automobile accident that occurred in Dongola last week.  The car in which LaMar and his wife were riding stopped on the Illinois Central railroad tracks in Dongola and was struck by a south bound freight train.  Mrs. LaMar was injured very bad, but was able to return to her home in Dongola.

The accident occurred near 1 o’clock, LaMar being rushed to the hospital, but died about 2:30.  LaMar suffered a badly crushed skull and his left leg was cut ___.

The victim was employed as ___ salesman, working out of Dongola, where he made his home.

(A marker in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Charles F. Lamar Born Aug. 24, 1890 Died July 26, 1926.  An American Legion marker next to this one reads:  Charles Frederick Lamar Pvt. Died July 1926.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 5 Aug 1926:

Card of Thanks

             We take this means of thanking the good people of Mounds for their many acts of kindness and sympathy shown us during the illness and death of our baby, Eileen, and wish to assure you that such acts of kindness go far towards alleviation of our sorrow.

Mr. and Mrs. Seth Titus

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 12 Aug 1926:

Fifteen Year Old Boy Drowned in Ohio

Search Being Made for Body.  $100.00 Reward Offered to Finder

             Arnold Lence, age 15 years, was drowned in the Ohio River near old Caledonia, between Olmstead and Dam 53, Tuesday afternoon, Aug. 10.

             The boy was considered a good swimmer for one of his age.  Waves from the steamer Tennessee Belle are thought to have been more than the lad could successfully struggle against.

             Arnold was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Loren Lence.  His father was killed in the World War and the boy lived in Olmstead with his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Arnold.  His mother passed through Mounds Wednesday en route to Olmsted, called there by the fatal accident to her young son.

             The lad celebrated his 15th birthday Monday at which time a party was given in his honor.

             A $100.00 reward has been offered by the grandparents for the recovery of the body.

 

Death of Infant

             An infant was born to Mr. and Mrs. Roy Brown Sunday night.  The little one lived only one day.  Burial was in Beech Grove Cemetery Tuesday afternoon.

 

Mound City Colored Man Killed in Quarrel with Wife

             Tom Clemons, colored, was instantly killed by his wife in a quarrel at their home in Mound City Monday morning about 10 o’clock.

             Immediately after the killing, Mrs. Clemmons called up Sheriff I. J. Hudson, over the telephone and told him what she had done.  A coroner’s jury exonerated her from all blame.

             Clemons was 42 years old and had been a porter for the firm of Rhodes-Burford for many years.  He was a brother-in-law of Charles Rice, colored attorney at law.

 

Mail Carrier Murdered by Youth of 20 Years

             Joe Chesnas has confessed to the murder of William Unsell, veteran mail carrier, of Harrisburg, Ill., as the latter lay asleep in his home Sunday night.

             The Thursday night previous the Unsell home had been robbed and two men, Alfred Dixon and Joe Ingram, had been arrested and imprisoned.

             Young Chesnas confessed that he had been implicated in this robbery and fearing the discovery decided to kill Unsell.  He stealthily entered the home and shot the aged man.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 13 Aug 1926:
___ Dauksch died at his home ___ last week. Interment at ____ Saturday.  Mr. Dauksch lived to a ripe old age, had been an invalid for a few years.  (Cross Roads)

COLORED WOMAN SHOOTS HUSBAND
Beating His Spouse in a Quarrel, She Kills Him Instantly

Tom Clemons, 42, porter at the Rhodes Burford Furniture Store here, was shot and instantly killed by his wife, Margaret Clemons.  The shooting occurred at the Clemons home and was the termination of a quarrel that started early Monday morning.  The shooting occurred between 9 and 10 a.m.

According to the testimony that was given at the coroner’s inquest that was held in the undertaking parlors of G. A. James at 2:30 o’clock Monday afternoon, Clemons left home apparently to go and sweep out the building at the usual hour.  He returned and asked for his breakfast.  His wife, who was working, said that she would fix it immediately for him.  She did so.  Clemons ate a few bites and saying that he did not want any more of the meal left the house.  He again returned and called to his wife.  A quarrel started and witnesses say that Clemons said that he “was going to kill you,” meaning his wife.  He started to load a shotgun but changed his mind and reached for his pistol.  The wife being the nearer to the weapon reached it first.  According to the testimony of Mrs. Clemons, she put the revolver behind her. Clemons is then alleged to have struck her in the left eye, terribly disfiguring it, and threw her against the door.  It is then that the shooting started.  The woman pointed the weapon at the man and started firing.  The pistol contained five empty cartridges.

Clemons was shot through the left shoulder and in the abdomen.  He died almost instantly.

Clemons is alleged to have been drinking heavily the preceding day.  It is the sentiment of the neighbors and many others who are acquainted with the deceased that he was under the influence of liquor when the shooting took place.

Funeral services were held Wednesday.  A Masonic funeral was held for the deceased.

The coroner’s jury returned the verdict of “justifiable homicide.”  Mrs. Clemons was not arrested.  

Her appearance on the stand constituted the important testimony in the case.

Mrs. Cogswell Passes Away

Mrs. M. D. Cogswell, of Crichton, Ala., formerly of this city, died at her home Monday night, according to word received here Tuesday.  She was a sister of the late Mrs. Charles Dishinger and an aunt of Harry Dishinger, of this city.  Mrs. Harry Dishinger and children were at her bedside when she passed away.

Mr. Dishinger leaving Tuesday for Crichton to attend the funeral.

Olmstead Lad Drowns

Arnold Lence, age 13, was drowned last Thursday while swimming in the Ohio River at the Caledonia landing near Olmstead.  Lence with two other boys had gone in swimming.  All were in a boat.  The Lence boy jumped from the boat into the water.  He immediately began to sink.  When the boys could not rescue the drowning boy, they ran for aid.

A thorough search was made for the body and when it could not be located a diver was called from Cairo to search the bottom of the river for the body.  The body has not been located as yet and the relatives are offering a reward for its recovery.


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 19 Aug 1926:

Two Men Killed in Collision

Riders of Motorcycle Killed in Crash with Buick

             Thursday morning at 9:30 o’clock, Loren Smith, manager of the Dixcel Oil Station, was instantly killed and Fremont Bridwell fatally injured when the motorcycle they were riding crashed into a Buick roadster on the curve of Titus hill.

             Loren Smith was driving the motorcycle, a new one he had purchased only a few days ago, and Bridewell was riding behind him.  They were going north.  At the foot of the hill they passed R. L. Britton in a Ford sedan.  There is a sharp curve near the top of the hill and evidently the motorcycle had not turned back to the right of the road going north.  A Buick roadster driven by Vernon Ogden, of Cairo, was coming south and the roadster and motorcycle met with a terrible crash.

             The driver of the roadster turned off the concrete to the right and the driver of the motorcycle turned west also.  The collision occurred several feet off the concrete slab.

             Both Smith and Bridwell were terribly mutilated.  The latter was brought to Dr. H. J. Elkins’ office and later taken to his home.  At 10 o’clock last night he was taken to St. Mary’s Hospital, Cairo, where he died at 2:15 this morning.

             Coroner O. T. Hudson was called to the scene of the accident and Smith’s body was then brought to the funeral home of G. A. James.

             Ogden, the driver of the Buick, had with him Gaither Moore, and Misses Billie Bass and Edith Leech, all of Cairo.  Miss Bass was cut and bruised about the face and was taken to Dr. Hudson’s office for treatment.

             Both Smith and Bridwell were young men in their twenties and both were married.  The former leaves his wife, formerly Miss Blanche Lentz, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Smith, two sisters and two brothers.  The latter leaves his wife, formerly Miss Margaret Lewis, a baby son, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Bridewell, a brother, and two sisters.

             These families have the sympathy of the entire community.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 20 Aug 1926:
OBITUARY
RAYMOND ARNOLD LENCE

Son of Mr. and Mrs. Loren Lence, was born June 22, 1913, at Mounds, Illinois and died about 4 o’clock Tuesday afternoon, August 10, by drowning while swimming in the Ohio River off Caledonia Landing.  Aged 13 years, 1 month and 13 days.

His father enlisted during the World War and lost his life while doing oversea services in France.
Arnold had always made his home with his grandmother and grandfather in Olmstead.  He was a boy with such a sweet lovable disposition that to know him was to love him.

He was baptized when a small boy and became a member of the Olmstead M. E. Church South at nine years of age from which time he had been a faithful little worker.

He leaves to mourn over his death an ever loving mother, grandmother and grandfather, as well as a great number of relatives and friends.

(A marker in the Masonic Cemetery at Olmsted reads:  Arnold Lence Born June 22, 1913 Died Aug. 10, 1926.—Darrel Dexter)

Card of Thanks

We take this means to express our gratitude to the many friends whose condolences served to assuage our great grief at the loss of our beloved boy, Arnold, and we acknowledge with thanks the many beautiful floral tributes.  We deeply appreciate the services rendered by Brothers White and Martin, also the Mound City choir.  And to the good men who unhesitatingly and with untiring efforts patrolled and searched the river for our boy, we offer our sincere thanks
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Arnold, Grandparents
Myrtle Arnold, Mother

Auto Crash, One Dead, One Fatally Injured

Loren Smith, age 23, manager of the Home Oil Co., at Mounds, was killed and Freemont Bridewell, age 21, of Mounds, was fatally injured when the motorcycle on which they were riding collided with a Buick roadster driven by Vernon Ogden, of Cairo, on the concrete road north of Mounds at 9:30 o’clock Thursday morning.

The motorcycle was completely demolished and the Buick so badly damaged that it had to be towed from the scene of the tragedy.

Moore and Ogden with two women, Miss Billie Bass and Miss Edith Leech, were occupants of the Buick car, the two men being notorious bootleggers.  Miss Bass’s face was so badly cut and battered that immediate medical attention was given her.  The others escaped with a few cuts and bruises.

As we go to press we learn that Freemont Bridewell died at _:30 this morning.

BODY OF LENCE BOY RECOVERED FRIDAY
Found By W. M. Ivy, of Urbandale—Funeral Held Saturday Afternoon

The body of Arnold Lence, age 13, who drowned in the Ohio River north of Olmsted near the old Caledonia Landing while in swimming with three boys Tuesday, Aug. 10th, was taken from the river opposite Urbandale Friday morning, Aug. 13th, when William Ivy, a grocer, of Urbandale, picked it up while fishing from a boat in the Ohio River just a short distance north of Urbandale.

No trouble was encountered in identifying the body as the boy wore a signet ring with the initial “L” engraved upon it.  He also had a handkerchief tied around his head at the time of his death.  Both the ring and the handkerchief were found upon the body.  The body was badly decomposed by the hot weather and time in the water.

Vernon Hughes and Carmen Albright, the latter a cousin of the drowned youth, testified at the inquest.  They said they were riding in a small boat about 15 feet from the bank and were diving from it.  Lence, after making a dive, was swimming toward the boat when he suddenly turned over on one side and appeared to be suffering intense pain as if stricken with a cramp.  He sank from view without an ___tery and never came to the surface.  A man standing on the bank saw the boy disappear, but was unable to swim and could not save him.  Dragging and diving for the body met with failure and it is thought that the body came to the surface and floated down the river Thursday night, getting past lookouts posted at Olmsted and Mound City.

Arnold Lence was grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Arnold.  His mother lives in Chicago.  His father was killed in the World War and he made his home with his grandparents since he was three years old.
Largely attended funeral services were held over the body Saturday afternoon at Olmstead.


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 26 Aug 1926:

Death of Wife of Local Pastor

             Mrs. G. W. Hill, wife of the pastor of the Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church (colored) of this city, died Sunday at 9 p.m. from a paralytic stroke.

             Funeral services were held at the church Wednesday afternoon at 3 p.m. after which the body was taken to St. Louis for treatment.

             Besides her husband, the deceased leaves two daughters and a son.

 

Clyde Lentz, who is in the U. S. Navy, was called here from Newport, R. I., by the death of his brother-in-law, Loren D. Smith.

 

Card of Thanks

             We take this means of thanking the friends who so kindly assisted us after the tragic death of our husband, son and brother.  Especially do we wish to thank the Masons and the donors of the beautiful floral offerings.

Mrs. Loren D. Smith

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Smith and Family

 

Civil War Veteran Answers Last Call

Henry A. Bride Dies at Home of Son

             Henry A. Bride, one of the best known residents of Pulaski County, passed away at the home of his son, Percy G. Bride, Saturday night, Aug. 21, in the 85th year of his life.

             Mr. Bride was born in Rochester, Vermont, in 1842.  He was a veteran of the Civil War, having served with the First Vermont Cavalry.  He came to Illinois in 1871 and for many years engaged in farming near Villa Ridge.  He was the oldest member of Caledonia Lodge No. 47 A. F. & A. M. of Pulaski, Ill.  For several years he has made his home with his son, Percy G. Bride, at 524 Twenty-first Street, Cairo.

             Besides his son, Mr. Bride leaves a granddaughter, Mrs. O. C. Geilhausen, of Centralia, a grandson, James Bride, of St. Louis, a sister, Mrs. W. W. Chaffee, of Alexandria, Va., and other relatives.

             Funeral services were held Monday at 1 p.m. at the residence, Rev. Joel Burgess, of Princeton, Ill., officiating.  The funeral cortege went by automobile to Liberty Cemetery near Villa Ridge.

A.J. Spencer of Mounds was a pallbearer.  Other pallbearers were E. J. Lackey, J. A. Calvin, H. E. Stewart, and W. R. Aldrich.

 

Loren D. Smith

Loren D. Smith, son of W. H. and Martha Smith, was born in America, Pulaski Co., Ill., May 27th 1897, and died at Mounds, Illinois, August 19, 1926, aged 29 years, 2 months and 22 days.  He came with his parents to this city about 1914 at which place he had since made his home except while away in government service in the Marine Corps from June 21, 1918, until he was honorably discharged on August 12, 1919.  He was married to Miss Blanche Lentz, of this city, on Nov. 14th, 1925.

He leaves to mourn his sudden departure, his wife, father, mother, two sisters, Pearl Smith, of Mounds, Mr. Ethel McConnell, of Multnomah, Oregon, two brothers, Roy and Claude, both at home.  He had been employed as manager of the Dixcel Oil Station of this city, in which business he had been engaged for the past two years.

He possessed an unusually pleasant, sunny disposition.  His work placed him where he came in contact with many people.  He made friends quickly and they were numbered by the scores and by the hundred.  He was an unusual character, standing for what he believed to be right and having no sympathy with mere pretensions.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 1 o’clock at the First Baptist Church.  Rev. Joel Burgess, of Princeton, Ill., officiated, assisted by Eld. H. C. Croslin, pastor of the church. Local Trinity No. 562 of the Masonic order had charge of the burial service at Beech Grove Cemetery.

(W. H. Smith married Martha Diehl on 23 Oct 1887, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Fremont Bridewell

             Fremont Bridewell, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Bridewell, was born in Webster, South Dakota, on Oct. 7, 1906, and died in Cairo, Illinois, Aug. 20, 1926, at the age of 19 years, 10 months and 13 days.

With his father and mother he came to Mounds in December 1911.  He attended the Mounds public schools through the eighth grades of the grammar school and through the freshman and sophomore years of high school.  His junior year’s work was taken in Webster, South Dakota, to which place the family had removed.  Returning to Mounds, Fremont completed his high school course and graduated from M. T. H. S. in the class of 1924.

             On November 30th, 1924, he was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Lewis, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. O. Lewis, of Villa Ridge. To this union was born, on November 30th, 1925, a son, Fremont Junior.

For a short time the young couple made their home in Mound City, later moving to Mounds where they resided at the time of the sudden death of the young husband and father, as a result of a motorcycle accident.

             At the time of his death he was an employee of the Illinois Central Railroad Company.

             Funeral services were held Monday morning at 9 o’clock at the Catholic church.  Rev. Father Traynor, pastor of the church officiated.  Interment was in St. Mary’s Cemetery.

 

A number from here (Villa Ridge) attended the funeral of Loren Smith Sunday and Fremont Bridewell Monday at Mounds, both boys being victims of an auto-motorcycle wreck which occurred last Thursday.

 

Paul Bame attended the funeral of Fremont Bridewell in Mounds Monday. (Ullin)

 

Several from here (America) attended the funeral of Loren Smith at Mounds Sunday afternoon. Loren was born and reared here at America and was liked by everyone.

 

Mrs. M. H. Lucas and little daughter, Eileen, of Easton, Ill., and Mrs. D. K. Brown, of Des Moines, Iowa, were called here by the serious illness of their mother, Mrs. Adam Bourland. (Ullin)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 27 Aug 1926:
Mrs. Rose Dunn Dies at Her Home in This City

Mrs. Rose Dunn, age 52, and a well-known resident of this city, passed away Tuesday night at her home on High Street, following an illness of several months.  She suffered from a leaky heart with which she became stricken last February.  Deceased was born near Vienna, and resided there for many years, coming from there to this city fifteen years ago.  She was a devoted member of the Baptist Church and leaves many sorrowing friends of that denomination.  Mrs. Dunn is survived by her husband, Edward Dunn, one daughter, Mrs. Carl Johansen, a son, James, of this city, a son, Ralph, of San Pedro, Cal.
Funeral services were held this Friday morning at 9 o’clock at the Baptist Church in this city.  After the services the cortege left in automobiles for Vienna where interment will be made.

Funeral and Burial Services Over Auto Accident Victims

Funeral services for Loren Smith, age 23, of Mounds, killed Aug. 19th, in a collision between an automobile and a motorcycle, was held Sunday at 2 p.m. at the Mounds Baptist Church.  Interment made in Beech Grove Cemetery.

Smith is survived by his wife, parents, sister and brother.

Funeral services for Freemont Bridewell, age 19, also of Mounds, who was fatally injured in the same accident and who died later in the St. Mary’s Hospital, was held Monday morning at 9 o’clock at St. Raphael’s Church in Mounds, conducted by Rev. Father Traynor, pastor of the church.  Interment made in St. Mary’s Cemetery.

Classmates from the graduating class of ‘24 of the Mounds high school acted as pallbearers for Bridewell.  The following selected taking part:  Paul Baine, Clifford Needham, Clyde Hogendobler, Henry Hogendobler, James Davis, John Spaulding, Leslie Wiese, Lawrence Schneider, Edgar Minton, Marvin Bishop, Jesse Tobin, Edwin Green, and Charles Bench.  Girls selected from the class of ‘24 acted as flower bearers.

Bridewell is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Bridwell, of Mounds, his wife and one child, a brother, Edwin, and twin sisters, Madeline and Adeline Bridewell, all of Mounds.

(His marker in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Fremont Bridewell 1906-1926 Son.—Darrel Dexter)

HENRY A. BRIDE DIES IN CAIRO
Aged Veteran of Civil War Highly Respected Resident of Pulaski County.

Henry A. Bride, passed away Saturday night at the home of his son, Percy G. Bride, 524 Twenty-first Street, Cairo, death being ascribed to the general infirmities of old age.  The deceased was in this 85th year and was well known in and about Cairo and Alexander County.

Mr. Bride, who was a veteran of the Civil War, was one of the best known residents of Pulaski County and Cairo and vicinity.  He came to Illinois in 1871 from Vermont and for years engaged in farming near Villa Ridge.  He was the oldest member of Caledonia Lodge No. 47 A. F. & A. M. of Pulaski, Ill.  For the past several years, Mr. Bride has made his home with his son, P. G. Bride, in Cairo.
Deceased is survived by the following relatives in addition to his son, Percy G. Bride, of Cairo; Mrs. O. C. Geilhauseh, of Centralia, granddaughter; James Bride, of St. Louis, a grandson; Mrs. W. W. Chaffee, of Alexandria, Va., a sister; William Bride, of Villa Ridge, and Garner Bride, of Harrisburg, nephews; Mrs. C. S. Britton, of Cairo, Mrs. D. L. Barthel and Miss Leila Bride, of Harrisburg, Mrs. Myron Brown, of Vincennes, Ind., Mrs. Joel Burgess, of Princeton, Ill. Mrs. Mary Johnson, of Milwaukee, nieces.

Funerals services were held Monday afternoon at 1 o’clock at the residence, Rev. Joel Burgess of Princeton, Ill., officiating.  Immediately after the services, which were largely attended by sorrowing relatives and friends the cortege left by automobiles for Liberty Cemetery, near Ullin, where interment was made.  The floral offerings were of unusual beauty and abundance.  Post No. 706 of the American Legion formed a military escort at the funeral.

The pallbearers who were chosen from the lodge of which Mr. Bride was a member were E. J. Lackey, C. W. Curry, J. A. Calvin, H. E. Stewart, C. J. Spencer, and W. R. Aldridge.

(A military marker was ordered for Henry A. Bride to be erected in Liberty Cemetery near Pulaski, but it is missing from the cemetery.  He was a private in Company E, 1st Vermont Cavalry and 23 Co., 2nd Battalion Vetean Reserve Coprs.  In 1880 he filed for a pension and died 21 Aug 1926.—Darrel Dexter)


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 2 Sep 1926:

Death of Infant

             Hazel Marie Corbett, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Corbett, passed away Sunday afternoon, Aug. 29th, at 4:50 o’clock after a two days illness.

             The little one was born July 9th, and was one month and 20 days old at the time of her death.

             Funeral services were held at the home of 1:30 p.m. Monday.  Rev. Father Eugene Traynor of the Catholic Church officiated.  Burial was in St. Mary’s Cemetery.

 

Card of Thanks

             We take this means of thanking the many friends who so kindly assisted us during the illness and after the death of our husband and father.  Especially do we thank those who furnished the cars and the donors of the beautiful floral offerings.

Mrs. W. P. Ledbetter

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Guy

Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Stull

Mr. and Mrs. Lute Wilson

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Sichling

Mr. and Mrs. Wes Ledbetter

 

Card of Thanks

             We desire to extend our heartfelt thanks for all the kindness shown to us in our great sorrow over the loss of our loved one.  Especially do we wish to thank the donors of the beautiful floral offerings.

Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Bridewell and family

Mrs. Fremont Bridewell

 

Small Child Dies

             Leo William Albright, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. William Albright, was born June 28th, 1925, and died Aug. 31, 1926, at 2:54 a.m. at the age of 1 year, 2 months and 3 days.  The baby was the grandson of Elder and Mrs. George Albright, a former resident of this city.

             Funeral services were held at the Baptist Church in Elco at 11 a.m. Sept. 2, Elder H. C. Croslin of Mounds, officiating.  Interment was in Sims Cemetery.

 

Young Woman of Cairo a Suicide

             Mrs. Villa Walker Taylor, age 23 years, wife of Earl Taylor, of Cairo, was found dead Monday afternoon near the road along the Mississippi River opposite Eighteenth Street, Cairo.  Her body was found by Andrew Petrie, a Cairo boy, and when found was still warm.  In her hand she was still tightly clutching a Smith and Wesson 32 caliber revolver.  The position of the body indicated that she had been sitting on a log when she fired the fatal shot and had fallen to the ground.  Mrs. Taylor had been in poor health for the last three years, having suffered a fractured skull in an automobile accident.  A few months ago she was sent to the hospital at Anna for observation.  She had returned home only about a week ago.

             Mrs. Taylor was the daughter of George B. Walker and sister-in-law of Thomas O’Kane, of the Walker-O’Kane Printing Co., of Cairo.

             (George B. Walker married Captola Albright on 13 Apr 1892, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

William Perry Ledbetter

             William Perry Ledbetter, eldest son of Isaac and Caroline Ledbetter, was born in Tennessee, July 5th, 1853, and died in Ullin, Ill., August 30th, 1926, his age being 73 years, 1 month and 25 days.

             He was married January 18th, 1874, to Armelda Dillon, of Pulaski, Illinois, and to this union were born three sons and five daughters.  Two sons and one daughter preceded him in death.  Surviving him are his wife, four daughters, Mrs. Ida Sichling, Mrs. Nora Stull, Mrs. Minnie Wilson, all of Ullin, and Mrs. Julia Guy, of Mounds, one son, Wesley Ledbetter, of Ullin.  Other relatives are three brothers, Wiley, of Olmstead, Benton, of Pulaski, and Albert Ledbetter, of Mounds, twenty-two grandchildren, and six great-grandchildren, with many friends and neighbors who with the relatives will miss “Uncle Perry” as he was so generally known.

             He joined the Southern Methodist Church at New Hope in early manhood and continued a faithful Christian until death.

             More than a year ago, he suffered a stroke of paralysis, from which he never entirely recovered.  This was followed by a second and a third, about nine weeks ago, and from that time his sufferings have been intense.

             Death came, with all his children at his bedside, as a great relief, as he was ready and had expressed a desire to go to the “Beulah Land” where the great Healer will surely say to him “well down, good and faithful servant, enter into the joy of thy Lord.”

             Funeral services were held at the First Methodist Church, Ullin, Tuesday morning, at 11 o’clock Rev. Charles Atchison officiating.  Burial was at New Hope Cemetery.

             (Joseph Sichling married Ida Ledbetter on 25 Dec 1892, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. James Reed, of Mound City, were called to Mounds Sunday by the death of their granddaughter, Hazel Marie Corbett.

 

There was a large attendance at the funeral of Mrs. Lulu O. Hill, wife of Rev. G. W. Hill, pastor of Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church.  The funeral sermon was preached by Rev. W. H. Polk.

 


The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 3 Sep 1926:
Lightning Kills Youth

Ralph Wisely, 14-year-old, son of George Wisely, of Wayne County, was killed by lightning about noon Monday.  He had just returned from plowing and his team and another horse was killed.  The barn was ignited from the bolt and was destroyed with contents.

Farmer Killed by Lightning

Henri Summers, 47 years old, farmer, was killed by lightning at his home near Thebes Sunday afternoon.  He was fixing a spout leading from the roof to the cistern when lightning struck the spout.

Old Colored Resident Dies

Frank Smith, a well-known and respected colored resident, passed away at his home in this city early Wednesday morning.  He had been ill, but was able to be up and around until a few days previous to his death.  He claimed to be 81 years of age, at least he told a number of his friends recently while conversing with him under the old elm tree.  He had been a resident of this city for 37 years and followed the livelihood of a drayman.  He was a widower, his wife having preceded him in death a year and a half ago.  Several children and grandchildren survive him.

Three Infants Die

Carl Junior, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Johansen, passed away Saturday evening at 7:30.  

Following the Sunday school of the Baptist church Sunday, a brief funeral service was held by Rev. Overby, the pastor.  Interment at Beech Grove Cemetery.

The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hazel Corbett died at their home Sunday afternoon.

Otho, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Otho Morehead, died Friday and the interment was made at Beech Grove Cemetery.


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 9 Sep 1926:

Father of L. H. Williams Dies

             J. R. Williams, of Elkville, Ill., father of L. H. Williams, died Friday, Sept. 3, as the result of a fractured skull which he sustained in a runaway Thursday afternoon.

 

Jesse J. Carson Passes to Beyond

             Jesse J. Carson, long a well-known resident of Mounds, was claimed by death at 12:10 a.m. Thursday at the home of his son, Thurman Carson.

             Mr. Carson had been ill for many months.  He was 61 years of age.  For many years he had been a prominent member of the I. O. O. F. of Mounds.

             Funeral services will be held Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the M. E. church.  Rev. J. S. Dever will officiate at the church and Beechwood Lodge No. 949 I. O. O. F. at Beech Grove Cemetery.  Undertaker G. A. James will direct the funeral.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 10 Sep 1926:
Jesse J. Carson Dies

Jesse J. Carson, age 61 years, died at the home of his son, Truman Carson, in Mounds, Thursday morning at 12:10 o’clock.  He had been a resident of Mounds for the past thirty years.  Funeral services will be this Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Methodist church.  Rev. Dever officiating.  Interment will be made in Beech Grove Cemetery.

Frank Smith Buried Sunday

Funeral services over the remains of Frank Smith were held Sunday afternoon at the A. M. E. church.  Members of the colored Masonic and Odd Fellows lodges also took part.  Interment in Beech Grove Cemetery.

Former Mound City Girl Dies in California

Friends here have received the sad news of the death of Mrs. Hugh LeRoy, who passed away recently at her home in Torrence, Calif.  Deceased was a former Mound City girl, having been a resident here several years ago, with her stepfather and mother, Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Floyd.  She was known in her girlhood days as Miss Inez Davis.


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 16 Sep 1926:

Burglar Meets Death as He Plies His Trade

Local Railroad Man Shoots Negro Trying to Enter Bedroom Window

             Tuesday morning at 2 o’clock, Earl Giles, engine inspector whose home is on McKinley Avenue, awoke to find a man at work prying loose the screen in a window of this bedroom. The burglar had picked up a hand ax, left on the back porch by Mr. Giles’ young son, had pried open the upper part of the screen and was working on the lower part when Mr. Giles was aroused.  The window opens on the porch and the bed was directly against it.

             With great presence of mind Mr. Giles kept still except for a movement of his left arm and hand to reach a revolver which was under his pillow.  Carefully transferring the weapon to his right hand, he fired.  The man staged then ran to the edge of the porch.  Turning around he threw the hand ax with great force toward Mr. Giles, but missed his arm and the ax was imbedded in the window casing.  Mr. Giles fired a second time.  The man then ran around the house to the front yard.

             After laying still a short time Mr. Giles got out of bed and walked to the front of the house.  He heard groans and found that the man had fallen in the front yard.  Mr. Giles then called special agent Dallas Winchester who lives only a short distance from the Giles home.  When Mr. Winchester arrived the man was dead.  The first bullet had hit his chest and ranged downward.

             Coroner O. T. Hudson was called, then Undertaker George P. Hartwell.

             The dead man was a negro, about 40 years of age.  The body was taken to the M. O. Cole Funeral Home on First Street, where he was identified as Joe Wrightout, of Martin, Tenn.  A sister living in Pulaski identified the body and made the statement, so we are informed, that her brother had twice been in the penitentiary—at Nashville, Tenn., and again at Jefferson City, Mo.

             A coroner’s jury, which met at 10 a.m. Tuesday, rendered a verdict of justifiable homicide.  The members of the jury were J. E. Herman, G. P. Waterman, Dion Davis, Eldridge Howard, Bob Mathis and Elmo Gooden.  The last three are colored.

             All day long on Tuesday a curious crowd of men, women and children thronged the undertaker’s establishment viewing the body of the dead burglar.

             Telegrams were sent to his wife and other relatives in Tennessee, but nothing has been heard from them.  Indications are that the county will be called upon the bear the expense of his burial.

             At about 9 o’clock Monday night Sam Shifley heard someone prowling around his premises on North McKinley and fired several shots to frighten him away.

             At 1 a.m. Tuesday Mrs. Henry Stern was awakened by the noise of someone climbing in the window of a front bedroom.  She tried to arouse Mr. Stern but failed to do so.  The intruder crawled on all fours into tight bedroom occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Stern took a pair of trousers and escaped with them through the window before Mr. Stern awoke.  Luckily Mr. Stern had emptied his pockets of watch and money and had put the contents on the dresser.  Naturally it is supposed that Wrightout was the nocturnal visitor at all these homes.

 

Jesse Jackson Carson

             Jesse Jackson Carson was born February 13th, 1865, at Olmstead, Illinois.  He was united in marriage to Georgia Ann Spense, September 1st, 1886, who preceded him in death December 7th, 1926.  To this union were born three children, Thurman, Gertrude, and Clyde.

             Mr. Carson moved to Mounds from Olmstead, Illinois, about 30 years ago, entering the service of the Illinois Central Railroad in the car department.  He worked in this department a number of years.  In July 1910 he went to work in the bridge and building department.  Owing to his failing health, he was retired and placed on the pension list of the Illinois Central, December 1st, 1925.  His health continued to fail until the end which came at 12:10 a.m. September 9th, 1926, at the home of his son, Thurman.

             He was a member of Beechwood Lodge No. 949 I. O. O. F., Pride of Egypt Lodge No. 444 K. of P. and Carpenters and Joiners Union No. 812 of Cairo, Ill.

             Those who survive the deceased are:  one son, Thurman, two granddaughters, Wilda and Anna; a stepmother, Mrs. Anna Carson; three brothers, Sam Carson, of San Francisco, Cal., James I. Carson, of Ullin, Ill.; W. C. Carson, of Jackson, Tenn.; two half-brothers, E. L. Carson, of Memphis, Tenn., and O. P. Carson, of Mounds, Ill.

             Uncle Jesse was liked by all who knew him.

             (Jesse J. Carson married Georgia A. Spence on 1 Sep 1886, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Frank M. Carson married Ann H. Lowler on 17 Oct 1875, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Card of Thanks

             We desire to extend our sincere thanks to all who showed kindness and rendered help during the sickness and after the death of our beloved father and grandfather.  Especially do we wish to thank the choir, the friends who offered the use of their cars and the officiating minister, Rev. J. S. Dever.

Thurman Carson and family

 

Hampton B. Sharp

             Hampton B. Sharp was born in Cherokee County, Alabama, Dec. 24th, 1861, died at Pulaski, Ill., Sept. 8th, 1926.  Age 64 years, 8 months and 14 days.  His parents moved to Illinois while he was yet a small boy.

             He was united in marriage to Miss Amelia E. Chamberlain, March 23rd, 1884.  To this union were born five children:  C. B. Sharp, of Pulaski, Ill., Ollie Sharp, of Carbondale, Ill., Henry Sharp, of East St. Louis, Ill., Mrs. Nellie Boger and Mrs. Gladys Modglin, of Mounds, Ill.  He was converted in a protracted meeting held at Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church by Rev. Hunsacker in December 1887 and joined Mt. Pleasant Church of which he was a member until his death.

             He leaves besides his wife and children, one brother, George W. Sharp, of Tamms, Ill., and sister, Mrs. Nellie McCluskey, of Campbell, Mo.; two half-brothers, Bert and Frank Sharp of Fornfelt, Mo., and five grandchildren also a host of other relatives and friends.  Funeral services were held Friday afternoon, Sept. 10, at Mt. Pleasant Church with interment in Rose Hill cemetery.

             (H. B. Sharp married A. E. Chamberlain on 23 Mar 1884, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Little Billie June Craig, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Craig, died Friday, Sept. 10th.  Funeral services were held at the Methodist church and interment was in the Ullin Cemetery.

             (A marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  Billy J. Craig Baby 1926.—Darrel Dexter)

 


The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 17 Sep 1926:
BURGLAR SHOT AT MOUNDS TUESDAY
Attempting to Enter a Home Thru Window Was Killed Instantly

Justifiable homicide was the verdict of the coroner’s jury which was composed of three white and three colored men in ___ death of a “cat burglar” who was killed in the act of entering a Mounds home.
A negro identified as Joe Wrighout, was killed at 1:30 o’clock Tuesday morning while in the act of breaking into the home of Earl Giles.  Mr. and Mrs. Giles, sleeping in a bed near a window, were aroused by noise outside.  Looking about, Mr. Giles saw the form of a man at the window.  Grabbing a gun from under his pillow, Mr. Giles fired twice at the robber and dropped one of the shots entering the shoulder, ranging downward, piercing the heart.  When the shots aroused the neighborhood, persons looking out of their windows saw a man run through an alley and disappear in the same block with the ___ home.  This leads the officials to believe that he worked as lookout.  The shooting having frightened him away.

Wrighout is about 40 years of age, formerly of Martin, Tenn.  He has a sister at Pulaski and she states he has served sentence in the Jefferson City and Danville penitentiaries.

Well Known Pulaski Resident Passes Away

Hampton B. Sharp, 64 years of age, died at his home in Pulaski Wednesday, Sept. 8th.

Deceased was born in Cherokee County, Alabama, December __, 1861, and was brought to Illinois by his parents when he was but a small boy.  He was united in marriage to Miss Amelia E. Chamberlain, March 23, 1884, to which union were born five children, C. B. Sharp, of Pulaski, ___ Sharp, of Carbondale, Henry ____ of East St. Louis, and Nelson ___oger and Gladys Modglin, of Mounds.

He was converted at a protracted meeting held at Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church by Rev. Hunsacker in December 1887, and immediately after being converted united with Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church and has lived a consistent, religious life since that time.  He leaves beside his wife and children, one brother, George W. Sharp, of Tamms, and one sister, ___ McClusky, of Campbell ___, two half-brothers, Burt and ____ Sharp, of Fornfelt, Mo., and ____ grandchildren, and many friends and distant relatives.
He was a charter member of M. W. A. camp at Pulaski.

Funeral services were conducted at Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church ___ o’clock Friday afternoon by ___ H. Vick, pastor of the church.  Interment was made at Rose Hill Cemetery, W. H. Aldred directed the funeral.

(H. B. Sharp married A. E. Chamberlain on 23 Mar 1884, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  A marker in Rose Hill Cemetery at Pulaski reads:  H. B. Sharp Born Dec. 24, 1861 Died Sept. 8, 1926.  Amelia E. Sharp Born Dec. 18, 1867 Died March 25, 1928. —Darrel Dexter)


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 23 Sep 1926:

Herrin Man Kills Son by Throwing Shoe

Ten-Year-Old Son of Hana Barnett Victim of Father’s Temper

             Coroner Bell’s jury returned a verdict finding “neck out of place.  Struck on head with shoe unintentionally.”  Barnett was taken to Marion.

             Hanson Barnett is in jail and his ten-year-old son is dead as a result of a deplorable occurrence at the Barnett home at 600 South Ninth Street about 5:45 o’clock this morning.

             At the police station Barnett is said to have told Coroner George A. Bell that he was questioning his son about staying out late last night.  “I thought he was lying to me and becoming angry I threw a shoe at him,” Barnett is quoted as having told the coroner.  “He ran around the table, said:  ‘Daddy, you have hurt me,’ and dropped to the floor, dead.”

             The police were notified and took Barnett into custody.  The body of the dead boy was removed to the Albert G. Storme undertaking establishment to be prepared for burial.  Coroner Bell was notified and came to Herrin at once to conduct an inquest into the death of the Barnett boy.

             Barnett is about thirty years of age.  He has a wife and two children younger than the dead boy.  The man was employed in No. 5 mine of the Franklin Coal Co., north of Herrin.  Officials said today that Barnett was one of the leading followers of the late S. Glen Young during the hectic times when Klan activities were at their height in Williamson County.—Herrin News

             (Hanson Bradley Barnett married Ruth Murphy.  The 1920 census of Nashville, Washington Co., Ill., shows the following household:  Hanson Barnett, 24; Ruth Barnett, 21; Bradley Barnett, 3.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Pansy Crabtree Roderick

             Mrs. Pansy Crabtree Roderick, daughter of Isaac and Gertrude Crabtree, was born in Mounds, Ill., Sept. 13, 1893, and died in Chicago, Ill., Sept. 14, 1926, at the age of 33 years.  She was married to John T. Ragland, of Mounds, Ill., May 12th, 1913.  To this union was born one daughter, Gwendolyn.  Later she was married to Mr. G. A. Roderick, of Chicago, Ill.  After leaving Mounds the family moved to Cairo where Pansy took her school work, reaching her sophomore year and placing her church membership with the 1st Presbyterian Church before leaving that place.

             It is said that she had a happy disposition, even rejoicing in rainfall.  She made many friends wherever she went.  She leaves to mourn her sad departure, her father, mother, daughter, Gwendolyn, one sister, Mrs. Valeria Cooper Shock, of St. Louis, Mo., two brothers, Oreta and Harley T. Cooper, of Chicago, Ill., and five cousins, together with many other relatives and friends.  Some of the out-of-town relatives in attendance at the funeral which was held at the First Baptist Church on Friday, Sept. 18, 3:30 p.m., Rev. H. C. Croslin officiating, were:  Mrs. Rosella Morrow Meneley, of Rantoul, Ill., Mrs. William H. Wood, of Cairo, Mrs. Grace Houston, of Dixon, Ill., Mrs. Alice M. Clarke, Champaign, Ill., and Fred Caseveere, of Murphysboro, Ill.

 

Bud Wells, who returned here recently from Chicago, died Friday morning, Sept. 10, at the home of his brother, Arthur Wells.  The funeral was held Sunday at two o’clock.  (Colored News)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 24 Sep 1926:
Mr. and Mrs. Singleton, of La Center Ky., Mr. and Mrs. Fellows and Mr. and Mrs. Ozie, of West Frankfort, were called here Friday by the death of Mrs. Joseph Jump.

Killed in Automobile Collision

Mrs. Pansy Crabtree Roderick, age 33, formerly of this county, was killed in an automobile collision in Chicago last week.  The body was brought to Mounds, Thursday, and after a funeral service held at the Baptist Church, conducted by Rev. H. C. Croslin, the remains were laid at rest in Beech Grove Cemetery.

Woman Dies after Brief Illness

Mrs. Alice Jump, wife of Joseph Jump, passed away Thursday afternoon, Sept. 16th, at her home on Commercial Avenue, in this city.  Mrs. Jump was only sick a short time and her death was quite a shock to her friends.  She was 50 years of age and had lived in Mound City about five years.  She is survived by her husband, one son and three daughters.  Funeral services were held Friday morning at 9 o’clock at the residence, Rev. Thomas Gray of the Congregational Church conducting the services.  Burial was made in Anderson Cemetery near Boaz, with G. A. James, funeral director.

(A marker in Anderson Cemetery reads:  Alice Jump.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. J. B. Kennedy Dies

Mrs. J. B. Kennedy, of Pulaski, passed away at her home in that place Thursday evening, Sept. 23rd.  Deceased was 76 years, nine months and five days of age.  She is survived by her husband.

Pioneer Resident of Grand Chain Passes Away Sept. 17

For nearly a half century, Grand Chain has known Charles Stohlheber, one of her successful and prosperous farmers, coming to this county in 1886, from Monroe County.  He was borned near Hecker, Ill., on Jan. 25, 1851, being one of ten children of Mr. and Mrs. Martin Stahlheber.  On March 30, 1880, he was married to Miss Louisa Ramseger.  To this union four children were borned, all of whom survive him.  He was one of the first German farmers to settle in Grand Chain and as the years passed became more prosperous, ranking among the foremost farmers of his locality.

In 1914, having given up the management of the southside estate, Mr. and Mrs. Stohlheber moved to the present home on the northside, where they have lived a happy sedate life, enjoying the companionship of their children, grandchildren and many close friends and would have, in a few years, celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary.  Uncle Charley as he was affectionately called by those who knew and love him best, was not a member of any church, although he believed in The Supreme Ruler of the universe and his whole life has been a beautiful exemplification of the Biblical quotation, “Therefore, all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them.”

Those surviving are his wife, two sons, J. N. and W. P. Stohlheber, of San Diego, Calf., Mrs. Arthur Gaskill, of Freeport, Mrs. Edward Wiesenborn, of Grand Chain, seven grandchildren, sisters, Mrs. Minnie Eisfelder, of Pinckneyville, Mrs. Sophia Schoefer, of Freeburg, Mrs. Mary Hepp, of Belleville, and a brother, Henry Stohlheber, Sr., of Hecker.  Funeral services were held at the Congregational church Sunday afternoon conducted by the pastor, S. C. Beninger.  Interment was made in Masonic cemetery.

(Charles Eisfelder married Mina Stahlheber on 5 Jan 1865, in St. Clair Co., Ill.  A marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  C. S. Stahleber 1851-1926.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The Mounds Independent, Thursday 30 Sep 1926:

Mrs. James B. Kennedy

             Sarah C. Buckmaster was born in Fayette County, Ill., near Vandalia, on Dec. 18th, 1846, and was called to her eternal rest at her home in Pulaski on Sept. 23, 1926, age 79 years, 9 months and 24 days.

             Her childhood was spent on her father’s farm on the Okaw River, death taking her parents when she was about 14 years of age.  After that she made her home with her brothers and sisters until she was 18 years of age, when she was married to James B. Kennedy, on Dec. 19th, 1864.  Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy were married at the old state Capital at Vandalia, Ill., by Rev. Henry Turney, an old Methodist minister of that place.  On coming to Pulaski County they lived for a short time with Mr. Kennedy’s mother, later moving to a farm about one and one half miles east of Pulaski, where they have lived since 1868, with the exception of what time they have made their home in Pulaski.

             Mrs. Kennedy became a member of the Methodist Church at Old Liberty about 1884 and has lived a Christian life in that faith continually holding her membership in that church until death.

             She leaves to mourn her departure, her husband, James B. Kennedy, two daughters, Mrs. Ora Sheets, of St. Louis, Mo., and Mrs. Flora Eshleman, of Long Beach, Calif., a twin brother, Charles Buckmaster, of Ramsey, Ill., six grandchildren and two great grandchildren, besides many other distant relatives and friends.

             She had been an invalid for about three years, bearing her sufferings with the utmost patience, finally in the true Christian spirit was prepared and willing to be called to the great beyond.

             Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon, Sept. 25th, 2 p.m. at the Christian church with interment in Liberty cemetery.  C. T. Miller, pastor of the Methodist Church, officiated.  Funeral arrangements were conducted by undertaker W. H. Aldred.

 

Card of Thanks

             We wish to extend our thanks to our many friends and neighbors who so kindly assisted us during the illness and after the death of our beloved wife and mother, also for the beautiful floral offerings.

James B. Kennedy

Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Sheets

 

Mrs. L. Schneider and son, Laurence, were called to Waterloo, Ill., by the sudden death of the former’s nephew.  The young man was accidentally shot.  About a year ago, his brother was killed by a train.  Both of these young men were in action in France and returned home only to meet sudden deaths.



The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 1 Oct 1926:
Card of Thanks

We wish to thank the many friends and neighbors who so kindly assisted us during the illness and death of our beloved wife and mother.  Also for the beautiful floral offerings.
James B. Kennedy
MR. and Mrs. C. G. Sheets

Mrs. T. P. Pillow, of Milan, Tenn., passed away at the home of her grandson at Milan Tuesday night.  

Word to this effect was received by her niece, Mrs. J. B. Blankenship, of this city, Wednesday.  John R. Read and W. E. Read, of this city, are nephews of the deceased.  She was about 84 years of age.

W. T. Kennedy went to Pulaski Friday to the home of J. B. Kennedy, which had been sorrowed by the death of the latter’s wife.

Mrs. E. P. Easterday and Mrs. Loyd Settlemoir were in Pulaski Saturday and attended the funeral of Mrs. J. B. Kennedy which was held Saturday afternoon from the Christian Church in that city with interment in Liberty Cemetery.

(Elmer P. Easterday married Bertha Kennedy on 25 May 1890, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Youth to Hang at Harrisburg

Joe Chesnas, 19, of Harrisburg, who entered a plea of guilty to a charge of murdering William Unsell, aged rural mail carrier, in his home on the night of Aug. 8, was sentenced to hang Oct. 16.  Judge A. E. Somers was the trial judge.  Chesnas and others had burglarized the Unsell home a few nights before the murder and Chasnas said he feared that Unsell would recognize him.  Saline County has not had a hanging in twelve years.

Mrs. Kennedy Lived Long Useful Life in This County

Mrs. James B. Kennedy, 79 years old, who died last Thursday at her home in Pulaski, was formerly Miss Sarah C. Buckmaster and was born in Fayette County, Illinois, near Vandalia, on Dec. 18, 1846.  Her childhood was spent on her father’s farm on the Okaw River and death taking her parents away when she was about 14 years of age, she made her home with her brothers and sisters until she was 18 years of age, when she married James B. Kennedy on Dec. 19, 1864.  Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy were married at the old state Capitol at Vandalia by Rev. Henry Turney, an old Methodist minister of that place.  On coming to Pulaski County they lived for a short time with Mr. Kennedy’s mother, later moving onto a farm about one and one half miles east of Pulaski, where they have lived since 1869, with the exception of what time they have made their home in Pulaski.

Mrs. Kennedy became a member of the Methodist Church at Old Liberty about the year 1894 and has lived a Christian life in that faith continuously holding her membership in that church at the time of her death.  She leaves her husband, two daughters, Mrs. Ora Sheets, of St. Louis, Mo., and Mrs. H. B. Eshleman, of Long Beach, Cal., a twin brother, Charles Buckmaster, of Ramsey, Ill., six grandchildren and many more distant relatives.  Mrs. Kennedy was beloved by all and was one of those upon whose past effort the welfare and advancement of the community has been based.  She had been invalid for about three years, bearing her suffering with the utmost fortitude.

(James B. Kenneday married Caroline Buckmaster on 19 Dec 1864, in Fayette Co., Ill. Charles G. Sheets, 21, married Ora Iris Kennedy, 18, on 25 Apr 1896, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  H. B. Eshleman, 21, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., son of W. J. Eshleman and Rachel Kelly, married Flora May Kennedy, 19, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., daughter of J. B. Kennedy and Sarah Buckmaster, on 15 May 1898, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Liberty Cemetery reads:  Sarah C. Kennedy Born Dec. 18, 1846 Died Sept. 23, 1926.—Darrel Dexter)

GEORGE STOCKTON DIES AT AGE OF 83
Old Resident of Mound City Passes Away at Hannibal, Mo.

George Stockton, 84 years of age, who has been making his home with his niece, Mrs. P. A. Nigren, at Hannibal, Mo., died Wednesday morning, Sept. 29, after an illness of several weeks.

“Uncle George” who was familiarly known to nearly everyone here, was a unique character and numbered nearly everyone as his friend.  He came to this city when a small boy and made this place his home until three years ago, when he went to reside with his niece.

Deceased is survived by his niece, Mrs. P. A. Nigren, of Hannibal, Mo., and a nephew, Vivian Montgomery, of California.

The funeral party arrived in Mounds Thursday night and the remains taken to the undertaking parlors of G. A. James.  At 2 o’clock this afternoon a brief service was held, Rev. Thomas Gray conducting the services.  The Congregational choir rendered the music.  Interment in Beech Grove Cemetery.


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 7 Oct 1926:

R. B. Utter Taken Critically Ill while in West

             A letter received by A. Crosson from Mrs. Ruby G. Easterly, of Aberdeen, Wash., sister of Mrs. R. B. Utter, states that Mr. Utter is critically ill and has been taken to Mayo Brothers Clinic at Rochester, Minn.

 

Mrs. Mary Twente Dies at Home in Cairo

             Mrs. Mary Twente, mother of Miss Lucy B. Twente, superintendent of schools of Alexander County, died suddenly of apoplexy, at her home in Cairo Thursday night, Oct. 5.  Mrs. Twente was the widow of Asa Twente, who died while serving as Alexander County superintendent of schools.  She was a lifelong resident of Alexander County, having been born at Diswood on Dec. 26, 1876.

 

Death Claims Aged Resident Sunday Evening

Samuel H. Harper, Civil War Veteran, Dies at the Age of 86

             Samuel H. Harper, a well-known and highly respected residents of Mounds, died Sunday, October 3, at 6:05 p.m. at the home of his daughter, Mrs. A. E. Mattson, on South Delaware Avenue, after an illness of about 18 months duration.

             Mr. Harper was born in Tennessee on February 22, 1840, and had reached the ripe old age of 86 years, 7 months, and 11 days.  He was married to Miss Maggie Trammell on September 12, 1862.  To this union was born one son, Lorenzo D. Harper, who is now living in Cairo, Ill.  Mrs. Harper died July 12, 1863.

             On July 2, 1866, he was united in marriage with Miss Josephine Greene, of Villa Ridge, Ill., who preceded him in death, October 4, 1922.  To this union were born three children, two of whom are living—Mrs. Myrtle M. Mattson and Walter Harper, both of Mounds.  These three children, one brother, Jesse Harper and a sister, Mrs. Mollie Glisson, of Fort Smith, Ark., 17 grandchildren, and 3 great-grandchildren are left to mourn his loss.

             Mr. Harper enlisted in the Union Army Co. D, 3rd Wisconsin Cavalry at Duvall’s Bluff, Ark.  He was discharged May 30, 1865, for disability.  He joined Grand Army Post No. 303 at Villa Ridge with 25 others on Sept. 15, 1883.  Of the original Post, all but one have answered the final roll call.  He was a member of the M. E. Church, having joined the church at Mansfield, Ark., while a young man.

             Funeral services were held at the home Tuesday, Oct. 5, at 2 p.m., Rev. J. S. Dever, pastor of the M.  E. Church, preached the sermon.  The Masonic lodge conducted the services at the grave, Masonic brothers acting as pallbearers.  Interment was in Beech Grove Cemetery.  Mrs. M. O. Cole had charge of the funeral arrangements.

 

Mrs. Fannie Bankson, Mr. and Mrs. C. T. Walbridge, daughter Frances, Mrs. Lilly Lindsey, and Mrs. Kate Inman attended the funeral of Mrs. Cora Ledbetter, of Olmstead Sunday.  Mrs. Ledbetter was a niece of Mrs. Bankson.

 

Card of Thanks

             We desire to express our thanks and appreciation for the kindness and sympathy shown us in Mounds by old friends at the time of the burial of Pansy Crabtree Roderick of Chicago

Rosella Morrow Menely and other relatives

 

Mrs. Oren Crawford and daughter, Miss Mary, Mrs. E. A. Young and son, James, attended the funeral of their aunt, Mrs. Martha Randolph, of Golconda, Sunday.  Mrs. Randolph who was a sister to Mrs. Mary Fulkerson, was 85 years of age.

             (Nathaniel E. Randolph married Martha Taylor on 15 Jan 1864, in Pope Co., Ill.  Richard M. Fulkerson married Mary Ann Taylor on 20 Jul 1870, in Pope Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 8 Oct 1926:
Mr. and Mrs. P. A. Niegren, of Hannibal, Mo., and Mrs. Lucy Robbins, of this city, accompanied the body of “Uncle” George Stockton to Mounds for burial.  Mr. and Mrs. Niegren returned home Friday evening and Mrs. Robbins will remain here.

Mrs. Cora Ledbetter’s funeral was held Sunday in the Holiness Church and a large crowd attended.  

Interment was made at the Masonic Cemetery.  (Olmstead)

Aged Resident of Mounds Died

Samuel H. Harper, age 86 years, an old resident of Mounds, died Sunday evening at 6:05 o’clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. E. A. Mattson, on South Delaware Avenue, following an illness of several weeks.

He is survived by his daughter, Myrtle, of Mounds, and two sons, Dowd Harper, of Cairo, and Walter Harper, of Mounds.  His wife preceded him in deaths several years ago.

Mr. Harper was highly respected resident of Mounds, a veteran of the Civil War and said to be the oldest Mason of Trinity Lodge of Mound City, having joined it 68 years ago.

(Samuel H. Harper married Josephene Green on 2 Jul 1866, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Arthur E. Mattson married Myrtle May Harper 12 Oct 1898, in Pulaski Co., Ill—Darrel Dexter).

Laid to Rest

The funeral services for “Uncle” George Stockton was held Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock in the undertaking parlors of G. A. James at Mounds.  Rev. Thomas Gray officiating and made fitting eulogy over the deceased.  The Congregational choir rendered two hymns, “Face to Face” and “Abide with Me.”  Floral offerings were many and beautiful and at the grave sorrowing friends full of sympathy and grief paid their last respects.  The pallbearers were W. T. Jaccard, L. D. Stophlet, E. P. Saturday, G. J. Murphy, William Prace and Daniel Hurley.

Mrs. Pleas Ward Passes Away

Mrs. Louisa Ward, wife of Pleasant Ward, former residents of this city, died at her home in Granite City after an illness of several months.  Mrs. Ward was the youngest daughter of Mrs. Ninenger who most of our older residents remember.  Deceased is survived by her husband and one daughter, who is married.  The body was laid at rest in the cemetery near Granite City.


The Mounds Independent, Thursday 14 Oct 1926:

Card of Thanks

             We wish to extend our sincere thanks to the many friends who assisted us during the sickness and after the death of our beloved father and grandfather. We especially thank Rev. J. S. Dever and the M. E. choir, also the Masonic order and the donors of the many beautiful flowers.

Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Mattson and family

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Harper and family

L. D. Harper and family

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 15 Oct 1926:
Mrs. Clara Harman Dies in Mound City

Mrs. Clara W. Harmon, age 66 years, died Thursday Oct. 7th, at 8:45 p.m., at the home of her brother-in-law, B. Hutcheson, in Mound City, Ill., after an illness of eight months.  The body was taken to the undertaking rooms of G. A. James and was taken to Olney, Ill., Friday morning on the Big Four Train.  Funeral services were held Friday afternoon at the grave.  Interment was made in the Olney Cemetery.  Dr. S. Hutcheson, of Cairo, B. S. Hutcheson and daughter, Miss Florimel of this city, accompanied the body to Olney, and other relatives joined the funeral party at Lawrenceville.  Mrs. Harmon was a patient at St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo for five months.

Mrs. Mary Flynn Dies at Advanced Age of 73

Mrs. Mary Ellen Flynn, age 73 years, and a resident of this city for 49 years, died at her home on 402 Poplar Street at 7 o’clock Tuesday morning.  She had been in failing for some time and recently she fell and sustained injuries which result in her death.  Deceased was born in Marietta, Ohio, in 1856, and was a daughter of the late Rev. and Mrs. McMarrow.  She was married to James D. Kennedy, of Pulaski, and two sons were born to this union, William T. and Charles Kennedy, of this city.  Death severed this union and she later married to James I. Flynn, and two daughters, Mrs. John Edwards, of this city, and Mrs. George Snyder, of Akron, Ohio, who also survive the deceased were the issues of this marriage.  A brother, Charles McMarrow, of McLeansboro, eighteen grandchildren and six great-grandchildren and other relatives and friends mourn her passing away.  She was a devout Christian being a member of the M. E. Church at Liberty.  A devoted woman to her home and family she had endeared herself to her neighbors and all who knew her.

Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the first Methodist Church conducted by Rev. Lawrence Smith.  Interment in Beech Grove Cemetery.

(James B. Kennedy married Mary E. McMarrow on 23 Apr 1870, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  James Flinn married Mrs. Ella Kennedy on 24 Mar 1878, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 21 Oct 1926:

Called to Bone Gap by Death of Sister

             Mrs. E. G. Britton, left Sunday for Bone Gap, Ill., called there by the death of her sister, Miss Flo Gould.

             Miss Gould had been seriously ill for a number of months and Mrs. Britton had been with her through a part of her illness.  She had frequently visited here and had made many friends who will regret to hear of her death.

 

Death of Infant

             The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Leighton Martin, died at the family home Friday, October the 15.  Interment was on Saturday afternoon at Beech Grove Cemetery.

 

Former Mounds Resident Dies in Paducah, Ky.

             Mrs. D. C. Williams, a former resident of Mounds, died Wednesday, October 20, in Paducah, Ky., where her husband is manager of the Van Noy Restaurant.

             Funeral services will be held in the Mounds Congregational Church Friday at 2 p.m.  Interment will be in Beech Grove Cemetery.

 

William Henry Leidigh Dies at Age of 85

             William Henry Leidigh was born in Cumberland County, Ohio, in 1840 and died at his home in Villa Ridge, Ill., Sunday morning, October 17.  He was the oldest child in a family of eight.

             Mr. Leidigh was married to Miss Elizabeth M. Hogendobler July 11, 1865 in Medway, Ohio.  They came to Pulaski County that same year.  To this union were born ten children, two of whom died in childhood.  The children who survive their father are Walter Lester, Minnie Nora, Harry William, Mary Elizabeth (Mrs. Henry Neistrath), Margaret Louise, and Dee Hogan, all of Villa Ridge; Charles Elsworth, of Valparaiso, Ind., and Frederick Horace, of Dongola, Ill.  He also leaves two sisters, Mrs. Fannie Coleman, of Dayton, Ohio, and Mrs. Maggie Carrol, of Paducah, Ky.

             Mr. Leidigh was a pioneer resident of this county, having resided here for 61 years.  He was a Civil War veteran.

             Rev. Charles Armstrong of Shelbyville, Tenn., conducted the funeral, which was held at the home on Wednesday morning at 10 o’clock.  Interment was in Villa Ridge Cemetery.

 

William Henry Leidigh, a pioneer farmer and very prominent in our community (Villa Ridge) passed away at his home Sunday morning at the age of 86 years and ten months.  Mr. Leidigh was a Civil war veteran, serving under General Grant and others in the Sixteenth Ohio Infantry.  Funeral service was held Wednesday morning at ten o’clock at the home.  Rev. Armstrong of Tennessee, a close friend of the family, officiated.  Interment was made in the Villa Ridge cemetery.

 

The funeral of Mrs. Roy Beaver, who died Sunday at the Hale Willard Hospital, was held at the Methodist church Tuesday afternoon.  Rev. S. Morgan, of Ullin, officiated.  Burial was at Beech Grove Cemetery, Mounds.  Mrs. Beaver was formerly Miss Hattie Holcomb.  She leaves beside her husband, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Holcomb, two brothers, Russel and Elbert, and a host of friends to mourn her death.

 


The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 22 Oct 1926:
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank the many friends and neighbors in the death of our beloved wife, daughter and sister, also those who sent flowers and cars, the choir, and Rev. Morgan and Rev. Gray.
Roy Beaver
F. H. Holcomb and family

Grace King (colored) died __day morning at her home, which was a shock to the community.  She leaves a husband and seven children.  (Olmsted)

O. E. Powell, age 73, died at his home in Cairo last week.  He was a well-known accountant and was known to a large acquaintance here.  He served as bookkeeper at the Polk Canning plant for a long period.

Mrs. Elisha Ashworth, daughters, Misses Pauline and Hazel, and son, George, and Mrs. Ruth Kennedy, attended the funeral of Mrs. Hattie Beaver, at Ullin, Tuesday afternoon.

James Rushing, Charles Rushing, and Rev. Lawrence Smith went to Anna Tuesday where they attended the funeral of Millard F. Rushing, an uncle of the Rushing boys.

(Millard F. Dunning, 20, born in Jonesboro, Ill., son of Robert H. Rushing and Johanah Nance, married Ellen Davis, 20, born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of James Davis and Mary Emerson, on 8 Oct 1882, in Union Co., Ill.  His marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Millard F. Rushing Born Feb. 27, 1862 Died Oct. 17, 1926.  Sarah E. Rushing Born Feb. 5, 1861 Died Dec. 25, 1935.—Darrel Dexter)

Young Wife Passes Away

Mrs. Hattie Beaver, age 27, wife of Roy Beaver, of this city, passed away at 5:45 Sunday afternoon at Hale’s sanitarium in Anna.  Mrs. Beaver, who was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Holcomb, of Ullin, was married to Roy Beaver early in March.  The lived here at the home of Mr. Beaver’s parents.  She was a member of the Pulaski Chapter, Order of Eastern Star and of the Royal Neighbors.  She was also a member of the Methodist Church at Ullin and the funeral was held at that church at 2 p.m. Tuesday.  Interment in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.

Death of Infants

Marie, the nine-month-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Thompson, passed away at the home of her parents on North Main Street Saturday morning at o’clock.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.

Lora, the four-month-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Andy Shipman, passed away at their home in this city Saturday morning at 3:30 o’clock.  Burial was made Sunday afternoon at Mounds in Beech Grove Cemetery.  G. A. James had charge of both burials.

Death of Mrs. F. G. Fricke Former Resident of This City

The sad news of the above was received from Plattsmouth, Neb., this week, and many old friends will regret to hear of her passing away.  She was married to Mr. Fricke in 1871.  Their happy wedded life lasted over a period of 56 years, until the parting of the ties that bind in the calling of the wife and mother to the better life.  She was a woman of fine character deep and unchanging, most highly esteemed and loved by all who knew her.  Mr. and Mrs. Fricke moved to Mound City in 1871, soon after their marriage where Mr. Fricke engaged in the drug business until 1893, when they moved to Nebraska.  

There is left to bear the sorrow of separation the husband and six children, all grown.

W. H. LEIDIGH, PIONEER FARMER DIES SUNDAY
Military Funeral Was Held From the Home Wednesday Morning

William Henry Leidigh, age 85 years and ten months, a Civil War veteran and pioneer farmer of this county, passed away at his home near Villa Ridge, Sunday morning at six o’clock following an illness of three weeks, however he had been in failing health for two months.

Deceased was born in Cumberland County, Ohio, in 1840, and was the oldest of eight children.  He married Miss Elizabeth M. Hogendobler, July 11, 1865, in Medway, Ohio, she having preceded him in death two years ago.  To this union were born ten children, two of whom, Bertha Kate and Cora Blanche, died in childhood.  The surviving children are Walter Lester, of Villa Ridge, Frederick Horace, of Dongola, Minnie Nora and Harry William, of Villa Ridge, Charles Ellsworth, of Valparaiso, Ind., Mary Elizabeth (Mrs. Henry Neistrath), Margaret Louise and Dee Hogan, also of Villa Ridge.  Two sisters, Mrs. Fannie Coleman, of Dayton, Ohio, and Mrs. Maggie Carroll, of Paducah, Ky., outlive their brother.

Mr. Leidigh was well known all over the entire county, having made his home here for 61 years, coming from Medway, Ohio, in 1865.  He served in the Civil War, being a member of the Sixteenth Ohio Infantry, and was in the service three and a half years.

Funeral services were held Wednesday morning at 10 o’clock at the family residence near Villa Ridge.  Rev. Charles Armstrong, of Shelbyville, Tenn., a very dear and close friend of the Leidigh family officiated at the funeral.  After the services at the home the cortege left for the Villa Ridge Cemetery where the interment was made.

The Winifred Fairfax Warder post of the American Legion formed a military escort for the body, marching from the residence to the cemetery.  At the grave a military salute was fired and a bugler of the legion sounded taps.

The active pallbearers were:  John Clancy, Dave Clancy, Steve Lampley, Ernest Staddler, Ralph Watson and T. P. Conant.  Honorary pallbearers were:  S. A. Steers, W. J. Mathis, M. D. Brelsford, L. E. Endicott, U. S. A. Gadbois, Robert Endicott, and Loren Boyd.  G. A. James directed the funeral.

(His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Sergt. William H. Leidigh Co. F, 16 Ohio Inf.—Darrel Dexter)


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 28 Oct 1926:

Card of Thanks

             I desire to express my sincere thanks to the many friends in Mounds who have to us their sympathy and attention during the illness and after the death of my beloved wife.  Such kindness can never be forgotten.

D.C. Williams



The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 29 Oct 1926:
OBITUARY

Mrs. Hattie Holcomb Beaver, youngest child and only daughter of Frank and Alice Holcomb, who was born at Rochelle, Ill., April 30, 1899, died at Anna, Ill., October 17.

When only three years of age, her family moved to Ullin, where she had lived continuously until on March 26th, 1926, she was married to Roy Beaver, of Mound City, and went to that place to live.
She attended the Ullin School and belonged to the class of 1915.

Eleven years ago, she was converted and recently baptized in the Methodist faith.  As a child she loved the Sunday school, was faithful in attendance and assisted with the music, which she so loved.  She belonged to Caledonia Chapter No. 587 O. E. S. at Pulaski and also the Royal Neighbors at Ullin.
She leaves her husband, father and mother and two brothers, Elbert and Russell, of Ullin, and many friends.

Cheerful and happy, her life was cherished as a flower in the hearts of her husband and family and all who knew her.

The funeral was held in the M. E. church of Ullin, Ill., Rev. S. A. Morgan officiating in the presence of a large congregation Tuesday, Oct. 19, at 2 o’clock, after which her body was laid in Beech Grove Cemetery.

Well Known Lady Passes Away

Mrs. Nannie Turney, formerly of this county, passed away Thursday night, Oct. 21, at the home of her son, Dr. L. A. Turney, at Browntown, Illinois.  Mrs. Turney was before her marriage to Dr. Turney, Miss Nannie Kennedy, having been reared near Villa Ridge.  Mrs. L. C. Perks, of this city, is a niece of the deceased.  She also leaves several other nieces and nephews in Pulaski County.  She had visited in Mound City frequently and had many friends here in the surrounding community.  Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Sunday afternoon at Brownstown.

(This may be Nancy E. Kennedy, who married S. R. Turney on 11Feb 1863, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Man “Buried” 2 Weeks Ago by Kin, Reappears

James O’Neil, 75, of Moberly, Mo., whom relatives thought they buried here two weeks ago, appeared in this city Friday.  O’Neil said some of his clothing had been stolen several weeks ago and possible the man buried had taken them.

John Dishinger, who has been a resident of this city a number of years, is seriously ill at his home in America.

  (A picture of John Dishinger is published with the notice.  His death was reported in the 17 Dec 1926, issue.—Darrel Dexter)


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 4 Nov 1926:

Father of C. M. Henderson Dies in Memphis

             C. M. Henderson and brother, Howard, of Anna, motored to Memphis Tenn., Saturday morning on account of the serious illness and death of their father, T. J. Henderson, of Senatobia, Miss.  They arrived at the hospital a few hours before their father’s death, which occurred Sunday morning.  He was taken to Senatobia, Miss., for burial Sunday afternoon.

 

James Davis

             James Davis was born in Tennessee on September 1, 1845, and died in Anna, Illinois, October 24, 1926.  He was married to Lucinda McRoberts and to this union were born eight children, three of whom survive, namely:  Don L. Davis, of Mounds, Ill., Arley Davis, of Bertrand, Mo., and Oscar Davis, of Belleville, Ill.

             Mr. Davis was a veteran of the Civil War.

             Funeral services were held in Anna Monday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at the National Cemetery.  All three sons were in attendance.  Rev. Adams, pastor of the M. E. Church of Jonesboro, officiated.

             (James Davis, 37, born in Tennessee, son of John Davis and Phebe Pace, married Clarrinda McRoberts, 28, born in Jackson Co., Ill., daughter of Samuel McRoberts and Jane Hammonds, on 29 Oct 1882, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Norman T. Hase

             Mr. Norman T. L. Hase, of Mill Creek, died Oct. 20, after an illness of about two months.  He was 57 years old.  He was born and reared near Golconda, Ill., but came to Union County when a young man where he has resided ever since.

             He leaves his wife, two sons, Clyde and Charles, two daughters, Miss Jewel, of Anna, and Mrs. George Albright, of Mounds, also two brothers, Enoch L., of Mill Creek, and John G. Hase, of Rockford, Texas, and one sister, Mrs. Edna Cooper, of Kansas City, Mo.

             Funeral services were conducted at Mill Creek Baptist Church by Rev. W. J. Ward, of Jonesboro, and member of the M. W. A. lodge, of which he was a member, had charge at the grave.—Jonesboro Gazette

             (His marker in St. John’s Cemetery at Mill Creek reads:  Norman T. Hase 1869-1926.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Killed in Runaway

             Oliver Hogg, of Bardwell, Ky., a brother of Mrs. Edgar Clanton, of this city, was killed in a runaway accident on Monday, Nov. 1.  He was the second brother of Mrs. Clanton to be killed in a runaway.

             Mr. and Mrs. Clanton and family went to Bardwell Tuesday to attend the funeral.

 

Mound City Man Meets Accidental Death

             Grant Staten was fatally injured Wednesday when a log fell on him while at work in the Inman plant at Mound City.

             He was taken to St. Mary’s Infirmary, Cairo, where he died about noon of the same day.  He was badly crushed and suffered internal injuries which proved fatal.

             An inquest was held Wednesday afternoon.  The coroner’s verdict of accidental death from injuries received when he was struck by a log.  He was fifty-three years of age.

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 5 Nov 1926:
Mrs. W. M. Moyers received word that her nephew, J. O. Evers, was killed last Wednesday, Oct. 27, in Centralia by falling from a truck.  The body was brought to the home of his daughter, Mrs. John McIntire, at Grand Chain Saturday and funeral services were held Sunday.

Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Moyers and daughter, Miss Grace, spent Sunday in Grand Chain where they attended the funeral of J. O. Evers.

J. O. EVERS KILLED IN AN ACCIDENT
Former Grand Chain Resident Meets Death in Centralia

J. O. Evers, of Centralia, formerly of Grand Chain, was thrown from a truck in which he was riding to his work on Wednesday, Oct. 27, and died from concussion of the brain at 11 p.m. the same evening.  

Mr. Evers was a prosperous and well known farmer of Grand Chain, having resided in that community all his life, until three years ago, when he removed to Centralia, where he has since resided.  The body was bought to Grand Chain Saturday morning to the home of his daughter, Mrs. John McIntyre, and the funeral was held Sunday, Oct. 31st, at 2 p.m. at Salem M. E. Church, conducted by R. S. A. Morgan, of Ullin M. E. Church.  Interment was made in the Salem Cemetery.

Mr. Evers is survived by his wife, Mrs. Lucy Maher Evers, and 8 children, Mrs. John McIntyre, and Leo Evers, of Grand Chain, Mrs. George Kobler, of Centralia, Miss C___a, James, Jr., Virgil and Russel Evers, of Centralia, two grandchildren, Margaret Lucille McIntyre and Homer Evers.  Also three brothers and two sisters survive, A. W. and Hubert H., of Chicago, and Luther L. Evers, of Metropolis, and Mrs. Cynthia Lippert and Mrs. Hattie Furguson, of Karnak.  Mrs. W. N. Moyers, of Mound City, is an aunt of the deceased.  Mr. Evers was a member of the Salem M. E. Church from an early age also a member of the M. W. of A. and I. O. O. F. orders.

(James Oliver Evers, 21, born in Hillerman, Ill., son of James A. L. Evers and Annie McGee, married Lucy Miller, 18, born in Yates Landing, Ill., daughter of L. V. Miller and Elizabeth Bayless, on 24 Sep 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  August Lippert married Cynthia C. Evers on 19 Jan 1898, in Massac Co., Ill.  His marker in Salem Cemetery near Grand Chain reads:  James O. Evers Born Feb. 23, 1878 Died Oct. 27, 1926.  William N. Moyers married Nellie McGhee on 17 Aug 1893, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Grant Staten Crushed by Log at Inman Veneer Plant

Grant Staten, 50 years of age, and employed at the Inman Veneer Plant in this city, was fatally injured Wednesday morning.  He was at work releasing logs when he jumped to avoid being struck by a log and fell in the path of another log which crushed him severely.  He was rushed to St. Mary’s Hospital where attempts were made to save his life, but he was so badly injured that an operation failed to do any good.

The body was removed to Karcher Brothers, where an inquest was held and the body prepared for burial.

Former Mound City Boy Dies in California

Leonard C. Davis, a former Mound City boy, passed away in the hospital at Lomita, Calif., Tuesday afternoon, Oct. 24th.  As no details were given in the message as to Mr. Davis’ death, but it is supposed it was an accident.  Funeral services and burial were held Thursday at 2 p.m. at the Torrance Chapel.

Mr. Davis, who lived here until about ten years ago, had many friends here to whom the news of his death will bring much grief.  He was a veteran of the World War, serving overseas and belonged to the American Legion.  Surviving are his mother Mrs. J. E. Floyd, of Lomita, a stepfather, Mr. Floyd, and there brothers, T. B. Davis, of Cairo, Aggie Davis, of Los Angeles, and Clayborn Davis, of Lomita.  A sister, Mrs. LeRoy, died in Lomita about a month ago.


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 11 Nov 1926:

Paul Turbaville Dies

             Just as we go to press we learn of the death of Paul Turbaville, which occurred at the home of Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Wiedemann at 3 o’clock a.m.

             Paul was a very fine lad, liked by everyone who knew him.  His death saddens the whole community.

             One sister, Miss Doris, is left alone, her parents and two brothers having died within a period of a few years.

 

Former Mound City Resident Dies in Cairo

             Herman Reese died Wednesday at St. Mary’s Infirmary, Cairo, after an illness of two weeks.

Mr. Reese was a former resident of Mound City, but had recently located in East St. Louis.  He was an interior decorator.

             He leaves a wife and a little daughter, Marion Rose, 19 months old.  His aged father survives, also two sisters, Mrs. Etta Barnett, of Cairo, Mrs. E. H. Alden, of Anna, and four brothers, E. A. Reese, Mokane, Mo., Albert, James, and Charles Reese, of Cairo.

             Funeral services will be held Friday at 2 p.m. at the home of Mrs. Barnett.  Interment will be in Beech Grove Cemetery.

 

Mrs. Ed. Beisswingert
Dies after Brief Illness

             Mrs. Byrd Millis Beisswingert, wife of Ed Beisswingert, died Monday night at her home in the Blum Addition, after a brief illness.

             Mrs. Beisswingert was stricken with apoplexy, at the Congregational church last Friday night whither she had gone to attend a business meeting of church officials.  She was taken to her home where she later suffered a second stroke.  She lingered unconscious until Monday night when death came.

             Mrs. Beisswingert was born in Union County, Ill., September 20, 1876.  She was married to Mr. Beisswingert on May 14, 1918, in Belleville, Ill.  She united with the Congregational Church of Mounds, May 1, 1921, and was a devoted worker in the church from that day until her death.

             Besides her husband, she leaves three brothers Albert Millis, of Oil Hill, Kan., W. R. Millis, of Union City, Tenn., Paul Millis, of St. Louis, Mo., and a sister, Mrs. Annie Millis Jones, of Portland, Oregon.

             Funeral services were held at the home Wednesday at 12:30 o’clock.  Sec. J. C. Minch of the Y. M. C. A. conducted the services.  Interment was in the Anna cemetery.

             (Edward Albert Beisswingert, 25, a guard at Anna Hospital, born in Jonesboro, son of Edward Beisswingert and Pauline Beck, married Ella Cassel, 29, born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of John Cassel and Malinda Mull, on 8 May 1894, in Union Co., Ill.  One marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Ella Beisswingert Born Oct. 6, 1888 Died June 22, 1959.  Byrdie Beisswingert Born Sept. 20, 1876 Died Nov. 8, 1926.  Edward Beisswingert Born Feb. 11, 1869.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 12 Nov 1926:
W. E. Read Seriously Ill in St. Mary’s Hospital

W. E. Read, merchant and a well-known citizen, became suddenly ill Thursday and was taken to St. Mary’s Hospital that night where he underwent an operation at 2 o’clock Friday morning.  His condition is considered critical.

Mrs. S. R. Tolley Dies

Mrs. Susianni R. Tolley, wife of J. L. Tolley, passed away at her home in this city at 8 o’clock Sunday evening.  Deceased was 61 years of age and was formerly Mrs. Ben Cunningham, an old resident of this city.  She is survived by her husband and one son by her former marriage.  A daughter, Minerva, preceded her mother in death several years ago.  Funeral services were held at 10 o’clock Thursday morning at the residence conducted by Rev. Gentry, minister of the Pentecostal Church with interment in Beech Grove Cemetery.  G. A. James had charge of the funeral.

(B. F. Cunningham married Mrs. Susan R. Hall on 29 Nov 1878, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Mr. and Mrs. William Young, of St. Louis, were called here by the death of the latter’s father, Grant Staten.

Former Resident Dies in Cairo

Herman Reese, a painter and decorator, formerly of this city, but for a number of years has resided in Cairo, was recently removed from the home of his sister, Mrs. Etta Barnett, 506 Walnut Street, to St. Mary’s Infirmary, is in a serious condition.  He is suffering from lead poisoning.  His brother, E. A. Reese and wife, of Mokane, Mo., are at his bedside.

As we go to press, Reese passed away leaving a wife and a little daughter.

 

Former Mound City Lady Dies in St. Louis

             Mrs. Lou Hoffman, of St. Louis, formerly Miss Hilda Schuler, of this city, died Saturday morning at 2 o’clock at St. Mary’s Hospital following an illness of three months.  Mrs. Otto Fahr, of Cairo, was at the bedside of her sister when the end came.

             Mrs. Hoffman is survived by her husband and two children, two years and three months old respectively.  She also leaves relatives in this city and vicinity.  Deceased was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Schuler, of St. Louis, formerly of this city.


The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 18 Nov 1926:

L. M. Mount Killed in Accident at Martin, Tenn.

             The friends of L. M. Mount, a former resident of Mounds, were shocked when they heard of his sudden death by accident at Martin, Tenn., on Tuesday morning.

             Mr. Mount was a south end flagman and was found dead by the side of his train.  One arm was off and he had sustained several injuries to the head.  We have heard no further particulars of the accident. Mr. and Mrs. Mount and family left Mounds for Jackson, Tenn., some time ago.  Mrs. Mount is a sister of T. B. Akin, and Mr. and Mrs. Akin left at once for Jackson.

 

Paul Turbaville

             Paul Turbaville was born in Mounds, Illinois, Feb. 28, 1910, and died Nov. 12, 1926, age 16 years, 9 months and 12 days.

             Paul was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Turbaville, and was one of a family of six children, three of whom died in infancy.  His mother died March 20, 1918, a brother Otis was killed in action in France on Oct. 27, 1918, and his father passed to the beyond May 20, 1925.  Doris, a sister, is left alone.

             Paul was a freshman in M. T. H. S.  During the summer months and on Saturday he was employed in A. Crosson’s Drug Store.  He and his sister lived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. P. W. Scott, but he was taken seriously ill at the home of Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Wiedemann.  Everything that kind and loving hands could do for the lad was done, but his frail body was unable to cope with the disease.

             Funeral services were held at the M. E. church Sunday afternoon at 1:30.  Rev. J. S. Dever, pastor, officiated.  J. C. Mench, secretary of the Y. M. C. A., spoke.  Rev. Dunlap, of Cairo, offered prayer.  Boys of the freshman class of M. T. H. S. were pallbearers.  The high school attended in a body.  Interment was made in Pulaski cemetery.

             (Joseph Turbyville married Ettie Jane Lackey on 26 Feb 1891, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Rose Hill Cemetery at Pulaski reads:  Paul E. Turbaville 1910-1926.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. J. L. Taylor was called to Marion by the sudden illness and death of her father, Mr. Shadowens.  Mr. Shadowens was a Civil War veteran and was 91 years old at his death.

             (Claburn Shadowens was born 18 Jun 1836, the son of David Shadowens and Miss Reeder, and died 13 Nov 1926, in Marion, Ill.  He was buried in Evergreen Cemetery at Makanda.  He enlisted as a private in Co. E, 120th Illinois Infantry on 16 Aug 1862.  He was from Pope Co., Ill., 26, 6’1”, born in Davidson Co., Tenn., and was discharged after being hospitalized at St. Louis.  His marker in Evergreen Cemetery at Makanda reads:  Claborn Shadowens Died Nov. 13, 1926  Co. E, 120th Ill. Inf.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Card of Thanks

             I desire to express my sincere thanks to the many friends who extended their sympathy who sent flowers, for the use of cars and to Rev. Dever, Rev. Dunlap, Brother Mench for the kind and comforting words which were such a consolation to me during the illness and death of my dear brother, Paul.

Sincerely,

Doris Turbaville.

 

First of Triplet to Die Passes at 83

             J. W. Williams, familiarly known as “Uncle Jerry,” died Tuesday morning, Nov. 2nd, at his home at Lovington, Ill., at the age of 83, his birthday being Sept. 23rd.  He is one of three children, triplets, and the first of the three to die.  His two sisters, the remaining triplets, are Mrs. Martha Staley, of Carmi, and Mrs. Mary Wiley, of Greybull, Wyoming.  Mrs. Staley is in poor health and was unable to attend her brother’s funeral, and Mrs. Wiley on account of the distance from her home, was also unable to be present.

             These triplets belonged to a family of seventeen children, six of whom are still living, Mrs. Elijah Randolph, of Carmi, also one of the six.  One set of twins was also born into this family, one of them dying about two years ago.  Mrs. Susan Foster, of Daytona Beach, Fla., is the surviving twin, she being 85 years of age.

             One of the remarkable things about this family is that all of the seventeen children lived to be grown men and women.—Carmi Times Tribune

             (Elijah W. Randolph married Catherine Williams on 18 Nov 1877, in White Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Thursday, 25 Nov 1926:

Mr. and Mrs. W.L. Blancett returned Friday from Jackson, Tenn., where they were called to attend the funeral of L. M. Mount.

 

Word was received here (Ullin) Sunday from Mrs. F. M. Cheek that her sister, Miss M. Cheek, had fallen and broken her hip.  Another sister, Miss L. Cheek, fell about a month ago and broke her hip.

             (The sisters of Mrs. Cheek were Misses Crouch instead of Misses Cheek.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 3 Dec 1926:

Mrs. C. Corbett and daughter, Mrs. Robert Wildy, were called to Red Hill, Ky., by the illness of the former’s mother, Mrs. Hargan, who is past ninety years of age.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 10 Dec 1926:

Former Sheriff of Williamson County Arrested on Murder Charge

             George Galligan, who retired on Monday from the office of sheriff of Williamson County, was arrested on the same day by his successor, Oren Coleman, on a murder charge.  Mrs. Charles Woolard had sworn out the warrant charging him with the murder of her husband, who was one of the six killed in a Klan gun fight at Herrin August 30, 1924.

             Galligan’s four year term as sheriff has aged him beyond his 38 years.  He entered the coal mines at the age of 11 and plans to go back to his old job.

 

Death of Former Mounds Resident Occurs in Chicago

             J. D. Quarles, a former well known resident of Mounds, died at his home in Chicago Thursday evening at 6:45 o’clock at the age of 53 years, after an illness of several weeks.

             Mr. Quarles was a business man of Mounds in the early days of the town.  We have been told that he was the first person of occupy the Nolte building on First Street where B. Coury now has his dry goods store.  Later he conducted the Mounds Hotel in the Illinois Central Station building and he also conducted a restaurant in one of J. J. Blum’s buildings.  He had been a resident of Chicago for 16 years.  He is survived by his wife, formerly Miss Grace Durning, of Mounds City, and one son, Albert.  He was a cousin of G. M. Quarles, of this city.

             The body was brought to Mounds Sunday morning and taken to the undertaker’s office of G. A. James where funeral services were held at 2 o’clock.  Rev. Thomas Gray, pastor of the Congregational church of Mounds City officiated.  The Mound City choir furnished the music.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery, the Masonic order conducting the service.

 

Mr. Thomas Hileman, who has been a merchant here (Ullin) for a number of years, died at his home Friday evening, Dec. 3, after a lingering illness.

             Besides his wife, he leaves five children, Mrs. Sam Frieze, Elsie, Frances, Mary Alice, and Monroe, also an aged father, C. M. Hileman, and one sister, Mrs. George Burnett, of Tacoma, Wash.

             The funeral was held at the M. E. Church, Sunday evening with Rev. S. A. Morgan officiating.  Burial was at the Anna Cemetery.

             (Thomas Lee Hileman, 22, merchant, of Ullin, Ill., son of Christian M. Hileman and Harriett Lucinda Robinson, married Etta Hunt, 23, born in Mason, Ind., daughter of Wesley Hunt and Samantha Myers, on 18 Sep 1897, in Union Co., Ill.  George Burnett, 22, born in St. Cyrus, Scotland, son of George Burnett and Jane Sinclair, married Nannie Hileman on 30 Nov 1898, in Union Co., Ill.  Christian M. Hileman married Harriet S. Robinson on 24 Sep 1871, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Horace Shaffer received word the latter part of the week that her sister, Mrs. James Harris, of Galesburg, Ill., was dead.  She started to Galesburg to attend the funeral, but found that she could not reach there in time, so returned home.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 17 Dec 1926:

Brother of Mrs. H. A. Hamlett Dies at Her Home Sunday

             R. L. Rust died at the home of his sister, Mrs. H. A. Hamlet Sunday morning, Dec. 12, 1926.

He was born November 12, 1914, at Barlow, Ky., and was 12 years and one month old at his death.

             Surviving him are his father, W. A. Rust, of Detroit, Mich., one sister, Mrs. Adele Hamlett, three brothers, Marvin C. and I. W. Rust, of Mounds, and Joe Rust, of Taft, California, besides many other relatives and friends.  His mother preceded him in death two and one half years ago.

             Funeral services were conducted at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Hamlett, at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday.  Evangelist Lew D. Hill of the Christian Church officiated, assisted by Eld. H. C. Croslin of the Baptist Church.  The funeral cortege left by motor for Barlow, Ky., where interment was made in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery.

 

Card of Thanks

             We wish to thank each and every one for the many kind and sympathetic things they did to help us in the death and burial of our little son and brother, R. L. Rust.  We wish to thank Rev. Croslin and Rev. Hill for the kind words spoken those who sang, those who sent the beautiful flowers and those who furnished cars.  Hoping that in the hour of your need we may be able to help you.

W. A. Rust

Mrs. H. A. Hamlett and family

M. C. Rust and family

I. W. Rust and family

 

John Dishinger of America Dies Saturday

             John Dishinger, of America, age 68 years, died at his home Saturday, Dec. 16, after an illness of several weeks.

             Mr. Deshinger, a former resident of Mound City, was at one time deputy sheriff of Pulaski County and for many years was city marshal of Mound City.  A number of years ago he moved to America where he was Big Four station agent, postmaster and proprietor of a general store.

             Mr. Dishinger was a member of the Modern Woodmen, Knights of Pythias and Odd Fellows Lodges of Mound City.

             He is survived by his wife, a daughter, Miss Mildred, a son, Walter and a sister, Mrs. William Wilson, of Mound City.

             Funeral services were held at the First M. E. Church of Mound City, Monday, Dec. 13.  Rev. Lawrence Smith, pastor of the church, officiated.

 

Charles H. Cruse and Dallas Winchester attended the funeral of Sam Toler at Carbondale Monday.  Mr. Toler died suddenly at his home in Centralia.

 

Death Calls Mrs. Raymond Badgley of Grand Chain

             Josephine Hannan Badgley, wife of Raymond Badgley, of Grand Chain, died at her home on Thursday, Dec. 9, at 11 p.m.

             Mrs. Badgley was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Hannan, of Olmsted.  She was 33 years of age.

             She is survived by her husband, two children, Delbert, age 13, and Maud Louise, age 12, her father, mother, two sisters and five brothers.

             Funeral services were held Saturday at 2 p.m. at St. Catherine’s Catholic Church, conducted by Rev. Father Orlet.  Interment was made in the Catholic cemetery at Grand Chain.

             (Her marker in St. Catherine’s Cemetery at Grand Chain reads:  Josephine Badgley 1893-1926.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 17 Dec 1926:
Old Resident Dies at America

             John Dishinger, 60 years old, and a former resident of this city, died at his home in America, Saturday night at 10:30 o’clock after a lingering illness of several weeks.

The remains were brought to this city and funeral services held at the First Methodist Church Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock, Rev. Lawrence Smith, the pastor conducting the services.  The Odd Fellows also held impressive services at the grave, deceased being a member of this order 42 years.

Deceased resided here until a few years ago when he moved to America and was station and express agent, postmaster and conducted a store in that place.  During his residence in Mound City, he served Pulaski County one term as deputy sheriff.  He also was for many years city marshal.  He took active part in public affairs and was a member of the Odd Fellows, Knight of Pythias, and Modern Woodmen of America.

Surviving Mr. Dishinger are his wife, son Walter, and granddaughter, Miss Mildred Dishinger, of America, sister, Mrs. William Wilson, of this city, and two nephews, Harry Dishinger, of this city and C. W. Dishinger, of Jacksonville, Fla.

OBITUARY

Died at her home in Grand Chain, Dec. 9th, 1926, Josephine Hannon Badgley, age 34 years after a prolonged illness. She is survived by the husband, two children, Maude and Delbert, age 13 and 12 years, father and mother, several brothers and sisters and many dear friends.

Mrs. Badgely has been a member of the Catholic Church here since childhood and was a devout member, a good mother and neighbor.  Truly a Christian has gone to her reward.

Funeral services were held at the Catholic church Saturday afternoon conducted by the pastor, burial in Catholic cemetery.

 

 

The Mounds Independent, Friday, 24 Dec 1926:

Brother Dies of Drowning

             Dave Wright and family were called to Gale, Ill., Wednesday by the death of Mr. Wright’s brother, Will Wright.  The message stated that Mr. Wright met his death by drowning, but we have not yet learned the particulars concerning the sad affair.

 

Samuel Lewis, of Villa Ridge, Dies Suddenly

             Samuel Lewis, member of a prominent family of Villa Ridge, died suddenly at his home on Monday, Dec. 20.

             Mr. Lewis who had clerked in the W. H. Spaulding store for years, had gone home for the noon lunch when he was stricken and he died before a physician could be summoned.

             He was the son of Major S. O. Lewis and had reached the age of 53 years.  He is survived by his aged father, his wife, two daughters, Mrs. R. E. Smoot and Mrs. Margaret Bridewell, two sons, three brothers, Walker T. Lewis, local superintendent for the C. I. P. S. Co., Dwight Lewis, of Villa Ridge, and Ralph Lewis; two sisters, Mrs. Ruby Adams, of St. Louis, and Miss Grace Lewis, besides many other relatives.

             Funeral services were held at the home Thursday afternoon at 1:30.  Interment was made in Villa Ridge cemetery.

 

Father of Evan S. Rushing Dies While on His Way Home

             R. J. Rushing, of Benton, Ill., dropped dead in the Illinois Central station at DuQuoin Monday evening while he and his wife were on their way to visit here en route to Florida.

             His son, Evan S. Rushing, of this city, had been operated on a week or more before at St. Mary’s Infirmary Cairo.  After a visit here and in Cairo, Mr. and Mrs. Rushing were to go to the home of their daughter, Mrs. Wade Baker, of Miami, Florida, for the winter.

             The body was taken back to their home in Benton.  Funeral services were held at the Baptist church in Benton Thursday afternoon.  Interment will be made at Pinckneyville his old home, today.

             Mrs. Evan S. Rushing attended the services at Benton.  Mr. Rushing, who was brought home from the hospital Wednesday afternoon, was unable to attend.

             (Reuben J. Rushing married Maggie A. Strait on 8 Aug 1886, in Perry Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. W. Park died at her home Wednesday evening and the funeral was held at the Baptist church, Thursday.  Burial was at the Ullin cemetery.

             (Wilson Parks married Eva Cantrell on 17 Sep 1890, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  A marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  Willis Parks 1868-1946 married 1889 Eva Parks 1871-1926 Beuhlah Parks 1896-1900 Maude Parks 1890-1964 Esther Parks 1903-1962 Donald Parks 1933-1933.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, 24 Dec 1926:
Sudden Death of Son Causes No XMas Service

Word from Charles K. Weller received Monday stated that his son, Charles, was accidentally killed the day previous while gathering evergreens from the old home place in Florida.  The archdeacon left immediately for the south.  He will not be able to hold services here until Sunday, Jan. 2, 1927, at 7:30 p.m.

 

Villa Ridge Resident Dies Suddenly Monday

Samuel Lewis, age 53 years, of Villa Ridge, died suddenly Monday noon at the home of his father, Major S. O. Lewis, prominent farmer.  An inquest was conducted by Dr. O. T. Hudson, coroner of this county, the verdict being that death as due to heart trouble.  Mr. Lewis had just returned from work at W. H. Spaulding’s store where he was employed, for his dinner when he was stricken during before a doctor could be summoned.

Surviving Mr. Lewis are his father, Major Lewis; his wife and four children.  He also leaves a sister in Kansas City, Mo., and three brothers of Pulaski County.

Funeral services were held Thursday at 1:30 p.m. at the residence.  Rev. O. E. Connett, pastor of the First M. E. Church of Cairo, officiated.  Following the services interment was made in Villa Ridge Cemetery.  G. A. James, of this city directed the funeral.

Mrs. Lewis was born in Villa Ridge and was well known throughout the county.

(Samuel O. Lewis married Sarah E. Walker on 11 May1870, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery reads:  Samuel O. Lewis, Jr., 1874-1926.—Darrel Dexter)


The Pulaski Enterprise, Friday, Dec. 31, 1926:
Fugitive Wanted for Murder

___ed Ross, a negro wanted on a charge of shooting Gene Buckhart, another negro, at Villa Ridge on Thanksgiving Day was apprehended at Pass, Tenn.  Deputies James Wilson and A. J. __ing went to Tennessee and brought Ross and placed him in the Pulaski County jail.  He has a penitentiary record in Tennessee, where he served a term on a charge of assault with intent to murder.

Former Resident Dies Xmas

Mrs. Lille Cheek received word from Denver, Col., Christmas morning of the death of her niece, Mrs. Lola Furgeson, she was formerly Miss Lola Peasley, of this city.  Mrs. Ferguson leaves one daughter, 19 years old.

The funeral was held Tuesday at Denver. 

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