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 Obituaries and Death Notices
in Pulaski County, Illinois Newspapers

The Pulaski Enterprise

2 Jan. - 31 Dec. 1925

Mound City, Pulaski County, Illinois


Transcribed and annotated by Darrel Dexter

darreldexter@hotmail.com

 

Friday, 2 Jan 1925:
Joe Layton, of this city, was bereaved this week in the death of his father, William H. Layton, who died in Cairo Sunday morning at 3:45, aged 77 years.  Deceased had been an employee at the Singer plant for 18 years.

OBITUARY

Charles R. Crippen, son of A. J. and Mary Crippen, was born near Pulaski, in Pulaski County, Illinois, November 11, 1858, and died in Cairo, Illinois, December 22, 1924, aged 66 years, one month and 12 days.  He was married to Miss Annie Mize about 1879 and to this union there were born eight children, four boys and four girls, three boys having preceded him into the great beyond.  The living children were:  Mrs. Homer Rivers, and Mrs. Oscar Sewell of East St. Louis.  Mrs. Jennie Hodges, of Cairo; Olin Crippen, of Ullin; and Mrs. Charles Yates, of California.  Besides there are 15 grandchildren and two brothers, J. E. Crippen, of Pulaski, and Henry Crippen, of Ullin.

Rev. Bradley of the First M. E. Church in Cairo prayed with him and read the scriptures during the deceased’s last hours, when he made a profession of the saving portion of God’s great economy.  He was led to confess:  I know I love Jesus and I know that He loves me.

Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Bradley at the daughter’s home in Cairo on Tuesday evening, December 23, and the body was brought to Ullin on Wednesday, December 24, where services were held at eleven o’clock by Rev. C. L. Phifer after which interment was made in the New Hope Cemetery.

(Charles Crippen married Annie Mize on 21 Oct 1883, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Friday, 9 Jan 1925:
Mound City Man Dies in Cairo Infirmary

John McGill passed away at 5:15 o’clock Tuesday afternoon at St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo.  He had been ill for some time, but his case was not considered serious.

Mr. McGill has been a resident of Mound City for several years, coming here from Kentucky.  He is survived by his wife, who was formerly Miss Stella Matlock, two children, Russel, 7, and Gerald, 3; two brothers, Thomas, of Truman, Ark., and William, of Louisville, Ky.

Mr. McGill was taken suddenly ill Saturday and was taken to St. Mary’s Infirmary Sunday afternoon.  He lived only two days at the infirmary.  An X-ray showed that he was a victim of a neglected cause of “flu.”  He was unconscious until the end came.

Funeral services were conducted Thursday afternoon at two o’clock at the home of the deceased by Rev. William Shelton, pastor of the First Baptist Church of this city.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.  G. A. James was in charge of the funeral.  Neither of the brothers of the deceased was able to attend the funeral.

Life Long Resident Here Passes Away Thursday

After an illness of several weeks, Miss Brema Lutz, aged 60, passed away at her home here at one o’clock Thursday morning.

The deceased was a lifelong resident of this city, having been born here.  She is the sister of Joe Lutz and Mrs. William Bestgen, of this city.  She had been failing in health for several months, but the condition became critical only a few weeks ago.

Funeral services will be held at eight o’clock Saturday morning at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in this city by Father Traynor.  Interment will be made in Beech Grove Cemetery with G. A. James in charge.

(William Bestgen married Louise Lutz, 30, daughter of Anton Lutz and Cresentia Moser, on 5 Apr 1900.—Darrel Dexter)

Conners To Hang, unless Committee Reports Him Insane

According to I. J. Hudson here, nothing has been done in the case of Hess Conners, sentenced last July to hang for the murder of Miss Daily Wilson, of Villa Ridge.  The execution was set for October 17th last, and preparations were made by Sheriff Hudson to carry out the sentence.  Word was received the day before the execution that a ninety-day reprieve had been granted the negro on petition of Attorney D. B. Read, of Cairo, to give him a chance to investigate the sanity of the negro.  The action was brought through several of the negroes in Cairo.

Conners was taken to the state penitentiary at Chester early in December for examination.  He has not been returned and may not be brought back to Mound City until the day before the execution, January 16th.

Preparations for the execution will be started early next week according to Sheriff Hudson.  He expects a report from the committee of doctors in Chester before the middle of next week.  The scaffold, which was borrowed last October from the sheriff. Was taken down following the announcement of the reprieve and stored away.  It will be put up again also the stockade which surrounded the scaffold, and which was blown down late last fall.

Only the regular deputies, twelve citizens for a jury, court attaches, two necessary doctors, and ministers will be admitted to the execution, according to Sheriff Hudson.

Unveiling Service

The Ullin M. E. church will hold a memorial service at three o’clock next Sunday, January 11, to the memory of the late Rev. W. Kemper, who while pastor of this church, died in July 1923.  Special ceremonies will consist of music, special sermon by a leader in the Methodist church and the unveiling of the fine new, beautiful memorial window dedicated and ascribed to the late pastor.  Everybody is invited to attend.

Died, December 31, 1924, Mrs. Schultz, at the home of her son, Dan, aged 87 years.  (Bryan)

OBITUARY
Mrs. Amanda Schoultz

Mrs. Armend Schoultz was born in Tennessee, April 7th, 1837, and died at the home of her son, D. N. Schultz, in Pulaski County, December 31, 1924, aged 87 years, three months and 13 days.

She had been making her home with her son, Dan Schoultz, near Eastwood Church for the past 2 years and has been in ill health for more than that time.  She was not considered dangerously ill, however, until shortly before the end came.

Mrs. Schoultz had two sons, one going before her, while Dan is the only living son, nine grandchildren and nineteen great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild survive her.

She gave her heart to God in early life and united with the Mount Moriah Church, Rigdon, Tenn., where she has ever since held her membership.  Her life was a testimony of the Lord’s goodness in sparing her to the 87th year.  She made many friends since coming to Pulaski County, who were present and attested their friendship at the funeral, which was held at the resident of her son, Thursday afternoon, January 1, 1925.  The services were conducted by C. L. Phifer, of the Ullin M. E. Church, after which interment took place in the New Hope Cemetery.

Friday, 16 Jan 1925:
Prior to her death in Cairo, Mrs. Oscar Harrison, 37 years old, wrote her own obituary for publication in the newspaper and made all arrangements for her funeral.

Mound City Man Dies in Cairo Hospital

Ben Brown, age 42 years, died at St. Mary’s infirmary in Cairo Tuesday at 9 o’clock a.m. after an illness lasting over a period of several weeks.  His death followed a second operation for peritonitis.

Mr. Brown was a resident of Mound City slightly over one year, coming here from Charleston, Mo.  Funeral services were held at the home of Olen Bowers, brother-in-law of the deceased, at 2 o’clock Wednesday afternoon by Rev. Roy Kean, pastor of the First Methodist Church of this city.  The funeral was in charge of G. A. James.

The deceased is survived by his wife, Jessie, eight children, Gilbert, Alberta, Thelma, Martha, Vesta, Clyde, Ruth Mae and Claribel; four sisters, Mrs. Olen Bowers, Mrs. Charles Keesee, Mrs. John Keesee, and Miss Ruth Brown; two brothers, Ma___ and Ossiesa; grandmother, Mrs. Ben Huff, of Charleston, Mo.  The grandmother was unable to attend the funeral.

The wife of the deceased was ill and unable to attend.

Samuel Back Dies Today After a Long Illness

Just as we go to press, we hear that Samuel Back passed away this afternoon at the age of eighty-four years.  He was well known here having been a merchant for several years.

The remains will be taken to St. Louis tomorrow where funeral services and burial will be held Sunday.

Two murder cases are set for next Thursday.  Raymond Meeks, who was indicted by the grand jury during the last term of court for the murder of Clarence Eubanks near Pulaski last October, will be tried Thursday, while the case of John Tapley and William Carter, the latter not yet apprehended will come up also.  They were indicted also at the last session of the grand jury for the murder of Joe Goins, Jr., at Olmsted last October.

The cases of the leaders of the mob that attempted to lynch Ike Brown and Arthur Jones held on suspicion in connection with the murder of Miss Daisy Wilson and for which crime Hess Conners hung today was certified down to the county court.  Harry Winters was fined $100 and given thirty days in jail.  The other members of the indictment were released for lack of evidence, with the exception of Roy Ogden, upon whom extradition papers were refused by the governor of Kentucky.

HESS CONNERS DIES ON GALLOWS THIS MORNING
Walks to Doom with Steady Step
Thanks Authorities for Their Kindness.

Hess Conners, murderer, was sent into eternity this morning at 10:20 by Sheriff I. J. Hudson.  Conners walked to the gallows with a firm step.  Upon asking if he wished to say anything before his execution he replied, “I want to thank Sheriff Hudson and Mrs. Hudson and all the other deputies who have been so kind to me while I have been in jail here.  I am sorry for the crime I have committed.  I ask you all and God to forgive me and I will never forget Mr. Hudson.”  Here his voice broke and he talked with difficulty.  He shook hands with all the attending officers and the straps were put on by Mr. G. P. Hanna, an expert from Carmi.  The expert then put the hood over the negro’s head, then the final adjustment of the noose was completed and Mrs. Hanna stepped back from the doomed man—Sheriff Hudson sprung the trap, and Conners was hanging beneath the scaffold.  He hung for sixteen minutes before Doctors Wesenberg and Hudson pronounced him dead, the body was then put into a basket and carried to the waiting hearse.  The body was placed in charge of George Hartwell, of Mounds.

Funeral services will be held Sunday under the direction of Undertaker George Hartwell of Mounds.
Rev. Cole, colored minister of this city, read a chapter to the doomed man from the book of Romans and offered a prayer for the soul of Conners.

A crowd of nearly a thousand had gathered in and around the courthouse before the execution took place.  It was rumored that the negro would be executed at 9:30.  As early as eight o’clock over a hundred people were anxiously awaiting the event.

None were admitted into the stockade, which was constructed around the scaffold until 10:00.  The prisoner was brought our and walked up the steps at 0:12.  The reading of the scripture by Rev. Cole and the short prayer consumed six minutes more.  The negro shook hands with the officers and gave his last woods.  The straps, hood and noose were adjusted during the other two minutes and Sheriff Hudson sprung the trap at exactly 10:20.  The negro was left suspended at the end of the rope for twenty-three minutes.

Sheriff Hudson stood up well under the strain and the only emotion he showed was the grip which he had on the two by four as he listed to the condemned man’s last words.

Conners never once flinched, but listened with stoical indifference to everything that was said.  At no time during the time in which he had been in the county jail has he ever evinced fear.

Conners pled guilty and was sentenced to death by hanging by Judge D. T. Hartwell July 30th, last for the murder of Miss Daisy Wilson, 18 years old daughter of J. C. Wilson, of Villa Ridge, nine days before when she came to the aid of her father in a struggle with two negroes following an attempted holdup of the Wilson store.

The negro eluded authorities for several days, but was finally captured near Future City in Alexander County by a negro deputy.  Conners and his pal, Fred Hale, who was with him on the expedition, were arrested and placed in the county jail in Cairo. Deputy Sheriff Jim Wilson, of Pulaski County bluffed Conners into a confession by telling him that Hale had confessed.

Upon being arranged before Judge Hartwell in the circuit court here the 29th, both the negroes pled guilty.  After appointing two of the most capable lawyers in this section of state to defend the negroes, Judge Hartwell adjourned court to give the negroes a chance to consult.  The defending counsel advised the negroes to plead guilty.  Both asserted and the Judge sentenced at Chester and Conner to hang.  Hale to a life term of imprisonment in the state penitentiary.  The day of the execution, which was October 17, was criticized by many, but according to law in this state a man cannot hang until the supreme court has had session; therefore the date set by Judge Hartwell was the earliest possible.

Preparations for the execution were consummated and all details were fixed by Sheriff Hudson, when word was received that a ninety day reprieve had been granted the negro on that petition by Attorney D. B. Reid of Cairo.  According to Reid, several Cairo negroes had asked for the petition upon the grounds that they believed that Conners was mentally deranged.  Attorney Reid also intimated that the negroes might have been intimidated by the mob which had threatened to hang two Memphis negroes who had been arrested on suspicion.

Acting upon the suggestion of Attorney Reid, Judge Hartwell named three Murphysboro physicians, Drs. Carter, Ormsby, and Evans to examine Conners and report upon his mentality.  The doctors reported the negro sane and he was returned to Mound City early this week.  The physicians reported that nothing in the actions of the negro would lead them to believe that he was anything but normal.  Upon hearing the report of the lunacy commission, the court refused the petition of Attorney Reid for an inquisition by jury and left the case entirely in the hands of the governor.

Plans for the execution were again made by Sheriff Hudson beginning this week.  The scaffold which had been borrowed from Johnson County had been taken down following the announcement of the reprieve.  Martin Bolar and William Wiley, who had put up the structure the first time were secured for the task again.  The stockade, which had blown down, was put in place again.  The noose, which was sent the negro to his doom, was borrowed from the sheriff of Saline County at Harrisburg.  Sheriff Hudson waited until there was no doubt about the execution and made his plan with his characteristic deliberation.

Funeral of Miss Brema Lutz

The funeral services of Miss Brema Lutz, who passed away Thursday morning at 1:30 o’clock were held from St. Mary’s Catholic Church at 8:30 o’clock Saturday morning, Father Traynor officiating and in his remarks gave the sorrowing friends much comfort in depicting the splendid character and devotion of the departed one.

Immediately after the services a special interurban train left for Mounds where interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.  The pallbearers were Tom Campbell, Al Schuler, Dan O’Sullivan, Mike Browner, Charles Curren, and Peter McNeil.  G. A. James was in charge.

Mrs. Martin Bolar was called to East Prairie, Mo., last week on account of the death of her father, Robert Grey, who passed away after several weeks of illness.

Friday, 23 Jan 1925:
JOHN A. WAUGH PASSES AWAY AT JACKSONVILLE
Prominent Mason, Church Man, and Business Man.  Funeral Held Monday P.M.

Like an appealing specter, death haunts every pathway of life drive every vision of joy.  Noiselessly and ceaselessly it treads on man’s footsteps from the cradle to the grave.  None can hope to escape its advance.  Infancy in its purity, youth in its beauty, and manhood in its strength, and age in its honor find no exception from it.

John A. Waugh, age 89, former resident of this city for many years, died Saturday morning at 1:30 o’clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Oscar Morris, Jacksonville, Illinois.  Some two years ago he suffered a stroke of paralysis and a recurrence of the trouble resulted in death.

John A. Waugh was born March 30th, 1835, in Mercer Co., Penn.  He was the son or Robert and Elizabeth Waugh.

While a young man Mr. Waugh learned the printer’s trade, following this line of work for some time.  In the year1856, he came to Pulaski County and became the editor and proprietor of the National Emporium.  In the year 1861 he entered the United States Navy as constructor’s clerk at the navy yards here in Mound City.  In 1865 he became bookkeeper for the Marine Ways, continuing with that concern until his election as county clerk in 1882.

Mr. Waugh was married in 1863 to Mary R. Emrie, daughter of Judge Emrie, who together with Mrs. Oscar A. Morris, a daughter and a granddaughter, __ grandsons and one great-grandson survive him.

Mr. Waugh became a member of the Methodist church in this city in the year 1876 where he was a faithful member until his death.  He was a member of the following lodges.  ___ Lodge No. 562 A. F. of A. M. of Mounds City; the Queen of Egypt Chapter No. 609 Order Eastern Star; the Royal Arch Masons No. 71 and the Knights Templar No. 13 of Cairo.

Mr. Waugh was well known and liked by all.  He held many positions of trust during the residence in this city, having been cashier of the First State Bank also secretary of the Building and Loan Association.
As a Mason, Mr. Waugh was honored by being elected Worshipful Master on more than one occasion and only the weight of years caused him to cease from active work in the lodge.

Just prior to leaving this city and take up his residence with his daughter in Jacksonville he made his last visit to the Masonic Lodge.  On this occasion he was presented with a beautiful ___nd in response said:  ”I _____ in the spring.”  He did not come back in the spring, but into springtime with his father Above.

In addition to his daughter he is survived by his wife, who is also living with her daughter, but who has been an invalid for several years.

Two grandsons, Buncombe and Phillip Morris, one granddaughter, Mrs. Earl King Anderson, of Chicago.

The remains were brought to Mound City Monday afternoon, arriving on the Illinois Central at 1 o’clock and were taken immediately to the M. E. Church where funeral services were conducted by Rev. Roy Kean, assisted by ____ J. Burgess.  The ____ Masonic lodge had ____ at Beech Grove Cemetery for interment.

(John A. Waugh married Mary R. Emrie on 5 Apr 8162, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Edward Wilson Dies in Metropolis Monday

Edward Wilson, age 53, a former resident of this city, died at 9 o’clock Monday morning at his home in Metropolis.  He had been ill for several months for eight weeks and was a patient at the Illinois Central Hospital in Paducah.  He was brought to his home in Metropolis last week.  He leaves a widow and three children, Edward, Katherine and James, all at home; a sister, Mrs. G. J. Murphy, and a brother, William Wilson, of this city.

The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon in Metropolis and was conducted by the Masonic Order.

(Granville J. Murphy married Ella F. Wilson on 28 Sep 1880, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Edward Wilson married Alice Earnhardt on 22 Jul 1890, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

AN OLD RESIDNET AND MERCHANT IS CALLED, 16th
Came Here in 1870 and Has Resided in This City Ever Since—Had Retired

Samuel Back who passed away Friday afternoon at 1 o’clock was in his 84th year.  He had been a resident of this city for 55 years and for nearly forty years was a prominent dry goods merchant retiring about fifteen years ago.

He is survived by a niece, Mrs. Clara Eichhorn and four nephews, Jake Blum, of Mounds, Ben Blum, of Mound City, Sam Blum, of Cairo, and Sigmund Back, of Memphis, Tenn.

The body was taken to St. Louis Saturday and on Sunday afternoon at 2 p.m. the funeral was held from the Rindskoph Chapel, 5216 Delmar Boulevard, interment in Mount Sinai Cemetery.

Life or Acquittal for Meeks Expected Today

The strength of the self-defense plea of Waymon Meeks, charged with the murder of Clarence Eubanks, another Pulaski negro, last October, will decide the fate of Meeks in his trial today.  It is generally believed that he will get life in the penitentiary or if his plea sounds good to the jury he may be acquitted.

Some forty witnesses have been subpoenaed and will be examined today.

Judge A. E. Sommers will adjourn court this afternoon until Monday when a few of the minor cases will be tried.  Tuesday is another big day.  Tom Woods, charged with a statutory crime against his 15-year-old daughter will appear for trial.  Two days may be taken for this trial.

____son and Archie Mathis, students of the U. of I. at Urbana, were here Friday to witness the execution.

Mr. and Mrs. G. J. Murphy, Mrs. Eleanor Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. Barney Burns left Wednesday morning for Metropolis where they attended the funeral of Edward Wilson.

Largest Woman Buried at Metropolis
Special Casket Required for Body of Extra Large Woman

The largest women in Metropolis if not in Illinois was buried in the Masonic cemetery Sunday afternoon.  She was Mrs. Sarah Stephens, wife of William Stephens, an employee of the Stove factory.  Mrs. Stephens weighed over 500 pounds.  Her exact weight was not known but the figure was the lowest estimate.

Mrs. Stephens died Friday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock from complications.  When W. P. Baynes was called in as undertaker he looked upon the largest body he had ever been called upon to bury.  Mr. Baynes had in stock no casket large enough for Mrs. Stephens’s remains.  He called the Belleville Casket Manufacturing Company on the telephone and said he needed a coffin for a body that measured 31 inches across the breast with arms tightly folded.  The company had none so large and had to work overtime to make a coffin to ship it by express.  Mrs. Stephens’s arms measured 23 inches at the elbows.

The funeral took place from the Stephens home at 2 p.m. Sunday, conducted by Rev. Sorsham, a Baptist minister.  Many relatives and friends attended.  It was a common saying among the neighbors that Mrs. Stephens was as good as she was large.  The woman had exceedingly pretty face and was noted for good nature and kindly disposition.  She was regarded as a very pious woman, a true Christian.

The casket was got into the house by carrying it sidewise.  Before bringing it out, after the body was placed in the coffin, it _____.

 

A large number from Ullin were in attendance at the hanging at Mound City last Friday.

OBITUARY
JOHN A. WAUGH

‘Tis sweet to think of he who rest at the close of life.  A husband and father whose mission was fulfilled in devotion ad  love to his family.  Patience and perseverance was his, so he conquered, and at the last passed out peacefully into the great beyond.  At an early hour Friday morning, December 18th, the gates were thrown ajar and Mr. Waugh passed from life to immortality at the advanced age of ninety years after a long and useful life.

Coming to Mound City in his early manhood for more than half a century he was identified with the city’s business interests holding many positions of trust and confidence and had been accorded the warmest to friendship and esteem of her citizens.

On Monday afternoon at 1:30 the remains, accompanied by his daughter and her husband, arrived in Mound City, from Jacksonville, Ill., where with his wife the last year of his life had been spent at the home of their daughter, Mrs. Oscar A. Morris.  Mrs. Waugh’s health preventing her from coming with them, inseparably bound together ___ the life of this husband and the wife who is now left to mourn his loss.

Upon arriving the remains were taken to Grace M. E. Church, of which Mr. Waugh had been a faithful member for almost fifty years.  Here the flower laden casket rested until at 3 o’clock friends and Masons listened to beautiful tributes of song and service rendered to his memory.  The pastor, Rev. Roy N. Kean, delivered the sermon, and Rev. Joel Burgess, of the Congregational Church, read for the lesson the twelfth chapter of Ecclesiastes, one of Mr. Waugh’s favorite passages of scripture.

Immediately following the service, interurban cars bearing the funeral cortege, left for Beech Grove Cemetery, where in the family lot was laid to rest all that was mortal of good man.

Trinity Lodge No. 562 A. F. & A. M. escorted the remains to the quiet graveside, where the beautiful burial rites of the Masonic order were held.

ROBERT GRAY

William Robert Gray, born July 25, 1861, in Franklin County, departed this life at his home in East Prairie, Mo., Sunday, Jan. 4, 1925.

In 1887 he was married to Miss Mintie Carpenter, of Franklin County, Ill.  To this union were born two daughters, Mrs. E. M. Bolard, of Mound City, Ill., and Mrs. J. W. Dubois, of Seattle, Wash.  In 1900 Mrs. Gray died and the following year Mr. Gray united in marriage to Miss Anna Herring of Massac County, Illinois, who survives her husband.  into this home were born two sons, Robert, who died two years ago, and Lloyd, of East Prairie.  His wife and all the children were present when he passed away.  He is survived by also four brothers, two sisters and four grandchildren, besides other relatives and friends.

About a year ago Mr. Gray became a Christian and so remained to the end.

Funeral services Monday Jan. 5th, at the Methodist church, East Prairie, were conducted by the pastor, Rev. Francis P. Cook.  Interment was made at the Dogwood Cemetery.—East Prairie (Mo.) Eagle.

(Robert Gray married Mintie Carpenter on 4 Sep 1886, in Franklin Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Friday, 6 Feb 1925:
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lentz and daughter, Miss Blanche and Mrs. M. Holden and Loren Smith went to Dongola Friday to attend the funeral of Mr. Stoner, a brother-in-law of Mr. Lentz, who died of hiccough.  (Mounds)

(William H. Stoner, son of George Stoner and Carrie L. Cox, married Effie L. Lentz, daughter of John Lentz  and Malinda Hartman, on 31 Mar 1892, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Pulaski Woman Passes Away

Mrs. Lillian Modglin, aged 30 years, wife of H. M. Modglin, died at her home near Pulaski Sunday morning at 4 o’clock after a prolonged illness of tuberculosis.

She is survived in addition to her husband, a two-year-old daughter, by the present marriage, and two daughters, Loretta and Lillian White, by a former marriage.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the Rose Hill Church, conducted by Rev. C. F. Corzine.  Interment was made in Rose Hill Cemetery.

Besides her immediate relatives, Mrs. Modglin leaves numerous friends to mourn her loss.

(Her marker in Rose Hill Cemetery at Pulaski reads:  Lillie Modglin 1893-1925.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Friday, 13 Feb 1925:
Deceased Merchant Leaves Local Schools $350

According to the last will and testament of the late Samuel Back, the Mound City Community High School will receive a legacy of $250 and the Lovejoy School will get $100.  Both legacies will be placed in the library funds.

Twentieth Anniversary of the Hanging of Eli Bugg Feb. 17th in This City.

Tuesday, February 17th, will be the twentieth anniversary of the hanging of Eli Bugg negro by Sheriff James Ray Weaver.  He was hanged in the courthouse here at 10:16 a.m. February __, 1905.  Approximately two hundred people witnesses the execution.  Thirteen sheriffs attended the hanging.

Bugg walked to his death pen from the crime he had committed and hoped that his execution would be a lesson to would be wrongdoers in the future.  He was allowed to walk into the enclosure and mingle with the crowd.

The crime for which the negro gave his life was the murder of ____ Mathis, another negro.  ___ did not kill Mathis with his own hands, but nagged his ___ Will Cross into committing the crime.  Cross escaped but Bugg was captured and sentenced September 17 to hang on December 16, 1904.  He first entered a plea of guilty, but upon being advised by the court that all the evidence would be heard he withdrew his guilty plea and entered one of not guilty.  A motion for a new trial was entered but was overruled.

The day of the execution ___ear, friends of Bugg induced Governor Deneen to the extent of a review of the case by the Board of Pardon and Parole.  The Governor’s reprieve allowed the negro to live until January 13, 1905.  When this day came with Acting Governor Yates, in the executive chair and additional stay of execution was given Bugg until February 17.  On January 13 Governor Deneen’s daughter was ill, but she had recuperated by the later day and the governor refused to interfere with the decision of the jury so the negro paid the death penalty.

Will Cross, the negro who really did the shooting, was never apprehended. Both negroes lived in Mounds, but were attending a picnic and barbecue at Wetaug on July 23rd, 1904, when the trouble arose between Mathis and Cross over a woman.  Bugg who was with Cross would not listen to reconciliation in the quarrel and advised Cross to kill Mathis, which he did.  Both the negroes fled.  Bugg was an old disturber and was easily captured, but Cross made his getaway.
COMPARISON OF THE TWO PULASKI COUNTY HANGINGS

Like Conners, Bugg walked to the gallows with a firm step and confessed religion.  His case unlike Conners’ in atrocity was equally bad in the eyes of the jury which pronounced the verdict and sentence.  The time of ___ of the two execution was almost identical, Bugg hang____ Conners at 10:__ ____ colored witnesses ____ of Eli Bugg _____ enclosure while _______ fifty, (rest missing)

Friday, 20 Feb 1925:
Rose Busam, Former Mound City Resident, Struck by An Automobile and Dies

Miss Rose Busam, 53 years old, a former Mound City resident, and who was residing with her sisters, Ida and Dollie, at 4033 McPherson Avenue, St. Louis, was killed at 9 o’clock Monday night when struck by an automobile.  The accident occurred near her home, while crossing McPherson Avenue at Sarah Street.  Her body, the police reported, was thrown about 25 feet by the impact, and the machine did not stop for 150 feet.  Its right ender and headlight were broken.

The car which struck Miss Busam was driven by Lee F. McBryde, 30, of 5135 Cabanne Avenue, a floor manager at a woman’s apparel shop.  Surrendering to the police, McBryde declared he had slowed for Sarah Street while driving east in McPherson Avenue and saw no one in front of his car and did not know he had struck anyone until he felt the jar.  He concluded he had struck another machine pulling away from the curb, but then found Miss Busam’s body in the street.  McBryde was driving friends, Mr. and Mrs. William Walgast to the Marion Roe Hotel, where they were stopping.

Miss Busam who was a stenographer, and had been employed by political leaders, was taken o Liberty Hospital, where it was found she had died of a skull fracture and internal injuries.  Formerly she was secretary to Seldon P. Spencer before he was elected senator and she was secretary to former Senator X. P. Wilfley when he was in Washington.  She was a stenographer in the Missouri House of Representatives in 1917.  She was a graduate of the Southern Illinois Normal at Carbondale.  Besides her sisters, Misses Ida and Dollie, with whom she resided, she is survived by a sister, Miss Minnie, of Tamms.

The body was brought to this city Wednesday night and the funeral services were held at the undertaking parlors of G. A. James, Thursday afternoon at 1:30, Rev. Roy N. Kean conducting the services.  Interment in Beech Grove Cemetery.

Miss Busam was preceded in death by her mother, Mrs. Fanny Busam, whose death occurred last October and her father, George Busam, has been deceased for a number of years.  Both are buried in Beech Grove Cemetery.

Charleston, Mo., Judge Killed

Judge J. B. Sanders, 31 years old, of Charleston, Mo., was killed when his automobile turned over between Villa Ridge and Pulaski, Ill., about 6 p.m. Sunday.  Oscar Hall, also of Charleston, who was with Sanders, is in a local hospital seriously injured.  Sanders’ mother resides in East Prairie, Mo., and he has a brother at Poplar, Bluff, Mo.

OBITUARY

Little John Frank Clark, twenty-month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. John Clark, died at his home one mile north of Grand Chain, February 12, 1925, after a two weeks’ illness of bronchial pneumonia.  Funeral services and burial at Cache Chapel with Rev. Corzine pastor officiating.  The bereaved family has the heartfelt sympathy of their many friends and is very grateful for the kind assistance of their neighbors during the illness and death of the little son, and especially thank the teacher and pupils of the Forest View School for the beautiful floral offering.

“Whosoever, therefore, shall humble himself as this little child, the same is the greatest into the Kingdom of Heaven.” –St. Mark 18:4.

Friday, 27 Feb 1925:
Month-Old Son Dies Monday

The month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Berl Dalton died Monday morning at 3 o’clock after a brief illness of pneumonia.  Two brothers, Bobbie and Harry and one sister, Mary Ellen, are surviving children of the family.

Services were held at the residence Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock conducted by Rev. Roy Kean, pastor of the Methodist church.  Burial was made in Beech Grove Cemetery, G. A. James undertaker.

Mrs. Betty Hauf Passes Away Sunday Morning

Mrs. Betty Hauf, age 57, passed away at her home here at 7 o’clock Sunday morning after an illness of several days of pneumonia.

She is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Lee Wilkerson, of Memphis, Tenn., and three sons, Tillman, of Cairo, and William and John, of this city.  The children were all at her bedside when the end came.  Funeral services were held at the residence Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock conducted by Rev. Roy Kean, pastor of the Methodist church.  Immediately after the services the cortege left by automobiles for Mounds where interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.  G. A. James was the undertaker in charge.

Friday, 6 Mar 1925:
Death of Mrs. H. H. Rogers

On Wednesday evening, March 4th, Mrs. F. L. Hough, was notified by long distance phone that Mrs. H. H. Rogers, of San Jose, Calif., her lifelong friend, had passed away at 6 o’clock p.m.  Many will remember her as her family was one of the early settlers of our city.  Dr. H. H. Rogers had lived in California but three years.

Bum Steers in Capture of Suspected Murderer at Olmstead

The negro who was caught by local detectives at Olmsted last Friday and brought to the county jail here for identification was released Monday when efforts to identify him as the negro who murdered a white youth at Lovejoy, Illinois, failed.

The suspected murderer gave his name as Tom Shelby.  He was on his way to Paducah, Ky., looking for a job.  He formerly had been employed at one of the plants at Olmstead, but had gone south a few months ago.  Upon his return to Olmstead he was picked up by Olmstead officers and turned over the Deputy James Wilson, who lodged him in jail.

OBITUARY
PAULINE MOZINGO

Pauline Mozingo was born in Choctaw County, Alabama, June 18, 1846.  She was the daughter of M. E. South preacher.

She was married to W. R. Turbavill in 1859, afterwards moving to Missouri, where her husband died and was buried in April 1909.  Mrs. Turbavill came to Illinois and has lived with her daughter, Mrs. James Lackey ever since, for the past six years and four months.

It was here she died last Sunday, March 1, after a lingering illness of several years, most of which she was confined to her bed.

Mrs. Turbavill had nine children, six girls and three boys of whom two died in infancy and two passing away in later life, Mrs. Cora West and George Turbaville.  Those surviving the demise of their mother are: Joseph Turbavill, of Mounds; Grand Turbavill, of Cairo; Mrs. Bee Cheney, of Missouri; Mrs. Kate Denby, of Mound City; and Mrs. Dora Lackey, of Ullin.

Mrs. Turbavill had given her heart to God while yet in her early life and always claimed a sweet experience in the spiritual life.  During her last illness she has told the minister of her sweet communion with Jesus and how she enjoyed God’s word when we read it to her no one but those present could know.  She was patient in suffering, joyful in tribulation, and though she suffered much here she was mindful of the comfort of the Holy Spirit in her life.  She has spoken of the joy in meetings when she was a girl and young lady; her father would take her on his knee in the pulpit and what of her joyful experiences she has had all along life’s pathway.

During a great deal of her last illness was helpless and needed to be lifted and carried.  Her daughter, Mrs. Lackey, with whom she was living was a patient and faithful attendant at her bedside until she passed into the great beyond.

Funeral services were held at the M. E. church Tuesday morning by Rec. C. L. Phifer after which the body was interred in the Ullin Cemetery.

(Henry M. Chaney married Beeatty Turbaville on 30 May 1885, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Joseph Cantrell married Cora E. Turbaville, daughter of William R. Turbaville and Pauline Magingo, on 21 Jul 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Grant Turbyville, son of William R. Turbyville and Poline Mosingo, married Silvaney Horton on 8 Jul 1894, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  James M. Lackey married Nora Turbyville on 11 Dec 1892, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  John D. Calvin married Catherine Turbaville on 13 May 1888, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

OLEY LOKEY

Oley Lokey was born September 19, 1898.  He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Lokey, of Ullin.  He died as the result of injuries sustained in a collision of his car with a street car at Aurora, Ill., Sunday, Feb. 22, passing away at St. Charles Hospital in that city, Monday at 12:30 a.m.

Mr. Lokey leaves to mourn his departure a wife, three children, Johnnie, Laverne, and Howard.  He also leaves mother, father, one brother and three sisters, besides other relatives and friends.

Funeral services were conducted from the Ullin M. E. Church Thursday, Feb. 26, and interment made in the Ullin Cemetery.  The funeral services were conducted by Rev. C. L. Phifer.

Friday, 13 Mar 1925:
Grandma Leutz Passes Away

Ida Leutz, of this city, died suddenly Wednesday, March 4th, at 3:30 a.m. at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Francis Baker.  The deceased leaves to mourn her death, two sons, Mr. Will Leutz, of this city, and Mrs. Lessie Leutz, of Perryville, Tenn.. also eight grandchildren.  She was familiarly known as Grandma Leutz and was loved by all who knew her.  She was converted and baptized by Rev. House of the Christian faith several years ago.  Funeral services were held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Baker, Thursday, March 5th, at 1:30 p.m. conducted by Rev. Shelton, of the Baptist church of Mound City.  Burial at Beech Grove.  G.A. James had charge of the funeral.

Old Pulaski County Resident Passes Away Monday

Mrs. Ellen Armstrong Mahony passed away at her home east of Mounds Monday, following ailments incident to her advanced age, which have kept her an invalid for eight years, during which time she also was totally blind.  Mrs. Mahoney was 83 years old.

Mrs. Mahoney was born in County Mounonaghan, Balley Bay Crus Kay, Ireland, January 28, 1842, and had been in the United States for upward of 70 years.  She was married to T. C. Mahoney in Cairo Oct. 3, 1860.  Mr. Mahoney died some years ago.  Mr. and Mrs. Mahoney lived in Cairo for about four years following their marriage and then moved to Pulaski County where she has lived for the past 66 years.

She was one of the best known women of the county and was held in high esteem by an unusually large acquaintance.  She is survived by three sons, James, Florence, and John, of Mounds; and one daughter, Mrs. Kate A. Stout, of Cairo; besides nineteen grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.  Five of the children preceded her to the grave.

Funeral services for Mrs. Mahoney were held at St. Raphael’s Catholic Church in Mounds, Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock, conducted by Rev. Fr. Sonnen of Mound City.  G. A. James had charge of the funeral.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.

(Timothy Mahoney married Ellen Armstrong on 31 Oct 1862, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. Harry Perkins returned Saturday from Yuma, Col., where she had been called on account of the death of her sister, Mrs. Edward Sealander.  Mrs. Sealander passed away in a hospital in Omaha, Neb., Feb. 27th, following an illness of considerable length.  Besides her sister, Mrs. Perkins, Mrs. H. F. Moreland, of Cairo, another sister, she is survived by her husband and three children.

The Rev. Pitts, pastor of the A. M. E. church had the very sad experience of losing his wife by death one day last week.  The couple had been married by about one year when the sadness occurred.  Death was due to a premature birth of a child which took both the mother and child to an untimely grave.  (Ullin)

Several from here (Grand Chain) attended the funeral of Mary Bartleson, of Muskogee, Okla., at Villa Ridge Saturday.

(Her marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Mary A. Bartleson 1869-1925.—Darrel Dexter)

Mr. and Mrs. Will Copeland and Wilson Bartleson, of Muskogee, Okla., are here (Grand Chain) after accompanying the body of their sister to Villa Ridge.

(William P. Copeland married Nannie L. Bartleson, 22, daughter of Augustus C. Bartleson and Susan Wilson, on 26 Mar 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Friday, 20 Mar 1925:
Mound City Man Meets Death on Cairo Road
Parvin Lasley Is Killed When His Car Strikes a Tree

Parvin Lasley, aged 29, was almost instantly killed Monday morning about eleven o’clock when the Star roadster which he was driving got away from him and plunged off the road just south of the Egyptian Country Club, hitting two trees.

No witnesses to the fatal accident can be found, but people on the interurban car, which Lasley had passed, state that he was not running faster than twenty-five miles an hour at the time he passed the interurban.  Howard Riding, a truck driver here, states that Lasley passed him just north of the subway.  Riding was only a mile or so from the scene of the accident when Lasley’s car left the road.  By the time Riding together with two other men had reached the wreck Lasley was almost dead.  He was carried to the pavement, where he lay until deputy Coroner J. B. Wall, of Alexander County arrived.
When found the car was demolished, hit one tree broadside on the right, and bounced off to hit another which completely smashed the side of the car on which Lasley was sitting.  It is thought that the last crash is the one that cost the man his life.  His skull was crushed, apparently from contact with the tree.  When aid came he was lying with his death thrust through the windshield and hanging between the hood and the front fender.  His face was lacerated consider by broken glass.  A pool of blood under his head which bore testimony that he had bled considerably.  His body was pressing the horn which kept up a continual blast until the body was removed.

It is a well-established fact that Lasley was not speeding, but that a break in the steering apparatus caused the wreck.  Before starting on his way home with the car filled with groceries in Cairo and tried to get the necessary repairs for his car, failure to secure the part cost him his life.  He was known here as one of the most careful drivers in this city.

The body was taken from the scene of the accident to the undertaking parlors of Karcher Brothers in Cairo where an inquest was finally held at seven o’clock Tuesday evening.  After the inquest the body was removed to the G. A. James parlors in Mound City.  The coroner’s jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

Lasley came to Mound City a number of years ago with his father, E. B. Lasley, brother, Burl, and sister, Myrtle.  The entire family is popular here among the young folks of the community.  Two brothers have been employed on the Illinois Central Railroad at Mounds for some time.

Lasley was to have been married soon to Miss Minnie Mansperger, of Cairo, it has been learned.  The two have been engaged for some time.

Funeral services for the wreck victim were held at 1:30 p.m. in the Baptist church here of which Lasley was a deacon, conducted by Rev. Shelton.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery under the direction of G. A. James.

Aged Resident of Mound City Dies Sunday Morning

Andrew Williams, aged 67, died at his home here Sunday morning at seven o’clock after an illness of only a few weeks.  The aged man had been totally blind, for quite a number of years.  He was stricken with paralysis a few weeks ago.

Funeral services were conducted Tuesday afternoon at the home of the deceased by Rev. Shelton, pastor of the First Baptist Church of this city.

Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery under the direction of G. A. James

William Billingsley Succumbs to Lingering Illness

William Everett Billingsley, aged 22, died at the home of his parents here Friday afternoon at two o’clock after an illness lasing over a period of six months.  He had apparently taken a new lease on life as he had just returned from an auto ride with his youthful wife, when he was stricken.

The deceased is survived by his wife, father and mother and a host of relatives, practically all of whom live in Pulaski County.

Interment was made in Concord Cemetery after a funeral service conducted by the Salvation Corps out of Cairo at Cache Chapel.

The funeral cortege was under the direction of Roy Beaver of the G. A. James parlors.

Mound City Man Is Stricken with Cerebral Apoplexy

Dorris Hatfield, aged 74, died at the home of his son, Henry Hatfield, on the gravel road here Monday morning at 11 o’clock.  Although Mr. Hatfield was well on in years, he was not an old resident of this city, having been here only a short time.

Funeral services were conducted at the graveside by Rev. Shelton, pastor of the First Baptist Church of this city. G. A. James, undertaker, was in charge of interment, which was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.

Friday, 20 Mar 1925:
Mrs. Basse of Villa Ridge Passes Away Friday

Mrs. Sarah Catherine Basse, wife of H. H. Basse, of near Villa Ridge, passed away Friday, March 13 at the age of 81 years, four months and 19 days.  Her death followed a short illness and came as a shock to her large number of friends and the community generally.  She was a very kind soul and a most devout Christian, having been confirmed in the Lutheran Church at 16 years of age.

Funeral services were held in Center Church by Rev. A. C. Dunlap, her pastor, who paid a loving tribute to one who was most faithful in her Christian life.

She leaves to mourn her departure a husband, two sons, two daughters and many dear friends.  Her grandsons acted as pallbearers.  Burial was made in Concord Cemetery.  The funeral was directed by Mr. James of Mound City.

(Henry H. Basse married Sarah C. Shoemaker on 2 Jan 1862, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Eli H. Basse, 27, son of H. H. Basse and Miss Shumaker, married May H. Lilley, daughter of G. W. Lilly and Miss Buckuster, on 23 Jul 1896.  Her marker in Concord Cemetery near Olmsted reads:  Henry Harmon Basse  Born Jan. 6, 1839 Died April 13, 1925  Father.  Sarah Catharine Basse Born Oct. 22, 1843 Died March 13, 1925 Mother.—Darrel Dexter)

Friday, 27 Mar 1925:
Mrs. James Gould Dies

Mrs. James Gould, age 51, died at her home north of Villa Ridge Monday, following a heart attack.  Deceased is a member of a prominent family and her husband is a member of one of the county’s oldest families.  She was also the daughter of the late G. W. Endicott, who was one of the early settlers of Pulaski County.  Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the residence.  Interment in Villa Ridge Cemetery.

(James Gould, 27, born in Perth, Canada, son of William Gould and Katherine Wright, married Georgian Endicott, 25, born in Villa Ridge, daughter of George W. Endicott and Martha Galbraith, on 31 Jan 1900, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Georgia E. Gould 1874-1925.—Darrel Dexter)

Death Takes Olmstead Lady Unexpectedly

This community was shocked at the news of the death of Mrs. Loria Sauerbaum, wife of William Sauerbaum, a farmer living north of Olmsted, which occurred Monday night at their home.  Mrs. Sauerbaum leaves a husband and seven children, mother and sisters with other relatives and a host of friends to mourn her departure from this life.  Mrs. Sauerbaum had lived a Christian life from childhood and see much faith in her Master all along during her suffering and bore up through the crisis with more patience than anyone we have ever seen.  A short funeral was held at the home Thursday morning at 9 o’clock conducted by Rev. Dunlap, assisted by Rev. Corzine.  There will also be a funeral held at Jonesboro, Ill., Thursday afternoon where interment will be made.

(His marker in Ebenezer German Cemetery south of Jonesboro reads:  William Sauerbrunn Born June 28, 1877 Died Nov. 6, 1946.  Lora Sauerbrunn, his wife, Born Sept. 26, 1884 Died March 23, 1925.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. Emma Hogendobler Dies

Mrs. Emma Hogendobler, widow of the late H. M. Hogendobler, died suddenly at her home Thursday morning of heart trouble.  Funeral services will be held at the home tomorrow afternoon at 2:20 o’clock.


Prominent Ullin Boy Passes Away at Cairo

Clyde Russell, son of Olen and Mattie Curry, residing east of Pulaski, died at the Cairo hospital March 32, 1925.  He was born March 9, 1910, making his age at the time of his demise, 15 years and 14 days.  He was always a resident of the farm upon which he was born.

He leaves to mourn his demise, father and mother, three sister, brothers, James and Johnnie Lee, two grandmothers, Mrs. Martha Curry, of near Pulaski, and Mrs. Hattie Caudle, of Ullin.  His own uncles were Charles Curry, of near Pulaski, Louis Caudle, of Ullin and Hugh Caudle, of near Pulaski.  His own aunts were Mrs. Stella Lackey, Mrs. Essie Reeves, of Cairo and Mrs. Kate Billingsly, of Hillsboro, also survive, as do many cousins and other relatives and a host of friends and associates.

His was one of the largest funerals ever held at Ullin.  It took place Tuesday afternoon from the First M. E. Church, the pastor, Rev. C. L. Phifer, officiating.  The funeral was in charge of undertakers Aldrich, of Pulaski, and Hartwell, of Mounds.

Russell was an exceptionally good, obedient boy.  He was in the eighth grade of the Bryan School and stood high in his class work, as was attested by his teacher, Don C. Gore.  It is in this association that he will be most missed.  He was a youth that others looked to as a leader and his influence will last throughout the lives of those with whom he went to school.

(E. J. Lackey married Stella Curry on 5 Aug 1894, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  Clyde R. Curry Born March 9, 1910 Died March 23, 1925.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. Kate Billingsly, of Hillsboro, is visiting her mother, Mrs. Hattie Caudle and brother “Bud” Caudle this week.  She came to be at the funeral of her nephew, Russell Curry, which was held Tuesday afternoon.

Friday, 3 Apr 1925:
John A. Woerner Dies at the Home of Niece

John A. Woerner, age 75 years, died Wednesday night, March 25, at the home of his niece, Mrs. Edna Capoot, in this city.  He had been suffering from asthma for some time and this was the cause of his death.  He was formerly a resident of Cairo, leaving there for California where he remained prior to coming to Mound City, where he resided for then past several weeks, Mr. Capoot going to California to accompany him home.

Surviving Mr. Woerner are his niece, Mrs. Capoot, and one nephew, Alfred Herbert, of Cairo.
The funeral services were held Friday afternoon, Rev. S. J. Burgess conducting the services.  Interment in the cemetery at Villa Ridge.  G. A. James had charge of the burial.

OBITUARY

Edward Whittaker Hale was born in Monroe County, Ky., June 16, 1899, and died at the home of his parents in Ullin, Ill., March 27, 1925, making him 25 years, nine months and eleven days old at the time of his demise.

He came to Illinois with his parents and settled at Lick Creek in 1902.  From there he came with his parents to Dongola and thence to Ullin.

Mr. Hale was married to Miss Irene Harmon January 17, 1921, and to this union were born two children, William Sherman, aged three, and Margatt Elizabeth, aged two years.

His occupation was that of fireman on the Illinois Central Railroad, which he followed until within a few weeks of his death.

He leaves to mourn his departure his wife, two children, a father, William Sherman Hale; and mother, Susan Hale; two sisters, Mrs. Isabelle Dale of Dongola and Mrs. Bessie M. Hill, of Carbondale; an aunt, Mrs. Dollie Davis, of Carbondale.  He leaves a host of friends, who have known him in life and whose sympathies go out to the bereaved ones.

Edward professed religion conducted in the revival by Little Mary in 1920 in the old church and at that time united with the church and had always retained that relationship with the House of God.

The funeral was conducted by Rev. C. L. Phifer from the M. E. church in Ullin, Sunday morning March 29.  Interment taking place in the Ullin Cemetery.

(His marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  Edward W. Hale Born June 16, 1899 Died March 27, 1925.—Darrel Dexter)

Funeral services were held in Grand Chain Saturday for the small son of Mr. and Mrs. Mike Hannon, and interment was made in the Catholic cemetery there.

(His marker in St. Catherine Cemetery at Grand Chain reads:  Vincent G. Hannon 1921-1925.—Darrel Dexter)

John Woods and John Young attended the funeral of a friend at St. John’s Church. (New Hope)

A large number of people from here (Olmsted) attended the funeral of Mrs. Hogendobler at her country home last Saturday afternoon, which was attended by a large crowd.  

Old Resident of Villa Ridge Passes Away at 70

One of the older more prominent and better known residents of the Villa Ridge section answered the death summons Thursday when Mrs. Emma Hogendobler, 70 years of age, passed away following years if invalidism.  Mrs. Hogendobler had been in poor health for many years and since the death of her husband, about two yeas ago, has been confined to a wheel chair.  She is survived by eight children, four sons and four daughters, all living in Villa Ridge.

Mrs. Hogendobler was born Nov. 12, 1854, in Villa Ridge and was married September 6, 1874, to Henry M. Hogendobler, of Villa Ridge.  To this union ten children were born, the eight who survive are as follows:  James A., Horace G., of Villa Ridge, Mrs. Cora M. Graves, of Mounds, Ernest C., of Olmsted, Walter L. and Pearl M., of Villa Ridge, Mrs. Flora Vick, of Karnak, and Oneta L. Hogendobler, of Villa Ridge.  Nineteen grandchildren survive and three brothers James E. Wright, East St. Louis, Watson Wright, San Bernardino, Cal., and Samuel H. Wright, of Villa Ridge.

Funeral services were held at 2 o’clock Saturday afternoon at the family residence conducted by Rev. Lane pastor of the Methodist church of Karnak and interment made in Beech Grove cemetery at Mounds.

(Henry M. Hogendobler married Emma M. Wright on 6 Sep 1874, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Friday, 10 Apr 1925:

Wetaug Man Is Killed in a Runaway Saturday

             The body of Roy B. Miller, farmer of Wetaug, Ill., who died Saturday night at St. Mary’s Infirmary, was the result of injuries received in a runaway accident near Wetaug lasted Saturday afternoon, was sent to Wetaug Sunday after a coroner’s jury at Cairo was unable to learn further details of the accident other than he had been thrown from his buggy and his head crushed against the pavement.  No witnesses to the accident could be found.

The man was found lying unconscious beside the road about 400 yards from a railroad track by F. B. Blanchard of Wetaug and Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Shaunnessy, of Cairo.  The man was brought to St. Mary’s Hospital noon, was sent to Wetaug Sunday.  The buggy which Mr. Miller had been driving was found at Wetaug.  One theory of the accident is that the horse became frightened at the passing train.  The inquest was held by Deputy Coroner J. B. Wall at Karcher Brothers who had charge of the body.

Mr. Miller was a well known citizen of Wetaug and was respected by all who knew him.  Funeral services were conduced from Mt. Pisgah Lutheran Church Tuesday, April 7.  The widow of Mr. Miller is very ill at her home in Wetaug, having just recently arrived home from a hospital.  A goodly number of Ullin people attended the funeral Tuesday.

 

Mrs. A. C. Hickman was called to Wetaug Tuesday to attend the funeral of her cousin, R. R. Miller, who was killed in a runaway accident Saturday.

 

The little brother of Mr. Slusher, the mail carrier, died last Sunday night at their home near Wetaug from the flu which caused an abscess to form on the brain.  (Ullin)

             (A marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery at Wetaug reads:  Lawrence son of John & Lura Slusher 1924-1925.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Friday, 17 Apr 1925:

Well Known Resident Dies

             Arch Clemmons, a well known colored resident, died Monday, April 6th, after a lingering illness of several months. Deceased is survived by three sisters, Mrs. Annie L. Rice, Mrs. Cora Patterson and Miss Emma Clemmons, and two brothers, Finley Clemmons and Robert Clemmons.  Funeral services were held at the A. M. C. church Thursday.  Interment in Beech Grove Cemetery.

             (Charles S. Rice married Anna L. Clemmons on 28 Feb 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  A marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds reads:  A. Clemons Born ___ __, 1889 Died April 8, 1925.—Darrel Dexter)

 

OBITUARY

             Parvin Auda Lasley was born March 4th, 1896.  He was baptized into the fellowship of the First Baptist Church, Mound City, Illinois, in November 1924.  On March 1st, 1925, he was ordained to the office of deacon, serving in that office only about two weeks, when he met with his death by accident near Cairo.

             Parvin was not only loved by his church, but all who knew him keenly feel the loss of an associate and friend.  His mother, Alice M., having preceded him, he leaves his father, James L. Lasley, one brother, Burl, and one sister, Myrtle.

             “From henceforth blessed are the dead who die in the Lord, for they rest from their labors.”

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We wish to thank all our friends who assisted us in the many ways during the illness and death of our beloved brother.  Their many acts of kindness will never be forgotten.

Annie L. Rice

Cora Patterson

Emma Clemmons

Finley Clemmons

Robert Clemmons

 

Gray, an aged man, who has been suffering for several months, passed away at his late home here (Ullin) last Saturday morning early.  Funeral services were conducted from the residence Tuesday, interment being made at New Hope Cemetery.

             (Eli T. Gray married Elizabeth Mayberry on 7 Nov 1873, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  The name of his previous wife was Israel C. Gray.  His marker in New Hope Cemetery reads:  E. T. Gray 31st Ill. Vol. Born March 1, 1849 Died April 11, 1925  Maggie Gray his wife Born Dec. 21, 1874.—Darrel Dexter)

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We wish to thank the people who so kindly and graciously helped us in the death of our son and brother, Parvin A. Lasley, who died March 17th, 1925.  To the ones who loaned their cars and to the church choir so we extend our sincere thanks.

James Lasley

Myrle Lasley

Burl Lasley

 

Friday, 24 Apr 1925:

Mrs. Julia Ann Miller Passes Away in Cairo

             Mrs. J. S. Miller, age 67, of __0 Elm Street, Cairo, died at her home Saturday morning at 11 o’clock following a prolonged illness of paralysis.  She is survived by her husband, four daughters, Mrs. J. F. Hickcox, of Pittsburg; Mrs. L. B. Livesay, of Auburn, Ind., Miss Edna Miller and Miss Merle Miller, of ____; also one son, James Miller also of that city.  Her children were at her bedside when she passed way.  She leaves two sisters, Mrs. Mary Goforth and Mrs. Ed ____n in Mt. Carmel, Ill., and ___ brothers, Rudolph Stein and ____ Stein, both of Portland, Oregon.  Six grandchildren are ____.

             Mrs. Miller was a devout member of the First Presbyterian Church. She had made here home ____ with her family for the ____even years, thing there ___ Mound City, where she had ____ for a number of years.

             Funeral services were held ____ afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the first Presbyterian Church, ___ pastor J. D. Turner Hood, ___ng.  After the services the funeral cortege left by special interurban train for Mounds, where interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.  E. A. Burk directed the funeral.  The services were largely attended and many ____ floral offerings were ____ marks of sympathy from _____.

Pallbearers were W. W. ____, __eo Kaufman, T. C. _____, _. S. Mertz, Allen O. ____, Will Neff, Sr., all of ____ _ D. Stophlet and Edgar___ of this city.

 

Ivan Buie Passes Away

             Friends have received word the past week that Ivan Buie, formerly of this city, passed away at his mother’s home in Los Angeles, Cal., April 10th.  He was 24 years of age and leaves besides his mother, a brother, Prentiss, and a wife.  He had been ill for some time with a complication of diseases.  At the funeral Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Williamson, Mrs. T. M. Ford, and Mr. and Mrs. Glen Williard were in attendance.  Harold Britton, a former Mound City boy, served as pall bearer.

 

Mrs. Blankertz went to St. Louis where she was called by the death of her stepmother, Mrs. Heitz.  (Mounds)

 

Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Karraker attended the funeral services of the former’s aunt in Dongola Friday.  (Mounds)

 

OBITUARY

Aged Pulaski County Couple Pass Away

H. H. Basse passed away at his home near Olmstead, April 13th, 1925, following ailments due to his advanced age. Mr. Basse was born in Germany, Jan. 6th, 1839, aged 86 years.  He came to Union County when four years old.  He was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Shumaker, Jan. 3, 1861.  He and his wife were among the first settlers of Pulaski County, where they lived for over 63 years.  Mr. Basse is survived by four children, two daughters, Sarah and Mary Basse, two sons, Samuel and William, Eli having preceded him to the grave.  Fourteen grandchildren and three great-grandchildren survive him.

Funeral services were held at Center Church, Wednesday at 11 o’clock conducted by Rev. Dunlap, of Cairo.  G. A. James had charge of the funeral.  Interment was made in Concord Cemetery.

Mrs. Sarah Basse preceded her husband to the great beyond one month.  She was born in Union County, Oct. 2J, 1843, and came to Pulaski County in her early childhood and spent the remainder of her life here.  She was 81 years of age.  Mr. and Mrs. Basse were well known residents and were held in high esteem among an unusually large acquaintance.  Their entire life was spent in living a devoted Christian life.

Servants of God well done

             Their glorious warfare’s past

The battles fought the victory’s won

             And they are crowned at last.

             (Their marker in Concord Cemetery near Olmsted reads:  Henry Harmon Basse Born Jan. 6, 1839 Died April 13, 1925 Father.  Sarah Catharine Basse Born Oct. 22, 1843 Died March 13, 1925 Mother.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Seel Caldwell, Ullin’s colored restaurateur, died at his residence here (Ullin) early Sunday morning from heart trouble.  He was 66 years old and leave a large family.

             (Silley Colwell married Adam Tharp on 23 Feb 1887, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Friday 1 May 1925:

Former Resident Dies

             Mrs. L. C. Perks received a message this week informing her of the death of Mrs. Catherine Estes, of 522 South Meridian Street, Indianapolis, her death occurring Friday, April 23rd.  Mrs. Estes was a former resident of this city, leaving here some 20 years ago with her daughter, Mrs. Stella Kellum, and grandson, Rev. Harry Kellum.  Both survive her and are now located at Galveston, Texas, where Rev. Kellum is rector of an Episcopal church.

 

Brother-in-Law of Mound City Man Dies in Indiana

             Harry Stout, aged 57, brother-in-law of Albert Walker, of this city, died Monday at Bloomington, Ind., of acute indigestion.

             Mr. Stout formerly lived in Cairo, having moved here in 1905.  He left Cairo a few years ago and moved his family to Grand Rapids, Michigan, and from there to Bloomington, Ind.  The body arrived in Cairo Wednesday and burial was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.

             Funeral services were conducted by Rev. E. L. Stovall of the Calvary Baptist Church of Cairo.

Mr. Stout married Mrs. Etta Snow, formerly Miss Etta Walker, of Cairo, in 1906, shortly after his coming to Cairo.  The deceased is survived by one son, Ralph, of Indianapolis, one daughter, Mrs. James Johnson, of Atlantic City, and his wife.

             (Harry Stout married Nannie Bambrick on 10 Nov 1889, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Friday, 8 May 1925:
___ I. Koonce of
Mounds Dies at Home Sunday

___ I. Koonce, age 67 years, a ___r resident of Mounds, died ____y morning at his home on _____ Street, having been ill for some time with a stomach dis____.

____ Koonce was agent at the interurban depot at Mounds and ____se an ice and coal dealer.

He came to Pulaski County when _8 years old with his parents ___s home on Oak Street was ____ first built in Mounds. He married Miss Marie Miller __ Golconda, in October 1880.

He was at one time a switchman ______ I. C. Railroad, later engaged in the livery business and ___ the coal and ice business. Koonce is survived by his wife and two daughters, Mrs. ____ Lewis, of Mississippi, Mrs. ____ Thomas, of Mounds, a son was killed in France. He also leaves three sisters, Mrs. T. ___ason of Mounds, Mrs. Ida ___son of Villa Ridge, and Mrs. ____ Kelley, of Cairo. One brother also survives him. He is Elmer Koonce of Villa Ridge.

___day afternoon at 2 o’clock at ___ funeral services were held at the residence conducted by Rev. ___er, pastor of the Methodist Church. Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery. G. A. James directed the funeral.

Mrs. Connel Dies in Chicago

Mrs. James Connell, of Chicago, died suddenly Sunday morning at _:15. Mrs. Connell was formerly Miss Bess Hoag of Vienna and __. Connell is well known here having resided in Mound City a number of years. Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Connell and Roy Connel of Mounds left Monday to attend the funeral.

Olmstead Farmer Is Killed by Heavy Disc

John Schoen, aged 52, was killed almost instantly Monday morning when he was thrown from a heavy disc which he was riding and was caught under the blades. It is believed that while driving his fractious team, he must have struck them and when the team jerked he was thrown in front of the disc. He was dragged quite a distance before the team stopped. Only the cut on his head was deep enough to have caused his death.

Schoen was an old resident of the county, having come from Germany to Pulaski County eighteen years ago. He is survived by his wife and a seven-year-old son. He lived about a half mile north of Olmstead.

Funeral services were held Wednesday at the German Lutheran Church in Olmstead, Rev. H. A. Huebotter officiating. Interment was made in Concord Cemetery. G. A. James was in charge of the funeral.

(His marker in Concord Cemetery near Olmsted reads:  John Schoen Born June 26, 1872 Died May 4, 1925.  Annie Schoen Born Feb. 25, 1880.—Darrel Dexter)

Another of Mound City’s Oldest Residents Passes Away at 85

John Schuler, aged 85, passed away at his home here Wednesday morning at 1 o’clock after a week of illness. Mr. Schuler has been a resident of Pulaski County since his discharge from the First Indiana Cavalry following service throughout the Civil War.

Until the grim reaper overtook the aged man he was known for his industry, working around his home until a week ago when he was taken ill. Upon his coming to Mound City he took the position of timber buyer for the G. F. Meyer Company. He held this position until the company sold its interest in Mound City.

Mr. Schuler’s death leaves only two of Mound City’s veterans of the Civil War living. The other veterans are John L. Dougherty and Christian Keller.

Deceased was the father of sixteen children, fifteen of whom are still living. At the time of his death, all of his children were at his bedside, except Charles Schuler, of Bakersfield, California. One son, E. E. Schuler, two daughters, Mrs. Carlos Parker and Mrs. John McNeil, live in Mound City and two other daughters, Mrs. Crippin and Mrs. Hess, in Mounds. His other children live at more distant points.

Besides his immediate family he leaves two brothers, Theodore, of St. Louis, and Jacob, of Cleveland, Ohio. Two other brothers, George and Edward, former Pulaski County residents, preceded John in death. All of the Schuler brothers were Pulaski County residents and formed one of the county’s most prominent families.

Funeral services were conducted Thursday afternoon at two o’clock in the Methodist Church here by Rev. Roy N. Kean, pastor. Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery with G. A. James in charge of the funeral cortege. The funeral was one of the most impressive of any held in this city for some time.

Harry Raymond Parker was born to Mr. and Mrs. Will Parker near Ullin, September 5, 1913, and died at the late home near Dongola, April 27, 1925, being 11 years, seven months and 22 days old. He was only sick ___ days. His father, Will Parker, passed away October 26, 1921, ____ two children; both boys ___ preceded him into the other world. He leaves to mourn his passing a mother, three brothers and two sisters. The funeral and burial took place at New Hope Church and Cemetery Wednesday, April 29, conducted by the pastor. Rev. C. L. Phifer of Ullin.

Friday, 15 May 1925:
___Rioters Is Captured by Authorities

__loyd Galbraith, of Cairo was captured Monday at the Illinois Lumber Yards and brought to Mound City to await trial on a charge of rioting.

Galbraith is the last of nine rioters indicted last July for attempting to take from the county jail here and lynch two negroes who it was thought were the ones who murdered Miss Daisy Wilson, of Villa Ridge. All the ___ men indicted on the bill ___ been tried with the exception of Roy Ogden, upon whom the Governor of Kentucky refused extradition.

Harry Winters one of the indicted men of this city served ___ty day term in the county jail for his part in the rioting. ___dition to a fine.

___ the other men were te___ upon their coming in and pleading guilty.

The arrest of Galbraith was made by deputies James Wilson and Charles Walbridge.

J. N. Dalton Dies Here After Lingering Illness

Another of Mound City’s old residents passed away this week. ____ J. N. Dalton, aged 63 years, died at his home after an illness ____g over a period of over a ____. Up until last week, the aged ____ was in fair condition, but ____ monly took a change which resulted in his death. All of his family were present when the end came. He died peacefully Tuesday afternoon at two o’clock.

Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at two o’clock in the Methodist church here by Rev. R. Kean. Interment was made in the Beech Grove Cemetery with G. A. James in charge.

Mr. Dalton was a member of the M. W. A. lodge at death and prominent in business life here until he became ill.

Deceased is survived by his wife and six children, Harry and Burl Dalton, Mrs. George Gunn, Mrs. Lewis Brasswell, Mrs. Virgil Payne, all of this city, and Mrs. Joe Kankford, of Chaffee, Mo. He also leaves a sister, Mrs. James Taylor, of Elgin, Illinois.  He also leaves eight grandchildren.

Bernard Giles, of Indianapolis, arrived Thursday to attend the funeral of his father-in-law, John Schuler, which was held here Thursday afternoon.

Paul Myre, of Griffin, Ind., was called here Thursday to attend the funeral of his uncle, John Schuler.
Mrs. Adolph Murphy of Jonesboro, was here Thursday to attend the funeral of John Schuler.

Card of Thanks

We wish to thank our many neighbors, friends and relatives for the many kindnesses shown during the illness and death of our beloved father, Mr. John Schuler.
The Family

Word was received here last week that P. P. Meals, a colored man formerly at this place (Ullin), was stabbed to death in an Indianapolis affray.

Friday, 22 May 1925:
Aged Negro Dies of Heart Failure While at Work

George Luster, aged 61 years, negro teamster of this city, died on this wagon Monday morning while returning from John Hayden’s farm with a load of hay. His team brought him on into town.

The aged negro has been hauling wood around the city from the Inman plant here for the past four or five years with a mule team.

Funeral services were held yesterday at one o’clock in the Mounds Missionary Baptist Church, of which Luster was a member. Interment was made in Spencer Heights Cemetery.  G. A. James was in charge of the funeral.

(His marker in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds reads:  George Luster 1866-1925.—Darrel Dexter)

Aged America Farmer Passes Away Saturday

Herman Wesenberg, aged 82 years, a resident of Pulaski County, for over thirty years, passed away at his home in America, Saturday morning, slightly after 12 o’clock.

Mr. Wesenberg was born in Kamen, Germany, in 1843. He came to America in 1873 and located in Chicago, where he was married to the wife who survives. The newly married couple came to southern Illinois in 1874 and located at America, at which place he resided until his death. Mr. Wesenberg has amassed a comfortable fortune as a successful farmer. He was well known throughout southern Illinois and well liked by everyone who knew him. He was one of the oldest members of the Masonic Lodge in Pulaski and was a member of the Lutheran Church.

Three of his family were at his bedside when the end came. They were his wife and sons, Charles and Dr. W. B. Wesenberg.

Deceased is survived by his wife and three sons, Charles, of America, and Drs. Paul, of Brooklyn, New York, and W. R. Wesenberg. Only one member of his family is deceased, Fritz, who was killed in an accident several years ago.

Funeral services were conducted Monday at the home by Rev. Dunlap of Cairo. Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery conducted by the Masonic Lodge. G. A. James was the undertaker in charge.

Mrs. Stout Dies at Home of Her Son.

Mrs. Jennie Stout, aged 64 years, passed away at the home of her son, Claude, in this city, at 2 o’clock Friday morning, after an illness of several years. Three children survive her Earl, of Cairo, Claude, of this city, and a daughter, Mrs. Mary Burris, of Vienna, all of whom were at her bedside when the end came. Also eight grandchildren and two sisters, Mrs. Henry Curtis, of Vienna, and Mrs. James Drake, of Illmo, Missouri, survives her. A brief funeral service was held at the home Sunday morning at 9 o’clock conducted by Rev. Roy Shelton, of the Baptist church, of which she was a member. Following the services the funeral party left for Vienna where interment was made.  G. A. James had charge of the funeral.

(George L. Stout married Jennie George on 18 Dec 1881, in Johnson Co., Ill.  H. S. Curtis married Amanda George on 15 Nov 1889, in Johnson Co., Ill.  James C. Drake married Emma T. George on 13 Dec 1888.—Darrel Dexter)

News was received here Sunday of the demise of Henry Lentz, a miner of Herrin, and a former resident of this place (Ullin). He was a nephew of Cicero Lentz, of near this place, who went to Herrin Saturday night. ___ Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near where ___ interment occurred at eleven o’clock Monday.

Word was received here (Ullin) Sunday of the death of Mrs. Anna Cline, mother of Mrs. William _____, residing in Anna, where the death occurred. She had ____ relatives and friends in and around Ullin, who attended the funeral at Mt. Pisgah, near Wetaug Monday afternoon.

(Daniel Cline married Anna Cantrell on 6 Jul 1890, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  A marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug reads:  Annie E. Cline Born Feb. 6, 1869 Died May 15, 1925.—Darrel Dexter)

Rev. Walker (colored) lost his small son Monday and was buried at the colored cemetery here (Olmsted) Tuesday afternoon.

Friday, 29 May 1925:
Old Mounds Resident Passes Away

Joseph Turbyville, age 55, died at his home in Mounds, at 2 o’clock Saturday afternoon, a lingering case of cancer being the cause of his death. He had been a mechanic for the Illinois Central for nearly 25 years.

He is survived by his widow, two children, Doris and Paul; two stepchildren, Margaret and Alice Smith; a brother, Grand Turbyville, of Cairo; and three sisters, Mrs. Kate Danby, of this city, Mrs. B. Chaney, of Sikeston, Mo., and Mrs. Nora Lackey, of Ullin.

Funeral services were held in the Methodist Church of Mounds at 1 o’clock Monday afternoon. Rev. Dever, pastor of the church, officiating. Interment was made in Thistlewood Cemetery under the direction of G. A. James.

(Henry M. Chaney married Beeatty Turbaville on 30 May 1885, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Joseph Cantrell married Cora E. Turbaville, daughter of William R. Turbaville and Pauline Magingo, on 21 Jul 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  James M. Lackey married Nora Turbyville on 11 Dec 1892, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  John D. Calvin married Catherine Turbaville on 13 May 1888, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Mound City Man Killed by Big Four Train

Hiram Travis, aged 61 years, was knocked into insensibility from which he never recovered Friday evening when he was struck by a Big Four train north of this city.

The southbound train, which is due out of Mound City at seven o’clock, struck Travis just after crossing the trestle north of the Inman plant. According to the engineer’s report, the man was lying with his body between the rails, apparently unconscious.

When the engineer saw the man he began blowing the whistle, but Travis did not move. The engine did not run over the body, but struck it in such a way as to throw it from the track. A fracture behind the ear was the only serious wound. It is generally believed that this wound caused the man’s death. His face was bruised and cut in several places.

Immediately upon striking the man, the train was backed up and the unconscious man placed aboard. When the train arrived at Mound City, Dr. Wesenberg was summoned and ordered the man to St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo, at which place he died at 8:45, about two hours after being struck.

Travis was an old resident of Mound City. He was a ship builder by trade at which occupation he was employed at the date of his death. He is quoted as having said he wanted to live to be a hundred years old.

Mrs. James Lackey was a visitor to relatives in Mounds Saturday night following the announcement of the death of her brother, Joseph Turbaville, at that place, which occurred that day. She also attended the funeral on Tuesday afternoon.

CARD OF THANKS

We wish to express our sincere and most heartfelt thanks to all our relatives, friends, and neighbors for the kindness and sympathy shown us in the great loss of our dearly beloved husband and father.
Mrs. Herman Wesenberg and Sons

Friday, 5 Jun 1925:

Wilson Moore Buried

Wilson Moore, a prominent negro citizen of Ullin, was buried from the C. M. E. church last Sunday afternoon.  He had been ill for some time with tuberculosis and passed away last Friday morning at his home.

JOHN M. WALKER
Aged County Resident Dies in Karnak

John M. Walker, aged 73, died at his home in Karnak last Friday morning after an illness of only a short time.

Deceased is survived by his four daughters, Mrs. Artie Williams, of this city, Mrs. Zetta Olmstead, of E. St. Louis, Mrs. Pearl Davidge, of Cairo, and Mrs. Belle Ritchie, of this city, by his first wife who was Martha Ann Ford, and by two daughters, Mrs. Ada Rhodes, of Cairo, and Mrs. Elsie Ritchie, and by a son, John Walker, by his second wife.  All of his children were at his bedside when the end came, with the exception of Mrs. Williams and their son, John.  Mr. Walker also leaves thirteen grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

Funeral services were held Sunday in the Methodist church at Karnak, Rev. Lane, pastor of the church officiating.  Interment was made in Concord Cemetery. G. A. James was the undertaker in charge.  Mr. Walker was the oldest member in the Masonic lodge in Pulaski County.  He had lived in Karnak for over nine years having moved there from Olmstead.  He is an old resident of Pulaski County.

(John M. Walker married Alice Ford on 21 Jul 1889, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  R. T. Olmstead married Zetta Walker on 14 Nov 1894, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Concord Cemetery near Olmsted reads:  John M. Walker Born Feb. 6, 1852 Died May 29, 1925.—Darrel Dexter)

Prominent Farmer Dies

Dave Mayberry, a prominent farmer residing near Cache Chapel, east of Ullin, died suddenly Saturday morning while resting on the front porch of his home.  Death was due to dropsy from which the deceased suffered for the past year.  The funeral was held from Cache Chapel Monday, Rev. C. F. Corzine the pastor, officiating.  W. J. Rhymer conducted the funeral.

(David Mayberry, 33, born in Hamilton Co., Ill., son of A. J. Mayberry and A. J. Merriman, married Annie Lence, 18, daughter of Moses Lence and Elizabeth Keller, on 6 May 1894, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Cache Chapel Cemetery near Ullin reads:  Dave Mayberry 1869-1925 Anna R. Mayberry 1875-1925.—Darrel Dexter)

Friday, 12 Jun 1925:
Dr. W. C. Rife Dies at St. Mary’s Infirmary Tuesday

Dr. W. C. Rife, aged 54, died at St. Mary’s Infirmary at 1:30 p.m. Thursday afternoon after an illness of several weeks.  He has been in the Cairo hospital for about two weeks.

Dr. Rife was a life long resident of Pulaski County and Villa Ridge.  His procession brought him in contact with a large part of the county population.  His friends were numbered by his acquaintances. He is survived by two sons, William E. Rife and Berry Rife and a wife, all of whom were at his bedside when the end came.  The former is a resident of Villa Ridge and the second son is a student.

Funeral services were held at the grave Thursday at 3:30 p.m. Rev. S. J. Burgess conducted the funeral.  G. A. James was the undertaker in charge.

Mounds Negro Kills Another Following Quarrel

Dorcie Chambliss, ex-convict and otherwise known as a bad man, shot and killed William Huffman Monday evening in an argument over a trade of property.  According to Chambliss, Huffman attacked him with a chair.  Chambliss is being held in Pulaski County jail here without bail pending an investigation.

It develops that Chambliss some years ago served on the Chicago police force.  It was while serving in this capacity that he was accosted by a white girl from Kansas who asked to be directed to a respectable boarding house.  The negro officer took the girl to a dive and kept her there for some time.  She escaped later and died of privation.  Action was taken by the Chicago Tribune against the negro officer and he was convicted and sentenced to five years at Joliet penitentiary.  Governor Small paroled the negro in 1923.  Since that time he has been running a restaurant in Mounds.

Miss Ida F. Lawler, aged 29 years, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lawler, died at their home in this city last Tuesday, May 9 (25 years ago—1900).  Deceased had resided in this city all her life.  Funeral took place from the Catholic church.

(Her marker in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Ida F. Lawler 1865-1906.—Darrel Dexter)

J. A. Parker Answers Last Taps, Here at Age of 83

J. A. Parker, aged 83, died at the home of his son, George Parker, at 10:30 Monday night after an illness of only a short time.  He was taken seriously ill Thursday of last week.  He leaves a son, George Parker, of this city; and a daughter, Mrs. Maggie Lawless, of Georgetown, Miss.; a sister, Mrs. Mary Greenlee, of Miller City; and a brother, A. G. Parker, of Unity, Illinois.  Other than his immediate family he leaves nine grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.  His wife preceded him in death fourteen months ago.

Funeral services were held at the Methodist church here Wednesday afternoon at two o’clock with Rev. Roy Kean officiating.  Interment was in Beech Grove Cemetery with G. A. James in charge.

Mr. Parker was a veteran of the Civil War, having served in the 31st Illinois Infantry under Gen. John A. Logan throughout the war.  He was one of the oldest residents of Pulaski County and has lived in Mound City for many years.

(James A. Parker, 18, born in Alexander Co., Ill., enlisted 20 Sep 1861, in Co. H, 31st Illinois Regiment, and was listed as missing in action 22 Jul 1864.  James A. Parker married Florence Howpe on 1 Jan 1867, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

OBITUARY

William Christopher Rife, son of William Volney Rife and Melvina Verble, was born at Pulaski, Illinois, August 21, 1870.

He united with the Congregational Church at Villa Ridge in 1885.

He graduated from Northern Indiana Normal School at Valparaiso, Indiana, 1892.  In 1894 he graduated in medicine from Vanderbilt University and immediately after graduation began practicing medicine at Villa Ridge with Dr. Royall.

On September 10, 1895, he married Lilley Royall.  To this union two sons were born, Berry V. and William E. Rife.

He was a member of the Masonic Order and the Knights of Pythias Lodge.  Dr. Rife was surgeon for the Illinois Central at Villa Ridge and president of the First State Bank at Mounds at the time of his death.
For the past thirty years Dr. Rife has served most faithfully the entire community of southern Illinois as a physician and friend.  He took an active interest in everything pertaining to the welfare of his friends and the community, and the loss sustained by his untimely death is most keenly felt by all.  Nature might stand before all the world and say, “this was a man when comes such another.”

The immediate relatives left to mourn his loss are his wife, Mrs. Lily Rife; his sons, Berry and William E.; a daughter-in-law, Mrs. William E. Rife; and little granddaughter, Mary Jane; a sister, Mrs. Lucy Prindle and family, an aunt, Mrs. Sarah Royal.

Rev. Joel S. Burgess conducted the funeral services at the Villa Ridge Cemetery Thursday, June 11th, at 3:30 p.m.  The active pall bearers were W. H. Spaulding, F. M. Dille, K. L. Crain, W. B. Kennedy, H. T. Horsfall, and W. M. Chenaie.  The honorary pallbearers were M. J. McBride, Thomas Aldrich, H. C. Moore, J. W. Dille, H. W. Gunn, W. H. Leidigh, R. L. Aldrich, and L. E. Endicott.  Undertaker James was in charge.

(W. C. Rife married M. Lilley Royall, daughter of Dr. B. A. Royal and Jane Bankson, on 10 Sep 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Daniel W. Prindle, Jr., married Lucy A. Rife, on 3 Sep 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Friday, 19 Jun 1925:
Former Mound City Passes Away in Cairo

The death of Miss Helen Bergman, age 23 years, beautiful daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Bergman, of 1215 Washington Ave., Cairo, which occurred at her home at 7:15 p.m. Sunday, came as a great sorrow to her many friends.  Miss Bergman had been ill for several months.  Miss Bergman was born in this city and removed to Cairo several years ago with her parents.

Rohan Lutz and Everett Schuyler of this city were among the active pall bearers at the funeral.

(Her marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Helen L. Bergman 1902-1925.—Darrel Dexter)

Friday, 3 Jul 1925:
Mounds Boy Meets Death in Auto Accident Saturday

Irvin Taylor, 21 year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Taylor, of Mounds, met his death Saturday night about ten o’clock when the car in which he was riding collided with another driven by Will Williams, of Cairo, on the Beech Ridge road six miles out of Cairo.  He was killed instantly.  His head was crushed under the car when it turned turtle.

Eddie Taylor, cousin of Irvin, and Misses Viola Guess, Ilba Cato, and Marguerite Cato were also injured more or less.  Miss Guess was taken to St. Mary’s Infirmary by passing autoists.  The rest of the party were taken to their respective homes. Miss Guess lives in Thebes. The Cato sisters are residents of Olive Branch.

Williams, the negro who was driving the other car, states that he was blinded by Taylor’s lights.  He was badly bruised.  Both of the cars were demolished.

According to friends at Mounds, Eddie Taylor, who was driving the car, had left his wife at Jackson’s beach and he and Irvin started for Cairo.  They found the young ladies in Cairo and had taken in a carnival at Tamms.  It was on the return trip that the accident occurred.  All of the injured members of the party are improving under the care of physicians.

Immediately after the accident, Deputy Coroner J. B. Wall, of Alexander County, was called and the body taken from the scene of the accident to Karcher Brothers funeral parlors in Cairo.  From there the body was taken to the home in Mounds.

Taylor is survived by his mother and father, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Taylor, four brothers and two sisters.

Funeral services were held Monday at 2:30 p.m. in the Methodist church at Mounds by Rev. Dever, pastor.  The church was crowded to capacity.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery with undertaker G. A. James in charge.

Reports have it that Miss Guess stated that she and Irvin were to have been married soon.  Friends of the boy in Mounds are of the opinion that either Miss Guess is out for a little notoriety or has been drawn into the statement by undue influence.

Taylor was a popular young man in Mound City and Cairo as well as his home town.  He had lived in Mounds practically all his life.

Former Pulaski County Prisoner Thanks Officers
San Antonio, Texas
June 24, 1925

Dear Editor—Fifty-four years ago today I was released from the Pulaski County jail at Mound City.  I was sent there from Metropolis to stand trial for murder in the first degree.  I was 19 years of age and spent my 20th birthday in the Pulaski County jail.  I am now an old man in my 75th year and it is my desire to again thank the officers and others for their kindness to me.  The officers were Judge D. J. Baker, Sheriff Kennedy, Deputies Dan Hogan and Bob Wilson and one arm Jake Ross and Jailer George Schuler.  I was prosecuted by Attorney John F. McCartney, Judge Mulkey and Judge Josh Allen and was defended by Judge William H. Green, David I. Linegar, and Dan Munn, all of them the leading lawyers at the time.
John W. Haley
302 Victoria Street

I. C. Ricks of Mounds Dies at Cairo Infirmary Following Operation

Lucien C. Ricks, of Mounds, an old resident of this county, passed away at 11:30 Sunday morning following an operation at St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo.

Mr. Ricks was a member of the Masonic Lodge with a number of degrees.  He also was a member of several other secret organizations.  The Masonic Lodge had charge of the funeral services which were held in the Baptist church in Mounds Tuesday afternoon.  Rev. Stovall, pastor of the Calvary Baptist Church in Cairo, officiated, assisted by the Mounds Baptist pastor.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery, with Undertaker E. A. Burke in charge.

Mr. Ricks had been employed as boiler maker for the Illinois Central system for several years and was active until the beginning of his short illness which ended in his death.  He is survived by his wife and three children, Genevieve, Clinton, Jr., Ruth; also four sisters, Mrs. Maude Mansfield, of Gainesville, Florida, Mrs. M. M. Barnes and Mrs. Robert Crane, both of Macon, Georgia, and Mrs. J. Wilder, of Orlando, Florida.; also three brothers, Randel Ricks, of Denver, Colorado, Raybourne Ricks, of Winnemucca, Nevada, and Clifford Ricks, of Sufford, Virginia.

Judge Hartwell’s Father Dies in Marion

Former County Judge L. D. Hartwell, of Williamson County, father of Circuit Judge D. T. Hartwell, died at the Marion hospital June 29, after an illness of several years.

Judge Hartwell was a Civil War veteran having served under Sherman in the famous March to the Sea.  He was awarded a medal for distinguished service at the Battle of Atlanta.  After his discharge he came to Williamson County.  He was prominent in political circles in that county.

(Lorenzo D. Hartwell, 18, native of Williamson Co., Ill., enrolled as a private in Co. F, 31st Illinois Infantry on 2 Sep 1861 and re-enlisted on 5 Jan 1864, and was mustered out as 1st sergeant on 19 Jul 1865.  Lorenzo D. Hartwell married Eolia Calvert on 30 Apr 1871, in Williamson Co., Ill.  Lorenzo D. Hartwell married Lizzie West on 1 Dec 1881, in Williamson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank our friends for their kindness shown us during the illness and death of our beloved mother and grandmother, Mrs. I. W. Read, also for the use of their cars at the funeral
Reads, Martins, and Blankinships

OBITUARY

Early in the morning June 28, 1925, Mrs. I. W. Read, who has been a resident of Mound City for fifty-five years, passed away in death.  Mrs. Read was born Jan. 29, 1842, at Pulaski, Tenn.  All her life has been one of activity with the exception of the last four or five years when a serious fall permanently injured her.  From the time of that accident until her death Mrs. Read has been a patient sufferer.

Before coming to Mound City the deceased was married July 6, 1859, to Mr. I. W. Read, who departed this life in October 1911.

Mrs. Read was convinced that if she were to be the best wife and mother possible it was necessary that she become a Christian.  Accordingly therefore, she united with the Methodist Church of this city in the year 1897, under the ministry of Rev. G. E. McCammon and has remained a faithful member until overtaken by death.

Mrs. Read is survived by four children, two sons and two daughters, John and Will Read, of Mound City, Mrs. G. E. Martin, of Urbana, Illinois, and Mrs. Jo. B. Blankinship, of Mound City.  Six grandchildren, too, hold sacred the memory of Grandmother Read, Hallie and Ralph Read, Mrs. Leonard Biesswingert, Miss Lily Read, Russel Martin and Miss Marie Blaninkship.

One brother, Thomas Pillow, aged 92 years, also survives the deceased.  Because of his advanced age, he was unable to attend the last rites of Mrs. Read, but waits until in God’s good time, a meeting with loved ones shall be effected in that land beyond this life.

(J. B. Blankenship married Kate Read, 23, born in Mound City, daughter of I. W. Read and J. A. Pillow, on 31 Dec 1900, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. George E. Martin, who was called here on the last illness of her mother, Mrs. I. W. Read, and remained over the death and burial, returned to her home in Urbana Thursday.

Friday, 10 Jul 1925:
The little twin baby boy of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Sichling died last Monday morning.  (Ullin)

Friday, 17 Jul 1925:
Life Long Pulaski County Resident Dies Tuesday Morning

Mrs. Permelia Jane Johnson, aged 77 years, and eight months, died at her home in Pulaski Tuesday morning at four o’clock.  She was well known and respected throughout Pulaski County.

Mrs. Johnson was one of Pulaski County’s oldest residents, having lived at her old home in Pulaski for over seventy-five years.  Her first husband, Alfred Bankston, now deceased was a brother, of Ab Bankson, well known Pulaski farmer.  Her second choice also deceased was James Johnson, an old resident of the county.  He preceded her in death seven years ago.

Mrs. Johnson leaves one daughter, Mrs. John Moore, of Pulaski and nine grandchildren to mourn her death.

Funeral services were held at Rose Hill Baptist Church in Pulaski Thursday afternoon.  Interment was made in Rose Hill Cemetery near the church. W. H. Aldred was the undertaker in charge of the funeral.
             (Alfred C. Bankston married Permelia J. King on 29 Jun 1867, in Pulaski Co., Ill.   J. H. Johnson married Parnelia Bankson on 16 Nov 1879, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  A marker in Rose Hill Cemetery at Pulaski reads:  John H. Johnson Born June 21, 1844 Died Jan. 7, 1918.  Permelia Johnson, his wife, Born Nov. 19, 1847 Died July 14, 1925.—Darrel Dexter)


Friday, 24 Jul 1925:
Mounds Policeman Is Killed by Tennessee Negro Gunman

Marshall Bagby, Mounds chief of police, was found at 12:20 this morning lying face down on his gun with a bullet hole over his heart and another in his leg.  A negro giving his name as “Soot” Shaw from Chicago was found in the weeds nearby with a 45 bullet in his leg.

             The discovery was made by Jimmie Miller, of Cairo, and Charlie Lackey, of Pulaski, as they were going home from work.  According to the two men they were walking east on First Street when they heard a shot.  This was followed by a fusillade from a heavy caliber automatic.  Miller knew the bark of Bagby’s gun and said to Lackey, “That’s Bagby’s gun.  Let’s help him.”  They began walking in the direction of the shots.  James Young, a call boy, happened along just in time to lend the two men his flashlight.  They walked up the alley in the rear of Wiedeman’s Bakery and near the end of the alley, came upon the lifeless body of the policeman.  In the weeds nearby a negro was crouching in an effort to escape detection.  As the men were unarmed, they moved toward the Hotel Marsh to get a gun.  Failing in their efforts to find a weapon they decided to call Deputy Walbridge and Dr. E. J. Elkins and Coroner O. T. Hudson.

             Upon the arrival of the deputy and the physicians together with quite a crowd which had gathered the negro was arrested and questioned by Deputy Dallas Winchester.  The body of the policeman and the crippled negro were taken to the jail from where Bagby was removed to the undertaking parlors of G. A. James.

             According to A. R. English, who is understood to be the last man with Bagby, he left the policeman in the corner of First and Oak streets at 12:10.  He had gone not more than a couple of blocks when the shooting occurred.  He states that he thought nothing about the shots supposing that they were over in the yards possibly some of the “Bulls” trying to scare a hobo off a freight train.

             Indications point to the fact that Bagby was coming through the alley and that the negro was either behind a building or facing south in the alley.  The bullet holes in the buildings from the heavy caliber gun were shot from the south and all of the bullets from the ___ Luger found by Jimmie Miller about ten feet from the negro were all fired southward.

             According to several fellows in Mounds, Bagby is understood to have had words with a strange negro a few nights ago.  This quarrel may have led to the fatal shooting this morning.  The negro was not known by any of the negroes in Mounds, as far as could be learned this morning.  Some of the more intimate of Bagby’s friends even go so far as to state that in their opinion he was lured to his death.  The general supposition is that he tried to arrest the negro when he found the prowler in the alley.

             Bagby served as a motor cop for Mounds last summer and this spring was appointed chief of police.  He was known throughout the county as a “nervy little policeman.” 

             A telegram was sent to his sister in Oklahoma City this morning and plans for the funeral services will be held until word can be received from her.  His two brothers, Ney, of Olmsted, and Matthew, of La Center, Ky., arrived shortly after word was sent them of the shooting.  Interment will be made in the cemetery at Olmstead with G. A. James in charge.

             The Bagby family is well known in Pulaski County.  Dr. Burton Bagby is a prominent dentist in Mounds.  All members of the family were lifelong residents of Pulaski County.

             The coroner’s inquest started at 10 o’clock this morning conducted by Coroner O. T. Hudson.

The main witnesses were Miller and Lackey, the men who found the body.  They both state that they heard six shots distinctly.  The coroner’s jury held the negro without bail for action of the grand jury.  The case will probably come up in this term of court, which convenes Monday with Judge A. E. Sommer on the bench.


Word was received here (Grand Chain) that Bob Cain, of Texas, died there recently.  He was born and reared here in Grand Chain, leaving here with his wife about 35 years ago.  His wife died just a month prior to his death.  He is a cousin to Billie and Wash Boyd and David Stevers.

Friday, 31 Jul 1925:
Slain Policeman Is Buried in National Cemetery

             Marshall Bagby, aged 25, who was shot to death by John Spurer, Tennessee negro, Friday morning in a gun battle in an alley back of the Marsh Hotel in Mounds, was buried with military honors in the National Cemetery near here Saturday at 2:30 p.m.

             The Winifred Fairfax Warder post of the American Legion was in charge of the funeral.  Company K, Illinois National Guard at Cairo furnished the firing squad for the salute.  The body was carried to its final resting place by W. C. Gat__, F. B. ___, John Walbridge, Harry ___d, Pute Hune, and Ray Taylor.

Bagby served with Company K at Cairo during the World War and distinguished himself as an ___ marksman.  He wore the ___ of a sharpshooter and won the respect of his comrades and officers for bravery under fire on the ____ line in France.  He was wounded seven times while in the service.  His engagements were numbered by those of his company and the famous 33rd division.  The famous Battle of Argon Forest was one of the toughest fights in which the soldier fought.

             Although the announcement of the military funeral was not made until Saturday morning, quite a crowd was gathered at the cemetery despite the fact that the weather was threatening.  His brothers, Matthew and Ney, and their wives, together with Dr. and Mrs. Burton Bagby uncle of the slain policeman were present.  Beatrice, sister of Marshall, was unable to attend.


Knife Wounds Prove Fatal to Grand Chain Man
             Nofel Kellum, aged 25, died at his home in Grand Chain at 4 o’clock Monday morning from the effects of knife wounds received in a fight with Jim Barber, 18, of Grand Chain last Tuesday.

             Kellum, it is alleged slapped the youth, then jerked him to his feet and threatened to beat him.  Kellum and Barber were separated by a bystander.  As Barber backed away he opened his knife.  Kellum jerked loose and leaped upon Barber.  He was cut across the face once and as the youth made another stab, Kellum fell away with his abdomen laid open.  A doctor was summoned and Kellum taken to his home.  The main intestine leading from the stomach was cut in two.  He lived from Tuesday afternoon until the following Monday.

             Funeral services were conducted at the home Tuesday afternoon.  He was buried in Concord Cemetery.  Barber was released following the coroner’s inquest.

 
Slayer of Policeman Received Life Term in Pen
             John Spurer, confessed slayer of Chief of Police Marshall Bagby in Mounds last Friday, received a sentence of life imprisonment on a plea of guilty Wednesday afternoon before Judge A. E. Sommers presiding at this term of circuit court.

             On account of Spurer’s broken leg, which caused his nonappearance in court, the court went to him.  The sentence was passed on him while he was unable to stand.  After the negro had entered his plea of guilty, only one witness, Dallas Winchester, special agent for the Illinois Central at Mounds, was heard.  The negro felt somewhat relieved at the sentence.  Some of the prisoners in the jail and visitors had kept him frightened, telling him that nothing could keep him from hanging.

             Only a few persons were present when the sentence was passed, a direct contrast to the trial of Hess Conners and Fred Hale.

 

The case of Dorsey Chambliss, who shot and killed Will Huffman June 8th, was put off until the October term at the request of his counsel, Attorney Charles L. Rice.

             Reports have it that Chambliss is faking insanity in the hope of having ground for further delay in trial.  He fears a mob.  Three nights in succession he has not slept.  Whether this is a fake or not will come out later.  Judge D. T. Hartwell, who dealt out the death penalty to Hess Conners and life term to Conners’ pal Fred Hale, will be on the bench during the October term of circuit court.


The item writer was pained to learn of the death of Hon. William Jennings Bryan, former Illinoisan.  But few men attained the prominence in national and religious affairs as Mr. Bryan so that the natural result is it will be hard to find one upon whom his mantel might fall with safety and efficiently.  (Ullin)

Friday, 7 Aug 1925:
Ullin Boy Meets Death in Missouri
Parents Go to Jefferson City, Mo., and Identify the Remains

             The body of Manzo Crader, 16, who was killed by a train in Jefferson City, Missouri, July 16, was identified Monday by his parents, W. A. Crader and wife, of Ullin.  The parents had gone to Jefferson City and Kirksville, following receipt of a letter advising them that there was but little doubt the body was that of their son.

Young Crader departed from Ullin about a week before the fatal injuries and was on his way to Colorado, when the accident occurred.  The body was embalmed by a Jefferson City undertaker and after being held there for identification for a week, was turned over to the School of Osteopathy at Kirksville, north of Jefferson City.  The clothing was retained by the Jefferson City undertaker and it was by these clothes that primary identification was made by the parents.

Upon learning of the presence of the body in Jefferson City on 16th of July, Mrs. Crader, his mother, addressed a letter to the chief of police in which she described her son, with the result that the letter was turned over to the undertaker who wrote the mother advising her of the fatal injury on the morning of the 17th and the ultimate death that evening in the hospital there.

The parents departed for Jefferson City Sunday afternoon and Monday afternoon wired to Ullin friends that it was the body of their boy and that they would arrive home with the body sometime tonight (Tuesday).  Funeral services were announced for tomorrow afternoon at the Ullin Baptist Church to which the parents belonged.  Interment will be held at Mounds.

It is supposed that the boy attempted to board a freight train in the Jefferson City yard and that he was thrown to the ground or beneath the wheels, when the fatality occurred.  He was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Crader, respected citizens of this place and who are engaged in the restaurant business.

Passes Away in Florida

Mrs. E. J. Atherton a former resident of Center Station and later of Mounds, died at her home in Lake Walkes, Fla., Sunday at 12:25 p.m.  The remains were brought to Mounds and the funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 3 o’clock at Baptist church in Mounds, the body arriving in Mounds Tuesday night from Florida.  Rev. H. B. Atherton officiated at the services which were largely attended.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.

Surviving in addition to her husband are a son, James G. Atherton, of Holley, Fla., and a nephew, Guy Mathis, of Cairo.

(Edward J. Atherton married Etta Harney on 29 Sep 1884, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

OBITUARY

Alva Burnett Crader was born to Mr. and Mrs. William Crader at Wetaug, April 2, 1909, and died at Jefferson City, Mo., July 17, 1925, making him at the time of his death 16 years, 2 months and 15 days old.

He was converted and joined the Ullin Baptist Church February 13, 1921. At this place he was found at the church services and in his Sunday school class.  He enjoyed going to church.  By nature Alva was a pleasant young man greeting everyone with a cordial smile and conversation.  He assisted his parents with the work about the house and restaurant in which business his parents were engaged.

While the nature of his demise may never become known and was sad to a great degree, yet there is but One in this last hour to whom the parents and numerous relatives might go for solace and the One is Jesus Christ.

The deceased leaves his mother and father and a great number of relatives and friends who sorrow with them and extend to them in their sorrow the sympathy of a Christian hope and trust.

Funeral services were conducted from the Ullin Baptist church Wednesday afternoon by Rev. Cick, pastor of the church.

(His marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  Alvia B. Crader Born April 2, 1909 Died July 17, 1925.—Darrel Dexter)

Friday, 14 Aug 1925:
Colored Lad at Mounds Badly Shot in Head

A deplorable accident occurred last Friday afternoon near Mounds when LaSalle Coleman, the 10-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Coleman, had the large portion of his head shot off by a shotgun.
The lad was looking after a cow in a pasture near the city and in an attempt to control the cow, which became somewhat unruly, and carrying a shotgun at the same time, in some unknown manner the gun was discharged and blew the entire right side of his head off.  The body was removed to the undertaking establishment of Cole and Hartwell in Mounds after the coroner’s inquest, and the remains were prepared for burial.  The head and face was badly mutilated and almost beyond recognition.
 
R. L. Aldred Passes Away in Pulaski

Robert Lee Aldred, age 42, died at his home in Pulaski, Sunday, Aug. 10, following a prolonged illness of several months.  He was a native of Pulaski, being born there in 1883 and spent his entire life there.  He was the son of Hamilton Aldred and wife.  He is survived by two brothers, W. H. Aldred and James Aldred, and two sisters, Mrs. Charles Hounard and Mrs. Frank Brown, all of Pulaski.  Besides his relatives, he leaves many friends.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock, Rev. Vick, of Tamms, officiating.  Cole and Hartwell undertakers in charge.  Interment was made in Rose Hill Cemetery.

(Hamilton C. Aldred married Elizabeth Jane Lackey on 11 Nov 1870, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Will H. Aldred, son of Ham Aldred and Jane Lackey, married Mrs. Ellen Fields on 16 Sep 1900, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Rose Hill Cemetery at Pulaski reads:  Robert Lee Aldred Born May 4, 1883 Died Aug. 9, 1925.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Funeral for Colored Lad

LaSalle Coleman, the little colored boy who was accidentally killed west of Mounds at the home of his grandmother, Mrs. Littlejohn, was buried Sunday in the New Bethel Cemetery.

Undertaker in charge, Cole and Hartwell.
 
Mrs. Wolver Passes Away

Mrs. Littie Walver, who passed away at her home two and one half miles north of Mound City on the Meridian Road, died Aug. 6, and the funeral services were held Aug. 7.  Cole and Hartwell undertaker in charge.  Interment was held in Spencer Heights Cemetery.
  
Friday, 21 Aug 1925:
John Peterson Passes Away

Funeral services of John Peterson, who died at his home on N. Elm Street, at 8 o’clock Saturday morning, Aug. 16th, was held in Thistlewood Cemetery Sunday, Aug. 17th, at 3 o’clock p.m., Rev. J. S. Dever of the First M. E. church officiating.  Funeral was largely attended by his many friends.  Cole and Hartwell undertaker in charge.
 
The little unknown colored boy, who was found dead under the viaduct on the I. C. R. R. at Mounds Sunday morning at 2 o’clock, was buried Tuesday morning in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds, Rev. Edward King officiating.  Cole and Hartwell, undertaker in charge.
 
 Friday, 4 Sep 1925:
DEATH REMOVES TWO PROMINENT RESIDENTS
Mrs. Full, of America, and John Spence, of Olmstead, Pass Away

Mrs. Alice Ellen Full, a well known lady, age 69 years, who has been ill for some time, passed away at her home near America Tuesday morning. Mrs. Full is survived by three children, Arthur, of America, Gladys, of Cairo, and Charles; and a sister, Mrs. Stephen A. Steers, of America; and three brothers, H. A. Mason, of Cairo, O. M. Mason, of America, and W. C. Mason, of Courtland, Calif. Her husband died about four years ago.

Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at the family residence at 2 o’clock the Rev. O. E. Connett, pastor of the First M. E. Church at Cairo, officiated. After the funeral services the cortege went by automobile to Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds, where interment took place. G. A. James of this city, had charge of the funeral arrangements.

(Andrew F. Full married Alice Mason on 11 Mar 1877, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Stephen A. Steers, 35, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., son of Samuel Steers and Mary A. McCleland, married Mary E. Mason, 25, born in America, Ill., daughter of B. F. Mason and Elizabeth Campbell, on 10 Mar 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
John Spence

John Spence, 51 years of age, died at his home in Olmstead, at six o’clock Wednesday morning. Mr. Spence was an old resident of that town, having lived there all his life. He was owner and proprietor of a small grocery business and was a very highly esteemed man.

Mr. Spence had been failing for some time, but was not confined to his bed until within a few days of his death.

In a final effort to regain and reserve his health, Mr. Spence went to Rochester to receive treatment from Mayo Bros. They advised him to return home.

Death came six days after his consultation.

Funeral services will be held at Olmstead this afternoon at 2 o’clock. Interment will be made in the Masonic Cemetery at Olmstead.

(John D. Spence, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., son of James D. Spence and Amanda Ormand, married Effie Shelby, born in Johnson Co., Ill., daughter of John Shelby and Sarah Roberts, on 14 Dec 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in the Masonic Cemetery at Olmsted reads:  John David Spence Born Oct. 21, 1873 Died Sept. 2, 1925.—Darrel Dexter)


Mrs. John Read received word Saturday of the death of her niece’s husband, Arlando Marver, at Cape Girardeau, Mo. Mr. and Mrs. Read, granddaughter, Edith Camile and Mrs. Walter Settlemoir left Sunday to attend the funeral.


OBITUARY

Cora Helen Crippen, oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Crippen, was born at Eastwood Town, Jan. 23, 1912, and passed away at the home of her parents, just west of Ullin, Friday morning, August 28, 1925, making her at the time of her demise 13 years, seven months and five days old.

Helen, as she was known, was a bright girl winning last winter the championship in spelling in the Grand Chain and neighboring schools.

She was a great help to her mother at home during the recent epidemic of typhoid fever, which ravished their home and took her away. Helen was always at the side of her mother assisting in the care of the younger children.

Best of all, Helen was a Christian, converted a year ago last winter at Grand Chain, uniting with the Congregational Church at that place.

She was always found at her place in church and Sunday school work. During their residence at that place near Beech Grove M. E. Church, Helen has been active in the work of the church. She attended faithfully the church Sunday school and Epworth League services. Her hands up to the time of her death tidied up the church, and it can be said to her credit that she did the work there as it meant the preparation of her earthly home for the reception of the Lord.

She leaves to mourn her demise, father, mother, six sisters, two brothers, grandparents and numerous other relatives and friends, which she made by her friendly disposition.

Funeral services were conducted by Rev. C. L. Phifer, pastor of the Ullin M. E. Church, at the Cache Chapel M. E. Church last Friday, interment being made in the cemetery there. Rev. White, pastor of the Cache Chapel Church, assisted. The funeral was in charge of Undertaker W. H. Aldred, of Pulaski.
She thought our good night kiss was given

And like a lily her life did close;
Angels uncurtained that repose

And the next waking dawned in heaven.

(Her marker in Cache Chapel Cemetery near Ullin reads:  Helen Crippen Born Jan. 23, 1912 Died Aug. 28, 1925.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Friday, 11 Sep 1925:
Joseph Vaughn, of near America, who died at his home Friday, Sept. 4th, was buried Sunday, Sept. 6th. Interment in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds. Mrs. M. O. Cole had charge of the funeral.

Helen Maxwell, aged 19 months, who died at the home of her parents, was buried Saturday afternoon. Rev. Roy N. Kean conducted the service. Interment in Beech Grove Cemetery.


Prominent Mounds Resident Victim of Heart Attack, Dies

Ulysses S. Jenkins, 56 years of age, died at his home in Mounds, Sunday, September 6, from an attack of heart failure. Mr. Jenkins had been up and around up until the instant of his death. He had just returned from a family reunion at Anna when the spell came upon him. He lived only a short time afterward, never regaining consciousness.

Mr. Jenkins was a lifelong resident of this county. He was born at Buncombe, but came here when a young man. In the past few years he has been employed at the Y. M. C. A. at Mounds, where he worked until the time of his death.

Mr. Jenkins was popularly known at Mounds and in the surrounding country. He was a member of the Methodist Church and an active worker. He leaves to mourn his demise a wife, Mrs. Lydia Jenkins; two children, Hobart, of Mounds, and Mrs. H. L. Wilkerson, also of Mounds; a brother, of Villa Ridge, and a sister of Chicago, in addition to a host of other relatives and friends.

Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in Mounds Wednesday afternoon with Rev. J. S. Dever in charge.

Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery under the direction of G. A. James, of this city.


CARD OF THANKS

We wish to express our sincere and most heartfelt thanks to all our relatives, friends and neighbors for the kindness and sympathy shown us during the great loss of our beloved father, John Spence.
The Sons


Funeral of Mrs. Mary Lewis, who died at her home west of Mounds, Sept. 5th, 1925 was held at St. John’s Baptist Church Monday, Sept. 7th, at 2 o’clock p.m. Interment was held in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds, M. O. Cole, undertaker.


Two Colored Residents Died

Mary Harris, col., passed away at her home in Villa Ridge, Sept. 5th, 1925. Funeral services were held at the M. E. church at Villa Ridge Tuesday at 2 o’clock p.m. Rev. Robinson, of Mounds, officiating. M. O. Cole undertaker in charge.

Phil Kelley, one of the oldest colored residents of Mound City, departed this life Tuesday. He was an honest, hardworking man and a noted useful politician before he lost his health.

Friday, 18 Sep 1925:
Mother of Dr. Carraker Dies

Mrs. Mathias Carraker, 69 years old, a resident of Anna, Ill., and mother of Dr. Oscar Carraker, of Olmstead, passed away at St. Mary’s Infirmary Monday morning. The remains were removed to Karcher Brothers funeral home and were taken Monday afternoon to Anna, where the funeral services and burial were held Tuesday afternoon.

The deceased is survived by her husband, two sons, Dr. Oscar Carraker, of Olmstead, Ill., and Melvin Carraker, of Cobden, and a daughter, Mrs. Clarence Dillard, of Herrin, Ill.

(Mathias Caraker, son of Daniel Caraker and Nancy Haire, married Jane Stout, daughter of William J. Stout and Manerva Clutts, on 19 Sep 1878, in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Vineca Janey Caraker  Born July 23, 1856 Died Sept. 13, 1925.—Darrel Dexter)


Mrs. Rhoda Kellems, 93, Passed Away Wednesday

Mrs. Rhoda Kellems, age 43 years, died at her home one half mile north of the Cross Roads Schoolhouse, Wednesday morning, of ulcer of the stomach. Funeral was held Thursday afternoon at Cache Chapel Church and interment made in the cemetery there. G. A. James was the funeral director in charge.


Several Deaths in County

Mrs. Anna Strong, colored, died at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Sooks, near America, Thursday, of typhoid fever.

Funeral and burial was held in Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds Friday. G. A. James funeral director.

Oscar Hooks, 3 years old, colored, died at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Hooks, near America, of typhoid fever. Funeral and interment was in the Spencer Heights Cemetery at Mounds Monday.

G. A. James undertaker in charge.

Mrs. Millie Hackney, colored, died at her home in Mound City Monday morning. Remains were taken to her former home at Mt. Pleasant where interment was made. G. A. James funeral director.


Card of Thanks

We want to thank the many friends and neighbors for the many kindnesses shown us during the illness and death of our beloved daughter and niece.
Mr. and Mrs. John Maxwell
Mrs. Walter Dishinger


Friday, 25 Sep 1925:
George W. Balance, Court Reporter, Dead

Attorney George W. Ballance, court reporter for 30 years, and city attorney of Vienna, died at St. John’s Hospital near Springfield last week and was buried at Vienna Tuesday. Flu, followed by tuberculosis, resulted in his death. He was 65 years of age and is survived by his wife and three children.
The deceased served as official court reporter for this judicial district for about thirty years and served in this capacity until the last term before his death. He also was serving as city attorney of Vienna and had served several terms in this capacity. He was in the insurance business and only a few days ago sold his business to his neighbor, B. Gray, at Vienna.

(George W. Ballance married Julia A. Burton on 24 Mar 1886, in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Death of Infant Child

Little Goldie Rose, age 6 months, and infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Escho Rose, of North Main Street, was laid to rest in Beech Grove Cemetery, Friday afternoon. Rev. Roy N. Kean conducted the funerals services and G. A. James had charge of funeral arrangement.


MRS. JULIA SCHULER PASSES AWAY, AGE 83 YEARS

Again we are called on to record the passing away of an old and highly respected lady, who has been quite sick for some time past at the homes of her daughters, Mrs. L. C. Perks and Mrs. Jennie Murphy, Mrs. Julia Schuler passed away Thursday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Jennie Murphy, on Main Street, following an illness that had lasted since the middle of June.

Mrs. Schuler was born at Villa Ridge on March 2, 1842, but she has lived in Mound City for more than sixty years. She was married to Mr. George Schuler of this city and with the exception of a very short time, she has made her home here since that time.

She leaves to mourn their loss two sons and three daughters, Al Schuler, of this city, and George T. Schuler, of Mounds, Mrs. L. C. Perks, and Mrs. Jennie Murphy, of this city, and Miss Kate Schuler of Mounds. There are 14 grandchildren, one great-grandchild and a host of relatives and friends who are grieved at her passing. Mrs. Schuler also leaves one sister, Mrs. Nannie Turney, who lives at Brownstown, Illinois.

The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at the First Methodist Church in Mound City and it will be conducted by Rev. Roy N. Kean, the pastor. G.A. James will be in charge. Interment will be made at the Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.

(George Schuler married Julia Kennedy on 24 May 1866, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  S. R. Turney married Nancy E. Kennedy on 11 Feb 1863, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Leo William Albright Dies in Kansas City

Leo William Albright, son of Elder and Mrs. J. H. Albright, died in Kansas City, Mo., Sept. 16, 1925. Age 34 years, 9 months, 20 days. He was born in Elco, Ill., Nov. 22, 1890. He spent the early years of his childhood at Elco. He professed faith in Christ at the age of fifteen yeas and untied with the Sandy Creek Baptist Church, later removing his membership to the First Baptist Church of Mounds. He united in marriage to Nell B. Crain, of Mounds, Ill., in 1910. To this union were born three children, namely: Roland, who died in infancy, Lester and Jane.

Mr. and Mrs. Albright spent their first seven years of their married life in southern Illinois removing to Kansas City in 1917, where he became a successful businessman and a leader for good in the community in which he lived. He was a devoted husband and father and his first thought was always for his loved one. Beside the above named ones he leaves to mourn their loss four brothers: Dallas, of Paragould, Ark., Tamm J., of Kansas City, Mo., William and Fred, of Elco, Ill., and one sister Miss Ruby, of Elco, and a host of relatives and friends.

Funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church in Mounds with Rev. H. C. Croslin officiating. Funeral director G. A. James was undertaker in charge.


Friday, 2 Oct 1925:
Prominent Negress Dies after Many Years of Service

Mrs. Anna Lane, negro, age __ years, died at her home on Commercial Avenue, early Monday evening of arterio sclerosis. She had been a resident of this city for the past 55 years and is well and favorably known by a majority of the citizens here as an old nurse.

Funeral services were held at the Methodist (colored) church on North Second Street Wednesday afternoon. Interment was in Beech Grove Cemetery. The funeral director G. A. James was in charge of the funeral.


HORACE E. ECHOLS, PROMINENT ULLIN RESIDENT, DIES
Well Known and Liked in His Community—Leaves Wife and Five Children

Horace E. Echols was born on the farm of his father, Alonzo Echols near Ullin, October 3, 1893 and died at his home in Ullin Wednesday, September 23, 1925, at 7:30 p.m. Age 31 years, 11 months and 20 days.

He married Miss Ruth Crippen November 14, 1913. To this union were born six children, one of whom, Leaverne, died at the age of 16 days.

The children, who together with the wife survive are Billie, Vaughn, Morris, Juanita, and Vesta. Among other relatives who survive his demise are his grandmother, father, mother two brothers, three sisters and other relative’s ad a host of friends.

In 1916 he came to Ullin and engaged the mercantile business, which business he operated until the time of his demise.

Mr. Echols was converted at Little Mary’s Meeting in 1918 and united with the Ullin Methodist Church on June 6th, 1920. He has since been a devout Christian and a leading member of the church.
Funeral services were held from the Ullin Methodist Church Friday, September 25th, at 11:00 a.m., the pastor, C. L. Phifer, officiating with Rev. T. H. Ballerby, pastor of the First Methodist Church South, Cairo, assisting. Interment was made in New Hope Cemetery.

(His marker in New Hope Cemetery near Ullin reads:  H. E. Echols 1893-1925  Ruth U. McClellan 1894-1962.—Darrel Dexter)


Friday, 9 Oct 1925:
Mrs. Mary Ann Weeds Dies at Pulaski

Mrs. Mary Ann Weeds, age 58 years, died at her home in Pulaski, Ill., Tuesday, September 29. She was born in Tennessee, June 13, 1867, and was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alex Merdock. She came to Illinois with her parents when three years old and was reared near Carterville. She was married March 20, 1888 to T. R. Weeds. To this union were born three children, Mrs. Ora Jackson, Mrs. Lora Gentry, and Mrs. Edith Ross, who with her husband survive her. She also leaves six grandchildren. She was converted in October 1908 and united with the Free Baptist Church.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Arnie Corzine, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Egner and Bill Egner, were called to Ullin Friday evening on account of the death of Cornelius Egner. Mrs. Corzine is a brother-in-law of the deceased and Messrs. Egner are nephews.


OBITUARY

Cornelius Egner, son of Mike and Josephine Egner, was born in Indiana, November 1, 1870, and died Oct. 1, 1925. Age 55 years, and 11 months.

The family in later years moved to Olmstead, Ill., where Mr. Egner was first married to Jenny Price, May 30, 1893. To this union was born one daughter, Mrs. Mary Egner, Belleville, who lives in East St. Louis with her husband and two children. Mrs. Egner died August 12, 1896.

He was wedded to Effie Corzine, December 28, 1904, and to this union was born six children: Josephine, Owen, Oma, Lucille, Glenda, and Cornelius Jr., who survive, together with brothers and sisters: Gus, John, Mike, Rich, Ed, Tony, Mrs. William Hannan, Mrs. Israel Rude, Mrs. Mike Ulrich, and a host of relatives and other relatives.

Brother was converted at Brother Corzine’s meeting held at Cache Chapel just before the church was organized, December 12, 1920, and had the happy privilege of joining the church with his entire family, eight in number.

He was a splendid citizen, a good neighbor, one who was always ready to lend a helping hand in time of need. Brother Egner has been a patient sufferer for the last four years with eh malady that took him away.

While Brother Egner will be missed from our community and from the home we feel sure his sprit will make heaven brighter and we would not call him back from eternal rest and glory to where we feel assured he has gone. Our loss is his gain.

(Cornelius Egner married Jennie Price on 30 May 1893, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  William Hannen married Caroline Egner on 1 Mar 1892, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Friday, 16 Oct 1925:
Well Known Captain Dies

Capt. John Streckfus, a well known steamboatman, died in St. Louis Monday night. He was the owner of several well known boats that ply the Mississippi River and two excursion boats, familiar to our residents, the Capitol and the Washington, which have given popular trips in the Ohio River trade.


CAPT. MARK WHITEAKER PASSES AWAY AT VIENNA
Well Known Civil War Veteran Answers Last Taps at the Age of Ninety-Two

The following taken from the Vienna Times announces the passing away of a well known resident to many of our readers.

Death has again claimed one of our most beloved old citizens, Capt. Mark Whiteaker, who passed away at his home on North Third Street, Wednesday evening at 10 o’clock, aged 92 years, 6 months and 9 days. The deceased had been in feeble health for several months and finally gave up the fight and entered rest.

Capt. Mark Whiteaker was one of the oldest citizens of this county, and one of the most prominent political, religious, and fraternal societies. He was a member of the M. E. Church, Vesta Lodge No. 340, I. O. O. F., the Masonic Lodge, and Vienna Post G. A. R. He enlisted in Company G, 120th Regiment Ill. Vol. Inf. at the outbreak of the Civil War and served as captain under General John A. Logan. He has held many offices of trust in Johnson County from constable to sheriff.

Captain Whiteaker was the father of eleven children, two of whom died when young, and the following survive: Arista Ann McElroy, Martha Elvira Burris, Geneva A. Brown, Dr. Hall Whiteaker, William J. and Thomas H. Whiteaker, the later losing his life on the Illinois Central Railroad; Charles Franklin Whiteaker, deceased, Elizabeth Mathis, and Daisy Gertrude Compton.

Truly a good and honorable citizen has passed out from among us—he who has spent the greater part of 92 years of life with us, coming here when southern Illinois was a wilderness and making it a fit place for the coming generation to live in. The hardships and privations of our forefathers in building up our county should not be forgotten.

Funeral services were held at the M. E. church on Friday afternoon, Oct. 9, at 2 o’clock, conducted by Rev. J. B. Jones, followed by Masonic rites and interment at the Fraternal Cemetery.

Among the relatives and friends who have been visiting at the bedside of Capt. Mark Whiteaker this week were: Dr. Hall Whiteaker, Santa Cruz, Calif.; Dr. Will Whiteaker, Harrisburg; Mrs. C. A. Compton, Marion; Mrs. Arista McElroy, Harrisburg; Hall and Mark Whiteaker, Carrier Mills; and Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Teeter, and Charles Brown, and wife of Murphysboro.

(I. N. McElroy married Arista A. Whiteaker on 25 Oct 1885, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Oscar E. Burris married Martha E. Whiteaker on 12 Jul 1885, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Austin I. Brown married Geneva Whiteaker on 27 Mar 1889, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Amos L. Compton married Daisy G. Whiteaker on 6 Jun 1900, in Johnson Co., Ill.  The Pulaski correspondent of the Pulaski Enterprise stated in the Friday,. 14 Dec 1917, issue “Captain Whiteaker and wife, of Vienna, visited his son, Dr. Whiteaker on Tuesday and Wednesday.  Captain is one of the veterans of the Civil War.  He is about 83 years old and his wife is about 78.  He took the premium here at the Pulaski County fair two years ago for the best old time fiddler in this part of the state”—Darrel Dexter)


Aged Colored Woman Dies

Mrs. Dora Jackson, colored, aged 83 years, died at her home here Sunday morning. She was one of Mound City’s oldest resident, having lived here some 60 years. Interment was made in the National Cemetery at the side of her husband. Funeral Director G. A. James, of this city, had charge of the funeral.


Infant Son Dies

Floyd Minton, infant son of Mrs. Elsie Minton, died at the home of his grandmother, Mrs. Delia Staten, Wednesday. Funeral services were held at the home Thursday with Rev. Roy Kean, of the Methodist Church in charge. Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery with Director G. A. James in charge.


Mrs. Ben Huff Passes Away

Mrs. Ben Huff, aged resident of Charleston, Mo., died at her home in that city Wednesday, Oct. 7, at 7:15 a.m. Mrs. Huff was a prominent lady of that city. She was the wife of Mr. Benjamin Huff, who preceded her in death.

Mrs. Huff leaves to mourn her loss seven grandchildren and seventeen great-grandchildren. The grandchildren are Mesdames Olen Bowers, Charles and John Keesee, Misses Malphus and Ruth Brown and Oss Brown, all of this city. Interment was made in the Odd Fellows Cemetery at Charleston.


OBITUARY

Mrs. H. O. Stout was born June 29th, 1878 and departed this life October 7, 1925—aged 47 years, 3 months and eight days.

On August 13, 1896, she was united in marriage to H. O. Stout and to this union five children were born—one having preceded her in death the time of its birth.

She leaves to mourn her departure her husband, three daughters, Mrs. Lena McKelfresh, Mrs. Lona Pieper, and Miss Alma Stout; one son, Alvin Stout, and four grandchildren, all of Summer. She also leaves her father, William James, of Mountain View, Missouri.  Two brothers, also survive her. They are G. A. James, of this city, and C. E. James, of Pittsburg, Pa. A sister, Mrs. Alberta Leach, of Mattoon, also survives.

In early life she united with the Protestant Methodist Church at Chauncey and upon moving to Summer placed her membership with the United Brethren Church in which she worked faithfully until her death.

She was a devoted wife, a kind and loving neighbor, and mother, and a friend to all who knew her.
She will be greatly missed, but our loss is heaven’s gain and an eternal reward for her labors here on earth.

(Howard O. Stout married Armilda James on 13 Aug 1896, in Lawrence Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Notice for Application of Pardon or Parole

Notice is hereby given that application will be made to the Board of Pardons for the parole of Leo Kennison who was sentenced to the Southern Illinois Penitentiary at Chester, Illinois, for a term of fifteen years from Pulaski County Illinois for the crime of murder.


Friday, 23 Oct 1925:
Resident of Mounds Dies in I. C. Hospital

Godfred Frank, 61 years old, a resident of Mounds for many years and an employee of the Illinois Central Railroad for the past 20 years, died at the Illinois Central Hospital in Chicago at 3:15 o’clock Friday morning after an illness of six week of cancer. His wife was with him with he died. He is survived also by his daughter’s Mrs. John H. Cobb, of Mounds, and Mrs. John F. Marrs, of this city. The body arrived in Mounds at 5:51 o’clock Saturday morning.

Funeral services were held at the Baptist church in Mounds at 1:30 o’clock Sunday afternoon. Rev. H. C. Croslin conducting the service. Interment in Beech Grove Cemetery.

(Godfred Frank married Bettie Boerschel on 18 Aug 1887, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Mrs. Augusta Dick Passes Away at Olmstead

Mrs. Augusta Dick, nee Behrendt, died October 15, 1914, at her home in Olmstead. She was born in Westprisoen, Germany on November 16, 1856. She leaves to mourn her death, her husband and ten children, Mrs. Frank Unger, Mound City, Mrs. J. W. Kynaston, Mrs. W. L. McDaniel and Mrs. Fred Ohnmais, Chicago, Mrs. J. F. Mikkins, Marriana, Ark., Mrs. Claude Bagby, Olmstead, Mrs. Walter Schnaare, America, and John, Rudolph, Otto, Olmsted, one brother, Daniel Behrendt, Villa Ridge, twenty-six grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

She came to America with her husband and three children forty-four years ago and located in Villa Ridge later moving to Olmsted which ahs been her home for thirty-seven years. She was a good Christian woman and a faithful and loving wife and mother.

Funeral services were conducted by the pastor of the Lutheran Church at 10 o’clock Sunday morning and interment made in Concord Cemetery, Rev. Huebotter officiating.

(Her marker in Concord Cemetery reads:  Carl Dick Born Oct. 3, 1851 Died March 25, 1935.  Augusta Dick Born Nov. 16, 1856 Died Oct. 15, 1925.—Darrel Dexter)


Mrs. I. N. Taylor Dies After a Lingering Illness

Mrs. I. N. Taylor, age 54, died at her home on Blanche Avenue, in Mounds, Thursday evening, Oct. 15, after an illness of several weeks.

She is survived by her husband, of Mounds and two sons, Robert and Norris Taylor, both of Truman, Ark., who were at her bedside when she died. She also leaves her parents, Mrs. and Mrs. Robert A. Cunningham, of Mounds, and a cousin, Mrs. B. Perkins, of Cairo.

Brief funeral services for Mrs. I. N. Taylor were held at the family residence in Mounds Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock, after which the cortege left for the Methodist church where a funeral sermon was preached at 2:15 p.m. by Rev. J. S. Dever, the pastor. Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery. G. A. James directed the funeral.

(Joel N. Taylor married Emma Cunningham on 23 May 1891, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Robert A. Cunningham married Sarah A. Holmes on 5 Apr 1870, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Mrs. Frank Unger and family, Mrs. Arnie Corzine and family and Mrs. Walter Egner and family were called to Olmsted on account of the serious illness and death of the former’s mother, Mrs. Carl Dick. Mrs. Dick passed away at her home at 1:10 p.m. Thursday.


Mr. Carl Dick died on Thursday evening, being sick only a short time. (Olmstead)


OBITUARY

James A. Duglas, was born in Massac County January 10, 1852, and departed life at his home near Grand Chain, Illinois, Thursday, October 15th. He was united in marriage to Miss Julia E. Graham, of Grahamville, Ky., to this union eight children were born, five sons and three daughters. Mesdames Velma Riley, Maggie Conant, both of Grand Chain, Mrs. Emma Corzine, of El Dora, Illinois, William C., Clarence H., Edward Z., Ernest A.—only son having died in his infancy. Other than his wife he leaves twenty-two grandchildren, one sister Ollie Mae Wood, of Karnak, and four brothers, and a number of other relatives and a host of friends.

The departed was a patient sufferer, having been in failing health for a number of years. He was a patient invalid, being confined to his bed for three weeks. He loved his wife. The welfare of his family, wife and children’s welfare was constantly in his mind, even to the very last. He lived up to the principals of purity honest, and justice. He was a friend to everyone all were welcomed both far and near. He was a kind, loving husband, and father and will be greatly missed in the community where he lived. Funeral services were held at Lower Salem Church in Massac County Friday, October 16 by Rev. J. T. Isaac. Interment was in Salem Cemetery.

(James A. Douglas married Julia E. Graham on 13 Oct 1880, in Massac Co., Ill.  His marker in Lower Salem Cemetery in Massac County reads:  James A. Douglas Born Jan. 10, 1852 Died Oct. 15, 1925.—Darrel Dexter)


CARD OF THANKS

We take this method to thank the many friends and neighbors who so kindly assisted us during the illness and death of our beloved husband and father, James A. Douglas. We wish to thank the undertakers for the kindness and thoughtful service, Rev. J. T. Isaac for his words of comfort. Those who brought beautiful flowers and all who by word or deed helped to lighten our burden of grief.

When sad hours such as these come to you, then may you have the same kindness shown you as has been ours.

Mrs. Julia E. Douglas, and family


Friday, 30 Oct 1925:
Mounds Negro Found Guilty, Receives Life Sentence

Dorsey Chambliss, negro, of Mounds, was found guilty in the circuit court here Wednesday for the murder of William Huffman, negro, and was sentenced to life imprisonment in the penitentiary.

Chambliss shot and killed Huffman in a gun fight at Mounds early in the summer. The trial was brief and occupied only a part of the day, the jury being out only a shot time.

The remainder of the day was spent in trying divorce cases.


Mrs. Sadler of Villa Ridge Passes Away Oct. 28th

Mrs. Minnie Stadler, 67 years old, passed away at her home in Villa Ridge Wednesday afternoon. Funeral arrangement will not be made until a brother from Missoula, Mont., arrives. G. A. James will direct the funeral.


Old Resident of Pulaski Passes Away

Mrs. Jane Ellen Lackey, age __ years, and widow of the late Thomas M. Lackey, passed away at her home near Pulaski on Wednesday, Oct. 21st.

Mrs. Lackey was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jefferson Parker, and was born near Villa Ridge, on Oct. 15, 1845. She was married to Mr. Lackey in 1867, his death occurring on Jan. 5, 1886. They had six children, two dyeing in infancy and Mrs. S. H. Rife passing away on Nov. 17, of last year. Two sons and one daughter, Harry Lackey, of Grand Tower, and Ed and Mrs. A. J. Lilly, of Pulaski survive, with thirteen grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

Funeral services were held at Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church. Rev. H. C. Vick, the pastor officiating. Interment on the Lackey Cemetery.

(Thomas M. Lackey married Jane E. Parker on 15 Apr 1866, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Samuel H. Rife married Clara H. Lackey on 18 Oct 1896, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  A marker in Lackey Cemetery reads:  Jennie Lackey 1846-1925.—Darrel Dexter)


Friday, 13 Nov 1925:
Representative Thomas Myers Dies in Carbondale

Thomas J. Myers, of Benton, member of the Illinois House of Representatives, of the 50th District, died Sunday night in a Carbondale hospital after an illness of several months. Myers was a southern Illinois democratic leader and held numerous offices, including state’s attorney, county judge and corporation clerk in the secretary of state’s office. The funeral was held Tuesday.

The year he became of age Myers was elected assessor of Benton Township. In 1900 he was elected state’s attorney and in 1906 he was elected county judge. In 1913 he entered the secretary of state’s office and served four years there. In 1917 he was appointed a member of the Franklin County Exemption Board and while serving as clerk of this board was again elected county judge. He since has served two years as representative from the Fifteenth District.


Former Resident of Our City Dies in Caruthersville, Mo.

Mrs. Edwin Peak, of Caruthersville, Mo., died at her home in that city Tuesday, Nov. 3, of influenza. Mrs. Peak was formerly Miss Gladys Cougill, of this city. Deceased was 32 years of age and leaves a husband and two children ages 8 and 10 years. Funeral and interment were held in Paducah Thursday. Mr. and Mrs. Hosea Dunlap and Forest Rushing, of this city, attended the funeral.


Mrs. Tom Perks and son have returned from McClure, where they were called there on account of the death of the former’s uncle.


A message received here (Grand Chain) announced the death of William Stahlheber, age 81, of St. Louis. Funeral services were held at that place Tuesday.


CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank the friends and neighbors for the many kindnesses shown us at the time of our great bereavement, the death of our beloved wife and mother. Also for the beautiful expressions of sympathy and the flowers. We also thank the Reverend Dunlap for his sincere words and kindnesses and sympathy.
G. E. Curt
Edward Curt and Sons
Walter Curt and family
Robert Curt
Sophia Curt


Friday, 27 Nov 1925:
Former Mound City Resident Dies in Indianapolis

Mrs. R. W. Holmes, age 46 years and ten months, died at her home in Indianapolis, Ind., Thursday, Nov. 19. She leaves her husband, three sons and two daughters, children by a former marriage, Irvin E. Nelms, of St. Louis, Carl M. Nelms, of Cairo, Robert Nelms, of Indianapolis, Mrs. Margaret Philps, of Cairo, and Miss Sarah Eva Nelms, of Indianapolis. She also leaves two sisters, Mrs. Sarah Carpenter, of Aberdeen, Wash., and Mrs. Rose Price, of Kankakee, and two brothers, Robert Hurst, of this city, and Will Hurst, of Vincennes, Ind., besides many other relatives and host of friends.

The body was brought to Cairo arriving there Saturday morning from Indianapolis, and was taken to the home of her son, Carl M. Nelms, 708 Twenty-second Street in Cairo, where funeral services were held Monday afternoon, with interment in Beech Grove Cemetery.

(H. A. Nelms, son of James Nelms and Nancy Bankson, married Christina C. W. Hurst, 15, daughter of J. M. Hurst and Margaret Duncan, on 27 Jul 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill.


Dr. I. F. and Ben Hargan Mourn Death of Sister.

Mrs. Logan Gasaway, 64, died at her home near Miller City at 8:00 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 19, after an illness lasting some fifteen months. Mrs. Gasaway was born in Kentucky and was reared in Cairo. She was a sister of Dr. J. F. Hargan and Ben Hargan of this city. In addition, she is survived by her mother, Mrs. Harriet Hargan, and two other brothers, Virgil Hargan, of Paducah, and Oscar Hargan, of Vine Grove, Ky. She also leaves four sisters, Mrs. Kate Bogard, of Vine Grove, Mrs. Lucy Leonard, of Vine Grove, Mrs. Charles Goodman, of Dongola and Mrs. Tony Corbett, of Mound City, besides four grandchildren and one great-grandchild.


The two-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jim Carol died Thursday morning after an illness of several days.


We were very sad over the loss of our neighbor, John Lingle, who died suddenly of heart failure. (Maple Valley)


Mrs. Joe Mosley, of Elgin, was called home Saturday on account of the death of her father. (Maple Valley)


OBITUARY

By especial request of friends of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Crader, we publish the following poem, which was written by a school mate of their son, Alvie, who was killed in a train accident last fall near Jefferson City, Missouri.
In Memory Alive
By Demovia Ward

Father and mother, we know

We know you’re unhappy
We know you are lonely and sad

To bury your child, your only sin
Who was just a youthful lad.

He was killed at Jefferson City, Missouri
We know not how it was done

You have our heartfelt sympathy
For the death of your only son

He would not listen to his mother’s warning
Nor heed what she would say

Now, he is lying in his grave
Awaiting the Judgment Day

He left his parents against their will
He left a happy home

He was out having a good time
When he met his fatal doom

Two of his boy friends with him
Out on that speeding train

When they saw him falling
They left him to die alone in pain

He was buried in the Ullin Cemetery
Under the blooming flowers

While we are left here to weep
Through these lonely hours

Kind parents don’t grieve,
For there is day coming

We trust to see him then
When there will be a reckoning

For all fallen men.

 

Friday, 4 Dec 1925:
Prominent Ullin Lady Passes at St. Mary’s Infirmary

Mrs. _____ Gandy, wife of W. F. Gandy, a well known businessman of Ullin, passed away at St. Mary’s Hospital in Cairo at noon Monday following an illness of several weeks. Mrs. Gandy was a highly respected woman in her home community, being an active worker in the Methodist church there.

(William F. Gandy married Lallie L. Bankson on 13 Apr 1890, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Mannon Bankson married Mary Rife on 27 Nov 1870, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Lola Gandy 1870-1925.—Darrel Dexter)


Death of Little Son

Homer, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Garland Youngblood, died at the home of his parents in this city Tuesday of pneumonia. He was one year and three months of age. Funeral services were held at the resident at 2 o’clock Thursday afternoon, Rev. Roy N. Kean conducting the services. Interment in Beech Grove Cemetery.


Little Girl Dies of Pneumonia

The two-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Carrol, died Thursday morning of last week of pneumonia. The funeral and burial in Beech Grove Cemetery was held Friday afternoon. Rev. Roy N. Kean conducted the services. G. A. James was in charge.


GRAND CHAIN ___ HIT BY AUTOMOBILE
DIES AT ____

Family Has the Sympathy of the Entire Community in Their Deep Sorrow

A very deplorable accident occurred Wednesday morning at Grand Chain, near the ____ school, when a car driven by Loren Stevers struck and seriously injured Master James Russel McIntire, the little son of Postmaster and Mrs. John R. McIntire. The accident of the 5-year-old boy occurred in front of the home and his mother an eye witness, his skull being fractured.

He was taken to St. Mary’s Hospital in Cairo, where he died last Wednesday evening. The corner’s jury returned a verdict of “death caused by being accidentally struck by an automobile.”

The body was brought back to Grand Chain early Thursday morning by Undertaker G. A. James and prepared for burial.

The funeral will be held this Friday afternoon at the home in Grand Chain.

(His marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  James R. McIntire Born April 5, 1921 Died Dec. 3, 1925.—Darrel Dexter)


Thebes Lady Dies Here

Mrs. Sarah Everett, wife of William Everett, age 77 years, passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Mitchell Lazar, on Commercial Avenue. Mrs. Everett had been ill for some time and her death was not unexpected. She formerly resided in Thebes, but for the past month has made her home with her daughter, who with her husband survive her. Funeral services were held at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Lazar at 10 o’clock Thursday morning. Interment at Beech Grove Cemetery. Rev. Roy N. Kean conducted the funeral services.

(William Everett married Sarah Tankestly on 3 Aug 1867, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


OBITUARY

Mrs. Mary Little died at her home in Massac County, Nov. 24, after an illness of several months. The deceased was born in Marshall Town, Iowa, and moved to Illinois in childhood. She was married to J. P. Little 45 years ago. Surviving her are two children, her husband and two sons. They are Mrs. Ruth Weaver, of Grand Chain, Bert and J. J., of Johnston City, a sister, Mrs. Josephine Little, of Kansas, and nine grandchildren.

She was a Christian woman and a good neighbors. Beloved by all who knew her. Funeral services were held at Lower Salem Church, conducted by Rev. Pace, Christian minister.

(Her marker in Lower Salem Cemetery in Massac County reads:  Mary Little 1858-1925  Jacob Little 1858-1925.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Friday, 25 Dec 1925:
Prominent Farmer Passes Away at Home Near Mounds

John C. Hawkins, aged 58 years, six months and 11 days, passed away at his home a mile west of Mounds at 9:40 o’clock, Thursday night, December 17th, following a second paralytic stroke suffered the day before Thanksgiving.

Mr. Hawkins was born at Grand Tower, Illinois, and came to this section in his early childhood. He leaves his father, who is 81 years of age. Other survivors are his wife and son, Frank, 16 years of age; Mrs. W. E. Crain, Mounds, May S. Hawkins, Mound City, Mrs. M. Shiflley, Mounds, Mrs. P. A. Simmons, Mrs. A. T. Carson and L. A. Hawkins, all of Mounds.

Mr. Hawkins had resided on the farm here he died for nearly half a century and was an ____ and energetic worker.

Funeral services were held at the Baptist church Saturday afternoon. Interment in Beech Grove Cemetery.


Aged Lady Dies at Olmstead

Mrs. B. Bierbaum, of Olmstead, died suddenly Tuesday from a heart attack while going from Olmstead to her home near there. Mrs. Bierbaum was an old resident of this county and leaves mourn her demise her husband, Barney, two sons and one daughter. Funeral services were held here Thursday morning at St. Mary’s Church.

(A marker in St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Josephine Bierbaum 1867-1926.—Darrel Dexter)


Called to Last Reward

When we step across the bridge of death, it is no strange land that we enter, but our native home. We are made to mourn and miss those loved.

Familiar forms that pass constantly from us and the dear home circle and in the light of memory then faded forms are vividly brought back to view.—Yet they are not dead—only sleeping.

It is only with deep regret that we chronicle the passing out from life another highly respected woman of this city.

Mrs. Lucy Jane Hoffman age 91 years, 10 months and two days passed away at the home of her daughter Mrs. J. F. Hargan, 409 Railroad Avenue, Friday morning, December 18, at 1 o’clock. Deceased had been ill only a short time, as she has always been very active considering her age.

Mrs. Hoffman was born February 16, 1834, at Maysville, Ky., was united in marriage at DuQuoin, Illinois, January 23, 1859, to Henry C. Hoffman. To this union three children were born, J. F. Hoffman and Mrs. J. F. Hargan, of Mound City, and Robert, who died in infancy. Her husband also preceded her in death October 4, 1900. She is survived by four grandchildren, Mrs. Bernard Miller, of Cairo, Mrs. Albert Parker, Miss Henri Hoffman, and John Hargan, all of Mound City.

Grandma Hoffman was of a lovable disposition and was held in high esteem by all.

The funeral was held Sunday afternoon at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church of which the deceased was a devout member. Rev. Charles K. Weller, the rector conducting the services. The church was filled to overflowing and floral tributes were many and beautiful. Interment took place in Beech Grove Cemetery.

(Henry C. Hoffman married Lucy J. Cockrum on 23 Jan 1859, in Perry Co., Ill.  J. T. Hargan married Josie Hoffman on 2 Aug 1893, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Card of Thanks

We wish to thank our friends and neighbors for the kindness shown us during the illness and death of our beloved mother, Lucy Jane Hoffman.  Their kindness will always be remembered with grateful appreciation.
Mrs. J. F. Hargan
Fred Hoffman

 

 

Mounds Independent


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 1 Jan 1925:

Prominent Resident of County Dies

Joseph H. Weiting, son of H. H. and Phoebe Weiting, was born in northern past of Pulaski County on October 26, 1858, and departed this life December 28th, 1924, at the age of 66 years, 2 months and 2 days.  When a youth of 17, he came with his parents to the farm where he has since made his home.

On March 9th, 1886, he was united in marriage to Helen Jane Atherton,  To this union were born five children, all of whom survive their father.  These are namely:  Harry Wieting, of Lake Wales, Florida, Mrs. J. H. Cheniae, of Mounds, Mrs. Clifford Gunn, Miss Beulah and Mrs. Joseph Henry Weiting, all of Villa Ridge.

Mr. Wieting professed a saving faith in Jesus Christ at an early age and united with the Shiloh Baptist Church, in which he held membership at the time of his death.  He was a charter member of the Modern Woodmen Lodge.

He leaves to mourn his death a wife, five children, six grandchildren and many other relatives and friend.

Funeral services were held at the Shiloh Baptist Church Dec. 30th, at 2:30 p.m.  The burial was in Shiloh Cemetery.  The Rev. H. C. Croslin of Mounds officiated.

(J. H. Wieting married H. J. Atherton on 9 Mar 1886, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in New Shiloh Cemetery reads:  Joseph H. Weiting 1858-1924.—Darrel Dexter)
 
DEATH OF AN INFANT

Marion Fred Paff, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Paff, was born and died Dec. 26, 1924,  The funeral services was held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Waterman, Dec. 27th, at 2 p.m.  The Rev. H. C. Croslin officiated.
 
Wife of Former M. E. Pastor Is Dead

Caroline Thrall Campbell, widow of the Rev. C. W. Campbell, died at the home of her adopted daughter in Lake Charles, La., Wednesday, Dec. 31st.

Mrs. Campbell was a graduate of McKendree College and was the last charter member of the Clio Literary Society of McKendree.  Before her marriage she was a successful teacher.

It will be remembered by the older residents of Mounds that the Rev. Mr. Campbell built the First M. E. Church of Mounds while serving as pastor.

(Charles Campbell married Hannah C. Thrall on 2 Sep 1875, in Edwards Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Former Pulaski County Man Loses Life

A. S. Manwaring, who was born and raised in Pulaski County, was killed in a seaplane accident at Hampton Roads naval air station landing, Tuesday, Dec. 23rd, while carrying a pneumonia patient from Hatteras to Norfolk by air ambulance.  Mr. Manwaring married Miss Bertha Rives before entering the navy.  Mrs. Manwaring’s mother resides at present in Cairo.  The body will possibly be brought to this county for burial.
 
The funeral services of the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Monogan, of this city (Mound City), were held Sunday afternoon at the home of the parents, the Rev. Roy N. Kean officiating.
 
 
Mounds Independent, Thursday, 8 Jan 1925:
Word was received here (Villa Ridge) of the death of Mrs. C. W. Campbell, widow of Rev. C. W. Campbell, formerly of this place, but who made her home with an adopted daughter in Louisiana since the death of her husband some two years ago.
 
Harry Wieting will return to Lakes Wales, Florida, Tuesday, having been called home by the death of his father.
 
Joe W. Dacus Dies after a Prolonged Illness

Joe W. Dacus was born Nov. 22, 1894, near Oxford, Miss., and died Jan. 5, 1925, aged 30 years, 1 month, 4 days.  He contracted tuberculosis at the age of 20 years.

Six years of his invalidism were spent in Asheville, N.C., and four years at the home of his sister, Mrs. H. A. Melton. He bore his illness with much patience.  He had a cheerful disposition and always had a smile for everyone.  He accepted Jesus as his Savior several years ago, but had never united with any church.

He leaves a mother, Mrs. W. L. Dacus, of Mounds; two brothers, A. H. and B. B. Dacus, of Greenwood, Miss.; one sister, Mrs. H. A. Melton, of Mounds; several nieces and nephews and a host of other relatives and friends.

The funeral services were held at the H. A. Melton home Wednesday, January 7th, at 2:00 p.m.  The Rev. T. A. Shaffer officiated.

The burial was in Beech Grove Cemetery.
 
Unveiling of Memorial Window in Ullin Church

The Methodist Episcopal Church in Ullin will hold a special memorial service on Sunday afternoon, January 11th, at 3 o’clock for the purpose of unveiling the beautiful, large, new art glass memorial window to the memory of the late W. W. Kemper, who died while pastor of the church in 1923.  The general public is invited to this service.

 
 
Mounds Independent, Thursday, 15 Jan 1925:
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Throgmorton attended the funeral of the former’s uncle, Mr. R. F. Throgmorton, of Ozark, Sunday.
 
 
Mounds Independent, Thursday, 22 Jan 1925:
The funeral of Ben Brown, who died at St. Mary’s Infirmary Monday morning after a lingering illness of several weeks was held at the home of his brother-in-law, Olen Bowers, on High Street, Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Rev. Roy N. Kean officiated.  After the services automobiles conveyed the cortege to Mounds where interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.  G. A. James was undertaker in charge.
 
Mr. and Mrs. Will Dougherty, of Cairo, attended the funeral of Mr. J. A. Waugh here (Mound City) Monday afternoon.
 
The small son of Mr. and Mrs. Devery passed away Tuesday morning.  (Pulaski)
 
Death Claims Mrs. Behring

Just as we go to press we learn that Mrs. Henry Behring is dead.  As yet the funeral arrangements have not been made.
 
Death Takes Mrs. W. L. Carter

Mrs. W. L. Carter nee Jessie McDade, of Fulton, Ky., died at her home in that city Thursday, January 15, at 8:30 a.m. and was buried in Fulton Saturday, 17.  She was the sister of Mrs. W. C. Hogg, a former Mounds resident, and was well and favorably known here, having visited here frequently until the removal of Mr. and Mrs. Hogg to Paducah, Ky.  Before her marriage she taught for a number of years in the schools of Kentucky.
 
Death of Samuel Back

Samuel Back, an old and well known resident of Mound City, died in that city, Friday, January 16.  Mr. Back was a number of years in the mercantile business, but for several years had been ill.  He was 84 years old.  Mr. Back was an uncle of J. J. Blum of this city, and Mrs. George Eichorn and Sam Blum, of Mound City.  He was buried in St. Louis Sunday, January 18.
 
Prominent Pulaski County Man Dead

John A. Waugh, who spent the greater part of his active life in Mound City, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Oscar Morris, in Jacksonville, Ill., Saturday, January 17, 1925.  His invalid wife survives him.

Mr. Waugh was 90 years old and through the years had served the people of Mound City and Pulaski County in many ways.  He was a cashier of the First State Bank for a number of years, served as county clerk was at one time editor of the Pulaski Patriot, and was secretary of the Building and Loan Association of Mound City.  He had been a member of the Mound City M. E. Church for 49 years and was one of the leaders among the Masons of the county.

The remains were brought to Mounds on No. 6, Monday, taken to Mound City, where funeral services were held at the M. E. church, conducted by the Rev. Roy N. Kean.  Burial was in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds with the Masonic Order in charge.
 
Old Colored Resident Dead

Hilman Tansil, aged 86 years, a well known colored resident of North Mounds, died Sunday at 6 p.m.  He was raised in Sharon, Tenn., but had lived in Mounds for a number of years.  His wife died 1 year, 1 month and 18 days previous to his death.  He leaves two daughters, Lena and Mrs. Addie Hester, and one son, Zelmar.

Funeral services were held at the Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church.  The Rev. G. W. Hill officiated.
 

Mounds Independent, Thursday, 29 Jan 1925:
Mrs. Alice Gunter passed away Friday evening Jan. 23.  The funeral was at the home.  Interment was in Anna Cemetery.  (Pulaski)

(Her marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Alice A. Gunter 1858-1925  Frances E. Gunter 1858-1934.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Henry C. Behring Passes to Great Beyond

Fannie Skyles Behring, daughter of David and Mary Skyles, was born in McClure, Ill., January 2nd, 1875, and died at her home in Mounds, Ill., January 20th, 1925, being 50 years and 18 days of age.  She was married to Henry Behring at Mound City, Ill., August 18th, 1898.  To this union two children were born, a son, dying in infancy and a daughter, Mrs. Freda Vallard living in Christopher, Ill.  She united with the Baptist church at Mounds, Ill., January 20th, 1909, and was a member of Mounds Rebekah Lodge and the Royal Neighbors of America.

She leaves, besides her husband and daughter, three brothers, Henry, of Dixon, Wyo., George of Mounds, and Charles, of Bird’s Point, Mo.; three grandchildren, seven nephews, 10 nieces and a host of sorrowing friends.  The funeral services were held in the Baptist church at 2 p.m. Friday, January 22, conducted by the Rev. H. C. Croslin.  Burial was in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

(Henry Behring married Fannie Skiles on 18 Aug 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Waugh Called Soon after Husband

Mrs. J. A. Waugh, whose husband’s death we chronicled last week, joined Mr. Waugh in death Friday, January 23.  She died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Oscar Morris, in Jacksonville, Ill.  The remains were brought to Mounds on No. 5 Sunday afternoon, taken at once to Mound City, where funeral services were conducted in the M. E. church, then brought to Beech Grove Cemetery, Mounds, for burial.  Thus ends a long and well spent life.

(John A. Waugh married Mary R. Emrie on 5 Apr 1863, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Death of George Lutz

George Lutz, father of Mrs. Harrison Lentz, of this city, passed to the Great Beyond Thursday, January 22, after a long illness.  He came here sometime ago from Elco, Ill.,   He is survived by his wife, three daughters, a sister and several grandchildren.  The body was taken on Saturday to Mt. Vernon, Ind., for burial.
 


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 5 Feb 1925:
The death angel came and took Thomas Jefferson Daniels January 27, 1925.  Mr. Daniels was born in Mississippi, September 4, 1858. He leaves to mourn his wife, four children, two boys and two girls, one having preceded his father in death. Mr. Daniels leaves a host of friends and relatives.  (Ullin)
 
Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Train were called to Cairo Tuesday because of the death of a very dear friend, Mr. J. A. Miller.  (Ullin)
 
Misses Juanita and Lois Stoner were called to Wetaug Friday by the death of their grandfather, Mr. Thomas Mowery.

             (Thomas Jefferson Mowery married Maryan Elenory Lentz on 17 Jan 1884, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Arthur Elmer Stoner married Malinda Catharine Mowery on 23 Oct 1904, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug reads:  Thomas J. Mowery Born April 25, 1857 Died Jan. 28, 1925.—Darrel Dexter)
 


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 12 Feb 1925:
Dr. C. L. Otrich Dies

Dr. C. L. Otrich, formerly of this city, died at his home at Sesser, Thursday morning at 5 o’clock.  County Superintendent C. O. Otrich received a telegram Thursday morning from Mrs. Nina Phillips apprising him of the death of her father.  Funeral arrangements had not been made at this time.—Anna Democrat.

Dr. Otrich was well known in Mounds where he frequently visited his son, Loel Otrich, for years a prominent Mounds druggist. Loel moved to Sesser some years ago and from there to Decatur, where he and his family now reside.

(C. L. Otrich married Mary McClure on 14 Mar 1878, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Charles L. Otrich married Mrs. Mary E. Hughes nee Stophlett on 1 Apr 1885, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Jonesboro Cemetery reads:  C. L. Otrich Born Sept. 16, 1849 Died Feb. 5, 1925  Mary E. wife of C. L. Otrich died March 11, 1880 Aged 29 Yrs., 4 Mos., & 17 Ds.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
Mounds Independent, Thursday, 19 Feb 1925:
Automobile Accident Causes Death of Judge

Judge J. H. Sanders, probate judge of Mississippi County, of Charleston, Mo., was killed and Oscar Hall, also of Charleston, was seriously injured Sunday evening about 5:45 o’clock, when Sanders lost control of the car on the concrete road between Villa Ridge and Pulaski and the machine turned over three times says the Cairo Bulletin.

Judge Sanders was 31 years old and single. His mother resides in East Prairie, Mo., and he has a brother in Poplar Bluff, Mo.

Oscar Hall is a barber and 33 years old, a widower, and has three children.

Coroner Hudson of Mounds held an inquest last night over the remains of Judge Sanders the jury’s verdict being as follows:

“We the jury, find that Jimmie Sanders came to his death by injuries to his head when an automobile in which he was riding turned over between Villa Ridge and Pulaski about 5:45 p.m.” 

 

Death of Aged Former Pulaski County Resident

John Edward Esque, a former resident of Grand Chain, died of pneumonia in St. Louis Mo., Saturday, February 14, 1925, at the age of 72 years.

Mr. Esque was born in Grand Chain and was the son of Mrs. Eliza S. Tarr, who survives him. Besides his aged mother he leaves a wife, one son, one grandchild, a brother, J. W. Esque, of Grand Chain; a half brother, Dr. Tarr, of Johnston City; and nieces and nephews, among whom are Mrs. F. C. Schoenfeld, of this city, and the Rev. Chester Esque, of Washington, Indiana.

The funeral services were conducted by the Rev. Chambers, of Washington, Ind., Tuesday, February 16, with burial at Grand Chain.

(John E. Esque married Elizabeth Molborn on 17 Oct 1879, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
Mounds Independent, Thursday, 26 Feb 1925:
The remains of Miss Rose Bosam, of St. Louis, were brought to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Christ Keller, Wednesday evening, where funeral services were held Thursday afternoon, Rev. R. N. Kean officiating.  Funeral services were conducted by Undertaker G. A. James.  Miss Bosam was a former resident of this city (Mound City).

(George Busam married Frances Rivington on 7 July 1871, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Christian Keller married Lizzie Revington on 28 Oct 1867, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
Mounds Independent, Thursday, 5 Mar 1925:
Mrs. Turbeville, mother of Mrs. James Lackey, made her departure to the other world at eleven o’clock Sunday morning.
 
The remains of the son of Mr. Luckey were brought here (Ullin) Monday. Funeral services were held at the M. E. church Tuesday morning.

(The 6 Mar 1925, Pulaski Enterprise identifies him as Oley Lokey.—Darrel Dexter)

 
Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Rhymer, accompanied by Joe Turbeville, motored to Ullin Sunday afternoon.  Mr. Turbeville was called there by the death of his mother.
 
 
Mounds Independent, Thursday, 12 Mar 1925:
Mrs. Mollie Rasbury, sister of Mrs. Ella Quigley, died Friday and was buried from Lane Chapel Tuesday, Rev. J. H. North officiated.  (Colored News)
 
Peter Gilbert, father of Mrs. Sylvia and Miss Mary Ward, died Saturday and was buried Monday from Pilgrim’s Rest Church.  Rev. G. W. Hill officiated.  (Colored News)
 
News has just been received of the death of Mr. Lois Willis, formerly of Ullin.
 
DIES IN THE WEST

Robert McCrite, brother of Cyrille McCrite, of this city, died in Everett, Wash., and on Saturday, March 7, was brought to Mounds.  The body lay in state at the home of his brother on North Oak Street until 11 a.m. Sunday when the funeral party left for Sandy Creek Church, Diswood, Ill., where services were held at 1 p.m. 

 

Old Resident of Pulaski County Dead

Mrs. Ellen Armstrong Mahoney died Monday, March 9, 1925, at the home of her son, Florence, of Valley Recluse, Mrs. Mahoney had reached the age of 83 years.

She was born in Ireland, Jan. 28, 1842, and came to this country when a child.  In 1860 she was married in Cairo, Ill., to T. C. Mahoney.  Soon afterward they moved to Pulaski where she has lived for over 60 years.  For the past eight years she has been totally blind.

She is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Kate A. Stout, of Cairo, and three sons, James, Florence, and John, all of Valley Recluse, 19 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Her husband and five children preceded her to the Great Beyond.

Undertaker G. A. James conducted the funeral, which was held in St. Raphael’s Church in Mounds, Wednesday at 2 p.m., the Rev. Father Traynor officiating.  She was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery.
 
BISHOP QUAYLE DEAD

Bishop William A. Quayle, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, died at his home, Green Haven, Baldwin, Kansas, Monday, March 9, following a heart attack.

Bishop Quayle had been in failing health for several years, but continued mentally active up to the hour of his death.

It will be remembered that Bishop Quayle has thrice been heard in Mounds—in the Lyric Theater during the war, at the dedication of the remodeled M. E. church, and in a lecture at the high school.
 


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 19 Mar 1925:
Mrs. S. A. Shifley was called to Cairo Saturday by the death of her nephew, Clyde R. Hoffner, aged 18, whose death was said to have been the first fatal case of the flue recorded in Cairo this winter.  The young man was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery, Mounds, Monday.
 
Mr. Andy Williams passed away at his home on upper Main Street Monday, March 16.  He had been without eyesight for many years and was an old resident of the city.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank our friends who so kindly helped us during the illness and death of our beloved little daughter, Hyacinth Louise.  Especially do wish to thank the Rev. Traynor for his kind and consoling words, those who lent their cars and the donors of the many beautiful floral offerings.
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Taylor and family
 
Death of Two Colored Residents

John Alexander, colored, age 54, fell dead March 12, at 8 p.m. in Ben Clark’s barber shop on Front Street.

He leaves a wife, one daughter and two sons.  The body was taken Saturday to Henry Station, Tenn., for burial.

Alexander Talbert, colored, aged 29 years, was drowned in the Illinois Central yards here Wednesday, March 11, at 7:30 p.m., when he stepped into an ash pit near the round house.  The young man, a soldier in the late war, had been married six months ago to Miss Etholia McClellan, who survives him.  His mother also is living.

The funeral services were held in the Free Will Baptist Church, North Mounds, Monday, March 16, with the Rev. R. L. McCauley, officiating.  Burial was in the National Cemetery.

(Alexander Tolbert, private, U. S. Army, died 11 Mar 1925, and was buried in section F, grave 4972C in Mound City National Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Small Child Succumbs to Pneumonia

Hyacinth Louise, three-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Taylor, died Thursday, March 12, at their home north of Mounds after suffering for some time with pneumonia.  The funeral services were conducted by the Rev. Father Traynor at St. Raphael’s Church at 1 p.m. Saturday.  Burial was in St. Mary’s Cemetery.  The bereaved parents have the sympathy of the entire community.
 
 
Mounds Independent, Thursday, 26 Mar 1925:
Death of Well Known Pulaski Youth

Clyde Russell, son of Olen and Mattie Curry, residing east of Pulaski, died at the Cairo Hospital, March 23, 1925.  He was born March 9, 1910, making his age at the time of his demise, 15 years and 14 days.  He was always a resident of the farm upon which he was born.

He leaves to mourn his demise, father and mother, three sister, Blanche, Juanita, and Viola, two brothers, James and Johnnie Lee, two grandmothers, Mrs. Martha Curry, of near Pulaski, and Mrs. Hattie Caudle, of Ullin.  His own uncles were Charles Curry, of near Pulaski, Louis Caudle, of Ullin and Hugh Caudle, near Pulaski.  His own aunts, Mrs. Stella Lackey, Pulaski, Mrs. Essie Reeves, Cairo, and Mrs. Kate Billingsly, of Hillsboro, also survive as do many cousins and other relatives and a host of friends and associates who will miss him from his usual friendly walks and associations.

His was one of the largest funerals ever held in Ullin.  It took place Tuesday afternoon from the First M. E. Church, the pastor, Rev. C. L. Phifer, officiating.

Russell was an exceptionally good, obedient boy.  He was in the eighth grade of the Bryan School and stood high in his class work, as was attested by his teacher, Don Gore.  It is in this association that he will be most missed.  He was a youth that others looked to as a leader and his influence will last throughout the lives of those with whom he went to school.

(James Curry married Martha E. Rodgers on 24 Dec 1865, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  E. J. Lackey married Stella Curry on 5 Aug 1894, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  J. Edward Reeves married Essie Curry on 6 Aug 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Georgia Gould, wife of James A. Gould, a prominent farmer passed away at her home Sunday night at eleven o’clock after a brief illness.  She was a daughter of the late G. W. Endicott, one of the oldest and most progressive farmers the county has known. She was a member of the Congregational Church, a devoted mother, and wife and leaves a host of friends to mourn her death.  She was an active member in the Rebekah Lodge and all community work.  (Villa Ridge)
 
Word was received here (Mound City) Wednesday by Mr. and Mrs. Joe Price, of the death of their niece, Mrs. P. T. Powell, of Vienna.  She was killed at West Frankfort by the tornado, while she was there visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Price.  They attended the funeral in Vienna Saturday. March 21.
 
Fate

Griffin, March 20—Fate had marked Mrs. Marinda Thomas, an aged woman, for death.  Although absent from her home in West Frankfort, Ill., where hundreds perished in Wednesday’s tornado. Mrs. Thomas, a visitor in Griffin, perished with the two-score others when that town was leveled to the ground.  A stranger in Griffin, her body was unidentified until today.—Evansville (Ind.) Courier.
 
Former Resident of Mounds Dies in St. Louis

John Hughes, Jr., son of John and Rachel Hughes, was born at Villa Ridge, Ill., March 31, 1878, and died in St. Louis, Mo., Monday, March 16, 1925, aged 46 years, 11 months and 15 days.  Mr. Hughes was twice married, his second wife being Miss Lacy Britt, of Mounds.  He was converted about 1912.

The body was brought to Mounds, Saturday, March 21, and taken to the home of Charles Buckles.  The funeral services were held in the Baptist church at 2:30 p.m. Sunday.  The Rev. H. C. Croslin officiated.  Burial was in Beech Grove Cemetery.

(John M. Hughes married Rachael E. Atherton on 18 Jun 1873, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 2 Apr 1925:
Mrs. Emma Hogendobler passed away at her home three miles east of town (Villa Ridge) Wednesday, March 26th, after several months’ illness. She was the wife of H. M. Hogendobler, a prominent and progressive farmer, who passed away to years ago.  She leaves to mourn her departure her daughters, Misses Oneta and Pearl who are at home, Mrs. Will Graves of Mounds, Mrs. Elmer Vick, of Karnak, and sons, Walter, Horace, and James, of this place, and Ernest, of Olmsted, other near relatives and a host of friends.  Funeral service was held from the home Saturday afternoon, Rev. Lane, of Karnak, conducting the service. Interment in the Mounds Cemetery.

(Henry M. Hogendobler married Emma M. Wright on 6 Sep 1874, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 
Edward Hale, one of Ullin’s best known young men, died at his home Friday morning after a lingering illness.  He leaves to mourn his demise, a wife and two children, mother, father, two sisters and a host of friends.
 
Prominent Villa Ridge Lady Passes to Beyond.

In the Villa Ridge items of this issue may be found a short obituary of Mrs. Emma Hogendobler, widow of the late H. M. Hogendobler.  Mrs. Hogendobler died Wednesday, March 26, and was buried Saturday, March 28, in Beech Grove Cemetery, Mounds.

She was the mother of Mrs. Will Graves, of this city.  A son, Ernest, formerly resided here, but is now a prominent merchant of Olmstead, Illinois.  In all, she leaves eight children to mourn a dearly beloved mother.
 
Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Calhoun, Mrs. Alex Deeslie, Homer McKenzie and son, James Howard, drove to Herrin Wednesday to see Charles Calvert, son-in-law of Mrs. Deeslie.  Mr. Calvert, whose back was severely injured in the tornado, is in the Herrin hospital and much hope is entertained for his recovery.  Mrs. Calvert is at his bedside.
 
Elder H. C. Croslin was called to Cypress, Ill., Wednesday, to conduct the funeral of Mrs. Jones, wife of Elder D. Jones, of the Cypress Baptist Church.
 
 
Mounds Independent, Thursday, 9 Apr 1925:
Death of Well Known Colored Resident

Mrs. Bud Jones, died in St. Mary’s Infirmary, Cairo, Monday, March 30, and was buried Friday, April 3.  Mrs. Jones, who before her marriage to Mr. Jones was the widow of Clabe Clark, was taken sick only a few days before she was taken to the hospital.  An operation was performed in an effort to save her life, but to no avail.

Mrs. Jones had long been a resident of Mounds and was a highly respected citizen.

Funeral services were held Friday afternoon at Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church.  She was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery.  Services at the grave were conducted by the Household Ruth Lodge.
 
A. L. EVANS PASSES TO GREAT BEYOND

A. L. Evans passed quietly away art his home on Delaware Avenue, Wednesday, April 8, 1:25 p.m. after a short illness of heart trouble.

He was born near Knoxville, Tenn., October 1869 and moved to Ballard County, Ky., in 1871, where he made his home until 1919, when he moved to Mounds.  He made his home with his sister, Mrs. Sallie Wilford, who passed on last June.

He leaves two brothers and a host of nieces and nephews, some great nieces and nephews and other relatives and friends to mourn his loss.

He was converted when a small lad and was prepared and willing to leave us.  Our loss is his gain.

Funeral services will be held Friday, 2:30 p.m. at the home of his niece, Mrs. O. C. Walker, after which he will be laid to rest at Beech Grove Cemetery by the side of his sister he loved so well.
 
DEATH OF WELL KNOWN M. E. MINISTER

Rev. J. W. Britton, age 70 years, of Farina, Ill., died in the Mattoon hospital March 30, 1925.  Funeral services were conducted April 2, 1915, at Farina, by Rev. G. R. Goodman, Superintendent of East St. Louis District, and attended by many other pastors, relatives and friends.  The body was laid to rest at Bone Gap.

Mr. Britton was born in Mt. Vernon, Ohio, Jan. 15, 1855.  He entered the ministry in 1883 and attended Garrett Biblical Institute, where he graduated in 1891.  He served the first pastoral charge at Bone Gap, Ill., where he met Miss Lucretia Morgan, whom he afterwards married. To this union were born seven children, one of whom died in infancy. After the death of his first wife, he later married Miss Mary Bailey, of Kansas, who has been a faithful wife to him and a devoted mother to his children.  He gave forty-one years of unbroken service to the Master.  He was superannuated in 1924, but served as a supply at Brighton.  He leaves to mourn his loss a wife, six children, nine grandchildren, four brothers, E. G. Britton, C. S. Britton, R. L. Britton, and B. I. Britton; two sisters, Mrs. Ida Bride and Mrs. Sadie Gould.  A son, Floyd, formerly resided in Mounds and a daughter, Lucille, and many other relatives and friends.

(Joseph W. Britton married Lucretia A. Morgan on 16 Dec 1885, in Edwards Co., Ill.  George S. Bride married Ida S. Britton on 25 Mar 1890, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Albert G. Gould married Sarah C. Britton on 26 Nov 1885, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 


Mounds Independent, Thursday 16 Apr 1925:
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank our many friends who were so kind to us during the illness and death of our beloved uncle, also for the many beautiful flowers that were sent and all who furnished their cars for the funeral.  We especially thank Dr. Hudson who was so kind and faithful during his illness, also Rev. Dever for his kind words of sympathy.
Mrs. H. B. Wilkerson and family
Mrs. O. C. Walker and family
Mrs. B. L. Poyner and family
Mrs. Percy Clark
Mrs. Ina Vaccaro
Mrs. Bess Rollins
 
Death Comes to John L. Henderson

John La Fayette Henderson died very suddenly of heart failure, Sunday, April 12, at 9:35 p.m. at the home of his daughter Mrs. Howard Geveden, with whom he had made his home since 1918.

Mr. Henderson was born in Marshall County, Kentucky, Dec. 9, 1852, and at the time of his death had reached the age of 72 years, 4 months and 3 days.

In the seven years he lived in Mounds, he made many friends, especially among the children of the town.

Mr. Henderson’s wife died fourteen years ago.  He leaves four children, Mrs. Howard Geveden, Robert Lee and Vester, who live in Mounds, and Bailey, of Jackson, Tenn., also eight grandchildren.
Funeral services were held at the home of Mrs. Geveden, Tuesday, April 14, conducted by the Rev. H. C. Croslin, after which the body was taken to Bardwell, Kentucky for burial.
 
Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Smith were called to Dongola Wednesday by the death of the former’s aunt, Mrs. Albert Karraker, who died in St. Mary’ Infirmary, Cairo, on Monday.


Young Colored Girl Passes to Great Beyond

Annie May Rhodes, 17 year-old daughter of Lee Rhodes, died on East Sunday, April 12, 1925, at 6:30 p.m. after suffering a week or more with pneumonia.

Annie May was born April 16, 1907, on a farm about two miles northeast of Mounds.  She and her sister Myrtle, aged 15 years, have made their home for several years with their uncle, Henry Rhodes, near Valley Recluse.

Her father, Lee Rhodes came here from Tiptonville, Tenn., 20 years ago and for the past eight years has been a trusted employee of the W. L. Toler Furniture and Hardware Store.

Funeral services were conducted by the Rev. C. W. Norman at St. John’s Baptist Church, Wednesday, April 15, at 2 p.m.  The body was laid to rest in Spencer Heights Cemetery.

Among the out-of-town relatives who attended the funeral were Larkin Rhodes, an uncle, of Tiptonville, Tenn., and Mrs. Tessie Rhodes and daughter, of Paducah, Ky.
 


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 23 Apr 1925:
C. W. Cawell, one of Ullin’s well-known colored citizens, died Saturday night from an attack of apoplexy.
 
Sudden Death of H. E. Mattson Shocks Community

Henry Edgar Mattson, a prominent farmer, whose home was about 1 ½  miles west of Mounds, died very suddenly at St. Mary’s Infirmary, Cairo, on Sunday evening, April 19, at 7:30 o’clock.

Mr. Mattson had been in town on Thursday and was not considered seriously ill until Saturday evening.  At four o’clock Sunday morning he was rushed to the Cairo infirmary, where an operation was performed in an effort to save his life.

He was born February 6th, 1870, at Villa Ridge, Illinois.  He was married to Jose Marie Castle, October 5, 1898.  To this union were born four children, Minnie, George, John and Ruth, who with their mother, survive him.  He also leaves two brothers, Arthur E. and George A. Mattson, of Mounds.  His father, George W. Mattson, passed away June 20th, 1876, and his mother, Susan E. Mattson Hanes on April 11, 1923.

When these boys were small their mother married T. W. Hanes and he has been a father to them through the years.

Mr. Mattson was a quiet unassuming man, devoted to his family, a kind neighbor and a true friend.

Funeral services were held at the home Tuesday, April 21, at 2 p.m. Rev. J. S. Dever of the M. E. Church officiating. Burial was in Beech Grove Cemetery.

(H. E. Mattson, son of George E. Matson and Susan Butler, married Josie M. Castle, daughter of G. M. Castle and Miss Field, on 5 Oct 1898, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Thomas W. Hanes married Susie E. Mattson on 11 Feb 1883, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to express our heartfelt appreciation to those who so kindly assisted us during our recent bereavement, the death of our father.  We desire also to thank the Rev. Mr. Croslin and those who sent the beautiful floral offerings.
B. P. Henderson and family
R. L. Henderson and family
Vester Henderson and family
Mrs. H. G. Geveden and family
 
 
Mounds Independent, Thursday, 30 Apr 1925:
Robert Gamble, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Gamble, passed away at the home of his sister, Mrs. Henry Gunning, Dongola, Monday morning after an illness of nine weeks.  The body was brought here, Wednesday, where funeral services were held at the Methodist church and burial in this cemetery.  Mr. and Mrs. Gamble were resides of this place (Villa Ridge) for many years, but now make their home in Centralia.

(His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Robert Leroy Gamble Born Sept. 23, 1913 Died April 17, 1925.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Death of Young Child

Joseph Robert, Jr., 17 months old son of Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Littleton, of Iuka, Illinois, died at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Boger, Sunday morning, April 26, 1925.  Mr. and Mrs. Littleton and little son had been visiting the former’s sister, Mrs. Boger and the little fellow became so ill that he could not be taken home.

Funeral services were held in the Catholic Church Monday afternoon at 3 o’clock.  Burial was in St. Mary’s Cemetery.

(His marker in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery at Mounds reads:  J. Robert Littleton Born Nov. 22,1923 Died April 26, 1925.  R. Eugene Littleton Born Nov. 16, 1927 Died Nov. 26, 1934.—Darrel Dexter)
 


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 7 May 1925:
Mr. and Mrs. W. I. Connell and Mr. R. C. Connell were called to Chicago Monday on account of the death of a sister-in-law, Mrs. James Connell of that city.
 
Charles Calvert, son-in-law of Mr. and Mrs. Alex Deeslie, who was a victim of the late tornado, is still critically ill in the Herrin hospital.
 
John Schuler Dies at His Home in Mound City

John Schuler, father of Mrs. F. P. Hess, and Mrs. William Crippen, of this city, died May 6 at the age of 86 years.

Mr. Schuler had been a resident of Mound City since 1864.  He and his wife are the parents of fifteen children, all of whom, with their mother, survive Mr. Schuler.

Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in Mound City today (Thursday) conducted by the Rev. Roy Kean.  Burial was in Beech Grove Cemetery.
 
Mounds Business Man Passes to Eternity

Lewis H. Koonce, pioneer resident of Mounds, died suddenly at his home on North Oak Street, Sunday morning at 7:30 o’clock.

Mr. Koonce, son of Mr. and Mrs. N. N. Koonce, was born in Bond County, Illinois, January 5,1858, and died May 3, 1925, at the age of 67 years, 3 months and 28 days.  He was married October 12, 1880 to Miss Marie L. Miller, of Golconda, Illinois.  To this union were born five children, two of whom have preceded their father to the other world—Fred, who died at the age of 10, and Orin, who was killed in action in France.  Those living are:  Mrs. Clara Lewis, Meridian, Miss., Mrs. Claude Thomas and Ivan E. Koonce, both of Mounds.  He leaves beside the above named loved ones, his beloved companion, three sisters one brother and three grandchildren.

Mr. Koonce came to Pulaski County with his parents at the age of eight.  He and his wife came to what was then called Beachwood, in 1891.  They built one of the first houses in the town, which afterward became known as Mounds.  As a switchman for the Illinois Central railroad, later as a liveryman and as an ice and coal dealer, Mr. Koonce became one of Mounds’ well known businessmen.  He had many friends.  It is said of him that he was always ready to correct any mistakes he had made in business, that he was a good neighbor and best of all a good husband and father.  he stated during his illness that he was ready to go.

Funeral services were held at the home Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock, the Rev. H. C. Croslin of the Baptist church officiating.  Burial was in Beech Grove cemetery with G. A. James directing the funeral.

(Louis H. Koonce married Marie L. Miller on 12 Oct 1880, in Pope Co., Ill.  Nicholas N. Koonce married Margaret A. Phillips on 21 Nov 1854, in Bond Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
Mounds Independent, Thursday, 14 May 1925:
CARD OF THANKS

For the many acts of kindness and sympathy shown us by friends and relatives in the death of our beloved husband and father also for the beautiful flowers from friends and relatives, we desire to express our sincere thanks.
Mrs. M. L. Koonce and children
 
C. C. Calvert Still Very Low

From the Murphysboro Republican-Era we learn that C. C. Calvert, whose back was broken when he was hit by a concrete slab during the tornado on March 18, is very low.  On last Wednesday he was given a blood transfusion, his brother furnishing a pint of blood.  After the transfusion Mr. Calvert was slightly improved.
 
 
Mounds Independent, Thursday, 21 May 1925:
Mrs. Dan Horner was called to Wetaug, Ill., by the death of her nephew last Monday.
 
 
Mounds Independent, Thursday, 28 May 1925:
Myrtle and Carrol Davis and Mrs. Henry Devary motored to Granite City, Ill., last Tuesday to attend the funeral of their cousin.  (Pulaski)
 
Joseph Turbaville Dies After Lingering Illness

Another well known citizen of Mounds has answered the last call.  Joseph Turbaville passed away in this city on Saturday afternoon, May 23, 1925, at 2:30 o’clock.

Mr. Turbaville was born in Pulaski, Ill., October 20, 1870.  He was twice married, the first time to Miss Ettie Lackey of Pulaski.  To this union were born three children, Otis, Doris and Paul.  Otis died in action in France during the world war and his mother’s death was hastened by grief.

Mr. Turbaville’s second marriage was to Mrs. Myra Smith, of Mound City, who with his two children, Doris and Paul, and two step-children, Margaret and Alice Smith, a brother, Grand Turbaville, of Cairo, and three sister, Mrs. Kate Danby, of Mound City, Mrs. B. Chaney, of Sikeston, Mo., and Mrs. Nora Lackey, of Ullin, survive him.  His aged mother died last March.

For 25 years, Mr. Turbaville worked as a mechanic for the Mounds division of the Illinois Central Railroad and for 20 years he had lived in Mounds.  The last few weeks of his life were spent in the Illinois Central Hospital at Paducah, Ky., and Chicago.  He was brought home only a few days before his death.

Funeral services were held at the M. E. church Monday, May 25, at 1 p.m. Rev. J. S. Dever officiated.  Burial in Beech Grove Cemetery.

(Joseph Turbyville married Ettie Jane Lackey on 26 Feb 1891, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Henry M. Chaney married Beeatty Turbaville on 30 May 1885, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  James M. Lackey married Nora Turbyville on 11 Dec 1892, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  John D. Calvin married Catherine Turbaville on 13 May 1888, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Death of Well Known Merchant of Hurst, Illinois

Charles C. Calvert, age 36 years, of Hurst, Ill., a victim of the storm of March 18th, died at the Herrin Hospital Saturday, May 23rd, from complications as a result of his injuries.  Funeral services were conducted May 25th at the Christian Church in Hurst.  Rev. Irl Sidwell and Rev. C. Williamson officiated.  Remains were brought by auto to Beech Grove Cemetery, Mounds, Ill., where interment was made.

Mr. Calvert was born at Dancy, Wis., Aug. 20, 1888, and was the youngest son of Henry and Lida Calvert.  When a small boy he removed with his parents to Southern Illinois, where he has lived since the last four years at Hurst.  June 28, 1911, he was united in marriage with Mae V. Deeslie, of Mounds, Ill.   To this union three children were born.  In 1913 Mr. Calvert started in business at Fayville, Ill., where he was postmaster and merchant for eight years.  He was seriously injured in a cyclone there, June 5, 1916, and was brought to St. Mary’s Hospital Cairo, where he recovered in about a month’s time, returned to Fayville and  rebuilt his business and home.  In 1921 when the Powder Plant at Fayville was closed he moved to Hurst, Ill., and started in business there which proved very successful;.  His was the largest general merchandise store in that community.  It happened that Mr. Calvert was at Bush, Ill. (1 mile from Hurst) at the time of the storm of March 18th and was caught under a falling wall of the Missouri Pacific Round House, his back being broken, which caused him to be paralyzed from the waist line down.  He was immediately taken to the Herrin Hospital where an operation was performed and everything possible done to restore him to health, but he gradually weakened.

Mr. Calvert leaves to mourn his loss a wife, three children, Lydia Mae, Charles and Florence Irene; his mother, Mrs. Lida Calvert, who made her home with him; and three brothers, E. B. Calvert, of Hurst, Ill., Harry and A. L. Calvert , of Miller City, Ill., also many other relatives and friends.
 
 
Mounds Independent, Thursday, 4 Jun 1925:
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Schnaare and son, Herman, attended the funeral of John Walker, Sunday, at Concord. (America)

(His marker in Concord Cemetery near Olmsted reads:  John M. Walker Born Feb. 6, 1852 Died May 29, 1925.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Wilson Moore, a negro citizen of this town (Ullin), died Friday morning at his home and was buried Sunday afternoon.
 
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Van Short, a stillborn baby boy weighing 17 pounds.  Mother is seriously ill.  A trained nurse from Anna has charge of the case.  Mrs. Short was formerly Miss Zula Miller, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Miller.
 
Mr. Dave Mayberry who lived near Cache Chapel died Saturday morning.  His death as caused from dropsy.  He was buried at Cache Chapel Monday.  C. F. Corzine officiated.

(David Mayberry, 33, born in Hamilton Co., Ill., son of A. J. Mayberry and A. J. Merriman, married Annie Lence, 18, daughter of Moses Lence and Elizabeth Keller, on 6 May 1894, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Cache Chapel Cemetery near Ullin reads:  Dave Mayberry 1869-1925 Anna R. Mayberry 1875-1925.—Darrel Dexter)
 
The Passing of Mrs. Moses

Mrs. Mary Moses, mother of George Moses, died at 11 p.m. June 4, of paralysis.  About eight months ago she had a fall and has been bedfast since then.  Her husband died a year ago.  She was 67 years old and a native of Syria, but has lived in America 30 years.  She will be buried Sunday at 2 p.m. in St. Mary’s Cemetery.

(Her marker in St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Mary S. Moses 1856-1925 Mother.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Death of Old Colored Resident

After an illness of about five years, Mrs. Martha Washington Gaston died at her home Thursday, May 28.  Mrs. Gaston came to Pulaski County from Munroe, La., shortly after the Civil War.  She helped to organize St. John Baptist Church about 44 years ago and was a member of that church at the time of her death.

Mrs. Gaston was 79 years old.  She is survived by one son, Lawrence W. Washington, and two daughters, Mrs. Hattie Hicks, Mounds, and Mrs. Beatrice McGuire, of Little Rock, Ark.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank our many friend who assisted us in taking care of our beloved mother during her illness and also those who sent floral tribute after she had passed away,.
Beatrice McGuire
L. W. Washington
Hattie Hicks
 
Mother Of M. A. Pulley Dead

Mrs. Pulley, mother of Miles A. Pulley, of Mounds, died Wednesday morning at 7 o’clock at the home of her son, Benjamin Pulley, of Hurst, Ill.

Mrs. Pulley had spent the winter here with her son and family.

She will be buried at Makanda on Friday, June 5.
 
 
Mounds Independent, Thursday, 11 Jun 1925:
James Parker, aged 67, died at his home on Upper Main St. (Mound City), Tuesday, June 9. 
 
C. L. Pulley, wife and children and Mrs. U. S. Jenkins attended the funeral of Mrs. Amanda Pulley Friday.

(Ulysses S. Jenkins married Lydia J. Pulley, 19, daughter of Berry Pulley and Nancy White, on 5 Feb 1896, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Card of Thanks

We desire to express our sincere thanks to all who aided us in any way during the sickness and after the death of our beloved mother.
Mr. and Mrs. George Moses and Family
 
DEATH OF PROMINENT PHYSICIAN OCCURS TUESDAY

Dr. William C. Rife, prominent and well beloved physician and businessman of Villa Ridge and Mounds, died at St. Mary’s Infirmary, Cairo, Tuesday, June 9, at 1:30 p.m.

Dr. Rife was born in Pulaski, Illinois, August 21, 1870, and was the son of W. M. and Melvina Verble Rife.  He was 54 years, 9 months and 18 days of age.  He is survived by his wife, who is a daughter of Dr. and Mrs. B. A. Royall of Villa Ridge, and two sons, William E. Rife, of Villa Ridge and Berry Rife, a medical student in St. Louis University, and a sister, Mrs. Lucy Rife Prindle, of Mounds.

Dr. Rife has been in failing health for some time past and he and Mrs. Rife had spent the past two winters in Florida.

At the time of his death Dr. Rife was president of the First State Bank of Mounds, having succeeded the late Dr. Boswell in 1921.

Dr. Rife was universally liked and respected in social business and professional circles.  His practice was large in Villa Ridge, Mounds and surrounding towns.  He will be sadly missed.

The funeral was held Thursday afternoon at 3 o’clock beside the grave in Villa Ridge cemetery.  The Rev. Joel Burgess, pastor of the Congregational Church of Mound City officiated.  The business houses of Mounds were closed at this hour in honor of his memory.

(W. C. Rife married M. Lilley Royall, daughter of Dr. B. A. Royal and Jane Bankson, on 10 Sep 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Daniel W. Prindle, Jr., married Lucy A. Rife, on 3 Sep 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


 
Newcomer Commits Murder in Mounds
D. C. Chambliss Kills William Huffman Monday

Mounds must chronicle another murder within her borders.  On Monday evening about 7:30, D. C. Chambliss (colored) shot and killed William Huffman (colored), two shots out of three taking effect—one in the head and one in the body.

The affair took place on the concrete walk in front of what is known as the Dreamland Cafe.  Huffman lived only a shot time after the shooting.  The coroner’s jury held Chambliss without bail to await the action of the grand jury.

Chambliss was originally from Tennessee, but came here from Chicago some two years ago and engaged in the restaurant business in this building.  Later he sold the business to Huffman and the trouble grew in some way out of the transaction.

Huffman had lived here many years and was known as a quite peaceable man.  The bereaved family has the sympathy of those who know them.
 
 
Mounds Independent, Thursday,18 Jun 1925:
Those who attended the funeral of Doctor Rife at Villa Ridge from Ullin were:  Mesdames Simon Aden, White, Jake Sichling, Kate Johnston, Misses Gwendolyn Mathis, Anna White, Eunice Train and John Walker, Jim Thomas and Cal Sichling.
 
Mrs. Ora Pollock, who was called home to attend the funeral of her brother, returned Tuesday to her duties in the Mary Wedig hospital, Granite City, Illinois.
 
Thomas M. Parker Passes to Beyond

Thomas M. Parker, aged 64 years, died in the Anna Hospital, Wednesday, June 10, 1925.  Mr. Parker had been an invalid for more than twenty years and had spent the last four years in the State Hospital at Anna.  He had never married and most of his life was spent with relatives near Valley Recluse. He was the eighth one of a family of thirteen children, only three of whom are living—namely:  Mrs. Ora Pollock, of Mounds, Mrs. Anna Kelly, of St. Louis, Mo., and Edward Parker, of Valley Recluse.

Funeral services were held at the G. A. James undertaking parlors and at Beech Grove Cemetery.  The Rev. G. B. Waldon officiated at these services.

(Robert S. Pollock married Ora Parker on 9 Jan 1887, in Pulaski Co., Ill.
 
 
Mounds Independent, Thursday, 25 Jun 1925:
Thomas W. Polk, age 56 years, died at his home near Mounds, June 14.  He had served his community as road commissioner and school trustee, for a number of years.  He leaves a wife, father, sister and two sons.  Funeral and interment at Bethel.  (Colored News)
 
Miss Helen Hight, a student of the Ullin High School the last year, was drowned in Waird’s Point near Wetaug. All the people of Ullin who knew Helen were grieved.

(Her marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug reads:  Helen J. Hight Born Feb. 23, 1910 Died June 16, 1925.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
Mounds Independent, Thursday, 2 Jul 1925:
The funeral services of Mrs. I. W. Read, age 83 years, were held at the M. E. church (Mound City) Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock, conducted by Rev. Roy N. Kean, pastor of the church.  After the services automobiles conveyed the cortege to Mounds, where burial was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.
 
Mrs. Hugh Mason and Mrs. Eva Travis, of Cairo, attended the funeral of Mrs. I. W. Read here (Mound City) Tuesday.
 
Mr. and Mrs. George Martin and son, Russell, who were called here by the death of Mrs. Martin’s mother, Mrs. I. W. Read, have returned to their home in Urbana, Ill. (Mound City)
 
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to express our heartfelt thanks to the Masonic Lodge, sisters and nurses at St. Mary’s Infirmary, Brothers Lee Stovall and H. C. Croslin, singers, donors of the beautiful flowers and all friends for their kindness and aid during the sickness and after the death of our dear husband and father.
Mrs. L. C. Ricks and children
 
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to extend our sincere and heartfelt thanks to all who gave to us their sympathy and aid after the sudden death of our beloved son and brother.  Especially do we wish to thank the Rev. J. S. Dever for his kindly ministrations.
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Taylor and Family
 
Prominent Resident Passes to Beyond

Lucien Clinton Ricks, was born in Macon, Ga., April 19, 1877, and died in St. Mary’s Infirmary, Cairo, Ill., June 28, 1925, age 48 years, 2 months and 9 days.

Mr. Ricks was the son of Lucien and Victoria Ricks, deceased of Macon, Ga.  On December 20, 1905, he was married to Sarah Genevieve Mulcahy, daughter of James H. and Nancy A. Mulcahy, deceased, of Cairo, Ill.

His wife and three children, Genevieve Victoria, age 18, L. C. Ricks, Jr., age 15 and Ruth Harrington, age 8, survive him.  He is also survived by three brothers and four sisters, namely, Rasdal Ricks, of Denver, Colo., John Clifford Ricks, Norfolk, Va., who was a twin brother of L. C. and Raburn R. Ricks, of Winnemucca, Nev., Mrs. R. L. Wilder, Orlando, Fla., Mrs. Maude Mansfield, Gainesville ,Fla., Mrs. Robert Caine and Mrs. M. Barnes, both of Macon, Ga.  His brother Rabun, of Nevada, was at his bedside at the time of death and his sister, Mrs. Mansfield arrived shortly after his passing.

Mr. Ricks was a member of the Masonic order, Lodge 237 A. F. A. M. Cairo, Ill., Cairo Chapter No. 71 R. A. M. Cairo Commandery No. 13, and Queen of Egypt Chapter 509 Mound City, Ill.  He was also a member of the Master Boiler Makers Union.

He was converted at Lake Milligan Baptist Church in 1912 and united with the Miller City Baptist Church the same year.

Funeral services were conducted by Rev. L. Stovall, of Cairo, and Rev. H. C. Croslin, at the First Baptist Church in Mounds, Tuesday afternoon at 2:30.  The burial service was conducted by the Masonic order.  He was laid to rest in Spencer Heights Cemetery amid a large concourse of sorrowing friends and under a mass of beautiful floral offerings.
 
Irving Taylor Meets Death in Auto Accident

Saturday night at about 10 o’clock Irving Taylor was instantly killed when a Ford touring car he was driving collided with a Ford sedan driven by Will Williams, colored proprietor of a restaurant in Cairo.  the collision occurred on the Beech Ridge Road six miles north of Cairo.

With Irving at the time were his cousin, Edward Taylor also of Mounds and three young girls, Misses Viola Guest of Thebes, Ill., and Ilba and Marguerita Cato, sister, of Olive Branch.

Miss Guest was severely bruised and cut and was taken by passing autoists to St. Mary’s infirmary, Cairo.  Edward Taylor and the Misses Cato received minor injuries.  The occupants of the other car escaped injury.  Both cars were badly damaged.

Irving was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Taylor.  He was born in Cypress, Ill., May 22, 1904, and died June 27, 1925, age 21 years, 1 month and 5 days.  He is survived by his parents, four brothers, Clarence, Ray, Everett and Earl Taylor, and two sisters, Mrs. Harry Kupfer and Mrs. John O’Daniels, all of Mounds.

Funeral services were conducted by Rev. J. S. Dover at the M. E. church Monday afternoon at 2:30.  Burial was in Beech Grove Cemetery.

The family has the sympathy of the entire community.

(His parents may be Albert Taylor and Rachel Fox, who were married on 8 Dec 1889, in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Death of Aged Mound City Resident

Mrs. I. W. Read of Mound City, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Ben Blankenship, on Sunday morning, June 28, after a lingering illness.

Mrs. Read who was 83 years old at the time of her death, had been a resident of Mound City for 56 years.  She is survived by four children, Mrs. Ben Blankenship, W. F. Read, and J. R. Read, of Mound City, and Mrs. George Martin, of Urbana, and a brother, Tom Pillow, of Milan, Tenn., age 90 years.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the M. E. church in Mound City.  Rev. Roy N. Kean officiated.  Automobiles conveyed the funeral cortege to Beech Grove Cemetery.

(J. B. Blankenship married Kate Read, 23, born in Mound City, daughter of I. W. Read and J. A. Pillow, on 31 Dec 1900, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
Mounds Independent, Thursday, 9 Jul 1925:
White County’s Largest Man Dies Tuesday

Lewis M. Owen, well known White County farmer, living a few milers southwest of Grayville, died at his home Tuesday morning.

He was likely the larges man in the county, weighting 480 pounds.

Funeral services will be held this afternoon a tithe Baptist church there with interment in Oak Grove Cemetery.—Mercury Independent
 
Unity Doctor Suicides After Years of Suffering

On Monday morning, in the Illinois Hotel at Cairo, Dr. E. J. Gause, of Unity, ended his life after an illness of several years.

While his wife was out in the city, Dr. Gause visited a nearby store and purchased a revolver and cartridges.

When Mrs. Gause returned to their room she found her husband lying on the bed dead, with a bullet wound in his left side.  No one in the hotel had heard the shot.

Dr. Gause had practiced medicine in Alexander County about 40 years.  A number of years ago his health failed and he visited the Mayo Clinic at Rochester, Minn., but they gave him little hope.  Since then he had gradually grew worse.

The beautiful home of the Dr. and his wife, in Unity, burned to the ground last spring and that too worried him greatly.

Funerals services were held Wednesday afternoon in Calvary Baptist Chuck Cairo conducted by Rev. H. B. Atherton, of Dongola, assisted by Rev. E. I. Stovall.

The body was laid to rest in Beech Grove Cemetery, Mounds.

(Edwin J. Gause married Alice J. Riggle on 9 May 1886, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mounds Independent, Thursday 16 Jul 1925:
Rowena Pritchard, daughter of Mrs. Francis King, passed away Friday night, July 10th, after an illness of several moths. Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the Christian Church.  Interment was in Beech Grove Cemetery.
 
Mrs. Belle Anglin and daughter, Vivian, Mr. and Mrs. Loren Anglin and children, of Marissa, Ill., were called here (Pulaski) Saturday by the death of the former’s niece, Miss Rowena Pritchard.
 
IN MEMORIAM

In loving memory of our mother, Harriet Parker, who died July 14, 1921, Sleep on, mother, sleep on.  We will meet you again.
Kate Blue and family
 
 
Mounds Independent, Thursday, 23 Jul 1925:
Rabun Ricks, who was called here by the illness and death of his brother, L. C. Ricks, left Thursday for his home in Winnemucca, Nevada.
 
Night Marshall Bagby Killed
Meets Death in Alley at 12:30 a.m. Negro Found Nearby with Shattered Leg

City Night Marshall Bagby was found dead in the alley back of the Marsh Hotel at about 12:30 a.m. this (Friday) morning.  He met death instantly having been shot through the heart.  He also had a flesh wound in one leg.  In his gun, a forty-five army Colts were found four empty shells.  His assailant was a strange negro whose weapon was a German leuger automatic pistol. This negro, who later admitted the attack, gave his name as John Sauper, and his resident as Ripley, Tenn.  He was found in a clump of weeds not far from the body of Bagby and had received two shots in his body, one having broken a leg hough the knee.  There were evidence of 8 or 10 shots in all.  Indications were that the men were not more than 0 feet apart at the time of the shooting.

The corner’s jury of 6 was impaneled and it was found that Marshall Bagby, age 26, was killed about 12:30 a.m. July 24.  Assailant held top await action of the grand jury without bail.
 

Mounds Independent, Thursday, 30 Jul 1925:

Bagby’s Slayer Gets Life Sentence

             ____rday afternoon Circuit _____ Somers sentenced to ____ ___mment John Sprurer, _____ who shot and killed ______ Bagby early on the ______ July 23.

             ____ was held in the county ____ ____ant of Sprurer’s bro____ _________ used by a bullet from _____ army Colts.

             ___ __mer entered a plea of ____ court listened to his ____ that of D. Win____, special agent of the Illinois _____ here.  The prisoner _____ ___sent to the Chester penitentiary.

             _____ Bagby was buried ____ afternoon, July 25, at ___ National Cemetery with military honors.  From 11 a.m. _____ that day his body _____ at the Y. M. C. A.

             _____ Funeral services were ____ by two posts of the American Legion, Winifred Fair___ post of Mounds, as____ Company K, Illinois National Guards.

             ____ served in Co. K in ____ his body bore several ____ wounds received in ____  ___ His age was 27 years ____ s.  He was a nephew of ____ Bagby of this city. ____ two brothers, Ney Bagby, ____ Tower, Ill., an M. ____, of Barlow, Ky., and a _____ ___e home is in Oklahoma.

 

Talks with the Editor

             The tragic death of Marshall P. Bagby, while performing his duty as night policeman or Mounds, brings forcibly to our minds once more the need of lighted alleys at the rear of business houses.  The rears of the business houses from Sycamore Street to Second Street are not protected, in the least, from the darkness o night.  Here the night prowler and the burglar have every opportunity to ply their trade.  Every business house on Front Street has been subjected to this risk for all these years.

             Night policemen have asked that this alley be lighted; private citizens have appeared before the council and made this request, but all to no avail.  It is commonly said that one member of the council is responsible for this condition and the only reason given by him has been that the city cannot afford to light all the alleys of the town and that business houses have no more need of protection than the homes.

             It is an unwise and unfair to expect any man single handed to march up and down this alley in the ark hours of the night in an effort to protect property, not knowing what minute he may come upon some desperate character to whom the taking of a human lie means little.

             When Marshal Bagby entered this alley from the lighted street, he was placed at a disadvantage.  The police character lurking in the shadows with pupils of the eye already adjusted to the darkness could easily fire the deadly shot, as was done in this case, before the officer of the law could make sure of his grounds.  The wonder is that other officers of the law have not gone in this same way in the years past.  Many times have the business houses facing Front Street been entered from the rear and heavy losses sustained by the merchants.

             It would be no great task to extend lights from the rear of these business houses so as to light this alley and if the city authorities will not take steps to give this protection, then the merchants should take up the matter themselves and in some way relieve this dangerous situation.



Mounds Independent, Thursday, 6 Aug 1925:

Mrs. Maude Carlock, age 34 years, died at St. Mary’s Infirmary Saturday at 8:30 a.m. She leaves to mourn her loss her husband, three children, one brother, two sisters, a mother and a host of friends. (Ullin)

             (A marker in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Wanda May Carlock Born July 30, 1891 Died Aug. 1, 1925  Mother.—Darrel Dexter)


Death of Colored Resident

Mrs. Ben Hines died Thursday, July 23, in Jacksonville, Mich., where she had gone to visit a nephew. Her body was brought back to Mounds and funeral services were held on Tuesday, July 28. Mrs. Hines is survived by her husband.


Colored Resident Dies at Home of Daughter

Mrs. McCorkle, widow of the late Professor McCorkle, who at one time was head of Mounds colored schools, died on Friday, July 24, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. T. Williams. Mrs. McCorkle had been an invalid for four years and for the past two years had been confined to the house. Funeral services were held on Monday, July 27.


CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank our many friends for their kindness and expressions of sympathy during the illness and death of our beloved mother.
Cecilia Williams
J. T. Williams

 

Body of Missing Ullin Boy Found in Missouri

Early in July, Alvin Crader and John Sydenstricker, 15-year-old lads of Ullin, left their homes and started west.

On Friday of last week young Sydenstricker returned alone and informed Mr. and Mrs. Crader, parents of Alvin, that he last saw his companion in Jefferson City, Mo.

Mrs. Crader wrote immediately to that city for information and on Sunday received a message indicating that Alvin had been killed by a train. The parents left at once for Missouri where they found that their son had died in a Jefferson City hospital from injuries received July 17 and that after the body had been embalmed and kept for a week for identification it had been given to the School of Osteopathy at Kirksville, Mo. The body was recovered and brought to Ullin, where funeral services were conducted at the Baptist church on Wednesday afternoon.

We understand that the other lad now acknowledges that he saw Alvin struck by the train.


Mrs. E. J. Atherton Dies in Lake Wales, Florida

Mrs. Etta Atherton, wife of E. J. Atherton, died Sunday, Aug. 2, at her home in Lake Wales, Florida. She had been a suffering some time from Bright’s disease.

The Atherton family formerly resided in Mounds, Mr. Atherton having conducted a restaurant on Front Street.

Mrs. Atherton is survived by her husband, one son, Grover Atherton, of Holley, Fla., a niece, Mrs. J. J. Blum, of Miami, Fla., and a nephew, Guy Mathis, of Cairo.

The body was brought to this city and funerals services were held in the First Baptist Church at 3:00 p.m. Wednesday. Rev. H. B. Atherton, of Dongola, assisted by Elder H. C. Croslin, officiated. G. A. James was the undertaker in charge. Burial was in Beech Grove Cemetery.


JOSEPH BOYD DIES FROM BLOW ON HEAD

Joseph Boyd, of Dongola, a former resident of Mounds, died in St. Mary’s Infirmary, Cairo, Saturday night, Aug. 1. He was struck on the head with a soda pop bottle by Claud Johnson, of Anna, in a fight at a barbecue stand between Dongola and Anna about 10 days before.

The coroner’s jury recommended that Johnson be held for grand jury action and he was arrested and placed in the Anna jail.

Funeral services were held in the Dongola Baptist church Monday. Mr. Boyd leaves a wife, son, daughter three brothers and three sisters.

(His marker in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Joseph P. Boyd Born March 13, 1883 Died Aug. 1, 1925  Amelia E. Boyd Jan. 15, 1866 Died Dec. 5, 1934.—Darrel Dexter)

 


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 13 Aug 1925:
Many people attended the funeral of Alvin Crader, which was held in the Baptist church, Wednesday, Aug. 3.


Robert Aldred passed away Sunday, August 9th at the home of his brother, W. H. Aldred, after an illness of several months. Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the Christian church with burial in Rose Hill Cemetery.

             (His marker in Rose Hill Cemetery at Pulaski reads:  Robert Lee Aldred Born May 4, 1883 Died Aug. 9, 1925.—Darrel Dexter)


FATAL ACCIDENT

On Tuesday, Aug. 7, Dr. O. T. Hudson, county coroner, held an inquest over the body of a 10-year-old colored boy who was killed in a peculiar accident.

Three or four miles west of Mounds, Hallie Baker, a white boy, and LaSalle Coleman, colored, were wrestling in. One of them had been carrying a shotgun and had stood it against a nearby fence. Along came a boy named Littlejohn who was driving a cow dragging a chain. The chain hit the gun and dislodged it. In falling, the gun discharged its load directly toward the Coleman boy, literally blowing off his head.


CARD OF THANKS

We wish to extend our heartfelt thanks to our friends and neighbors who so kindly assisted us during the sad hours of our recent bereavement in the death of our wife, mother and aunt. Also to the choir and ministers, Rev. H. B. Atherton, Rev. H. C. Croslin and to the donors of the many beautiful floral offerings. We shall ever hold in grateful remembrance the kindness of our friends at this time.,
E. J. Atherton
J. G. Atherton
Mrs. J. J. Blum

 


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 20 Aug 1925:
Mrs. I. N. Taylor Very Ill

Mrs. I. N. Taylor, who had been very ill for several days previous, was taken on Monday to St. Mary’s Infirmary, Cairo. On Tuesday an operation was performed on the gall bladder in an effort to save her life. She is reported to be in a serious condition, but slightly improved.

Mr. Taylor and their two sons, Robert and Norris, of Truman, Ark., are at her bedside.


Card of Thanks

We desire to thank our neighbors and friends for their kindness to us during the illness and after the death of our beloved husband and father, John Peterson. Especially do we desire to thank the minister for his words of condolence, the friends who sent floral offerings and all who helped us in any way to bear our grief.
Mrs. Laura Peterson and family


John Peterson Dies Saturday

John Peterson, who had been in failing health for the past year, passed quietly away at his home on North Elm Street early Saturday morning.

Mr. Peterson was born July 11, 1862, and died Saturday, August 15, 1925, at the age of 63 years, 1 month and 4 days. He was born in Johnson County and came to Pulaski County with his parents in his youth. Since that time he had resided in Alexander and Pulaski counties.

Five years ago, Mr. Peterson accepted Christ as his Savior but he had never united with any church. He was a kind and loving husband and father, a law abiding citizen and was honored and respected by all who knew him.

Mr. Peterson is survived by his wife and six children, Lawrence, of East St. Louis; Earl, Pearl, Ollie, Vida, and Mary Frances; two sisters, Mrs. Richard Stokes, of Cairo, and Mrs. Albert Mattson, of Mounds; a brother, Noah Peterson, of Belleville, Ark., and a host of other relatives and friends.

Funeral services and interment were in Beech Grove Cemetery Sunday afternoon, Aug. 16, Rev. J. S. Dever officiated.

 


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 27 Aug 1925:
THE DEAD RETURN

On the night of July 12, two young men were killed by a train north of Jonesboro. They were subsequently identified as George Spurlock and George Dotson, of Jonesboro, and the bodies were claimed by relatives and interred in the Casper Cemetery north of Anna on July 24 and 25. The father of George Dotson, Samuel Dotson, died suddenly while sitting in an automobile in Jonesboro the following Saturday afternoon.

Now one of the young men has returned. Last Tuesday evening, George Spurlock, one of the young men supposed to have been killed, appeared at his father’s home north of Jonesboro. He states that on July 22, he was either in Texas or Oklahoma, that George Dotson was with him and that they had been working in Missouri and Kansas as farmhands.  He said he left Dotson in St. Louis Monday and the latter told him he was going to Gorham, Ill., to visit his aunt.

When the bodies were found on the track July 22, they were positively identified by acquaintances of the young men and the relatives by certain marks on the bodies. The features of one of the dead men were so badly mangled that identification was impossible except by marks on the body. The relatives of the young men are overjoyed to know that they are alive. Now the question is: Who were the young men killed on July 22? It will probably never be answered.—Anna Democrat.


Found Dead on Tracks

On Sunday morning, August 16, the body of a colored boy, about 16 years of age, was found on the Illinois Central tacks near the viaduct. The boy had been struck in the head with an unknown weapon and the blow had fractured his skull. There were no clues to his identity and he was buried unidentified.

This is not the first instance of the kind and we have heard the theory advanced that a plan to rob the hoboes has been systemized and is being put into practice.


Major Greaney of Cairo Dies at Camp Grant

Major William P. Greaney, of Cairo, died suddenly Saturday, Aug. 22, in Rockford, Ill., while attending the summer camp of the Illinois National Guard at Camp Grant.

For many years Major Greaney, then Captain Greaney, had charge of Company K and he was largely responsible for the high standing of this company. His marked success with Company K attracted the attention of army superiors and later he was appointed a mayor in the National Guard.

Major Greaney was a native of Cairo. He is survived by his wife and three daughters.

Interment was in Calvary Cemetery, Villa Ridge, on Tuesday, Aug. 25.  He was buried with full military honors.

(His marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Major William P. Greaney 1869-1925.—Darrel Dexter)


___s. A. W. Pyatt ____ of Villa Ridge

____ Pyatt, of Villa Ridge died at his home Friday, ____ 21, at 3:30 o’clock,____ of three weeks ____.

____ was born in Morris, ____ .  He came from ____ Illinois in 1865 and ____ where for many ____ in the bookbinding ____ cause of ill health _____ business in Cairo ___ved to Villa Ridge.

____ years he has had ____ Calvary Cemetery ____.

___ survived by his widow, ____ children, also a sister, ____es Coleman, of ____.

Services were held in ____ Catholic Church, in ___ __ay afternoon at ____ Rev. Father Eugene ____ of St. Raphael’s ____ and St. Mary’s ____ Mound City officiated. ____ Calvary Cemetery.

 


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 3 Sep 1925:
Taken Sick Here Dies in Memphis Hospital

Mrs. R. C. Smith returned Saturday from Jackson, Tenn., having been called there to attend the funeral of her aunt, Mrs. E. G. Parish. Mrs. Parish was visiting at the home of Mrs. Smith when she was taken ill. She was removed by train on a cot to a hospital in Memphis, Tenn., and seemingly was better when Mrs. Smith returned home only to receive word that her aunt was dead.

Mrs. Parish had visited here a number of times and was known by many who will grieve to hear of her death.

 

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. John Timmons passed away Saturday and the funeral services were held at the M. E. church Monday afternoon, Rev. Shaffer conducting same. Little girls, members of the Junior League sang. (Villa Ridge)

 


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 10 Sep 1925:
Cora Helen Crippen, oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Crippen, was born at Eastwood, Jan. 23, 1912, and passed away at the home of her parents, just west of Ullin, Friday morning, Aug. 28, 1925.

             (Her marker in Cache Chapel Cemetery near Ullin reads:  Helen Crippen Born Jan. 23, 1912 Died Aug. 28, 1925.—Darrel Dexter)


Card of Thanks

The family of the late Ulysses S. Jenkins desire to tender sincere thanks to neighbors and friends for their many manifestations of thoughtful kindness in this our time of sorrow, also for the beautiful flowers.
The family

Death Shocks Entire Community
____ Stricken while on ___ Sunday Night

___community was ___ grieved to learn of ___ death of Ulysses S. Jenkins ___ occurred Sunday ____ the corner of First ___ ___nche Avenue, from ____ of valvular hearts ____.

___ was returning ____ Ill., where he had ___ company his step ____ Sarah E. Jenkins ____ ___s’ Home. He had ____ Anna, Ill., Sunday ____ reunion of relatives ____ had joined him _____ arrived here on No. ____ and were on ____ when he suffered _____. A physician was ___ immediately but Mr. Jenkins ____ died instantly.

____ was well and en____ ____ the summons ____.

___ Jenkins was born in ____ Nov. 4, ___, in Mounds, Ill. ____ 1925, at the age of ___ ___ months and 2 days. ___ in marriage to ____ Pulley on Feb. _____. To this union were _____ children, both of whom_____.

____ mourn his loss his ____ James Hobart, one ____ H. L. Wilkerson, ____ Edward E., of Villa Ridge ____ half sister, Miss _____ Jenkins, of Chicago, a _____ Mrs. Sarah E. ____ ncy and a host of ____ and friends.

____ converted and untied ____ Methodist church at the ____ was a consistent ____ at his death.

____ for a number of _____ night secretary _____ Y. M. C. A. He ____ at the Y. M. C. A. ____ 1912 and had made ____ loyal secretary ____ years.

___ services were held at ____ church Wednesday ____ ev. J. S. Dever ____ church officiated. ____ secretary of the Y. M. C. A. ___ paid tribute to his ____. Interment was in ____s Cemetery.

____ from out of town ____ the funeral were ____ H. L. Wilkerson, ____ Fla., Mrs. Cora _____, Mr. and Mrs. _____ ____dtom, St. Louis, ____ ___inton Caruthers, ____ Mr. J. T. Pulley, ____.

(The obituary includes a photograph of Jenkins.  Ulysses S. Jenkins, 27, born in Johnson Co., Ill., son of James Jenkins and Sarina Standard, married Lydia J. Pulley, 19, born in Marion, Williamson Co., Ill., daughter of Berry Pulley and Nancy White, on 5 Feb 1896, in Union Co., Ill.)

 


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 17 Sep 1925:
Former Mounds Resident Dies in Kansas City
Funeral to Be Held in Mounds Saturday Afternoon

Leo Albright, of Kansas City, Missouri, died Wednesday, Sept. 16, at 11 p.m. at Research Hospital in that city following an appendicitis and gall stone operation.

Mrs. Arthur Kupfer, a sister of Mrs. Albright, received a telegram announcing his death and stating that he would be brought here for burial, arriving on No. 1, Friday. His remains will be taken to the home of Mrs. Kupfer. Funerals services will be held in the Baptist church Saturday afternoon.

Mr. Albright was a former resident of Mounds and a son of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Albright, who now reside in Elco. His wife was formerly Miss Nellie Crain, of this city.

 


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 24 Sep 1925:
Little Goldie Rose, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Escho Rose, died Thursday after several days’ illness. Burial was made at Beech Grove Cemetery, Mounds. Rev. Roy N. Kean conducted the funeral services and G. A. James had charge of the funeral arrangements.


Mrs. F. M. Cheek was called to her home in Greencastle, Ind., last week by the sudden death of a close friend. (Ullin)


Mascoutah Farmer Hit by Pitched Ball Dies

Funeral services were held Wednesday for Henry Renth, 37, who died Sunday afternoon in an ambulance from injuries suffered when he was hit by a pitched ball during a game played on the farm of his brother, Fred Renth, near Mascoutah.

Renth is said to have taken his turn at bat and had challenged the pitcher to stroke him out. The first ball hurled struck the batter squarely between the eyes and he collapsed as if he had been shot.—Herrin News


___ William Albright, son of Elder and Mrs. J. H. Albright, was born in Elco, Ill., Nov. 22, 1890, and died in Kansas City, Mo., Sept. 16,1925, aged 34 years, 9 months and 20 days. He spent the early years of his childhood at Elco. He professed faith in Christ at the age of fifteen years and united with the Sandy Creek Baptist Church, later removing his membership to the First Baptist Church of Mounds.

He was united in marriage to Nell B. Crain, of Mounds, Ill., in 1910. To this union were born three children, namely: Roland, who died in infancy, Lester and Jane.

Mr. and Mrs. Albright spent the first years of their married life in southern Illinois, removing to Kansas City in 1917, where he became a successful business man and a leader for good in the community in which he lived. He was a devoted husband and father and his first thought was always for his loved ones.

Besides the above named loved ones, he leaves to mourn their loss four brothers: Dallas, of Paragould, Ark., Tamm J., of Kansas City, Mo., William and Fred, of Elco, and a host of friends both in Mounds and in Kansas City.

The remains were brought on Friday to the home of Mrs. Albright’s sister, Mrs. A. Kupfer. Funeral services were held at the First Baptist Church at 2 p.m., on Saturday, Sept. 19, Rev. H. C. Croslin officiated. Interment was in Beech Grove Cemetery.


Aged Resident of Mound City Dies at Home of Daughter

Mrs. Julia Kennedy Schuler, widow of the late George Schuler, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Jennie Murphy, in Mound City, on Thursday morning, Sept., 24th, at 6:35 o’clock.

Mrs. Schuler who was born and reared near Villa Ridge, was the daughter of Thomas and Polly Kennedy. Her age at the time of her death was 83 years, 6 months and 22 days.

She had been ill for a number of months. Her children have been devotedly attentive to her every wish both in health and in sickness.

She is survived by five children namely: Al Schuler, Mrs. L. C. Perks, and Mrs. Jennie Murphy, of Mound City, Postmaster George T. Schuler, and Miss Kate Schuler, of this city.

For a number of years Mrs. Schuler made her home here with her son, George, and his family, but for some time past has lived with her daughter, Mrs. Murphy, of Mound City. During her husband’s lifetime their home was in the latter place.

Funeral services ill be held at 2 p.m. Friday afternoon in the M. E. church in Mound City. The Rev. Troy N. Kean, pastor, will officiate. Burial will be in Beech Grove Cemetery, Mounds.

(George Schuler married Julia Kennedy on 24 May 1866, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 1 Oct 1925:
Ullin lost a valuable citizen when Mr. H. E. Echols passed away. He will be greatly missed in the church and also as a business man. (Ullin)

             (His marker in New Hope Cemetery near Ullin reads:  H. E. Echols 1893-1925  Ruth U. McClellan 1894-1962.—Darrel Dexter)


Among those from out of town who attended the funeral of Mrs. Julia Schuler last Friday afternoon were her sister, Mrs. Annie Turney, of Brownstown, Ill., her nephew, Dr. Will Turney, of Cowden, Ill., and her nieces, Mrs. Minnie Brown, of St. Elmo, Ill., and Mrs. J. Smith, of Herrin, Ill. Mrs. Smith was accompanied by her husband.

             (S. R. Turney married Nancy E. Kennedy on 11 Feb 1863, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Mrs. Ida B. Magee Buried in Beech Grove

The mortal remains of Mrs. Ida B. McGee were brought from St. Louis by her children and laid to rest in Beech Grove Cemetery today (Thursday). Mrs. Magee died in St. Louis Tuesday from nephritis.
Years ago Mrs. Magee and her husband, Benjamin Magee, were resident of Cairo, where Mr. Magee was an engineer on a transfer boat. He died and was buried here some thirty years ago. And now she sleeps beside him. Undertaker James had charge of the funeral.

 

Arvle Sowers of the Independent force, attended the funeral of H. E. Echols, of Ullin, last Friday. Mr. Sowers and the late Mr. Echols married sisters, the Misses Ina and Ruth Crippen.

 


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 15 Oct 1925:

Capt. Mark Whiteaker Dies at Vienna

             After a series of illness, Captain Mark Whiteaker died at his home in Vienna at ten o’clock Wednesday night. The venerable old warrior would have been ninety-three years of age had he lived until March 23. He has lived the entire period in that locality. His early days were the pioneer days of Illinois. Seventy-nine years ago he was carrying mail by horseback from Golconda to Old Frankfort via Stonefort, when there were only three houses in Marion. He was one of the brave soldiers in the Civil War, where he won his commission as captain.

The bereaved widow to whom he was married sixty-five years ago is left to mourn his death along with Mrs. Aristo McElroy, of Harrisburg, Mrs. O. E. Burris, Vienna; Mrs. Geneva Brown, of Vienna; Dr. Hall Whiteaker, of California; Dr. W. J. Whiteaker, of Harrisburg; Mrs. J. P. Mathis, of Vienna, and Mrs. A. L. Compton, of Marion. Three children preceded him in death.

The Captain had long been a respected and treasured citizen of Vienna, being a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows lodges. he was a lifelong member of the First Methodist Church of that city. Funeral services will be conducted at 10 o’clock Friday from the first Methodist church by the pastor, Rev. L. B. Jones. The Masons will have charge of the services at the cemetery.—Marion Post.

Two of Capt. Whiteaker’s sons were at one time resident of Pulaski County., Dr. Hall Whiteaker and Dr. W. J. Whiteaker located at Olmstead, the latter following the former when Dr. Hall decided to locate in Mound City. Later, Dr. W. J. located in Pulaski and these two brothers practiced in this county for many years.

(I. N. McElroy married Arista A. Whiteaker on 25 Oct 1885, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Oscar E. Burris married Martha E. Whiteaker on 12 Jul 1885, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Austin I. Brown married Geneva Whiteaker on 27 Mar 1889, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Amos L. Compton married Daisy G. Whiteaker on 6 Jun 1900, in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Sudden Death

G. A. James, of Mound City, received a message last week informing him of the sudden death of a sister, who resided in Sumner, Ill. A member of the family had gone to her bedside to awaken her and found her dead. Mr. and Mrs. James and son attended her funeral.


Death Claims Mrs. I. N. Taylor This Evening

As we go to press we learn of the death of Mrs. I. N. Taylor, after a lingering illness of two months duration. She leaves beside her husband, two sons, Norris and Robert Taylor, of Truman, Ark., her aged parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Cunningham, of Perryville, Mo., and Robert Cunningham, of near Mounds. The bereaved family has the sympathy of the entire community.

No arrangements for the funeral have as yet been made.

 


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 22 Oct 1925:
Mrs. Walter Schnaare was called to Olmsted Tuesday by the illness and death of her mother, Mrs. Carl Dick. Mrs. Schnaare and the entire family have the sympathy of the community. To know Mrs. Dick was to love her.


Those who attended the funeral of Mrs. Carl Dick at Olmsted Sunday were: Mr. and Mrs. Everett Bever, Mr. and Mrs. William Schwartz, Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Schnaare, Mr. and Mrs. M. D. Brelsford, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Jackson, Mr. William Mathis, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Schwartz, and Mrs. John Dishinger. (America)


Mr. and Mrs. Robert Taylor and Norris Taylor who were called here by the sickness and death of their mother, Mrs. I. N. Taylor, returned Tuesday to their home in Truman Ark.


Card of Thanks

We sincerely thank our kind neighbors and friends and the railroad employees for their loving acts of kindness and the sympathy shown us in the bereavement of our dear husband and father. Also those who sent the beautiful flowers. We also thank Rev. Croslin for the sympathetic words of comfort he rendered to our aching hearts, those who sang the lovely songs and the sweet solo. This will never be forgotten.
Mrs. Godfred Frank
Mrs. John Cobb
Mrs. John Marrs


Godfred Frank Passes to Great Beyond

Godfred Frank, for many years a resident of this city, died in the Illinois Central Hospital, Chicago, Oct. 16th, at 3:15 a.m. at the age of 64 years, 5 months and 6 days.

Mr. Frank was born in Germany, May 10th, 1861. He came to America in 1879 and was married to Miss Bertha Boerschel in 1887. To this union were born three daughters. One of these daughters passed away in infancy. His wife and two daughters, Mrs. John Marrs, of Mound City, and Mrs. John Cobbs, of Mounds, also seven grandchildren, survive him.

Mr. Frank had been a steady employee of the Illinois Central Railroad for the past 25 years. He became ill the first of the year, but kept at his work until the first of September, when he went to the I. C. R. R. Hospital in Chicago for surgical treatment. Later he had a five days’ leave of absence from the hospital and while at home he attended morning service at the Baptist church in company with his wife and daughter and later made his peace with God.

Funeral services were held at the Baptist church Sunday, Oct. 18th, at 1:30 p.m., the pastor, H. C. Croslin officiating. Burial was in Beech Grove Cemetery.

(Godfred Frank married Bettie Boerschel on 18 Aug 1887, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Card of Thanks

We desire to thank our friends and neighbors for their kindness and sympathy during the illness and after the death of our beloved wife, mother and daughter. Especially are we grateful for the kindly ministrations in the home and for the beautiful floral offerings.
I. N. Taylor
Norris Taylor
Robert Taylor
Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Cunningham

 


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 29 Oct 1925:
Mrs. Ricker, who lived east of Ullin, on the Butter Ridge Road, passed away Sunday, Oct. 25. She was laid to rest Monday, Oct. 26, in Butter Ridge Cemetery. She leaves one son, Joe Myre, and a daughter, Miss Mary Ricker, who lived with her. (Ullin)


Death of Mrs. French

Mrs. Mary Eliza French died at her home in Villa Ridge Wednesday morning, Oct. 28th, 1925 at 11:15 o’clock at the age of 73 years.

The funeral services will be held at St. Raphael’s Church, Mounds, on Friday, Oct. 30th, at 2 p.m. Interment will be in Calvary Cemetery, Villa Ridge. G. A. James is the undertaker in charge.

(Her marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Lloyd French 1845-1925  Mary E. French 1849-1925  Wilfred V. French 1870-1910, Son—Darrel Dexter)


Mrs. Minna Stadle Passes to Beyond

Mrs. Minna Stadle, age 68 years, died at her home near Villa Ridge, Thursday morning., Oct. 29th, 1925, at 1:15 o’clock. Funeral arrangements have not yet been made as the family is waiting for word from a brother in Montana. Interment will be in Thistlewood Cemetery beside her husband, who was buried Dec. 24, 1924. Rev. Dunlap, of Cairo, will officiate. Undertaker G. A. James has charge of the funeral.

 


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 5 Nov 1925:

Obituary

Mrs. Jane Ellen Lackey, widow of the late Thomas Lackey, died at her home near Pulaski, Wednesday, Oct. 21st.  Mrs. Lackey was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jefferson Parker, and was born near Villa Ridge, Ill., on Oct. 15, 1845.  She was married to Mr. Lackey in 1867.  His death occurred Jan. 5th, 1886.  They have six children, two dying in infancy, and Mrs. S. H. Rife on Nov. 17, 1924.  Two sons and one daughter, Harry Lackey, of Grand Tower, Ill., Ed Lackey, and Mrs. A. J. Lilley, of Pulaski, survive, with thirteen grandchildren and two great grandchildren.  Funeral services were held at the Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church Friday, Oct. 23.  Rev. H. E. Vick, pastor officiating, with interment in the Lackey Cemetery.  Undertaker W. H. Aldred had charge of the funeral.

(Thomas M. Lackey married Jane E. Parker on 15 Apr 1866, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Samuel H. Rife married Clara H. Lackey on 18 Oct 1896, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  A marker in Lackey Cemetery reads:  Jennie Lackey 1846-1925.—Darrel Dexter)

Sister to Former Chief Clerk Fred Held, Dies

Miss Julia Held, sister to Fred Held, formerly chief clerk to Supt. C. R. Young, of the I. C., but now utility man at Mounds, passed away at her home in Morrison, Mo., Tuesday of last week.  The funeral was held Thursday.

Mr. Held left Monday for Morrison, but his sister died before he reached her bedside.—Carbondale Herald

Prominent Mound City Resident Dies
L. C. Perks Passes Away after a Lingering Illness

L. C. Perks, for many years a prominent businessman of Mound City and Pulaski County, died Sunday morning, November 1st, 1925, at 10 o’clock at his home in Mound City.  Mr. Perks had been in failing health for a number of years.  Several years ago he consulted the Mayo Brothers Clinic in Rochester, Minn.  For some time he had been in St. Mary’s Infirmary, Cairo, but was brought to his home shortly before his death.

Mr. Perks was born in Petersburg, Ky., Sept. 2, 1858.  He came to Illinois with his family when a boy, coming via the Ohio River in 1871.  The family located in Villa Ridge, but later moved to Mound City.  At one time he was employed in a factory in Mound City.  Early in his career to be contracted with the Illinois Central to operate the mule car between Mounds and Mound City and continued in this business until the method of transportation was changed to the steam engine.

In 1891 he and his brother-in-law, Thomas Higgins, formed the firm of Perks and Higgins.  It was at first a livery business, but grew into a real estate and loan business.

On September the 6th, 1899, Mr. Perks was married to Miss Nettie Schuler, of Mound City, who survives him.  He is also survived by two sisters, Mrs. Nannie Higgins, of Mound City, and Mrs. W. J. Brown, of Olive Branch; a brother, William Perks, of Creston, Iowa; several nephews and nieces.  Three nephews, Harry Perks, William J. Perks, and Thomas J. Perks, live in Mound City and these will continue the business of Perks and Higgins.

In 1912 Mr. Perks was elected president of the First State Bank of Mound City.  He was interested in the Mound City Building and Loan Company.  During the world war he served as chairman of the local exemption board.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the M. E. church in Mound City.  Interment was in Beech Grove Cemetery.

Found Guilty and Sentenced to Life Imprisonment

D. C. Chambliss, colored, who shot and killed William Huffman, also colored, on June 8th, was sentenced in circuit court last Wednesday to life imprisonment in the penitentiary.  The trial occupied only a portion of a day and the jury deliberated only a short time.

Illinois Editor Falls Dead

____ Hill, editor and founder ____ Carbondale Herald, and ___ the oldest newspaper men in southern Illinois, fell dead at _____ in Carbondale, Friday _____.  He was 82 years of age, _____  Bert E. Hill, is now ____ that city.  Active until ____ of his death, he spent a ____ usefulness as a printer and _____.  He was connected with ____ St. Louis Republic some ____ years ago.  Later, he ____ on Belleville newspapers, ____ establishing his own paper ____ Carbondale.—Marion Post


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 12 Nov 1925:
Representative Meyers Dies in Carbondale

Honorable Thomas J. Meyers, of Benton, Democratic member of the Illinois House of Representatives from the 50th District, died Sunday night in Holden Hospital, Carbondale.  He had been ill for several months and had been in the hospital about two weeks.

His passing leaves a vacancy in the House and since there will be no session of the legislature during his unexpired term, the vacancy will remain unfilled until the primary election next April.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lentz, of Mattoon, were called here by the death of the former’s brother, who was buried in Ullin Monday.  While here they visited Mrs. D. J. Horner, a sister of Mr. Lentz.

Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Dale were called to Dongola Tuesday on account of the serious illness and death of Mrs. Dale’s mother.

(Her marker in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Anna Minnie Born Feb. 13, 1830 Died Nov. 11, 1925 Mother.—Darrel Dexter)

Rev. C. L. Phifer, of Golconda, formerly a pastor of Ullin, was called here Sunday to preach the funeral of Cicero Lentz.

Cicero Lentz, a well known and highly respected farmer of Ullin, died suddenly Friday.  (Ullin)

(Cicero Lentz married Nora Standard on 31 Jul 1892, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug reads:  Ulysses C. Lentz Born Dec. 14, 1868 Died Nov. 5, 1925.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. E. E. Boyd and her sister, Mrs. M. D. Brelsford, of America, who were called to Mt. Vernon Friday by the death of their nephew, George Hugely, have returned to their homes.

Mrs. Alwida Auld Dies Early This Morning

Mrs. Alwilda Auld, who has resided in Mounds for 16 years, died at 5 a.m. today at her home on South Elm Street, after an illness of several weeks.  She had reached the age of 78 years, 3 months and 29 days.  She leaves three daughters, Mrs. Alex Deeslie, Mrs. A. S. Calhoun, and Miss Jessie Auld, and one son, A. C. Auld, all of Mounds.

Funeral services ill be held at the home Saturday afternoon, Nov. 14th, at 2:30 o’clock, with the Rev. G. B. Waldron as officiating clergyman.  Interment will be in Thistlewood Cemetery.


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 19 Nov 1925:
Those from Ullin who attended Mrs. Minnie’s funeral at Dongola were Johnnie Scanlin and mother, Mrs. W. L. Rutter, Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Rhymer, Mrs. Mark Easter, Mrs. Ella Cook, Mr. and Mrs. M. G. Hart, Mrs. John Crader, and Mrs. Kenley.  Mrs. Minnie was the mother of Mrs. A. S. Dale and was 96 years old.

Mrs. M. D. Brelsford and sister, Mrs. Elmer Boyd, of Mound City, were called to Mt. Vernon Friday on account of the death of their nephew, George Lawrence Hughey. (America—from last week)

Mr. and Mrs. William Schwartz and Mr. and Mrs. Walter Schwartz and Mrs. Lizzie Neistrath attended the funeral of Mrs. Ed Curt, near Concord Monday.  (America—from last week)

(Her marker in Concord Cemetery near Olmsted reads:  Edward Curt 1859-1933  Mimmie Curt 1859-1925.—Darrel Dexter)

Friends of Mrs. Margaret Baccus were sorry to learn of her death, which occurred at Boaz last week.  Mrs. Baccus formerly lived here.  (America—from last week)

Elder H. C. Croslin, pastor of the Mounds Baptist Church, was here last Thursday to officiate at the funeral of Miss Amy Carlton.  Bro. Croslin was pastor of the church here for four years and is held in high esteem by all the citizens of the county.  He is one of the few real good man.—Vienna Times

Obituary

Mrs. Alwilda Ann Auld, daughter of Rebecca and Samuel Holmes, was born near Tappan, Harrison County, Ohio, on July 14, 1847, and died at her home in Mounds, Ill., on Thursday, Nov. 12, 1925.
She was united in marriage to Samuel A. Auld, Nov. 15th, 1866.  They took up their residence in Dennison, Ohio, where Mrs. Auld spent the greater part of her life.  She united with the Dennison Presbyterian Church as a charter member 55 years ago.

Mrs. Auld came to Mounds to reside in 1909 in order to be near her children, Mr. Auld having died previously.  She was the mother of seven children, four of whom survive her, namely:  Mrs. A. Deeslie, Mrs. A. S. Calhoun, Miss Jessie Auld and A. C. Auld, all of whom live in Mounds.  One sister Mrs. Mary Shannon, of Ulvrichsville, Ohio, also survives.

Funeral services were held at the home Saturday, Nov. 14, at 2:30 p.m. the Rev. George B. Waldron pastor of the Congregational Church officiating.  Burial was in Thistlewood Cemetery.

Those from out of town who  attended the funeral were:  D. C. Mahon, Dennison, Ohio.  Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Gracey, Columbus, Ohio.  Mrs. Mae Calvert and children, Hurst, Ill.  Miss Wilda Deeslie, Hurst.  Mr. and Mrs. Harold Dougherty, St. Louis, Mo.  H. E. Exby, Carbondale.  Ms. Nannie Auld and children, St. Louis.  Mrs. Margaret Guilhausen, Centralia.  Mrs. P. G. Bride, Cairo. Miss Rena Crain , Mound City.

Card of Thanks

We wish to express sincere thanks and deep appreciation of all the acts of kindness and sympathy shown us during the illness and after the death of our beloved mother and to thank all who sent flowers and offered the use of their cars.
A. C. Auld
Jessie Auld
Mrs. Alex Deeslie
Mrs. A. S. Calhoun


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 26 Nov 1925:
Death of Mrs. Thornton Occurs Friday, Nov. 20th

Mrs. Mary Jane Thornton, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Chester, was born in Jonesboro, Ill., Jan. 26, 1855, and died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. R. L. Britton, of Mounds Nov. 20, 1925, at the age of 70 years, 9 months and 24 days.

She was married to Thomas Thornton at about the age of 18 years, to which union were born nine children, namely Mrs. Estella Britton, deceased; Mrs. Cora Van Hoorebeke, of Marseilles, Ill., Mrs. Lula McNeese, of Phoenix, Ariz., William Thornton, deceased, Mrs. Myrtle Stringer, of Lakeland, Fla., Mrs. Mary Britton, of Mounds, Joseph Thornton, deceased, Mrs. Oma Beck, of Peoria, Ill., and Alva, who died in 1919.

Mrs. Thornton was converted and united with the First Baptist Church of Jonesboro about 1908.  She was a devout Christian lady, kind and gentle in the home.  During her last illness, she expressed herself as being ready to go, saying, “Why doesn’t the Father come and take me home?”  She leaves to sorrow at her departure, the above named loved ones—twos sisters-in-law, fifteen grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren and many friends.

Funeral services were held at the home Sunday morning, Nov. 22, at 10 o’clock, Elder H. C. Crosslin officiating.  Interment was in Jonesboro Cemetery, Jonesboro, Illinois.

(William T. Thornton married Mary J. Chester on 25 Jan 1872, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

CARD OF THANKS

We desire to thank our friends and neighbors for their kindness and sympathy during the sickness and death of our beloved mother and grandmother.

Especially do we wish to thank the donors of the beautiful flowers and those who furnished cars.
Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Britton and children

Death of Small Child

Melvin E. Butler, two and a half year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Butler, who resides near Shiloh, died Saturday, Nov. 21, of pneumonia.

Funeral services were conducted at the home on Sunday with Elder H. C. Croslin of the First Baptist Church of Mounds officiating.  Burial was in Thistlewood Cemetery.


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 3 Dec 1925:
Mrs. William Gandy, of Ullin, Dies in Cairo Hospital

Mrs. William Gandy, a Pulaski County resident whose home was near Ullin, was taken to St. Mary’s Infirmary, Cairo, on Wednesday, Nov. 25.  On Thursday morning she underwent an operation and died on Monday, Nov. 30, at 1:15 p.m.

Lola Anita Bankson, daughter of Mannon and Mary Rife Bankson, was born Sept. 17, 1870.  She was united in marriage to William T. Gandy on April 13th, 1889.  Mrs. Gandy had lived in and near Ullin most of her life and was loved by all who knew her.  ”Aunt Lola,” as she was affectionately called by the young folk, will be greatly missed.

Some 30 years ago she united with the M. E. church of New Hope and she lived a devout Christian through life.

She is survived by her husband, one brother, Cecil B. Bankson, of Malvern, Ark., a sister, Mrs. S. R. Aden, of Ullin, Ill.,  a half sister, Mrs. I. O. Lambert, of Chicago, Ill., and a host of other relatives and friends.

Funeral services were held at the M. E. church in Ullin Wednesday, Dec. 2, at 1 p.m.  Interment was in the Anna Cemetery.

(William F. Gandy married Lallie L. Bankson on 13 Apr 1890, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Mannon Bankson married Mary Rife on 27 Nov 1870, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Lola Gandy 1870-1925.—Darrel Dexter)

Former Mounds Merchant Dies in California

John H. Lane, a former Mounds resident and businessman, died at his home in Los Angeles, Calif., after an illness of a year’s duration.

At one time Mr. Lane was a merchant here.  His store was in a frame building on the site now occupied by the Federated Crafts Store.

Mr. Lane married Miss Alma Frederick, daughter of Mr. William Frederick, of this city, and built the home now owned and occupied by Mrs. Ada Wood.  He left Mounds for California about 1904.
He is survived by his wife, one daughter, Mrs. Gladys Lorenzo and a grandson, all of California, and a sister, Mrs. Alice M. DeGelder, of Cache, Illinois.

(John H. Lane married Alma Augusta Fredrick on 23 Jul 1895, in Alexander Co., Ill.  George P. DeGelder married Alice M. Lane on 14 Dec 1887, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 10 Dec 1925:
Elder H. C. Croslin, of the Baptist church, was called to Buncombe on Wednesday of this week to preach the funeral of Aunt Emma Robertson, of that place.


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 17 Dec 1925:
Wife of Station Agent of Pulaski Commits Suicide

The village of Pulaski was shocked on Tuesday afternoon when Mrs. Ethel Dye, wife of Harry Dye, Illinois Central station agent at that place, was found unconscious at her home and two empty carbolic acid bottles at her side.

She was found by Mr. Dye’s father, who went to the home on an errand, and at once three doctors were called in an effort to save her life.  All efforts failed and she passed on at 8:08 o’clock that evening.
Mrs. Dye is described as a fine looking, large woman of about 40 years of age and seemingly in the best of health.

The funeral services will be held Saturday at the family home in Pulaski with interment at Golconda, the old home of Mrs. Dye.

(Harry L. Dye married Ethel May Wuster on 26 Oct 1911, in Pope Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Prominent Farmer Dies Following Long Illness

John C. Hawkins passed away at 9:00 p.m. Thursday at his home one mile west of this city.  Mr. Hawkins had been in failing health for several years having suffered a paralytic stroke some time ago and the second on the day before Thanksgiving.

Funeral services will e held in the First Baptist Church Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock and interment will be in Beech Grove Cemetery.


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 24 Dec 1925:
Mr. and Mrs. William Cheniae attended the funeral of John Hawkins in Mounds Saturday. (Villa Ridge)


Called to Indiana by Death of Sister

Mrs. George E. Chance received a message Sunday morning informing her of the sudden death of her sister, Mrs. Colgrove, of Indianapolis, Ind.  Just the day before a letter from Mrs. Colgrove reached Mrs. Chance and in it there was no intimation of illness.  Mrs. Chance left immediately to attend the funeral.

Among those from out of town who attended the funeral of John C. Hawkins were:  Miss Frances White, of LaFayette, Ind., David White, of Centralia, Ill., and George White, of Champaign, Ill., sisters and brothers of Mrs. Hawkins, and Mrs. Elsie Preston, of Richview, Ill., an aunt of the deceased.

Harry McKimm Dies Suddenly in Chicago

Harry McKimm, for many years a resident of Mounds, passed away suddenly at his home in Chicago Monday afternoon, Dec. 21.  He had been in failing health for some time and had been in Cairo, where his parents reside, only a short time ago for treatment.

Mr. McKimm had lived here a greater part of his life.  Just before his marriage to Miss Anita Goode, of Jackson, Tenn., he built the bungalow now owned by Dr. H. J. Elkins, and the young couple lived there a number of years their son having been born there.  Later they moved to Cairo and from there to Chicago.  Mr. McKimm was an employee of the Illinois Central Railroad.

He is survived by his wife, one son, and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William McKimm, of Cairo.
Funeral services were held in Cairo on Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock, the Rev. L. A. Crittenton of the Church of the Redeemer officiating.  The Masonic lodge, of which Mr. McKimm was a member, had charge of the burial services in Villa Ridge Cemetery.

John Craig Hawkins

When death claimed John Craig Hawkins, Pulaski County lost one of its most progressive farmers and citizens.

Mr. Hawkins was born June 6, 1867, at Grand Tower, Illinois, and died December 17, 1925, at his home near Mounds.  Early in life the deceased came to his county.  His education was obtained in the Mounds Schools.  All his life he has been intensely interested in the town of his boyhood.

In his lifetime he saw the city of Mounds grow from a village of a few scattering buildings to the important railroad center that it now is.  In the building of the Illinois Central Railroad Yards he had no small part, as a matter of fact, he assisted in constructing the fill for the first yards and took great pride in the coming of such a great industry to Pulaski County.

As a businessman he has always been progressive in principle and in methods.  His interests lay chiefly in farming, although he did not confine himself solely to agriculture.  He was a member of the Pulaski County Farm Bureau, having assisted in its organization.  For several years he was manager of the Live Stock Shippers Association promoted by the Farm Bureau.  Various other positions of trust were placed upon him.  Among these was that of road commissioner.  upon him was laid the responsible position of membership on school boards in both Mounds and the Lufkins district, which offices he filled acceptably.  He served as a commission in the Mounds Drainage District.  The deceased has left upon the family, his neighbors, and his many friends the lasting impression that he was indeed a community man, interested not only in that which belonged to him, but that which belonged to others.

On the evening of his death the statement was made by a friend that in the 58 years he was permitted to live, he lived as much as many men who are given 70 years, his life was so full of service and loving deeds for mankind.  his was, indeed, a life well spent.

In his parental home, life John was an exemplary young man.  As the eldest child of the family, he bore well the responsibility of an elder brother.  Younger brothers and sisters continually became recipients of his love and kindness.  In family life too, “service” might well have been his watch word.  To the responsibilities of husband and father he was true.  For his family he always coveted the best, both material and spiritual, and he labored diligently that they might receive this best.
Mr. Hawkins lived an influential life of good deeds.  Although not a member of any church, he was liberal in his support of the church and he believed firmly in that institution.  Death found him reconciled and ready to meet his maker.  he has left his family the pleasant memory of a life well filled.—a life that came to its close unafraid to begin anew in another world.

Those who survive the deceased are the wife and son, Frank, the father, L. A. Hawkins; one brother, Louis; and five sisters, Mrs. Adelaide Crain, Mrs. Elizabeth Shifley, Mrs. Hattie Simmons, Mrs. Sallie Cason and Miss May S. Hawkins.

The death of Mr. Hawkins has left a void in the heart of his family and friends.  That void is only temporary, however.  Let us rather say with the poet, Riley,

“I cannot say, I will not say
That he is dead.

He is just away!
With a cheery smile and a wave of the hand,

He has wandered into an unknown land,
And left us dreaming how very fair

It needs must be since he lingers there.
And you—Oh, you, who the wildest yearn

For the old time step and the glad return—
think of him fairing on, as dear

In the love of there as the love of here.
Think of him still the same, I say

He is not dead—he is just away.”

(Louis A. Hawkins married Sarah E. Walbridge on 21 Aug 1865, in Jackson Co., Ill.  Warren E. Crain married Addie R. Hawkins on 25 Mar 1896, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. L. C. Perks and Mrs. E. P. Easterday, of Mound City, attended the funeral of John C. Hawkins, here Saturday.


Mounds Independent, Thursday, 31 Dec 1925:
Fred Ulen received a message from Dexter, Mo., stating the sudden death of his brother’s wife, Saturday night.  Mr. Ulen and family left for Dexter, Monday morning.

(Samuel Ulen married Dora Miller in 1897.—Darrel Dexter)

Mr. and Mrs. B. M. Peek and children have returned to their home in West Frankfort, Ill.  They were called here (Pulaski) last week by the illness and death of Mrs. Peek’s father, Mrs. John Little..

 

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