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 Obituaries and Death Notices
in Pulaski County, Illinois Newspapers

The Pulaski Enterprise

13 Feb - 2 Dec 1920

The Mounds News

2 Jan -19 Dec 1920

Mound City, Pulaski County, Illinois

and

The Ullin Times

13 Feb - 10 Sep 1920

Ullin, Pulaski County, Illinois


Transcribed and annotated by Darrel Dexter

darreldexter@hotmail.com

 

The Pulaski Enterprise

Friday, 13 Feb 1920:
Joe Bowers, a former resident of this city, died Sunday night at the Soldiers’ Home at Quincy, Ill.  He is survived by his wife and daughter, Miss Loma.
 
Frances M. McNeil, aged 73 years and 22 days died last Friday at his home on Railroad Street of pneumonia.  The deceased suffered a paralytic stroke four years ago and has been confined to his room since.  He is survived by his wife, four daughter and five sons.  The funeral services were held at the residence at 2 o’clock Sunday afternoon conducted by Rev. H. E. Lockard, pastor of the Baptist church, interment at Beech Grove Cemetery.
 

Friday, 20 Feb 1920:
Among some of the most important cases to be disposed of is the murder case of Lemon Bunch, charged with the murder of Willie Anderson at Grand Chain last September.
 
Mrs. Edward Brunswick, who with her husband and son resided in a tent below the Marine Ways was seriously burned on Monday and died a few hours after the accident.  Mrs. Brunswick was giving medicine to her husband when her dress caught fire.  The funeral was held on Tuesday afternoon and the remains were interred in Beech Grove Cemetery.
 
Rev. S. A. Matthews was called to Marion Saturday on account of the serious illness of his father.  On arriving there he found two of his sisters also quite ill.
 
Friday, 27 Feb 1920:
Mr. and Mrs. James Dorris returned from Missouri Sunday where they were called by the death of the latter’s sister.  (Grand Chain)
 
James Crippen, Henderson Perkins, and M. J. Meeks attended the funeral of the late Samuel Wilson at Pulaski the 19th inst.  He belonged to the C. M. E. church and was an old soldier.  (Edith Chapel)
 
We are sorry to note the death of Miss Bessie Mason, who died Feb. 20, of “flu” and pneumonia.  The rest of the family, except the father, being sick at that time.  She was a sweet little girl, just blooming into womanhood.  The family loses a loving daughter and sister, the school a bright and loving schoolmate.  Interment at Mounds Sunday.  To the bereaved we extend our deepest sympathy.
 
Mr. and Mrs. James Doris, of Grand Chain passed through (Perks) en route for Fornfelt to attend the funeral of Mrs. Earnest Atherton.
 
James, the little son of Mr. and Mrs. Bon Berkley, departed this life on Feb. 21, 1920, aged 1 year and 13 days. (Karnak)
 
Little Freda Marie Wesenberg, of America, died last Monday at the home of her parents, near America, after a short illness of pneumonia.  She was buried at Beech Grove Cemetery on Tuesday.
  
Friday, 12 Mar 1920:
News has been received here of the death of George Moore, of Murphysboro.  He was a resident of our vicinity some years ago.  (Edith Chapel)
 
Mary Price, daughter of Mrs. Bessie Price, died of pneumonia following influenza.  Interment took place in Price Cemetery.  Rev. Joseph Reich conducted the services.  (Levings)

(Her marker in Price Cemetery reads:  Mary Dau. of J. H. & B. Price Born Feb. 1, 1906 Died Feb. 28, 1920.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. N. Holder, who has been an invalid for some time and helpless for the past month, died at her home here Tuesday, aged about 86 years.  She is survived by her husband and one daughter, Mrs. Pat Murphy, of Levings.
 
W. S. Sandeson received a message Monday announcing the death of his brother-in-law, at Joplin, Mo.  He left Tuesday for Joplin to attend the funeral.
 
 Friday, 26 Mar 1920:
Mr. Hazen Leach died at his home in Mt. Vernon, Ill., the 13th of March.  Hazen spent one summer here with his cousin, U. D. Clark, and family.  (Perks)
 
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to heartily thank all who in any way sympathized and assisted us during the sickness and funeral services of our beloved one, Mrs. N. Holder.
N. Holder
Mrs. Minnie Murphy
Mrs. Sallie Schwartz
 
William Heim, aged 79 years, a Civil War veteran, died at St. Mary’s Infirmary at Cairo on Sunday after a short illness.  Mr. Helm was a resident of this city for a number of years.  Services were conducted at Cairo by Rev. William P. Pearce and the remains were interred in the National Cemetery.
 

Friday, 2 Apr 1920:
Miss Mabel Steers, aged 22 years, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen A. Steers, of America, died at 6 o’clock Thursday morning.  She is survived by her parents and one sister, Miss Helen.  Interment will be made in Beech Grove Cemetery Saturday afternoon.

             (Stephen A. Steers, son of Samuel Steers and Mary A. McClelland, married Mary E. Mason, daughter of B. F. Mason and Elizabeth Campbell, on 10 Mar 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 

Friday, 9 Apr 1920:
Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Boyd attended the funeral of the daughter of Steve Steers at Beech Grove Sunday. (Grand Chain)
 
The remains of A. C. Essex, of California, were brought here for interment on Friday.  The deceased leaves a wife, who is the daughter of James Bayless, of Tick Ridge, and four children who came with the remains.  (Grand Chain)
 
Mr. A. C. Essic, died March 28th, at Denver, Colo., aged 32 years.  He leaves a wife formerly Miss Nora Bayless, of this place (Round Pond) and two little sons, Coleman and Robert, and three brothers, and a host of friends to mourn his loss.  Funeral services were held at the Christian Church at Grand Chain on Friday conducted by the Rev. Robert Smith, of Boaz.  The body was laid to rest in the Grand Chain Cemetery.
 
OBITUARY

Mabel Steers is the eldest child of S. A. and Mary Steers.  She was born in this house Nov. 17th, 1897.

Mabel has had the unusual experience of enjoying the innocence, simplicity and sweetness of childhood all her life.  Her life in the home and community has been like a lovely, sweet-scented rose that would live for decades and that would not perish in a week.  Why God has arranged it so Mabel should have such unique experience is beyond our comprehension and it reminds us of the language of the inspired Apostle Paul when to the church he said, Rom. 11:33, “O the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of his judgments and his ways past finding out.”

Mabel was permitted to escape the common trials and perplexities of mortals and to enjoy the loving sympathy and care of home and community for more than 22 years.  She lived in the sweet state of childhood long enough to win many more friends than the ordinary child.  She never had an enemy in the world.

We believe, but for the imperfections of our earthly house, her spirit would have manifested all the intelligence of ordinary human beings.  We believe her responsibility to the home, society and God was like that of an innocent child.  God has never required impossibilities of his creatures.  We believe the language of our Lord, when he said, “Suffer the little children to come unto me and forbid them not for of such is the kingdom of heaven” is applicable to all such.

The illness that terminated in her death lasted some weeks.

Mabel leaves her faithful parents and one sister, Helen, and a large circle of relatives and friends to mourn her departure from them here, but to be consoled by the glorious precious promise of Christ of eternal life in heaven.  Mabel lived in this world  22 years, 4 months and 14 days, and died March 31, 1920.  We believe she is now at home with the Lord.

A large assembly of friends attended the funeral services, conducted by Rev. C. W. Freeman, ably assisted by Bro. Joel Burgess, on April 3rd, at 1 p.m. at the family residence.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to extend our heartfelt thanks to our friends and neighbors for the kindness and sympathy shown us in the loss of our dear Mabel, also to those who sent the beautiful flowers.
Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Steers
Miss Helen Steers
 
PLANT BLOWS UP

Five dead and three more probably fatally injured and property damage estimated to about $250,000 was the result of the explosion, which occurred at Fayville plant of the Aetna Explosive Company last Wednesday afternoon at about two o’clock.  There was about six tons of nitro glycerin in the storehouse at the time of the explosion and the shock was felt for many miles even as far as Union City, Tenn.

Just what the cause of the explosion was, is yet unknown and will probably never be known.
 
The three-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. George Schuler, of Mounds, died on Thursday evening.  The funeral will be held on Saturday afternoon.
 

Friday, 16 Apr 1920:
Mrs. Nina Lyerle was called here (Grand Chain) last week on account of the illness of her father, J. W. Bartleson.
 
J. W. Bartleson died at his home near Grand Chain Saturday and was buried in Grand Chain Cemetery Monday.
 
Mr. and Mrs. John Johnson, of Olmsted, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Crippen, of Cairo, and Mrs. C. M. Rosenberger, of Vienna, attended the funeral of J. W. Bartleson here Monday.

C. E. BARNES DEAD

Charles Barnes, one of the oldest negroes in this part of the state, aged 86 years, died last Monday in this city after an illness of a few weeks, and the remains were laid to rest in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.

The deceased had been engaged in farming for many years just outside the city limits and was a good and industrious citizen.  He was confined to his bed during the recent high water when his house floated from the foundation and almost completely wrecked.  He was taken by his friends and brought to this city where he was cared for until the end came.
 
A former resident of this city died Tuesday, April 13th, at the home of her sister, Mrs. Edward Bentliff, of St. Louis.  The remains will arrive here this afternoon and will be interred in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.
 
J. W. BARTLESON DEAD

James W. Bartleson died at his home in Grand Chain, Ill., April 10, 1920, after an illness of ten days.  In vigor and strength in the very prime of life he was stricken with pneumonia on April 2nd, and from that time until the Angel of Death appeared, the anxiety of the entire community was centered on the home where love, devotion and the skill of medical aid was doing all that could be done, but nothing availed, for his work on earth was completed, and we know beyond doubt he received the Savior’s approved ‘well done.’

Mr. Bartleson has lived his entire life, except for a brief period in this community, and has won and held the respect and esteem of everyone and will be missed by all.  A man of rare character, broad in his views, kind and courteous to all alike, upright in all dealing, a true and noble Christian in every sense of the word his life was worthy of imitation.

Mr. Bartleson was one of the most prosperous farmers in this section, turning his attention in later years to stock raising, keeping only the best of thoroughbreds.

James W. Bartleson was a son of the late Capt. James Bartleson, well-known veteran of the Civil War, and minister of the gospel.  He was born near Grand Chain on April 16, 1863.  On Dec. 9, 1885, he was united in marriage to Miss Laura Lipe, three children were born to them the two surviving with him to the last.  On April 9th, 1885, together with his wife, be became a member of the Church of Christ of Grand Chain, of which he was a faithful member and officer, seldom missing service.

Funeral services were held in the church he so often entered to worship, and on similar occasion to pay the last respect to friends and loved ones.  Rev. C. W. Freeman conducted the beautiful services, the sermon impressing the importance and reward of the preparation on earth for  the life eternal, that carried a message to all.  The music was especially touching and well rendered by mixed quartette and duet singers.  The floral offerings were many and most beautiful.  The funeral was one of the largest ever witnessed in the community and despite the inclemency of the weather the church was filled to its utmost capacity.  Under the direction of Mr. Lucas Parker the body was interred in the Masonic Cemetery near the waters where thirty-four years ago his body was buried in baptism.

The immediate family to mourn his loss are his devoted wife, one son, Guy C., one daughter,. Mrs. Nina Bartleson Lyerle, of Joplin, Mo., two sisters, Mrs. Elsie Davidson, of Grand Chain, Mrs. Ida Heathcock, of San Francisco, Cal., one brother, Mr. G. C. Bartleson, of Grand Chain.

Mr. Bartleson will be missed by all and the sincere sympathy of the entire community is extended to the bereaved family and we commend them to the care of our Heavenly Father, in whose power alone it lies to give and to take away and who in His own good time will reveal to all, why his will not ours must be done.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank our many friends for their kindness, sympathy and help furring the illness and loss of our loved husband and father; also for the beautiful floral offerings.
Mrs. J. W. Bartleson
Guy C. Bartleson
Nina B. Lyerle
 

Friday, 23 Apr 1920:

James Travers, a respectable colored man of this place (Grand Chain), died at his home Monday after a long illness. He leaves a wife and several children.

A PIONEER GONE

To the old residents of Mound City it was a great shock to hear of the death of Mrs. Josephine Goodloe, for over a quarter of a century actively identified with the life of this city and Cairo, both as a leader in social events and in its musical activities. A music teacher for twenty years or more of her life here, her pupils are scattered all over the north and west, and all will unite in praise of her painstaking and careful work. For the better part of her life in this city, she was a communicant of St. Peter's Episcopal Church, and was a leading spirit in its religious, social and musical work, taking almost sole charge of the choir work, being a great help to Rev. E. A. Wells, for many years rector of the parish.

In the late 80s the family home was broken up, and Mrs. Goodloe went north with her mother to make her home with her sister, Mrs. E. A. Bintliff, in Kankakee, later moving with her to St. Louis.
A most beautiful character has been called home to its maker. Unselfish to the last degree, it may be said that she lived her life for others, lending a helping hand here, comforting the afflicted there, and in all things putting self behind her that others might benefit. She has left a legacy of good deeds behind her that any man might be proud of. Inheriting from her mother a taste for reading she had accumulated during her four score years a vast store of information that enabled her always to converse intelligently on almost any of the current topics of the day. The last six months of her life was clouded by failing memory, making veritably true "that tho we be strong that they come to four score years, yet is there strength, there but labor and sorrow, so soon passeth it away and we are gone."

Josephine Holmes was the eldest daughter of James and Mary Holmes and was born in Lexington, June 1839. In 1859 she removed with her father to Mound City, then just springing into existence. During her many years of residence she watched its growth and took part in its progress. She died at the home of her sister at 4:55 p.m., Tuesday, April 13, 1920. The interment took place at Beech Grove Cemetery, being laid to rest beside her father, mother and sister. Her son, J. H. Goodloe, of Milwaukee, and sisters, Mrs. H. H. Rogers, of Lake Geneva, Wis., and Mrs. E. H. Bintliff, of St. Louis, accompanied the remains. She was united in marriage to I. B. Goodloe, in June 1859. One son was born to this union.

A useful life is ended; a noble character has gone to its reward.

(Ed H. Bentiff married Anna B. Holmes on 15 Nov 1875, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

BODY FOUND

The body of Ebb Ramsey, one of the men missing in the Fayville Powder Plant explosion, was found Tuesday afternoon by a gang of workmen who were clearing away the debris of one of the houses that were totally wrecked. Ramsey was 27 years old and the body was identified by his father, which is a resident of Fayville.

The coroner was called and an inquest held over the body. The verdict rendered by the jury was that is death ____ by ___ explosion occurring on April 7th. The body was found just a few feet from the _____.

_________ were called to take charge of the body and the funeral arrangements. Ramsey's body was taken to Commerce, Mo., for burial.

Mrs. H. E. Burliff, of St. Louis, Mrs. H. H. Rogers, of Lake Geneva, Wis., and J. H. Goodloe, of Milwaukee, Wis., who accompanied the remains of Mrs. Josephine Goodloe here for burial, have returned to their homes.

Friday, 30 Apr 1920:
MRS. MOORE DEAD

Mrs. Mary Moore, widow of the late Richard Moore, and aged about 74 years, died last Sunday at her home in Grand Chain after suffering the past week with a severe case of pneumonia. The remains were laid to rest Monday afternoon in the Olmsted Cemetery.

The deceased, who has lived in this county for many years, is survived by five sons and three daughters, most of whom were with here when the end came.

(Her marker in Calvin-Barber Cemetery near Olmsted reads:  Mary J. Moore 1845-1920.  Richard Moore 1835-1916.—Darrel Dexter)

MRS. GRAVES DEAD

Mrs. Mary Catherine Graves, widow of the late Samuel H. Graves, died at her home at Villa Ridge at 1:30 o'clock on Sunday afternoon. She was 80 years old. Mrs. Graves was born in Mason County, Ky., May 22, 1839. She removed with her parents to Pulaski County in 1854, when a girl of 16 years and has made her home there for 64 years.

She is survived by six children, Mrs. Joseph Bour and F. E. Graves, of Villa Ridge, Mrs. W. E. Sheerer, of this city, W. O. Graves, of Mounds, Mrs. C. R. Wakeland, of St. Louis and Mrs. J. W. Bundscuh, of Thermil, Cal. All the children, except the daughter living in California, were at their mother's bedside during the last few hours.

Funeral services were conducted at the residence of Joseph Bour on Tuesday afternoon at 2 p.m., interment in Beech Grove Cemetery.

(William E. Sheerer married Lilly D. Graves on 14 Jul 1888, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Charles Richard Wakeland married Nettie Graves on 17 Apr 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  John Wesley Bundschuh married Flora Graves on 20 Oct 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Friday, 7 May 1920:
John Kline died at his home in Grand Chain Saturday morning after a long illness. Interment at Masonic Cemetery at Grand Chain.

(His marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  John A. Cline Born Sept. 25, 1856 Died May 1, 1920.—Darrel Dexter)

We had our (Edith Chapel) regular session of Sunday school last Sunday, but no church service, as our people were very much disturbed and grieved over the sudden death of Mrs. Mariah Meeks. She had been in impaired health for two years or more, but assisted in the home duties, and on Saturday, May 1st, she had been on duty all day up to about 5 o'clock in the afternoon. She had a stroke that rendered her helpless and speechless. Medical aid was given and all the service and attention that the family and friends could tender her, but she remained in a stupor until death relieved her. She was the wife of Louis A. Meeks and was 56 years old. To this union 13 children were born, of that number 8 are living, 4 boys and 4 girls. She also leaves ten sisters and brothers, besides other relatives and friends to mourn her loss. She was converted in 1886 and joined the A. M. E. church and remained a member of same until her death. She was a devoted wife and mother, a kind neighbor and a loyal supporter of the church. Funeral services were held Tuesday, May 4, at Edith Chapel Church conducted by the pastor, assisted by Rev. White of Pulaski. Theme: "The erection of a building as to plan, material, workmen and purpose." The text being taken from the Second Corinthians, 5th chapter and 1st verse. Funeral in charge of Undertaker Aldred of Pulaski. Interment at Wafford Cemetery.

Relatives and friends from Murphysboro, Sparta, Dumain and elsewhere who were her in attendance at the funeral of Mrs. Mariah Meeks have returned to their homes.

(Louie A. Meeks married Mariah Cherry on 1 Oct 1883, in Jackson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

OBITUARY

Mr. John A. Cline, only son of John and Mary Cline, was born two miles northwest of Olmsted, September 25, 1856. His parents died when he was a child. He has been weakly for forty years, with several severe sick spells. He was converted to Christ about 40 years ago. His hope of eternal life sustained him under all his afflictions to the last. He was tenderly cared for in his last illness by his only sister, Mrs. Margaret Jane Hileman, for about six months. His deceased sisters were Nancy Leann, Lucinda, and Mary Lodema.

He apparently without pain fell asleep at 6:30 a.m. May 1, 1920, aged 63 years, 7 months and six days. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. C. W. Freeman at 2:30 p.m., May 2. The large auditorium was about full of people.

(Thomas Hileman married Jane Cline on 14 Jan 1872, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

MR. GAUNT DEAD

Oliver Gaunt died on Tuesday evening at 6:30 o'clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. H. L. Settlemoir in this city.

The deceased was born at Grand Chain, Ill., on May 1st, 1860, and was 60 years and 3 days old at the time of his death. He is survived by his daughter, three brothers, Willis, of Cairo, Perry, of Grand Chain, and Thomas, of Texas; also a sister, Mrs. Thomas Litherland, of Grand Chain.

The funeral was held at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Settlemoir at 1:00 o'clock on Thursday afternoon conducted by Rev. L. V. F. Meske, pastor of the Congregational Church, interment in Beech Grove Cemetery.

CARD OF THANKS

We wish to extend our heartfelt thanks to the people of Mound City for their kindness during the sickness and death of our father and brother, Oliver Gaunt.
Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Settlemoir
Mr., and Mrs. T. J. Litherland
Perry Gaunt
Willis Gaunt

Friday, 14 May 1920:
KILLS STEPFATHER

John Lilly, aged about fifty-three years and a fisherman residing just south of this city on Cache, was shot and instantly killed last Monday by his stepdaughter, Mrs. Nellie Yositch, after Lilly had repeatedly insulted her for some time past. After hearing the story of the woman, coroner's jury immediately returned a verdict of justifiable homicide.

KILLED NEIGHBOR

Pat Nordman, a well-known colored fellow residing in Mounds, is now in jail here after the murdering of his neighbor, Jerry Meyers, last Thursday afternoon, following a quarrel, in which a number of shots were discharged.

When Deputies Mannon Bankson and James Wilson entered the home of Nordman to make the arrest, they found him in bed with two riffles and four revolvers and about five hundred rounds of ammunition by his side.  He submitted to arrest fearing mob violence.

Friday, 21 May 1920:
MRS. ROULETTE DEAD

Mrs. Mary Roulette, a former resident of the Valley Recluse District, and one of Pulaski County's most highly esteemed residents, died Friday morning in Cairo after an illness of many months. She is survived by her husband John, three sons and four daughters, as well as a number of brothers and sisters.

The deceased moved from her farm some time ago and went to Cairo to receive medical attentions to move to California to reside and had purchased a home in that state.

Friday, 28 May 1920:
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to thank our friends and neighbors for their kindness and sympathy shown us during the illness and death of our dear sister, Mrs. Mary Roulette; also for the beautiful floral offerings.
J. T. Hayden and family

Hayden Brothers
J. L. Wanura and family

Monday, May 24th, 1920, the funeral service of Mrs. Maude Eubanks was held at the church. She was taken sick over a year ago and lingered until Sunday morning, May 23rd, 5 a.m. her spirit took its flight. She was 31 years, 11 months and 9 days old and had been a member of the church ever since she was 13 years of age. She died in the triumphs of faith and leaves a husband, a little daughter, a sister and one brother, three nieces and other relatives to mourn her loss. Funeral services conducted by Rev. A. C. Jones and W. P. White. Text Phil. 1st, 21. Theme "Loss and Profit."  Interment at Pulaski.

George Hyte, colored, aged 17 years, died at his home in this city on Wednesday afternoon of tuberculosis. The funeral was held Friday afternoon, interment at Beech Grove Cemetery.

Woodrow Walter, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Dishinger, of America, died Sunday and was buried at Beech Grove Cemetery Monday afternoon.

Mrs. Eliza Ann Ogden died at the home of her son, Ed Ogden, in this city on Wednesday, May 26, of paralysis. The funeral services were held at the residence at three o'clock on Thursday afternoon, conducted by Rev. S. A. Matthews, pastor of the Methodist Church. The remains were shipped to Barlow, Ky., for interment.

Friday, 4 Jun 1920:
Jerry Suter, an old citizen of Pulaski County, also an old soldier, died at Pulaski last Friday morning. The funeral services were held at the C. M. E. church Sunday afternoon. Interment at North Pulaski Cemetery. A goodly number of our vicinity (Edith Chapel) attended same.

             (Jerry Suter married Mrs. Mary Moten, ancestor of Michelle Obama, on 26 Dec 1887, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Henderson Cemetery near Pulaski reads:  Sgt. Jerry Sutton Co. E, 55th U. S. C. Inf.—Darrel Dexter)

Friday, 11 Jun 1920:
Mr. George Hartwell was out Tuesday to embalm the body of Uncle Charles Anderson, who passed away Sunday night at 10 o'clock. He was the oldest resident of our vicinity (Edith Chapel) being something over 90 years old. He leaves a wife, two daughters and three sons. He was a member of the Catholic Church at Sandusky. Funeral services were held Wednesday.

Mrs. Grace Raines, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Napoleon Ranes, was killed in a car accident at St. Louis. The body was brought to Ullin for interment. (Perks)

Friday, 18 Jun 1920:
The funeral of the late Charles Anderson whose death was noted last week was held at the Catholic church at Mounds last ____ , interment at Catholic cemetery. (Edith Chapel)

MR. DAUKSCH DEAD

Fred Dauksch, formerly proprietor of the Grand Laundry in Cairo, died at his home at Galesburg early Sunday morning. Mr. Dauksch was for many years a resident of Cairo. He was married to Miss Winnie Richardson and besides his widow, he leaves two small sons, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Dauksch, of near Olmsted, a sister, Mrs. E. L. Atherton, of Cairo, and four brothers.

The remains arrived in Cairo Tuesday afternoon and were taken to the home of Mrs. Richardson, at 717 Thirty-fourth Street from where they were taken to Beech Grove Cemetery and buried.

(Emmett Atherton married Augusta Docks on 2 Jun 1896, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Friday, 25 Jun 1920:
MR. BURGESS DEAD

Peter Burgess, a prominent and highly respected farmer of this county, passed away at St. Mary's Infirmary at Cairo on Sunday night, at the age of 77 years. Mr. Burgess had been ill for about two years, suffering from paralysis, following an attack of influenza.

Mr. Burgess was born in Macclesleld, England. He moved to America, Ill., in 1863 and was a resident of that place until last August, when he moved to Cairo. He is survived by his wife, two sons, H. G. Burgess, of Herlinger, Texas, and S. J. Burgess, of America; two daughters, Mrs. N. J. Hester and Miss Agatha Burgess. The funeral was held on Tuesday afternoon, interment at Beech Grove Cemetery.

Lola Smith, the one-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Olen Smith, died on Monday after a few days illness of pneumonia. The funeral was held at the residence on Tuesday afternoon, conducted by Rev. S. A. Matthews, interment in Beech Grove Cemetery.

Sidney E. Herron, colored, aged 46 years, died on Tuesday afternoon after a few hours illness. The funeral was held on Friday afternoon at the Missionary Baptist Church, interment in Beech Grove Cemetery.

Friday, 2 Jul 1920:
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to express our deepest gratitude and sincere appreciation to our friends and relation for their kind words and deeds of love and sympathy and for the beautiful floral offerings during then illness and death of our precious baby.
Mrs. Nora Essex
Mrs. J. D. Bayless and family (Edith Chapel)

FORMER MOUND CITY BOY DIES AT HIS ____

Howard Swisshelm, ___ of Mound City, died ___ morning at the home of his parents at Louisville, Ky. The ___ man had been ill since ___ after securing his discharge from the navy about the time the war ended.

Information of his death was received by William Ba____ Mound City, manager of ___man Veneer & Panel Company. The message contained no details, however. The young man's death had been expected ____.  He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. U. A. Swisshelm, who ___ resided in this city, ____ Swisshelm was in charge ___ Inman plant prior to his transfer to the Louisville office company.
Howard Swisshelm was 24 years old. He was well ____ among the young folks of Mound City and Cairo and scores of friends will be sad to hear of his untimely death. The young man served in the U. S. Navy throughout the ___ the war.

Friday, 9 Jul 1920:
Mrs. Amanda Goins, of east of Karnak, was brought to this place (Round Pond) Wednesday for burial.

CAIRO MAN DROWNS

Oscar Loeb, a well-known employee of the Singer plant in Cairo, was accidentally drowned last Monday at the Lewis Sandbar north of this city, while enjoying a picnic party with his family and a number of friends.

Just as to how the accident procured will probably never be known, but it is thought that the young man, in diving from a tree top, must have struck his head on some obstacle under the water, which knocked him unconscious and he drowned before his fellow friends even knew that anything had happened.

Word has been received that J. E. Mackey, formerly a resident of Vienna in Johnson County and later a resident of Mounds, suffered five distinct strokes of paralysis last Monday at his home in Centralia and was in a very dangerous condition at last accounts. The day previous to the strokes he apparently was in the best of health and spirits.

Friday, 16 Jul 1920:
DEATH OF MRS. JOE SMITH

Mrs. Joseph Smith, aged 67 years and one of the most esteemed residents of this city, died at her home here last __day morning and on Wednesday afternoon the remains were taken to the Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds where they were laid to rest.

The deceased had ___ been in fairly good health, but a few weeks ago when ___ suffered a paralytic stroke from which she could not recover.

She leaves to mourn her husband, Joseph Smith, three children, Mrs. J. E. ____, Elisha and George Ashw___ of this city.

(Joseph Smith married Mrs. Laura Ashworth on 22 Dec 1896, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Friday, 30 Jul 1920:
Wiley Thompson, one of our (Pulaski) highly honored colored citizens and a farmer and preacher, died on Wednesday. He was nearing the age of 92 years and was a very industrious man and well liked by all of the people both white and colored. He owned a good 80-acre farm.

(Wiley Thompson married Martha Davis about 1861.  He is in the 1880 census of Tywappity Township, Mississippi Co., Mo.:  Wiley Thompson, 40, born in North Carolina.  He is in the 1900 census of Pulaski Precinct, Pulaski Co., Ill.:  Wiley Thompson, born in 1841 in North Carolina.  He is in the 1910 census of Pulaski Precinct:  Wiley T. Thompson, 73, born in North Carolina.  He is in the 1920 census of Pulaski Precinct:  Wiley T. Thompson, 89, born in North Carolina.  His marker in Henderson Cemetery near Pulaski reads:  Wiley Thompson died July 27, 1920 Age 80.  Resting in Peace.—Darrel Dexter) 

Friday, 6 Aug 1920:
Mrs. Mollie Hickman, wife of G. W. Hickman, was born in the state of Kentucky in 1872 and departed this life July 27th, 1920. She leaves a husband, one daughter, three sons, mother, brother and sister to mourn her demise. She was a member of the Edith Chapel Church where funeral services were conducted July 30th. Rev. A. C. Jones conducted the services and delivered the sermon.

Mrs. Mollie Hickman, wife of G. W. Hickman, passed away Tuesday night, July 27, 1920, at their residence. The arrangements for the funeral are being made. (Edith Chapel—last week's items)

Several from Grand Chain attended the funeral of the seven-year-old daughter of Mrs. Don Smith, at Karnak last Wednesday. (Grand Chain)

Mrs. Verna Davis, of Carterville, came home Wednesday to attend the funeral of her sister. (Perks)

Little Violet Davis, the two-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. Davis, was laid to rest at Mt. Olive Cemetery Tuesday, July 27th. She leaves to mourn her death, father, mother, sister and brothers. (Perks)

THOMAS PRICE AT REST

The remains of Thomas Price, one of the Pulaski County boys, who served with the American Army in France, was laid to rest Wednesday afternoon at the family cemetery at Grand Chain with military honors.

More than 200 persons attended the services and 30 or more former soldiers in uniform, members of the Winifred Fairfax Warder Post of the American Legion of Alexander and Pulaski County is acted as pall bearers, firing squad, buglers, and an escort for the body.

Rev. Fr. Reich of the Catholic Church at Grand Chain delivered the services.

(His marker in Price Cemetery reads:  Thomas T. Price Illinois Pvt., Emergency Hospital 2, Feb. 15, 1919.—Darrel Dexter)

DEATH OF JUDGE CARTER

Henry Goodlow Carter, one of the old and highly esteemed residents of this city, died last Sunday afternoon at Carbondale, at the Methodist Hospital, where he had been taken for treatment. He was over eighty-two years of age.

Judge Carter was born at Versailles, Ky., March 22, 1838, and when a young lad came to this county, where he has since resided. In the year 1872 he was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Brown of St. Louis and to this union were born three children, all of whom have passed away. The only survivors of the deceased are his sister, Mrs. Dora W. Hogan, of Danville, Ill., and his grandson, Wiltz B. Bristoe, who is at present serving with the American forces in Germany.

During the Cleveland Administration, he was appointed postmaster.  He was an active member of the Pulaski County bar and at the time of his death was police magistrate.

The funeral services were conducted Tuesday afternoon at the Baptist church by Rev. Lockard, pastor of the church and the remains were laid to rest in the Beech Grove Cemetery.

(Daniel Hogan married Dora W. Carter on 25 May 1876, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

IRMA MAY DEVORE IN AUTO COLLISION

Irma May, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Devore, of this city, lies at the St. Mary's Hospital at Cairo in a very dangerous condition, the result of being thrown from an automobile in a collision with an interurban street car Thursday afternoon last on the northern outskirts of Cairo. Martin Bolar, who was in the car with Miss Devore, was slightly bruised.

Witnesses state that the girl was making the turn near the Country Club, preparing to return to the picnic grounds and just as the automobile was on the track, the interurban car, which was hidden from view by a load of hay, struck the machine, completely demolishing it and throwing the occupants to the ground.

(Robert E. Devore married Laura F. Hughlett on 30 Dec 1889, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Friday, 13 Aug 1920:
IRMA MAY DEVORE DIES

Miss Irma May Devore passed away late Monday evening at the St. Mary’s Hospital at Cairo where she was taken last Thursday afternoon after being in a terrible automobile collision on the Cairo road north of that city, she driving her car into an approaching interurban car.

Miss Devore was a very attractive young lady, eighteen years of age,  and the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Devore of this city, who have been in constant attendance at the bedside up to the time of her death.

The accident occurred last Thursday morning.  Miss Devore had driven south to the Beech Ridge road to turn her car around.  A wagon with a load of hay obstructed her view of the approaching interurban car, according to the statement of Martin Bolar, who was in the machine with Miss Devore at the time of the accident.

Both occupants of the automobile were thrown about 20 feet and the young man escaped without serious injury.

They were both taken to St. Mary’s Infirmary and it was found that the young girl had sustained a fractured skull.  She never regained consciousness, and although the skull was trephanned in an effort to save her life, the operation proved to no avail.

The funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the Methodist church of which she was a member and conducted by Rev. Matthews. Interment at the Beech Grove Cemetery.

(Robert E. Devore married Laura F. Hughlett on 30 Dec 1889, in Pulaski Co., Ill.

MRS. KOONCE AT REST

Mrs. M. A. Koonce, of Villa Ridge, 89 years old, mother of Mrs. G. B. Kelly, of Cairo, died at home at 6 o'clock last Friday afternoon.  She had been ill three months and had been confined to her bed for the past three weeks.

Besides Mrs. Kelly, she is survived by her daughters, Mrs. Allie Thompson of Mounds, Ill., Mrs. Ida Helman of Villa Ridge, and sons, L. H. Koonce, of Mounds and Elmer of Villa Ridge.  She had lived in the vicinity of Villa Ridge nearly all her life and was one of the oldest pioneer residents of Pulaski County.  ___ rest last Saturday afternoon.

(M. L. Helman married Ida Koonce on 22 Jun 1887, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

N. Devore and family of Arkansas City attended the funeral of Miss Irma May Devore which was held here Wednesday afternoon in the Methodist church.

Friday, 20 Aug 1920:
J. R. WEAVER DIES

James Ray Weaver, one of the old residents of this county and for many years a resident of the city of Mounds, died last Monday at his home there after suffering for many weeks with a complication of diseases.  He was fifty-seven years of age.  He is survived by his wife, son and daughter, all of whom were with him when he passed away.

The deceased a number of years ago was sheriff and collector of Pulaski County, but of late years has been interested in real estate dealings, he being a large property owner in this county.

The remains were taken to his former home town of Grand Chain, where they were laid to rest.

DEATH OF CAPT. REES

An item appearing in the Memphis Commercial Appeal tells of the death of Capt. Rees of that city, who was so well known by the residents of this city.

Capt. Rees was the owner of the big steamer Kate Adams, which was on the Marine Ways, here some years back for repairs and during that time many of the younger society set were entertained at different times by Capt. Rees.

He is survived by his wife and one daughter, who reside at Memphis and were with him at the time of his death.


Friday, 27 Aug 1920:
Fred and Roy Weaver, of Mt. Carmel and St. Francisville, were present at the funeral services of their cousin, J. R. Weaver, here (Grand Chain) last Sunday.

The remains of Bob Street, well known colored man, formerly of this place (Grand Chain), were brought here from Indianapolis for burial Sunday.

(Robert Street, 28, son of Albert and Emeline Street, married Mrs. Pharisee Flernoy Richardson, 24, daughter of Edenborough Flernoy and Mary Harris, on 26 Dec 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

A SAD ACCIDENT

One of the most sad accidents ever occurring in this city was on last Friday afternoon, when little Harry, the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. W. I. Baccus, of Upper Main Street, stepped behind their auto as it was being backed from the garage and was instantly killed, the wheels passing over the body and breaking the child's neck.  The car was being driven by the child's brother, Paul.

The terrible happening was purely accidental, as was the verdict by the coroner’s jury after a complete investigation.  The remains of the little lad were laid to rest Sunday afternoon at the Beech Grove Cemetery and the services conducted by Rev. Matthews, of the Methodist Church.

A number of friends of the family of Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Avant of Mounds attended the funeral of their son Wentworth that was held at Mounds on the 22nd.  (Edith Chapel)

Friday, 3 Sep 1920:
MRS. TATUM AT REST

Mrs. Frank Tatum aged about forty-six years, and a highly esteemed resident of this city, died at her home here last Wednesday, after an illness of several weeks.

The funeral services were conducted Friday afternoon at the residence and the remains were laid to rest in the Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.

She leaves to mourn her death, her husband, a brother and her niece, Miss Margaret Brown, of Columbia, Ill.

W. Orville Brown, a former resident of this city, but now engaged in the newspaper business at Columbia, Ill., was in the county seat this week, being called on account of the death of Mrs. Tatum.  His daughter, Miss Margaret, who has made this city her home for many years, will return with her father to Columbia, to reside.  She has a great many friends here who will hate to see her go.
 
Friday, 17 Sep 1920:
Little Elmo Freels, of Upper Main Street, the 15-month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Freels, died at the home of his parents on last Monday night with stomach trouble.  The remains were laid to rest Wednesday at the Beech Grove Cemetery.

Friday, 24 Sep 1920:
Mrs. Nettie Jones has returned home from Golconda and vicinity, she being called there by the sad death of her grandmother.  Her father also passed away the day after she arrived there.  (Edith Chapel)

Robert Duncan, special agent for the Illinois Central at the Mounds yards, shot and killed a young colored fellow on last Tuesday night in the yards at that city and was placed under arrest by Sheriff Bankson and brought to this city to await the action of the grand jury who turned in a verdict of murder.  Duncan later on was released on a bond of $5,000.  The boys were stealing a ride and when ordered off the train started shooting.

Friday, 1 Oct 1920:
DEATH OF MRS. CAMEL

Mrs. Alice Camel, wife of Richard Camel, died at her home in Johnson City, Illinois, September 24th, 1920, after a long illness.

She leaves to mourn her loss a companion, three sons and one daughter and several relatives.  
The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Robert Smith of Boaz, and the remains laid to rest in the Salem Cemetery.

The deceased was a charter member of the M. E. Church at Karnak.

Friday, 8 Oct 1920:
We (Edith Chapel) had no services last Sunday on account of sickness and the death and also so many attending the conference.  Quite a number of our fold attended the annual A. M. E. conference of the Cairo District, which convened at Cairo September 29th and closed Oct. 3rd.

(The death mentioned was probably that of James Flippen.—Darrel Dexter)

Lon Flippen and wife, Mrs. Bessie Eck and others were here from Dumain at the bedside of Brother Flippen, who having been sick for several weeks passed away early Sunday morning.  Had been a member of the church for 45 years and was a faithful ardent Christian.  His membership was at Pulaski, but he was an attendant of our church (Edith Chapel) and Sunday school.  We will miss him, but he is resting from his labors and his works remain.  Funeral services at Edith Chapel Church, conducted by his pastor, Rev. White, of Pulaski, and our pastor, Rev. Jones.

(The 15 Oct 1920, issue gives the deceased’s name as James Flippen.—Darrel Dexter)

DEATH OF CHARLES LIVESAY

Charles Livesay, one of Mound City's prominent and highly esteemed residents, passed away Sunday night at the ____ Hospital, where the ____ he had been taken for ____ treatment after suffering from a fall at Hendrix L_____ company’s plant in the north part of town.

The accident occurred ___noon while a crew of ____ were rolling some big timber ___ skidway, and Mr. Livesay was assisting them by prying ____ on a long timber.  The ____ broke, letting him fall ____ railing and to the ground a distance of about twelve feet falling on his back.  He ____ up and rushed to the hospital and X-Ray taken of his ___ and was found necessary to operate at once.

The funeral was held ___day afternoon from the ___ and the remains laid to rest in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.  Rev. Joel ___ conducted the services.

CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank our many friends who so willingly assisted us during our sad bereavement, the death of our husband and father.  We also wish to thank the many for the use of cars, floral offerings and singing.
Mrs. Charles Livesay
Lawrence Livesay

Mrs. George Cowles, went to Columbus, Ky., this week, being called there by the serious illness of her father.

Victor Koontz, who was called here by the sudden death of his uncle, Charles Livesay, has returned to Chicago to resume his studies at the school of pharmacy in that city.

Lawrence Livesay, of Akron, Ohio, and who was called home here by the sudden death of his father, Charles Livesay, will remain here this winter with his mother.

Friday, 15 Oct 1920:
Had a very interesting session of S. S. last Sunday.  The subject "Baptism" appealed to us as to the spirit soul, mind and body.  At the close of the lesson study, a short memorial service was held, appropriate to the memory of Brother James Flippen. Our pastor, Rev. A. C. Jones, was at Villa Ridge on duty, so the officers conducted morning service.

 

Friday, 22 Oct 1920:
MRS. PORTER DEAD

The funeral of the late Mrs. Porter, who passed away last Saturday afternoon at her home in this city, was held Monday at the Episcopal church here and the services conducted by Rev. Fr. Keuhn.  The deceased had been a resident of this city for many years.  She leaves as her survivors, two daughters, Mrs. Frank Bergman, of this city, and Mrs. Sandige, of Cleveland, and one son, Charles, with whom she had lived for many years.

Friday, 29 Oct 1920:
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to extend our thanks to the friends for the kindness during the illness and death of our beloved little daughter Violet Amelia and especially to the dear brothers of the I. O. O. F. Lodge No. 250, for the help, kindness and the beautiful floral offering.
Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Isenberger
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wedgewood, and children

DEATH OF JAMES CAPOOT

James Capoot, one of the old and highly esteemed residents of this city, died at his home here Thursday afternoon at 2:45 o'clock, after suffering from a severe stroke of paralysis with which he was stricken while at his work at the Marine Ways here.

At the time of his death the deceased had reached the age of seventy-eight years.  He was an old soldier, having served with the Confederate side during the Civil War.

Mr. Capoot is survived by one son, M. L. Capoot, stepson, W. T. Jaccard, and three grandchildren.
The remains will be laid to rest Sunday afternoon at Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.

(James Capoot married Mrs. Henrietta Jaccard on 11 Jun 1872, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  William T. Jaccard married Henrietta Stophlett on 25 Oct 1863, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

OBITUARY

Little Violet Amelia Isenberger, the second and youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Isenberger, died at their home 3 miles north of this city Saturday night after an illness of a few days from a complication of diseases was 4 years, 2 months and 17 days old, just a sweet baby, fled to the arms of Jesus to rest on his bosom of love waiting there to meet the rest of her loved ones.  She leaves to mourn her loss, her parents and two brothers, one sister and grandparents and a number of other relatives.  The funeral was held at the home Monday and the remains laid to rest in the Beech Grove Cemetery with many beautiful flowers.

Friday, 5 Nov 1920:
HUNTER ACCIDENTALLY KILLED AT HORSE SHOE

Elmer Cope, aged about 25 years and residing near Dongola, was shot and almost instantly killed early Friday morning at Horse Shoe Lake in Alexander County, while hunting ducks with his cousins, Clyde and Nathan Karraker, of Dongola and A. J. Karraker, of Venago, Neb.

The four fellows were all in a small boat.  Cope setting in the rear, when finally a bunch of ducks swung into them and all raised to shoot.  In some unknown manner, Cope's gun hung on the side of the boat and was discharged, the full load hitting him in the back of the head.  He died before the boat could be gotten to the shore.

The men hurried to Olive Branch and Coroner John Brown and Undertaker Edward Burke of Cairo were summoned.  An inquest was held and the body removed to Cairo where it was prepared for burial and sent to his home at Dongola.

The young man is a cousin of Earl Karaker, of this city.

(His marker in Hinkle Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Elmer L. Cope Born April 26, 1895 Died Nov. 5, 1920.  Member U. S. Marines 1918-1919.  The loneliness is hard to bear; The silence seems to chill us through And missing him that was so fair, There seems no joy in all we do.  U. S. American Legion.—Darrel Dexter)

Thursday, 18 Nov 1920:
Mrs. Bourland, of Cleveland, formerly of Grand Chain, whose husband died recently, is here on an extended visit with Mrs. O. F. Lischer and other friends.  (Grand Chain)

BODY OF NEGRO SOLDIER ARRIVES FROM FRANCE
Remains of David Fitzpatrick Laid to Rest with Military Honors.

The body of David Fitzpatrick, colored, who died in France in the early summer of 1919, while a member of the American Expeditionary Forces, arrived in Mound City Sunday from New York and was taken to the undertaking parlors of G. A. James to await burial.

Fitzpatrick went to France early in 1918 with the first draft from Caruthersville, Mo., and was 29 years of age at the time of his death.  He died in a U. S. Hospital near Brest, France.  Funeral services were conducted by Rev. O. H. Henderson of the Main Street Free Baptist Church and the remains given a military burial at the National Cemetery Monday afternoon.

(David Fitzpatrick Pvt. U.S. Army Died 17 Mar 1919, and is buried in Section F grave 4974D at Mound City National Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Thursday, 2 Dec 1920:
Mrs. C. W. Freeman has been ___ days in Cumberland County, ___ She was called there to the funeral services of her sister-in-law.  The burial was ___ends Grove Church near ____.  She was the wife of A. ___ Freeman, an engine inspector ___ Big Four shops at Mattoon.

Mrs. Mattie Clarry one of our (Edith Chapel) oldest settlers here and a widow, is to take her departure in the near future for St. Louis, Mo., to reside with one of her daughters.  Last Saturday a widow's dinner was given in her honor to which all the widows were invited, who lived in our immediate settlement.  There were seven in all and they enjoyed the substantials as well as the after dinner chat of reminiscences of ye time of old.

FORMER MOUND CITYAN DIES IN TEXAS

Word was received here last week by Mrs. J. T. Armstrong of the death of her nephew, Russell Taylor, of San Antonio, Texas.  Mr. Taylor was a former resident of this city and several years ago moved to Texas, where it was thought his health would be improved by the climate.  Besides a number of relatives, the deceased had a large circle of friends here who will mourn his death.

******************************

The Mounds News

 

The Mounds News, Friday, 2 Jan 1920:
OBITUARY
LOTTIE BENSON WILKINSON

Lottie Benson Wilkinson was born near Dongola, Illinois, February 27th, 1847.  Died at the home of her daughter at Mounds, Illinois, December 27, 1919, aged 70 years and ten months.

She was married to Hancel A. Wilkinson in November 1887.  To this union four children were born, three daughters and one son.  One daughter—Martha--died at the age of nine years.  Her husband passed on to the other world about three years ago.

The two surviving daughters and son are:  Mrs. Alice Biggerstaff, of Shiloh, Mrs. Clara Penry, of Mounds, and J. F. Wilkinson of Villa Ridge.  Together with these she leaves one brother, L. W. Benson, eleven grandchildren and a host of friends to mourn their loss.

She professed faith in Christ in her girlhood days and united with the Methodist Episcopal Church near Moscow, later moving her membership to Villa Ridge, where she was a faithful member until her death.

“For her to die was gain.”

Funeral services were held in the Methodist church at Mounds Sunday at 2 p.m., December 27, and the body laid to rest in Villa Ridge cemetery.
Contributed by O. F. Culver
 
Aged Colored Justice Dead

Joseph Perry Lewis (colored), of Olmstead, died Dec. 24th of malaria fever at the age of 58 years.  He had been a justice of the peace for many years and was well known in and around his home town.  Funeral services were held at Olmstead and burial at Warfield Cemetery, conducted by Undertaker G. J. James of this place.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to tender our sincere thanks to the many kind friends who so graciously and lovingly served us by acts and words during the long illness and at the time of the death of our loving mother, Mrs. Littie Bentson Wilkinson.
Mrs. Eliza Biggerstaff

Mrs. Charles Penery
Mrs. J. F. Wilkinson
 
The Mounds News, Friday, 9 Jan 1920:
SWITCHMAN KILLED IN FALL UNDER FREIGHT CAR

W. J. Poindexter, 24, a switchman in the I. C. yards at this place, died Monday morning from injuries received when he fell beneath a moving car Sunday night at 9:30 o’clock.

There were no eye witnesses to the accident, but it is believed that a broken drawbar was the cause.

He was taken by special train to a Cairo hospital, where it was found that his left leg was nearly severed at the hip and was horribly mangled besides he had received internal injuries that caused his death.

The young man was well known here and had many warm friends.  He joined the army during the world war and upon receiving his discharge he secured a position in the railroad offices here as a clerk and only took a job switching about three weeks ago.
 
ENGINEER KILLED IN WRECK AT CAIRO JUNCTION

Engineer J. W. Howard, 42 years old, of Jackson, Tenn., sustained injuries from which he died at St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo last night at 11 o’clock, when he was buried under his engine in a wreck at Cairo Junction Thursday night at 5:10.

J.R. Hendon, of Mound City, engineer on a switch engine was cut and bruised and his fireman, Clarence Beedle, of this city, was hurt, but able to go to his home unaided.

Howard’s engine, pulling an extra, had crossed the bridge proceeding north, blinded by the heavy fog he did not see the switch engine running from Cairo to Mounds.  Hanson, also blinded by the fog, was crossing on a switch track to the main line when the two engines came together.

The engine from the south was overturned and the water tank was torn from the switch engine.  Hanson was crushed in the wreck about the shoulders and hips, but his condition is not considered serious.
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 16 Jan 1920:
COBDEN HERO DIES; RECEIVED MEDAL

             Cobden, Ill., Jan. 14, 1920.—Clarence Rich, a prominent son of Michael M. and Allie E. Otrich Rich, who died of empierna Jan. 7, will be remembered as one of Union County’s first heroes who went down in the world’s greatest war.

Private Rich enlisted in Chicago on Aug. 24, 1917, with the 149th Field Artillery, 42nd Div., sailed for France Oct. 18, 1917; saw the advance of the Allies and the retreat of the German army through Belgium and France into Germany, serving the army of occupation.

Through all the fierce fighting he received no wound, but contracted his fatal malady through exposure which the soldiers endured.

Before going to Germany, Private Rich received a medal for valor and three bars of service to his country.
             Besides his father, there survive him three sisters:  Mrs. Harvey L. Jones, Clula Vista, Calif., Mrs. G. F. Oxburne, Murphysboro, Ill., and Mrs. Hans J. Fletcher, of Mounds, Ill., also three brothers survive him:  John L., Robert R. and George D. Jr.

Funeral services were held at the Congressional church Sunday, Jan. 11, 1920.  Overseas boys of the American Legion acted as pallbearers.

(Michael M. Rich married Alice E. Otrich on 4 Dec 1879, in Union Co., Ill.  The Jonesboro Gazette records his name as Charles L. Rich and states that he was 33 years old and died of disease contracted while in France.—Darrel Dexter)
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 23 Jan 1920:
Funeral services of Mrs. White (colored), who died Wednesday of last week, during a severe spell of coughing, were Sunday afternoon.  She left several children.
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 30 Jan 1920:
Prominent Farmer Dies

Mr. R. Carrico died at his farm home, northwest of the city Monday morning of pneumonia.  He was one of the county’s old residents and very prominent in the community.
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 6 Feb 1920:
RESOLUTIONS

In as much as fate has seen fit to remove the son of our beloved brother, J. E. Skyles, from the family circle, be it hereby

Resolved, That Beech Wood Lodge No. 897, brotherhood Railroad Carmen of America, extend their heartfelt sympathy to the father and mother and brothers of the deceased one in their sad bereavement.

And, be it further resolved that a copy of these resolutions be tendered the family of the deceased that they may be partly consoled in their period of distress.
H. B. Parker
L. McNeil
E. G. Birdwell, Committee
 
The Mounds News, Friday, 5 Mar 1920:
Harry Neistrau

Harry Neistrau, 47 years old, died at his home near America Sunday after an illness of several months.  He is survived by his wife and seven children.  Funeral services were held Monday afternoon from the family home.  Interment being made in Beech Grove Cemetery under the direction of Undertaker James of this place.
 
Henry Moore

Henry Moore, 38 years old, died at his home in Grand Chain Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock.  He is survived by his wife and one child.  Deceased was well known around Grand Chain.
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 12 Mar 1920:
AGED WOMAN BURNED TO DEATH TUESDAY

Mary E. Thomas, colored, living on the John Hawkins farm, about two miles west of Mounds was burned to death Tuesday evening when her clothes caught on fire while at work around a stove.  She was 80 years old and was helpless to save herself, being alone in the house at the time.  She was attempting to empty shucks into the stove from her apron when it caught fire, resulting fatally.
 
Sarah Ann Holder

Sarah Ann Holder, wife of N. Holder, died at her home in Grand Chain Tuesday morning of internal cancer. She was 76 years old and is survived by her husband and one daughter, Mrs. Patrick Murphy. Funeral services were held from the Christian church Wednesday, interment being made in the Boren Cemetery by Undertaker James.
 
Mrs. Frank Lence and three sons were called to Ullin Wednesday by the death of a relative.
 
Miss Blanche Lence returned from Ullin Thursday, where she had been called by the death of an uncle.
 
The Mounds News, Friday, 26 Mar 1920:
BANK ROBBER BROUGHT BACK HERE FOR TRIAL
Sheriff Bankston and Chief of Police Malley Land Alleged Criminal in County Jail
MAY BE MURDERER OF JAMES SITTON
Big Crowds Here Witness Arrival of Bandits in Mounds from St. Louis Last Friday Night under Heavy Guard.

After a legal fight lasting several weeks, George Laskowitz, of St. Louis, is in the hands of the county officials and was brought to Mound City last Friday night for arraignment and trial on the charge of robbing the First National Bank on Feb. 9th of $7,300.
Suspect Sandusky Murder

Laskowitz and Max B. Kallner, alias Harry J. Coleman, were arrested in St. Louis shortly after the robbery and charged with the crime.  They were so insistent in their denials and made such strong fights to prevent extradition that the authorities are convinced they have under arrest one of the men who murdered James H. Sitton, at Sandusky December 20.  Although the murder has been a mystery, many persons saw two men in the vicinity of Sandusky about the time Sitton was killed and a series of crimes were committed.
 
T. W. Doughty, accompanied by his son, C. D. Doughty, drove to Charleston, Mo., Sunday to attend the funeral of his brother.
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 2 Apr 1920:
America Girl Dead

Mabel Elizabeth Steers, 22 years old, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Steers, died at the home of her parents, north of America, Thursday morning after an illness of about four weeks.

Funeral services will be held from the residence Saturday afternoon at 1 o’clock.  Interment in Beech Grove Cemetery, Undertaker James in charge.

(Stephen A. Steers married Mary E. Mason on 10 Mar 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mr. and Mrs. George Albright were called to Dongola, Wednesday to attend the funeral services of the former’s father, who was accidentally killed in Detroit, Mich., Sunday morning.
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 9 Apr 1920:
EXPLOSION AT POWDER PLANT KILLS 5 MEN
Buildings in Mounds Shook to Foundation by Severity of the Force

Six tons of nitro glycerin exploded at the Aetna Explosives Company at Fayville, fifteen miles northwest of Mounds, Wednesday afternoon at 2:45, killing four men instantly and injuring one so severely that he died a few hours later.

The concussion of the explosion was felt distinctly here where buildings were shook to their foundations.

According to Superintendent Messersmithe, the explosive, which went up was equivalent to 75,000 pounds of dynamite.  That accounts for the severity of the force which was felt for miles around.

The dead men were literally blown to atoms.  Only fragments could be found of them.  A cap lying on the ground near the hole where the building stood is believed to have belonged to one of the men.
 
Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Ricks and family returned Thursday from Macon, Ga., where they had been called by the illness and death of Mr. Rick’s father.
 
Child Dies of Pneumonia

George Schuler, Jr., 18 months old, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Schuler, died Thursday evening at 7 o’clock of pneumonia.  The little fellow contracted measles and his frail body could not withstand the ravishes of pneumonia, an after result of this dread disease.

The funeral services will be held Saturday at 2:00 in the M. E. church. Interment in Beechwood conducted by Cole & Hartman, undertakers.
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 16 Apr 1920:
WOOD ALCOHOL CAUSES DEATH OF WILL NOLTE

Will Nolte, a former Mounds boy, was found dead on the sidewalk near his parents’ home in St. Louis last Saturday.

Death is supposed to have been caused by drinking wood alcohol.

Young Nolte had been working at his trade of jeweler in Cincinnati and was on a vacation, spent visiting his parents in St. Louis.

His brother, the only remaining member of the family living here, went to St. Louis Monday evening to attend the funeral.
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 23 Apr 1920:
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Healy returned Monday from Bardwell, Ky., where they had been called by the death of Mrs. Healy’s sister.
 
Mrs. R. P. Furlong attended the funeral services of Mrs. Roberts of Bardwell, Ky.
 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hurst were called to Brookport, Ill., Saturday by the sudden death of Mrs. Hurst’s father.
 
The Mounds News, Friday, 30 Apr 1920:
MOTHER OF F. E. GRAVES DIES AT THE AGE OF 80

Mrs. Mary Catherine Graves, widow of the late Samuel Graves, of Villa Ridge, died at her home in Villa Ridge Monday afternoon.  She was 80 years old.  Mrs. Graves was born in Mason County, Ky., May 22, came to Pulaski County in 1854, when a girl of 16 years, and was made her home there for the past 64 years.

Only a few of her early acquaintances are living.  She is survived by six children, Mrs. Joseph Bour, and F. E. Graves of Villa Ridge, Mrs. W. E. Sheerer, of Mound City, W. O. Graves, of Mounds, Mrs. C. R. Wakeland, of St. Louis, and Mrs. J. W. Bundschuh, of Thermal, Cal.  All except the daughter living in California were at their mother’s bedside during her last few hours.  Mrs. Bundschuh had recently visited here with her mother.

Funeral services were held from the residence of Joseph Bour, Tuesday at 2 p.m., interment being made in Beech Grove Cemetery, direction of G. A. James, undertaker.

(Samuel Horry Graves married Mary C. Littlejohn on 20 Oct 1864, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Charles Richard Wakeland married Nettie Graves on 17 Apr 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  John Wesley Bundschuh married Flora Graves on 20 Oct 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Walter Albritton, age 11 days, died Wednesday.  He was entered at the Beechwood Cemetery on Thursday.
 
Baby Keys, son of Jesse Keys, age five months, died Wednesday and was buried at 11 o’clock Thursday at Beech Grove, Cole undertaker.
 
Mollie Douglas, of North Mounds, was buried at Lincoln Cemetery at 1:00 p.m. Thursday from the Baptist colored church.  Mrs. Douglas died Tuesday at the age of 59 years.
 
Mr. and Mrs. John Newell attended the funeral services of Mr. Newell’s little granddaughter of Elco Monday.
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 7 May 1920:
PULASKI PIONEER DEAD

James E. Tobin, 71 years old, a pioneer of Pulaski County, died Wednesday afternoon at St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo, after a lingering illness.

Mr. Tobin was early in life one of the most prominent farmers in Pulaski County, his operations being in the vicinity of Villa Ridge, where he raised a large family.

He is survived by a widow and twelve children, Frank, Will, Edgar, Ernest, Mrs. Daisy wife of Ward Cotter, Mrs. Isola Koontz of Mounds, John and Clyde Tobin, of Mounds, and Clarence Tobin, who is in California, Jesse, Bessie and Mrs. Kate Laws, of St. Louis.

Funeral services were held Friday morning from the Catholic church in charge of M. O. Cole, undertaker.

(James Tobin married Amanda M. Walker on 28 Oct 1883, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 14 May 1920:
SHOOTS NEIGHBOR; THREATENED BY MOB

Pat Nordman, 45 years old, colored, was arrested at his home in North Mounds Thursday afternoon by Sheriff Bankson after he had shot and possibly mortally wounded Jerry Meyers, 60 years old, also colored, and his neighbor, following a quarrel.

He used a Winchester repeating rifle and fired four shots into Meyers’ body.  Two entered his chest, one his back and the other his thigh.

When the sheriff entered Norton’s house, he found a veritable arsenal.  The negro was in bed but by his side were the Winchester and a Marlin rifle and four revolvers, all loaded, and 200 rounds of ammunition.

It is believed fear of the mob, which had surrounded his home, caused him to submit without trouble.  His victim is expected to die.

(The 4 June 1920, issue of the newspaper records the murderer’s name as Pat Northern.—Darrel Dexter)
 
JURY EXONERATES WOMAN WHO KILLED STEP-FATHER

After Mrs. Nellie Yosich, 27 years old, told a coroner’s jury in Cairo how she had suffered repeated insults at the hands of her step-father, John Lilley, 53 years old, they deliberated only a few minutes before returning a verdict of justifiable homicide. Mrs. Yosich shot and killed her stepfather near her home on the Redman farm in the Drainage District.

The chain of circumstances which led up to the killing related in such a straightforward manner by Mrs. Yosich that the jury could not fail to believe her story, was sufficient provocation to warrant her action, the jurors believed.
 
Mount Vernon—Mrs. Bettie Thomason, divorced wife of Roger Thomason, of East St. Louis, was mysteriously shot and killed in her home at Wayne City.  F. A. Talbert, an admirer of Mrs. Thomason, was found critically wounded in another room of the house.
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 21 May 1920:
MISS WARDER’S BODY TO BE RETURNED FROM ENGLAND FOR BURIAL

Miss Winifred Fairfax Warder’s body will be brought back here from England where she was buried following her death during her service in the American Red Cross.  It was learned yesterday by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Warder, who are in Godfrey, Ill., attending a memorial service for Miss Warder, at Monticello Academy.

Burial will be in the family lot at Marion, Ill., and the funeral will be attended by members of the Cairo Woman’s Club of which she was a member and the local post of the American Legion which bears her name.—Cairo Bulletin
 
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to extend our grateful thanks to all those kind friends who so graciously aided us during the illness and at the sad hour of bereavement, when our death and beloved father passed from our midst.  Especially do we wish to thank those for their beautiful floral offerings and those who furnished machines for our service.
W. L. Tobin
and Brothers and Sister
 
Cairo—Mrs. Thomas Yosich, 27 years old and mother of four children, shot and killed her stepfather, John Lilley, 53, at Cairo because she asserted he insisted on forcing his attentions on her.
 
Centralia—A family quarrel culminated in Edgar Sanders, 19, of Centralia, shooting to death his father.  He emptied the chambers of two revolvers at his father, firing eleven shots.  The boy was arrested.
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 28 May 1920:
Card of Thanks

We take this method of extending thanks to the many friends who, during the recent illness and death of Mrs. Mary E. Roulette, wife and mother, for their numerous acts of kindness and thoughtfulness.  We also wish to thank them for the beautiful flowers which came to brighten an hour of gloom, and for other expressions of sympathy.
J. A. Roulette and Family
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 4 Jun 1920:
KILLED IN I. C. YARDS LAST SATURDAY NIGHT

An unidentified man was killed south of the viaduct in the I. C. yards Saturday night.  He was picked up by the train crew and taken to the James undertaking rooms.

Nothing was found on his person to identify him.
 
MAN WHO KILLED NEGRO DIES IN JAIL

Pat Northern, colored, who shot and killed Jerry Meyers, in North Mounds on May 13, died in the county jail at Mound City Monday evening, where he had been confined awaiting action of the grand jury.

His death was the result of a complication of diseases.  The remains were brought to Mounds by Cole-Hartwell Undertakers and prepared for shipment to his brother in Toone, Tenn.
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 11 Jun 1920:
SIXTEEN-YEAR-OLD COLORED BOY SHOT IN CRAPS GAME

Hillard Woods, colored, 16 years old, was shot and killed Wednesday night by Leo Kenneson, 22, in the new building just being completed in the rear of Smother’s Cafe.

It is understood that the boy and man got into an altercation during a crap game in progress, however, information is meager and the actual facts of the murder are not obtainable.

Keninson has made his get-away and it is questionable whether he will ever be apprehended.
 
The Mounds News, Friday, 25 Jun 1920:
BERT ADAMS KILLED IN FALL FROM TRAIN
Brother of Walter and Ed Adams of This City and Well Known Here

Royal Vertie Adams, 31 years old, a switchman, received fatal injuries near the Illinois Central station at Belleville at 8 p.m. last Saturday, when he was run over by a southbound freight train.  Both of his legs were severed at the knees.  He died at St. Elizabeth’s Hospital in Belleville at 2 a.m. Sunday.

Adams was on his way to Dongola to join his family, whom he had sent back home after he was laid off of his job as switchman at St. Elmo, and was riding with the crew of the train.

He was found by some boys attracted by his groans, lying alongside of the tracks and removed to the hospital where he died.
Identified by Check

When found Adams was conscious.  He said that he had started to walk on top of the slowly moving train which suddenly gave a jerk and he missed his footing and fell between the cars.  As he struck the ground, he attempted to pull himself out from under the train, but had only moved a few inches when caught under the wheels

He lost consciousness on the way to the hospital.

On Adams’ person was found $37.50 in cash and a check for $9.  From the check his name and St. Ilmo address were obtained.

Mrs. Adams was in Mounds at the time of the fatal accident visiting at home of her brother-in-law, and she with his brothers, Walter and Ed, went to Belleville to make arrangements for bringing the remains to Dongola for burial.

Adams was born in Union County, January 12, 1889.  In 1910 he was married to Bessie Spect.  He leaves his wife and one daughter, Lova, 13 years old and one son, Fred, 8 years old.  He also is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Adams, of Dongola, and four brothers Walter, Oscar, Edward and Curtis.
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 2 Jul 1920:
Mildred Mary Galbraith

Mildred Mary Galbraith the little 4-month-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Homer Galbraith, died Saturday evening at the home of her parents.  Funeral services were held Monday evening, conducted by Rev. O. F. Culver.  Interment at Beech Grove Cemetery.
 
Mary Ellen Kalaher

Mary Ellen Kalaher, 37 years old, died at the home of her aunt, Mrs. A. A. Light, Saturday evening.  Funeral services were held at the Baptist church, conducted by Rev. Turner of Cairo.  Interment in Beech Grove Cemetery.
 
I. C. ENGINEER DIES AT SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO

Word was received here Monday of the death at Santa Fe, New Mexico, of Richard N. Finch, formerly an engineer on the Illinois Central out of Mounds, and a son-in-law of Mr. and Mrs. H. O. Aldred.

The remains are being brought to Mounds for burial by his wife and are expected to arrive here some time tomorrow.

W. G. Bard met the party at El Paso, Texas.

(Henry O. Aldred married Sarah E. McClellan on 3 Dec 1882, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
SEVEN ARE KILLED WHEN I.C. TRAIN HITS AUTO

Seven lives were snuffed out and two possibly fatally injured last Sunday when an Illinois Central train hit a machine near Franklin, Ind., driven by Will Litherland, in which he, his wife and five children, his wife’s cousin and her little son were riding.

Local color is given to the disaster from the fact that Litherland was well known here and that two of his sisters, Mrs. Robert Ent and Mrs. W. H. Hammett, live in Mounds, and one of the children was here visiting her aunty at the time the accident occurred.

Two of the Litherland boys are still living, but one of them has only slight chances of recovery.
Three weeks ago the Litherland family had a family reunion, the first one in twelve years, when all the children were brought together.

Mr. Litherland leaves three sisters, Mrs. Robert Ent, and Mrs. W. H. Hammett, both of this city, and Mrs. A. J. Burnhardt, of Vicksburg, Miss.  All of them attended the funeral at Nashville, Ind., the home of the family, which was held last Tuesday.

(Robert Ent married Edith Litherland on 29 Aug 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
EVIDENCE FOUND THAT WILL NOLTE WAS KILLED BY BEING HIT BY AUTOMOBILE

Officials of St. Louis working on the suspicion that Will Nolte had lost his life by being struck by an automobile, and did not die as the cause of drinking wood alcohol, as was erroneously reported, have unearthed evidence to substantiate their contention.

The young man with a companion was picked up in the streets of St. Louis early last spring unconscious and the report was sent out that they had been drinking alcohol.  At a coroner’s inquest of the body of young Nolte it was found after an autopsy that his stomach had no signs of liquor of any kind, but that his skull was fractured, and on this evidence the department of police has been working to apprehend the driver of the car that struck the boys.
 
Logan Taylor was called to Creal Springs the first of the week on account of the death of his uncle, Mr. Burbanks, who died last Friday.
 
Miss Edith Latherton was called to her home in Nashville, Ind., Monday by the sudden death of her mother and father and three other members of the family, who were killed in an automobile accident.

(The name should be Edith Litherland.—Darrel Dexter)
 
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to extend our sincere thanks to our friends and neighbors and especially Rev. Mr. Turner, for their kind offices during the hours of our sad bereavement when our sister and niece, Mary Ellen Kalaher was called to her maker.  For the many beautiful floral offerings we feel grateful.
Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Light
Oscar Vowels
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 9 Jul 1920:
ENGINEERS LAY FORMER CTAFT MEMBER AT REST

The remains of Richard Finch, a former engineer on the Illinois Central railroad here, who died at Santa Fe, New Mexico, were bought to this place last Saturday, accompanied by his wife and two children and laid at rest in Beech Grove Cemetery under the direction of the Local Lodge of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers.

Rev. O. F. Culver, pastor of the M. E. church officiating at the services held at the home of W. G. Bard, brother-in-law of deceased.

The pall bearers were:  J. L. Harrington, of Jackson, Tenn., J. W. Anderson, of Mayfield, Ky., Alex Deeslie, S. L. Atherton, A. C. Burr and T. Summers.

J. E. Green officiated in the service at the cemetery for the engineers.

Mr. Finch is survived by his wife and two sons, his mother, Mrs. H. N. of Martin, Tenn., and four brothers and four sisters, all of whom were here to attend the funeral.
 
Miss Tillie Aldred was called hoe the first of the week from Washington, D.C., where she is employed in a government department, to attend the funeral of her brother-in-law.
 
 The Mounds News, Friday, 16 Jul 1920:
Bowel Paralysis Takes Baby

Ernest LeRoy, the 3-month-old baby boy of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Guy, of South McKinley Avenue, died Wednesday morning at 6:45 after an illness of over two weeks suffering with paralysis of the bowels.

The little fellow had been in delicate health since birth.

Funeral services were held at the residence Thursday morning conducted by Rev. Harry Lee Spencer, assisted by Rev. O. F. Culver.

Interment in the New Hope Cemetery north of Mounds.
 
Leo Kinninson Is Arrested

Leo Kinninson, colored, who shot and killed Hillard, another colored boy, in Bailey’s pool room here in Mounds June 9th, was arrested in Toledo, Ohio, last week and turned over to the authorities of Pulaski County, and is now in jail at Mounds City awaiting action of the grand jury.
 
IN MEMORIUM
Woodland Mills, Tenn., April 8, 1880

Richard Newton Finch was born the son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry N. Finch.  Died in Santa Fe, New Mexico, Saturday, June 26, 1920, aged 40 years, 2 months and 18 days.

Had been in declining health for the past year and had gone to several places with the hope of benefit.

Was a member of Division No. 93, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers of Jackson, Tenn., where he resided for the past fourteen years.

At the time of his death he was a valued employee of the Illinois Central Railroad, in his chosen work, in the capacity of engineer.

In his youth he united with the Baptist Church in which he held membership until his death.

On December 25, 1905, he was united in marriage to Miss T. Olive Aldred of Mounds, Ill., who with two sons, Richard Newton, Jr., and M. Aldred survive.

He also leaves father, mother, four sisters and five brothers, and many other relatives and friends.
Was laid to rest in Beechwood Cemetery, Saturday, July 3rd, 1920, Rev. O. F. Culver conducting the service. Division 93 B of L. E. had charge of the service at the grave.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to express our thanks and appreciation for the kindness and sympathy extended us in the recent sad loss of our husband, father, son and brother, Richard Newton Finch.
Mrs. Richard Newton Finch
Richard Newton Finch, Jr.
Aldred Finch
Mr. and Mrs. H. O. Aldred
Ora M. Aldred
Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Bard
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 23 Jul 1920:
Mrs. Rena Harrison, mother of Mr. Nate Atherton, died this afternoon after a long illness.  The remains will be taken to Wycliffe, Ky., Sunday for burial.
 
Mrs. Mary E. Dunsworth, 73 years old, wife of Charles W. Dunsworth, died at the family home on Blanche Ave., this afternoon after an illness of over a year, two months of which time she was confined to her bed.

Besides her husband, four children survive her:  Mrs. E. B. Miller, of Muskagee, Okla., Ebb Moore, of Memphis, Tenn., Mrs. J. Robertson, of Cabool, Mo., and Mrs. J. R. Weaver, of Mounds.
Funeral services will be held at the family residence at 2 p.m. Monday interment in Odd Fellows Cemetery at Dongola, Ill.  Train No. 6 will convey funeral party to Dongola.

(Charles W. Dunsworth married Mrs. Mary Moore, daughter of Cyrus Braden and Dicy Davis, on 28 Apr 1879, in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Mary E. Dunsworth 1847-1920.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Little Miss Fay Watley, niece of Mrs. Hargett died Wednesday morning at St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo after an operation for appendicitis.
 
OBITUARY

Ernest LeRoy Guy was born April 25, 1920.  He was transplanted to the heavenly garden Wednesday morning, July 14, aged 2 months, and 19 days.

Little Ernest was loaned to us but a short time, but his presence brought only sunshine.
The stairs seem to shine with a brighter light as they welcome those little sinless and untaught spirits into eternal companion with the spotless and pure in an infinity of God’s providing.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to extend our grateful thanks for the kindness shown us during the illness and death of our dear baby, also do we wish to show our appreciation for the many beautiful floral offerings.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Guy
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 30 Jul 1920:
KENNISON GETS 15 YEARS FOR THE MURDER OF HILLARD

Leo Kinnison, colored, who shot and killed Hillard, another colored boy, here in Mounds several weeks ago, was indicted by the grand jury Monday and plead guilty to the charge of murder.  Judge Hartwell sentenced him to 15 years in the penitentiary.

After Kennison killed Hillard he made his escape, but was arrested several weeks later in Toledo, Ohio, a fine piece of work done out of Sheriff Bankson’s office worthy of the highest praise.
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 6 Aug 1920:
OBITUARY

             Brother Henry Goodloe Carter was born in Versailles, Kentucky, March 22nd, 1838, departed this life at Carbondale, Illinois, August 1st at 1 p.m. 1920, aged 82 years, 4 months and 9 days.  He was the oldest child of Judge George W. Carter, one of the pioneer settlers of Pulaski County, who moved here from Woodford County, Kentucky, in 1860.  In 1872 he married Miss Margaret Brow of St. Louis, Mo.  To this union was born three children, all of whom have passed away. Out of the three promising grandchildren, only one is now living, Wiltz B. Fristoe.

Brother Carter was a lawyer by profession.  He served as postmaster during Cleveland’s second administration. At the time of his death he was still a useful man, filling the office of police magistrate.
He was converted a number of years ago and feeling the need of a church of his faith he united with the First Baptist Church of Mounds City.  He was a loyal supporter of the church and his greatest happiness was in advancing the interest of the church and working for the Lord and Master.  He was ordained a deacon in the church and was also one of the trustees of the church.  Brother Carter was in every sense a Christian gentleman of a kind disposition, every ready to administer to the poor and needy.  His beg heart was full of love for humanity.  He was truly one of “nature’s nobleman.”

Funeral services were conducted Tuesday afternoon at the First Baptist Church by Rev. H. E. Lockard and remains laid to rest in the Beech Grove Cemetery.
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 13 Aug 1920:
MOTHER OF A. L. KOONCE DIES AT VILLA RIDGE

Funeral services for Mrs. Margaret Koonce, who died August 6th, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Ida Helman, near Villa Ridge, Ill., were held at the Congregational church in Villa Ridge Sunday afternoon by her pastor Rev. Richards.  Interment was made at Villa Ridge cemetery.

Mrs. Margaret Koonce was born April 18th, 1831, in Pennsylvania.  She was married to N. N. Koonce in 1854 in Greenville, Ill. and ten children were born to them, five of whom survive her.  They are L. H. Koonce, Mrs. T. A. Thomason, of Mounds, Mrs. G. B. Kelly, of Cairo, and Mrs. Ida Helman and E. J. Koonce, of Villa Ridge, Ill.  Her husband passed away on March 8th, 1906.

She leaves 21 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren.

(Nicolas N. Koonce married Margaret A. Phillips on 21 Nov 1854, in Bond Co., Ill.  M. L. Helman married Ida Koonce on 22 Jun 1887, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Mother Koonce 1831-1920.  Father Koonce 1830-1906.—Darrel Dexter)
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 20 Aug 1920:
FUNERAL OF J. R. WEAVER HELD FROM HOME MONDAY

The funeral of James R. Weaver, 67 years old, one of Pulaski County’s pioneer residents and prominent in business and politics 0f the county, who died at his home on North Oak Street Monday morning at 2:30 o’clock was held from the family residence Wednesday afternoon conducted by Rev. O. H. Culver.  Interment was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.

Mr. Weaver had suffered for several months past with cirrhosis of the liver and his friends and family were expecting his death at any hour for several weeks

He is survived by his wife and small child and his daughter, Mrs. Susie Kaiser of Duluth, Minn.
Mr. Weaver served the people of Pulaski County as sheriff and county treasurer and in latter years was active in the real estate business.
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 27 Aug 1920:
Mrs. Ellen Vawels, 61 years old, died at the home of her sister, Mrs. A. A. Light, Monday morning of internal cancer.  Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon from the Baptist church. Interment under the direction of Undertaker James in Beech Grove Cemetery.

             (The 3 Sep 1920, issue refers to her as Mrs. Vowels.—Darrel Dexter)
 
The Mounds News, Friday, 3 Sep 1920:
A stillborn child was the misfortune at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Otis T. Hudson, Wednesday night.  The bereaved parents have the sympathy of their many friends.
 
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Vowles, who were called here by the death of Mr. Vowles’ mother, returned to their home in St. Louis Friday.
 
Newton Hester, father of James Hester, is very seriously ill, having suffered a stroke of paralysis.
 
The Mounds News, Friday, 17 Sep 1920:
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to extend our sincere thanks to our many friends for the sympathy and kindness shown us in the loss of our dear mother and grandmother.  Especially do we wish to thank the minister and choir.
Mrs. Dave Dugan
Mrs. Frank Bauer and Families
 
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to extend our heartfelt thanks to our friends and neighbors for the kindness and sympathy shown us during our sad bereavement in the death of our infant child.  We also express thanks for the beautiful floral offerings.
Dr. and Mrs. O. T. Hudson
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 24 Sep 1920:
SPECIAL I. C. AGENT KILLS MAN IN YARDS

Special officer for the I. C. Railroad Duncan at this place on Tuesday, shot and killed negro boy in the yards here, who with others was attempting to steal a ride.

It is alleged that Duncan ordered the boys from the yards when they started shooting.  The special officer retaliated with the result as stated above.

Duncan was arrested by Sheriff Bankson and placed under $5,000 bond to skate the action of the grand jury.
 
The Mounds News, Friday, 8 Oct 1920:
Mr. and Mrs. Mat Quarrels attended the funeral services of Charles Livesay, their brother-in-law, in Mound City Wednesday afternoon.
 
Mr. and Mrs. Mike Thomas were called to Michigan City, Miss., Tuesday by the sudden death of Mr. Thomas’ father.  They were accompanied by their two children, Boyd and Evelyn.
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 15 Oct 1920:
Mr. and Mrs. Homer McKensie attended the funeral services of Mr. Thomas at Michigan City, Tenn.
 
The Mounds News, Friday, 22 Oct 1920:
Mr. and Mrs. Mike Thomas who were called to Michigan City, Miss., several days ago by the death of Mrs. Thomas’ father, returned home Monday.  They were accompanied by their children, Eveline and Boyd.
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 29 Oct 1920:
Dies of Diphtheria

Charles John Schuling, the 6-year-old grandson of Mr. and Mrs. John Travers, Sr., died of diphtheria at their home on Oak Street Wednesday morning.  The funeral was held private and services at the grave were conducted by Fr. James Downey of St. Patrick’s Church.
 
The Mounds News, Friday, 12 Nov 1920:
DEATH OF LITTLE CLARA LEE REGAN

Clara Lee, the little five-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. V. C. Regan, their only child, a bright winsome little girl, died last Saturday morning after a short illness.

Funeral services were held from the Methodist church where the child attended Sunday school, Monday, conducted by Rev. O. F. Culver.  Interment being made in Beech Grove Cemetery.

Among the beautiful floral offerings was a wreath from the members of her Sunday school class.
The grieved parents have the sympathy of the entire community in their saddest hour.
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 19 Nov 1920:
FARM HAND KILLED BY FAST FREIGHT

John Hogan, about 28 years old, a farm hand employed on the Pendleton farm north of town, was killed by No. 51, a southbound fast freight, just outside of the north yards, Saturday about 4 o’clock.
He was waking south between the two tracks and stepped over in front of the engine just as it came up to him, according to a statement given out by the engineer.

The body was taken to Cole’s undertaking rooms, where it was held until Monday for relatives to claim it.

It looked like a case of suicide, judging from the story of the engineer that he deliberately stepped onto the track in front of the engine, but those who knew the man can call to mind no reason why he should take his own life.
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 26 Nov 1920:
Marion—Ed Baker, thirty-five, and Henry Pate, fifty-six, were killed at the Slogo mine near Marion, in an explosion caused by a windy shot.
 
The Mounds News, Friday, 3 Dec 1920:
FATHER OF CIRCUIT CLERK EASTERDAY DIES IN CAIRO

M. Easterday, 80 years old, father of E. P. Easterday, circuit clerk of Pulaski County, died at his home in Cairo, Monday morning.

Mr. Easterday had been a resident of Cairo for over 50 years and was at one time active in business circles in that city.

Funeral services were held from the home Wednesday, interment being made in Beech Grove Cemetery.
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 10 Dec 1920:
MRS. CARSON FOUND DEAD IN HOME BY FAUGHTER-IN-LAW

Mrs. J. J. Carson, of North Delaware, was found dead in her home on Tuesday morning at 10:45 by her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Thurman Carson, who had stopped at the house on the way to town.
Mrs. Carson was lying in front of the telephone leaving the impression that she had been strick and had attempted to telephone for help.

A coroner jury found that the lady came to her death from heart failure.

Mrs. Carson was apparently in good health when left by her husband in the morning when he went to work.

The deceased is survived by her husband and one son and two grandchildren.

Funeral services were held from the Congregational church Thursday under the auspices of the local Rebeccah Lodge.

(Jesse J. Carson married Georgia A. Spence on 1 Sep 1886, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Card of Thanks

We wish to extend our very grateful thanks for the many words of condolence and acts of kindness tendered us at the time of our trying trouble, especially do we wish to thank those good neighbors for the use of their cars and for the many beautiful floral offerings.
J. J. Carson
Thurman Carson and Family
 

The Mounds News, Friday, 17 Dec 1920:
OBITUARY

Georgia Ann Carson, was born July 21st, 1853, at Olmstead, Illinois, and died at Mounds, Illinois December 7th, 1920, aged 67 years, 6 months and 17 days.

She was married to Jesse J. Carson September 1st, 1886.  Three children were born to this union:  Thurman, Gertrude, and Clyde.  Gertrude and Clyde have preceded her.

She is survived by her husband, Jesse J. Carson, one son, Thurman, two grandchildren, Wilda and Anna Carson, two sisters, Henrietta and Matilda Clanton and one brother, Albert Spence.

She moved to Mounds in 1897 and has lived in Pulaski County all her life.

She was a member of the Congregational church, the Order of Eastern Star and was Past Noble Grand of the Rebeccah Lodge of Mounds.

She was a devoted wife and mother and a good neighbor and to know her was to love her.
Communicated

(William Lewis Clanton married Matilda Spence on 2May 1867, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  W. T. Clanton, son of Jackson Clanton and Henrietta Spence, married Estella E. Waterman on 31 Dec 1896, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mr. and Mrs. L. Snider were called to Waterloo, Ill., Wednesday by the death of Mr. Snider’s mother. 

*******************

The Ullin Times

The Ullin Times, Friday, 13 Feb 1920:

Word has been received of the death of Anderson Durham, Jr.  He died a few months ago. His wife died about a year ago. (Lime Kiln)

 

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. William Crite is very ill at this writing.

 

The infant of Mr. Lackey was laid to rest in the Mt. Pisgah Cemetery Friday.  (Perks)

 

 The Ullin Times, Friday, 14 May 1920:

Miss Grace Zella Evans departed this life Saturday morning, May 9, about 7 o’clock, suffering a dreaded malady for more than ten months.  Was born to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Evans, Feb. 18, 1904, being 16 years, 2 months and 29 days of age.  She professed a hope in the blessed Christ at the age of 13.  I school, she was jovial, but kind and was loved by teacher and pupils.  She leaves to mourn their loss, father, mother, sister, grandmother, two aunts, a nephew and niece.  Warren and Edith Henderson, cousins and a host of friends.

             Having lingered for more than ten months, took very ill Monday, Mary 3rd, and desired very much to see all the folks.  Her friends and relations came.  Shaking hands with them, she told them as she had previously told her father, that she was going to leave them and asked them to meet her in Heaven.  Papa tried to impress her that she would soon be better and on the road to final recovery.  Her answer so, I may get better this time, but must leave you.  When the Lord calls, I am ready for I am going to Heaven  The friends having gone one into another room, she called Papa to her bed and asked him to have the people return to her room, for she wasn’t satisfied.  When all had re-entered, she exclaimed, “All who mean to meet me in heaven show it by the uplifted hand.”  She seemed pacified.  In her next conversion she said that all the people had been kind and had done much for her.  “Oh, how I love them.”  She also mentioned Mesdames Rogers, Lottie Henderson and Opal Johnson as her stand Byers (sacred friends) and was so thankful.  When dying, she called Mama and Papa and said, “I am so sleepy, I can’t hardly keep my eyes open.”  Shortly she called Papa again, but was too weak to finisher thoughts.  Then the end came.

             Gone but not lost.  Let us strive to meet her.  Prepare to stand the test. On the day of consummation, in Heavens of rest.

             The memorial services Monday was one to be remembered.  Rev. Britt, of Cairo, officiated.  The testimony left by the deceased was one of momentary interest.  The parents of this dear girl should feel proud that they have a hand in framing her spiritual life.  HHer testament should be instantly on the lips of each boy and girl with whom he had so pleasurefully associated.

Our folks are grateful to the undertaker for his courteous service.o:p>

             (Her marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  Grace Daughter of T. & F. Evans Born Feb. 18, 1904 Died May 8, 1920.  Gone but not forgotten.—Darrel Dexter)

  

The Ullin Times, Friday, 28 May 1920:

Obituary

             Mrs. Eliza (Potter) Wright was born near Caledonia, Pulaski County, Ill., Oct. 7, 1861, and departed this life May 14, 1920.  She was married to F. F. Wright, June 25, 1885.  She was the mother of eight children, two sons and six daughters, three daughters having preceded her.  Mrs. Wright was converted in 1902.  SShe died suddenly at Illmo, Mo., where she was visiting her daughter, Mrs. Della Tucker.  The body was brought to Hiram Wright’s home and the funeral services were conducted at Mt. Zion Church Wednesday at 3:00 p.m. by Rev. S. Albrecht, of Ullin.  Her body was laid to rest in the cemetery at that place.  She leaves to mourn her departure her children, Mr. William Potter, Mrs. Della Tucker, Mrs. Flora Herrin, Mr. Pete Wright and Miss Leola Wright, and other relatives and friends.

             (F. F. Wright married Louisa Potter on 25 Jun 1885, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

  

The Ullin Times, Friday, 16 Jul 1920:

Obituary

&             The remains of Duard Britt, son of Mr. and Mrs. Rufus Britt, were laid to rest in Cache Chapel Cemetery Sunday afternoon, July 11th.

             The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Hallam in the church yard, the house not being large enough to accommodate he crowd of relatives and friends who came to pay their last respects to the dead boy.  The floral tributes were beautiful and many.

             Duard came to his untimely death through the kick of a mule.

             The accident occurred four weeks previous to his death.  He was injured internally and his sufferings were intense, but his patience and his resignation to the Lord’s will was a beautiful and wonderful lesson to all who were with him.

He was a beloved member of the Cache Chapel Sunday School and accepted the Lord as his Savior while on his bed of affliction.o:p>

             We extend our deepest sympathy to his parents, his brothers and sister and other loved ones and we want to say that we shall surely miss him.

             ((His marker in Cache Chapel Cemetery near Ullin reads:  Deward Britt Born Aug. 4, 1905 Died July 9, 1920 Aged 14 Ys., 11 Ms., & 5 Ds.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The remains of the little two-and-one-half-month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Guy, of Mounds, was laid to rest in the New Hope Cemetery Thursday.

 

 The Ullin Times, Friday, 10 Sep 1920:

Obituary

             The death angel visited the home of Henry and Clara Adams at Marianna, Ark., and took one of their dear little sons.  Arnold Victor Adams was born at Grand Chain, Ill., March 13, 1916, departed this life at Marianna, Ark., Aug. 27, 1920, of congestion, age 4 years, 5 months and 14 days.  He leaves to mourn his departure, his father mother, one sister, Helen, and two brothers, Edward and Clyde, one grandmother, several aunts, uncles and cousins.  He was a dear, sweet little child and will surely be missed.  HHe was loved by everyone that knew him, but he is at rest in his Saviour’s arms, where we hope some day to meet all our loved ones.  The bereaved family have the sympathy of the entire community.

             Mr. and Mrs. Adams are well known around Grand Chain and Perks, having lived at both places quite a while.  Mrs. Adams is a sister of Mrs. John W. Smith, of the Friendship neighborhood.

 

Mr. William Adams was called to Arkansas last week by the death of his daughter-in-law, Mrs. Henry Adams.  Mrs. Adams was a former resident of this place.

 

Mrs. Elm__ Wright and son, Glen, and Mrs. Lewis Albright attended the funeral of Mrs. Sarah Palmer at Mounds, Wednesday.

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