Search billions of records on Ancestry.com

 Obituaries and Death Notices
in Pulaski County, Illinois Newspapers

The Pulaski Enterprise

 5 Jan 1917 - 28 Dec 1917

Mound City, Pulaski County, Illinois


Transcribed and annotated by Darrel Dexter

darreldexter@hotmail.com

 

Friday, 5 Jan 1917:
City Superintendent of Schools, C. L. McCabe, has returned from Willow Springs, Ill., where he was  called on Monday on account of the death of his mother.
 
Mrs. John L. Brandt, one of our oldest and most highly esteemed citizens, who suffered a paralytic stroke while on her way home from church last Sunday morning, remains in a critical condition.
 
New Years a.m., the little two-month-old babe of Mr. and Mrs. William Peck was laid to rest in Salem Cemetery.  The parents have the sympathy of their many friends, as this one makes five little ones they have given up that was only spared to them a short time.  Only budded on earth to bloom in heaven and wait for the coming of Papa, Mamma and loved ones.  (Grand Chain)
 


Friday, 12 Jan 1917:
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to thank our friends for the many acts of loving kindness and tender mercy show us in  ___ our dear wife and mother. 

L. A. Hawkins and Family
 
COL. W. F. CODY DIES

Col. William F. Cody (Buffalo Bill) died Wednesday afternoon at the home of his sister in Denver, Colo., from pneumonia, from which he had been suffering only a few days.
 
DEATH OF MRS. HAWKINS

Mrs. Lewis A. Hawkins, one of the old and highly esteemed residents of Pulaski County, died early last Saturday morning at her farm home just west of Mounds from a stroke of apoplexy, which she suffered a few days before her death.

Mrs. Hawkins was born at Vergennes, Illinois, about seventy-one years ago, and at the age of twenty years was united in marriage to Mr. Hawkins at Murphysboro and removed to Mounds where they have resided ever since.

The deceased leaves to mourn her death her husband, five daughters, Mrs. W. E. Crain, of Villa Ridge, Miss May Hawkins, of Mound City, Mrs. Marion Sheffley, Mrs. Thurman Carson and Miss Hattie Hawkins, of Mounds; two sons, John C. and Lewis Hawkins, of Mounds, a half brother, Charles Walbridge, of Mounds, and a half sister, Mrs. L. C. Preston, of Richview.

The funeral services were conducted Monday afternoon at the residence by Rev. John Galvin, of the Congregational Church of Mounds, of which she was a very active member.  The remains were laid to rest in Beech Grove Cemetery.

(Warren E. Crain married Addie R. Hawkins, daughter of Lewis A. Hawkins and Sally E. Walbridge, on 25 Mar 1896, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter) 
 
DESPERATE NEGRO CAPTURED

Fred Briggs, a colored fellow wanted here for the murder of Babe Jones, another colored fellow, in the saloon of H. V. Handley on September 18th, 1915, was captured in East St. Louis last week Tuesday by Deputy Sheriff James Wilson and brought to this city where he will await trail.

Wilson had his man located in St. Louis, but as it was necessary to get him into the State of Illinois so as to avoid the trouble of securing requisition papers, he trailed his man across the river on a streetcar and landed him in East St. Louis.

Briggs at the time of his arrest was armed with a revolver and no doubt would have used it had he had a half chance.  He is about twenty-three years of age and gives his home at Henderson, Ky.
 
Mrs. H. L. Biggs and Mrs. Samuel Wright attended the funeral of Miss Gay Taylor at Grand Chain Thursday.
 
Miss Gaynell Taylor was born Feb. 4th, 1897, departed this life Jan. 9th, 1917, at 1 p.m., aged 19 years, 11 months and 5 days.  Funeral Thursday afternoon conducted by Rev. Robert Smith Methodist minister, of Karnak.  Deceased leaves her mother, Mrs. Annie Taylor, grandmother, Mrs. Sarah Short, and grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. John Taylor, of Olmsted.  Her father, Allen Taylor, preceded her in death on July 21st, 1913.  Burial in Masonic cemetery beside her father.  Gay was a long and patient sufferer for two years with a stomach and bowel trouble.  The mother and aged grandmother have the sympathy of the entire community in this their darkest hour of trouble.  Life is short.  It won’t be long till you can join Gay in the world where parting is no more.  (Grand Chain)

(Allen Taylor, son of John H. Taylor and Sarah Comston, married Anna M. Short, daughter of Lynn B. Short and Sarah E. Alexander, on 30 Oct 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Lynn B. Short married Sarah Warren on 2 Sep 1866, in Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Golconda—Mrs. Maris Hoffman, aged seventy-six, was burned to death in a fire which destroyed her home here.
 


Friday, 19 Jan 1917:
Word has been received here by friends of the death of Mrs. Mary A. Scott, at her home in Detroit, Mich., on Monday morning.  Mrs. Scott was a resident of this city for many years.
 
We received the news recently that Frank Roach, formerly of this place (Ohio), lost his baby recently and is about to lose his wife.  We are sorry to hear this sad news.
 
Several of our vicinity (Ohio) attended the burial of Bart Hale at Grand Chain cemetery Sunday.
 
The remains of Bart Hale, of Cairo, were brought here (Grand Chain) Sunday afternoon for burial and were laid to rest in the family lot in the Masonic Cemetery.  Deceased leaves a wife, mother, two sisters, two brothers and other relatives and friends to mourn his loss.
 
Mesdames Sam Wright and Henry Biggs, of Mound City, were up Thursday to the funeral of Gay Taylor.
 


Friday, 26 Jan 1917:
Rev. Fr. Tecklenburg went to Pinckneyville, where he attended the funeral of the late Rev. Fr. Snyder of that place.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank the neighbors and friends for their kindness during our recent bereavement, also for the beautiful floral offerings.
J. W. Dille
C. E. Dille and family
Laura Conant
Rowena Dille
C. C. Davidson and family
 
FUNERAL OF G. C. ROBERSON

The funeral of the late George C. Roberson, who passed away Tuesday evening at the St. Mary’s hospital at Cairo, was held Thursday morning from the St. Mary’s Catholic Church and the remains were laid to rest in the cemetery at Mounds.  The services were conducted by Rev. Fr. Tecklenburg.
The deceased was a number of years ago a resident of this city, but of late had been one of the prosperous businessmen of Gale.  Only a few days ago he was taken ill and it was thought best to remove him to Cairo, he would have the best of attention, but he passed away just a few hours after his arrival there.

Mr. Roberson leaves to mourn his death, his wife and seven children, Marie, Lillian, Helen, Gale, Paul, Joseph and Elizabeth, also a sister, Miss Mary Roberson, of this city.

(G. C. Roberson married Rose Browner on 12 Oct 1887, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
DEATH OF MRS. NELLIE BRANDT

Mrs. Nellie Brandt, wife of J. L. Brandt, of this city, passed out of this life on last Saturday morning at the age of seventy-two years, after suffering only a few days paralysis with which she was stricken about two weeks ago.

The deceased was born in Pittsburg, Pa., on Sept. 3, 1844, and when at the age of about fifteen years came to this city to reside.  She was united in marriage to Mr. Brandt, fifty years ago on Christmas Day.  She was a great church and charitable worker about the city and leaves a large number of friends and relatives who extend their most heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved ones.

She is survived by her husband and an adopted daughter, Mrs. W. T. Parker, both of this city.
The funeral was held Monday afternoon from the Methodist church, of which she was a member, and the services were conducted by Rev. J. B. Johnson, pastor. The remains were interred at the Beech Grove Cemetery on Monday afternoon.
 
CARD OF THANKS

It is our desire to extend our thanks and sincere appreciation to the dear neighbors and friends who administered such loving service to our dear wife, mother and sister, during her late illness and our great loss, for the many deeds of kindness rendered to us making it possible for us to spend more time at the bedside of our loved one.  To those who sent flowers to cheer her and make her home more cheerful when she could see and love them.  To those who sent beautiful flowers as a token of their love and esteem for her and their sympathy for us.  Especially to the telephone operators who so cheerfully and promptly answered calls at all times.  May God’s richest blessings rest on all friends, who mourn her death and may each one determine in their hearts to love and serve her God and meet her where there will be no more sorrow.
J. L. Brandt
Mrs. Martha Hutton
Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Parker and Beulah
 
DEATH OF MRS. J. W. DILLE

Mrs. J. W. Dille, one of our county’s most highly esteemed residents, died at her home near Villa Ridge, on last Thursday night at the age of about sixty-one years.  The deceased was an invalid having suffered a paralytic stroke about fifteen years ago.

At the time of her marriage to Mr. Dille the deceased was engaged as a schoolteacher in this county and will be remembered as Miss Libbie Davidson.

Mrs. Dille is survived by her husband and two daughters, Miss Rowena and Mrs. Fred Conant, both of Villa Ridge, and one son, Dr. J. W. Dille, of Cairo, also two brothers, C. C. Davidson, of Villa Ridge and Clarence Davidson, of Joliet.

The funeral services were conducted Saturday afternoon at the Villa Ridge Congregational Church and the remains laid to rest in the Villa Ridge cemetery.

(A marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Elizabeth J. Dille Born Oct. 25, 1850 Died Jan. 18, 1917.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FORMER MOUND CITYITE COMMITS SUICIDE

A. H. Perrine, a former resident of this city, shot and instantly killed himself last week Saturday at his home in Jonesboro, Ark.

             As soon as the officials learned of the shooting, his wife, who was Miss Lad Davidge, formerly, and lived in this city for many years, was placed under arrest, suspicion of doing the shooting.  She was released the following day.

Upon investigating, it was found that Perrine was short about eighty dollars in his account with the Iron Mountain Railway for which he was agent.

(Alfred H. Perrine, Jr., married Mrs. Nancy Ladd Cooper, daughter of Charles C. Davidge and Emma Kate Bain, on 30 Nov 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Frederick W. Cooper married Nancy Ladd Davidge on 6 Sep 1894, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter James were called to Wetaug last week on account of the illness and death of Mrs. James’ brother’s baby.
 


Friday, 2 Feb 1917:
The body of Dr. George B. Howard, who died at the Anna hospital at Anna Tuesday night, was taken to Mounds Thursday morning, where it will be held in Montgomery’s undertaking parlors pending the arrival of his daughter, Mrs. B. W. James, of Prestonsburg, Ky., who is expected Saturday afternoon at Mounds, although arrangements have not been completed.
 
FORMER ULLIN MAYOR DIES

John Kelly died at his home at Ullin Wednesday night of a complication of diseases.  He was formerly mayor of Ullin and at the time of his death was road commissioner of that district.  He was well known among the businessmen of Mound City.  Two months ago, Mr. Kelly attended a trial here.  His condition was such at that time that it was necessary for him to lie on a cot during the trial.
 
OLD NEGRO DIES

George Vaughn, one of the oldest colored residents in this county, died on Thursday night at his home in this city.
 
DEATH OF SOLON B. PRINDLE

Citizens of Villa Ridge and Pulaski County were greatly shocked last Saturday when the sad news arrived announcing the death of Solon B. Prindle at his home in Chicago.  Mr. Prindle left this county some years ago for Chicago, where he was engaged as an architect and it will be remembered that he drafted the plans for the Pulaski County jail and courthouse some three years ago.

The deceased leaves to mourn his loss two sisters, Mrs. Harry Leidigh and Miss Florence, and one brother, Herman, the last two being with him at the time of his death.

The remains were laid to rest Sunday morning at the Villa Ridge cemetery, Rev. Galvin of Mounds conducting the services.
 


Friday, 9 Feb 1917:
DEATH CLAIMS H. D. GAUNT

___ Gaunt, clerk of Pulaski County, died very suddenly Wednesday  ____ of pneumonia at the St. Mary’s Infirmary at Cairo, where he had been a patient for only a few hours.

____ was a great shock to this city, as he was attending to his duties last Saturday and appeared to be in pretty good health.  On ___ he was taken ill and Tuesday he was removed to Cairo.

The deceased was about thirty years old and is survived by his father, W. A. Gaunt, a prominent merchant of Grand Chain, and one sister, Miss Minnie Gaunt ___ that city, also a great number of relatives residing in the county.

A number of years ago Mr. Gaunt ____ this city as assistant cashier in the State Bank, then accepted a position with the First National Bank of this city, then was appointed ___ of the Security State Bank ___, which position he occupied until his election to county clerk.  His ___ Miss Anna O’Sullivan will attend __s duties of the office until an ___ is made.

Mr. Gaunt was a member of the Masonic Lodge at Grand Chain and also of ___ and K. M. K. C. Lodge of ___. The remains were taken to Grand Chain where the funeral was held Thursday afternoon.  The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Roy Morgan, pastor of the Congregational Church of this city.

(William A. Gaunt married Margaret Fallenstine on 3 Aug 1879, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
DEATH OF MRS. MARY STULL

Mrs. Mary Stull, one of the old and highly esteemed residents of this county, died on last Friday night at the home of her daughter, Mrs. T. W. Hayden, at their farm house just east of Villa Ridge.  She was 73 years of age.

The funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the residence and the remains were removed to Mounds, where they were interred in the Beech Grove Cemetery.  Rev. John Galvin, pastor of the Congregational Church at Mounds conducted the services.
 
LOUDEN COMMUTES SCOTT’S SENTENCE

Springfield, Ill., Feb. 7—Gov. Lowden announced today he would commute the death sentence of Elstone Scott, the Murphysboro negro, to life imprisonment.
 
DEATH OF MRS. C. HAYES

Word was received in this city on Thursday morning of the death of Mrs. Carolina Hayes, a former resident of this city, but recently residing in Indianapolis at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Pearl Hoffer.  The remains were expected to arrive at Mounds sometime today (Friday) and will be interred at Beech Grove Cemetery.

The deceased had reached the age of about seventy-one years and had been a resident for nearly forty years.  After the death of her son William here some months ago, she removed to Indianapolis, where she resided with her daughter, Mrs. Hoffer, who was with her at the time of her death.

She leaves to mourn her death one daughter, Mrs. Pearl Hoffer, two brothers, W. R. Wilson, of this city, and Edward Wilson, of Metropolis, and two sisters, Mrs. Clara McNeise, of Cincinnati, and Mrs. G. J. Murphy, of this city.

(Edward A. Hays married Caroline M. Wilson on 10 Dec 1866, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Charles D. Hoffar married Pearl May Hayes on 23 Jul 1897, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Granville J. Murphy married Ella F. Wilson on 28 Sep 1880, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Rev. G. W. Braddock, a colored preacher of this city, died on last Tuesday night at his home here from pneumonia.  The funeral will be held next Sunday afternoon and the remains will be interred at the Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.  He was about fifty-five years of age and is survived by his wife and one son.


Mrs. John Henson was found dead in bed at her home at 1 a.m. Monday.  She had been ill for several months and was much better.  She had told her folks to lay down and rest, of which they did, but when they awoke to give her medicine, they found her dead.  (Perks)
 
The many friends of W. H. Odel were sorry to hear of his death, Sunday, 11 a.m. at his home near America.  Besides a host of friends, Toney leaves five sisters, Mrs. Esta Atherton, of this place (Bryan), Mrs. Frances Neely, of Missouri, Rosie Odell, of America, Mrs. Martha Youngblood, Mrs. Annie Mangold, of Olmstead, and two brothers, Jessie and Tommie, to mourn his loss.

Toney was born near America in 1864, was one of our most respected and honored citizens and we wish to extend our sympathy to the bereaved sisters and brother.
The pains of death are past

Labor and sorrow cease
And life’s long warfare closed at last

His soul is found in peace.
And although he sleeps,

His memory doth live
And cheering comfort

To his mourners give.

(Marion Atherton married Esta Odle on 25 Sep 1892, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  William Youngblood married Martha Jane Odel on 23 Feb 1886, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Henry L. Mangold married Annie Odle on 24 Jun 1880, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Houston Odel married Nancy J. Livesay on 19 Mar 1863, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 


Friday, 16 Feb 1917:
DEATH OF MRS. L. STOPHLET

Mrs. Anna Fair Stophlet, one of Mound City’s most highly esteemed residents, passed out of this life Friday morning at 11:20 o’clock from an illness of only a few days.  The funeral arrangements have not been made as yet, but it is expected will be held some time Sunday.

The deceased was born in the state of Missouri about sixty-three years ago and when a child came to this city with her parents.  At the age of about twenty-one years, she was united in marriage to L. D. Stophlet, one of our leading merchants, who with their daughter, Mrs. H. C. Rice, and son Loren, both of Chicago, and a sister and a brother residing in California are the only surviving relatives.

(Loren Stophlet married Annie Fair on 28 May 1873, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hoffer have returned to their home at Indianapolis.  They brought the remains of the latter’s mother, Mrs. Hayes, here for interment and the funeral was held last Friday.
 
Daisy, the 2-year-old child of Mr. and Mrs. James Johnson, died Feb. 12, at an early hour and was buried the 13th.  (Edith Chapel)
 
The remains of Herman Gaunt was brought here (Grand Chain) Thursday for burial.  The funeral was conducted Thursday at 2 p.m. in the Christian church by Rev. Morgan, the Congregational minister of Mound City.  Herman was one of our home boys and was our county clerk at the time of his death.  His sudden death was a shock to his many friends here and elsewhere, but death will come to all and all we can do is to go when called.  He leaves a father and one sister and several other relatives.  His mother and one sister departed this life several years ago.  The many friends of the family extend their deepest sympathy to the sorrowing relatives.
 


Friday, 23 Feb 1917:
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to express our sincere thanks to Herman’s and our many friends and neighbors for the many acts of kindness shown us in our great sorrow for the loss of our dear son and brother.
W. A. Gaunt
Minnie Gaunt
 
MARGARET ERMINE MILLER DEAD

Miss Margert Ermine Miller, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edgar S. Miller, died at the home of her parents at 5 o’clock Wednesday morning, after an illness of several months of dropsy.

Miss Miller was born in this city on May 28, 1900, and was a pupil of the Mound City High School when illness compelled her to give up her studies.  She was a devout member of the Congregational Church and an active member of the Camp Fire Girls.  She was very popular with all due to a cheerful disposition.  She is survived by her parents, two sisters, Edina and Inez Miller, and a number of other relatives.

Funeral services will be held at the Congregational church at 1:30 o’clock on Saturday afternoon conducted by Rev. Roy B. Morgan.  Interment at Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.

(Edgar S. Miller married Girtrude Culp on 8 Jul 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Dutch Goins died Friday morning and was buried Saturday at 2 p.m. at Ohio Chapel on Tick Ridge.  Deceased leaves an aged mother, two sisters, two brothers and other relatives to mourn his departure.  (Grand Chain)
 
East St. Louis—The murder trial of William Causey was stopped by a visit of the stork to his home.
 


Friday, 2 Mar 1917:
Capt. Mike Williams, of Paducah, Richard Fitzgerald, of Memphis, Mrs. James Rohan, of St. Louis, and Charles Fitzgerald, of Chicago, are in the city this week having been called here on account of the death of the late Mrs. Mary Cunningham.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to thank our dear friends and neighbors for their many acts of kindness shown Margaret Ermine during her illness and for help, sympathy and words of consolation in the sad loss of our dead daughter and sister.  Such expressions as these can never be forgotten.
Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Miller and Daughters
 
AN AGED RESIDENT DIES

Mrs. Mary Cunningham, one of the oldest and most highly respected residents of this city, passed away at her home here Monday night at 7:45 o’clock, after a week’s illness of pneumonia.

The deceased was born in Castle Isle, Ireland, 89 years ago and came to the United States in 1858 and settled at Mound City and has resided here since that time.  She was a devout member of the Catholic Church and has many friends.  Mrs. Cunningham is survived by four sons, William Fitzgerald, of Belleville, Patrick and Richard Fitzgerald, of Memphis, John Fitzgerald, of California, twenty grandchildren and a number of great-grandchildren.

The funeral services were held at St. Mary’s Catholic Church Wednesday morning, conducted by Rev. Father Tecklenburg.  Interment was made in St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds.

(William Cunningham married Mrs. Mary Fitzgerald on 29 Jan 1876, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Uncle Jim Eller, an old resident of Pulaski County, was buried Tuesday afternoon at Ohio Chapel on Tick Ridge.  Uncle Jim’s former home was on Tick Ridge, but for several years he has lived in Massac County.  (Grand Chain)

(James Eller married Mrs. Jane Osband on 10 Jun 1879, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  James I. Eller, 56, born in North Carolina, son of Peter Eller and Miss Ross, married 3rd Mrs. Josephine Eastwood on 7 Apr 1898, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Ohio Chapel Cemetery reads:  James I. Eller Born Aug. 7, 1841 Died Feb. 25, 1917.—Darrel Dexter)
 
OBITUARY

It is said indeed to record the very sudden death of Miss May McIntire, of this place (Grand Chain), which occurred at her home Saturday morning, Feb. 24, 1917.

May was about 20 years of age and was a member of the Christian Church here and was raised up in the Sunday school and church from which she was seldom absent.  She was a pupil of the Grand Chain High School at the time of her death, from which she will be sadly missed by her teacher and classmates.  May was a most lovable amiable girl, whom to know was to admire, and will be sadly missed by her many, many friends.  She was the eldest daughter of W. A. McIntire, her mother having preceded her to the home beyond several years ago.  Funeral services were held in the Christian church Sunday at 2 o’clock, conducted by Rev. Robert Smith, Methodist minister of Karnak. 

Interment in the family lot in the Masonic cemetery.  Deceased leaves a father, one brother, two sisters and a host of relatives and friends to mourn her loss.  In the death of May, her father loses an affectionate daughter, her brother and sisters a loving sister, our church and community a true and zealous member and a kind friend.  While we mourn the loss of this dear loved friend and sister, we must strive to emulate her example while she was with us that we may meet her over there, where she has only gone a little before.
The Savior has called her to his home

In the beautiful land above.
There she dwells with the angels,

Where all is joy, peace, and love.
We miss her kind and gentle face,

her deeds of thought and love.
With pain we note her vacant place,

But with joy she sings above.
In that fair and beautiful land,

She is happy without alloy.
Then do not think of our sorrow

But oh! remember her joy.

(W. A. McIntire married Emma Davis on 18 Nov 1894, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to thank the many friends and neighbors for the many acts of kindness shown us during the illness and death of our beloved mother and grandmother, Mrs. Mary Cunningham, also for the beautiful floral offerings.
The Children and Grandchildren
 

Friday, 9 Mar 1917:
SAMUEL SHEERER KILLED IN RAILROAD YARDS

Samuel, the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Sheerer, of this city, was instantly killed on last Saturday morning in the railroad yards at Mounds, while he was engaged at his duties of engine foreman on one of the switching crews for the Illinois Central Railroad.  The funeral was held Monday afternoon from the young man’s home in Mounds and the remains were laid to rest in the Beech Grove Cemetery at that place.  The Masonic Lodge of this city had charge of the services.

Just how the terrible accident occurred is not known for sure, but it is supposed that Mr. Sheerer in stepping to the footboard on the front of the engine, slipped and fell beneath the engine and was rolled for a distance of about fifty feet before the predicament of the young man was noticed by a brother employee, and the engine was brought to a halt immediately and the body removed, but it was too late.

Sam was born and raised in this city, was about twenty-seven years old and was a valuable employee to the concern for which he was employed for the past five or six years.

He leaves to mourn his death his wife and four children, his father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Sheerer, and his brother and three sisters, all of whom have the heartfelt sympathy of the entire community.
 
MISS MAY McINTYRE

In the Garden of God, a place was being prepared that even the angels of heaven wondered who could be worthy to dwell therein, and as the time drew near for the Angel of Light to descend to earth to garner the beautiful flower, it flew first to the Great White Throne to be sure of making no mistake in transplanting the fair blossom to its Eternal home.

Because of the ones who were waiting to receive and give the welcome, the choice must fall upon a maiden who was a daughter and a sister, a virgin whose beautiful character was unspotted by the world, yet whom the crown of sorrow had touched in such a way that happiness and lightness of heart blotted out all trace of bitterness, leaving the character beautiful, noble and unselfish.  The Angel flew direct to the home of W. A. McIntire, there finding the source of its quest, and early on the morning of Feb. 24th, the soul of winsome May, the eldest daughter, burst its bonds of earthly clay and in joyous flight ascended to enter the portals of its home on high and if the veiled eyes of the loved ones on earth could have seen the welcome of the loved ones there, though with tear-stained eyes their aching hearts would have echoed with greater fervency, “Thy will be done.”

Funeral services were held at the Christian church Sunday p.m., where May had been a faithful attendant at all its services during the greater part of her brief 20 years of life, and which was filled to its utmost capacity with relatives, schoolmates and friends, who came to pay the last tribute to the one so beloved.  The impressive services were conducted by Rev. Robert Smith, M. E. minister of Karnak, and carried the message of hope and comfort to the sorrowing ones, the blessed truth of God’s promise, and at the close of the services as eyes dimmed with tears viewed for the last time the sweet countenance, each one whose faith clung to the Savior’s blessed word, that better became stronger, firmer than ever before that
“There is no death; What seems to is transition.

This life of mortal breath
Is but the suburb of the life elysian

Whose portal we called death.”
Mrs. R. P. Evers
 
Mrs. Oscar Fritz died at her home Sunday evening following an illness of several months of cancer.  Mrs. Fritz was born in Pulaski, Ill., Nov. 21, 1881, and was united in marriage to Oscar Fritz in June 1905.  The funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the Methodist church conducted by Rev. George A. Dunn, of Mounds.  Interment in Villa Ridge cemetery.  She is survived by her husband, four sons, a daughter and number of relatives and friends. (Villa Ridge)

(Her marker in Cairo City Cemetery reads:  Minnie O. Fritz Born Nov. 21, 1881 Died March 4, 1917 Mother.—Darrel Dexter)
 
The many friends of Mrs. Blanche Curry Sheerer were sorry to hear of her sad bereavement.  Blanche was one of our home girls.  We all wish to extend our sympathy in this her hour of trouble.  (Bryan)
 


Friday, 16 Mar 1917:
The funeral and services over the remains of Thomas Rendleman, who died last week Thursday at Farmington, Mo., were held at the residence of his brother-in-law, James Painter, on Sunday afternoon, conducted by Rev. Ward, of Chaffee, Mo., pastor of the deceased.  Interment was made at Beech Grove Cemetery.  The body was accompanied here by his wife, mother, his daughter, Rev. Ward, and Mr. and Mrs. Stokes, of Chaffee, Mo.

(Thomas Martin Rendleman born Oct. 11, 1872, married Sarah A. Dodge, on 14 Jul 1892, in Union Co., Ill.  He married Effie M. Knowlton on 27 Aug 1908, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Catherine Rendleman, of Jonesboro, who attended the funeral of her stepson, Thomas Rendleman, here Sunday returned home Tuesday.

(John Carol Rendelman married Missouri Catherine Dempsey on 16 Oct 1876, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. J. A. Waugh received a message Sunday announcing the death of her brother-in-law, Thomas Carrico, who died at his home at San Antonio, Texas, last week.  Mr. Carrico was 85 years old and was a former resident of this city.
 
DEATH OF A. POLLOCK

Mr. Alexander Pollock, a former resident of Pulaski County, died at his home in Davenport, Iowa, Saturday, March 10.

Mr. Pollock was born in Glasgow, Scotland, March 10, 1831, and came to the United States in 1851.  He came to Pulaski County in 1856, where he was engaged in farming until a few years ago, when he moved to Iowa.  The remains accompanied by his daughter, Mrs. Jessie Lewis and son, Walter Pollock, arrived at Villa Ridge Monday, where interment was made in the Villa Ridge cemetery.

(Ira E. Lewis married Jessie Pollock on 10 Jul 1887, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
JESSE EVANS KILLED

Jesse Evans, a carpenter, who has been a resident of this city for only a short time past, was killed sometime during the night on Thursday by a train on the Big Four line and was found lying along side the track near the Bartlett mill.

It is said that he and his wife had had a little quarrel earlier in the evening and that he was going over to the Bartlett mills, where he expected to remain over night and then seek employment there, but becoming sleepy or tired sat down on the tracks to take a snooze and was struck by the train.  It is said that he had been drinking somewhat heavy during the day and was intoxicated when last seen alive.

The coroner’s inquest was immediately held and exonerated the railroad company.

He has a son in St. Louis who was notified of the killing and is expected here sometime today to look after the remains.
 
A letter was received here (Grand Chain) that Grandma Moyers, an old resident of Grand Chain, is very sick and not expected to live at the home of her son, Mikle, in Poplar Bluff, Mo.
 


Friday, 23 Mar 1917:
___ VETERAN DIES AT VILLA RIDGE

___ Conant, for many year a ___ Cairo died at his home at ___ at 6 o’clock Friday night ____s of several months of ___ble, but which was not ___ serious until a few weeks ___ been for 30 years one of ___ prominent farmers in the ___ Villa Ridge.  He was born ___ in Louisville, Ky., and ___ childhood days in Smithland, Ky.

___survived by his wife, who was ___ Ellis Rose Squire, of Washington ___, C., five daughters, Misses ___ Edith, Grace and Ruth ___, and three sons, Gordon ___ living near Grand Chain, ____ Villa Ridge and Edward of ___, Iowa.  He also leaves ____ Mrs. P. A. Conant, of 811 ___nd Street, Cairo, C. W. __ Smithland, Ky., and Edward ___ of Noblesville, Ind.

___ was a Civil War veteran ___ ed the four years of ___  joined the First Missouri ___ was wounded at the battle ___ Creek, Mo.,  he served un ____ an. In that battle more ___ __rd of the member of his ___ were killed.

___ was made Captain of Company ___ Missouri Light Artillery ___ with honor in the battles of ___ Fort Donelson.  After ___ mustered out of service at ___ war, he went to Washington ___ where he was for ten years ___ of the post office department __ during his residence there ___ married. 

Concluding his ___ Washington, he came to ____ for a number of years was ___ Bird’s Point by the Cotton ___.

Funeral was held Sunday afternoon ___ interment at Villa Ridge cemetery.

(His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  John Heywood Conant 1842-1917  Rosetta Squires Conant  1847-1939.—Darrel Dexter)
 
LYLE CHASTINE SHOT

Lyle Chastine, formerly of this city, was accidentally killed near Carmi, Ill., on March 13, while hunting.  A gun in the hands of his companion was discharged causing his death.

Young Chastine and his companion, Kenneth Hall, got in a boat and went to the home of Hall’s uncle, and got out of the boat and started up the bank.  Lyle saw a bird and shot at it.  Kenneth started to shoot, but when he cocked his gun, the trigger would not stand and the gun was discharged, Chastine getting the entire load.  The accident happened at 9 o’clock in the morning and Lyle died at 6:30 in the evening.  He told everybody that Kenneth did not intend to shoot him.
 
Miss Jessie Neadstine, who for the past few weeks has been confined to the St. Mary’s Hospital at Cairo and suffering with a complication of diseases, was reported today as being in a very critical condition and no hopes of her recovery are entertained by attending physicians.  The young lady’s condition for many years past has been such that she was absent from her home most of the time and at health resorts endeavoring to regain her health, but on returning home here a few weeks ago from the south she was in such a condition that she was compelled to take to her bed.
 
The remains of Jesse Evans, who was killed by a Big Four train last week, was shipped to his brother at Warsaw, Ind., Thursday morning for burial.  The remains were accompanied by his wife and her mother.
 
The body of Miss Lethia Brooks, who died at the General Hospital in Kansas City Tuesday of meningitis, arrived here Thursday morning and was taken to Montgomery & Stockton undertaking rooms, where funeral services were held at 1o’clock Thursday afternoon conducted by Rev. Roy B. Morgan.  The remains were interred in Beech Grove Cemetery.  Miss Brooks would have graduated as a nurse from this hospital in June.
 
MR. DILLOW DEAD

Eli Dillow, aged 66, a prominent resident of Dongola, passed away at St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo on last Thursday afternoon.  The deceased was a prominent farmer and is well known throughout this county.

The remains were shipped to Dongola on Friday where interment was made.  He is survived by one son.

(Eli Dillow married Vernila Worley on 11 Feb 1883, in Union Co., Ill.   Eli Dillow married Lilly May Clutts on 15 Aug 1889, in Union Co., Ill.  His marker in St. John’s Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Eli Dillow Born Oct. 11, 1850 Died March 15, 1917.—Darrel Dexter)

 
Last Thursday, Mrs. Cora Perkins received the sad news of the death of her son, Charlie Armstrong, at Dumain.  He was shot by a man, who seeing young Armstrong approaching him with a gun, supposed he had murderous intent.  But the coroner’s inquest found that his gun was unloaded.  It was said by some that he was intending to trade or pawn the gun.  His remains were brought to Edith Chapel Friday.  Funeral was held Saturday, conducted by Rev. S. S. Smith.  There was quite a number of relatives and friends attended the funeral from Dumain, Murphysboro, and Paducah.  All have returned to their homes.

(Henderson Perkins married Mrs. Ara Armstrong on 16 Dec 1888, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  A. M. Armstrong married Coria Morten on 24 Dec 1874, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Cora’s surname may be Moten, and she may be a sister of Phoebe Moten, an ancestor of Michelle Obama.  On the 1880 census of the village of Pulaski is Emory Armstrong, 34, born in Virginia, his wife Cora, 21, born in Missouri; and their son John, 5, born in Illinois.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Gus Reichert and daughter Katie have returned from St. Louis, where they were called last week by the death of a relative.
 
OBITUARY

The angel of death has again visited our midst and taken from us one of our brightest flowers.  It stopped at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Ablett, Saturday, March 17th, and with it the soul of their little ten-year-old daughter, Edyth took its flight.  Deceased had been ill only a short time with pneumonia and measles.  Little Edytha was a bright and lovable child and will be sadly missed by her relatives and many friends.  She leaves to mourn her loss a father, mother, two sisters, one brother, one half brother, one half sister, also many friends both young and old.  We extend to the bereaved family our heartfelt sympathy in this their darkest hour of trouble.  God’s will not ours be done.
We miss her kind and gentle face

Her deed of thought and love
With pain we note her vacant place,

but with joy she sings above
in that fair and beautiful land

She is happy without alloy
Then do not think of our sorrow

But oh! remember her joy.  (Grand Chain)

(James W. Ablett married Emily H. Terwellegor on 22 Jul 1891, in Pope Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
OBITUARY

Hildah Lischer departed this life Saturday, March 17th, after a few days’ illness with measles.  Thus again amid the changing scenes of this uncertain life we are called to record the death of another true and faithful daughter, sister and friend.  Deceased was about thirty years of age.  In Hildah her aged parents have lost an affectionate daughter, her brothers and sisters a loving sister, our community has lost a kind friend.  Hildah had been an invalid all her life and had been a most patient sufferer.  The family have the sympathy of the entire community.  We say to them while you mourn her loss, strive to illuminate her example, while she was with you that you may meet her “over there” where she has only gone a little before.
Her chair is empty, her voice is stilled

A place is vacant in our home
that never can be filled.  (Grand Chain)
 


Friday, 30 Mar 1917:
MISS NEADSTINE DEAD

Miss Jessie Neadstine died at St. Mary’s Hospital in Cairo on Tuesday afternoon, March 27th, after suffering with a complication of diseases for the past six or seven years.  During that time the decline of her health had been gradual, and about three weeks ago her condition became so serious that she was forced to take to her bed from which she never arose.  While her death was not unexpected, yet it came as a distinct surprise and shock to all who enjoyed the privilege of her acquaintance.

Miss Neadstine was born in Mound City, May 5, 1883, and at the time of her death was aged 33 years, 10 months and 3 days.  She was the only daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. William Neadstine, both of whom passed away in this city.

She was a devout and active member of the Episcopal Church and Rev. Dyke, pastor of the same, conducted the services over the remains which were laid to rest in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds on Thursday afternoon.

On account of poor health Miss Neadstine had not taken an active part in the affairs of the social world for several years, living a quiet retired life here and at summer resorts where she would go for the benefit of her health.

She is survived by two brothers, George, of this city, and Harry, of Murphysboro, also a number of relatives residing elsewhere.
 
Mrs. Charles Dishinger and son, Roy Connell, went to Marion Monday to attend the funeral of Miss Sallie Felts, who died at the home of a relative in that city Sunday.  Miss Felts was 83 years old and made her home here with her niece, Mrs. Dishinger, for a number of years.
 
A daughter was born Saturday evening to Mr. and Mrs. Carl F. Bode and died Sunday morning.  The body was buried at Villa Ridge Sunday afternoon.
 
Grandfather Price was found dead in his bed Tuesday morning.  He had been puny for several days.  (Perks)
 
Rev. John Crossland was caused to go to Beechwood to the bedside of his sister, who was ill last Sunday.  She died at 9:00 a.m. Sunday.  We extended sympathy to the troubled ones.  (Perks)
 
Prof. Corzine and wife ___ their farm last week.  He ___ intelligence after returning ___ of the fatal accident of ___ being killed by the train by attempting to board on his ___.  Funeral services were held ___ March 28.  A number of ___ here were in attendance.  (Edith Chapel)
 
B. W. Bolen, a highly respected citizen of our town (Karnak), died at his home Friday night.  Funeral was conducted at the M. E. church Sunday morning at 10 o’clock and interment was made at Grand Chain Cemetery immediately after the funeral.  Mr. Bolen will be greatly missed from our town as he was a good neighbor and citizen.
 
The remains of Mr. Bolen, of Karnak was brought here Sunday and laid to rest in the Masonic Cemetery.  Deceased had been a patient ____ some time.  He leaves a ____ daughter, and some sons to mourn his departure.  (Grand Chain)
 


Friday, 6 Apr 1917:
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Harland, of Metropolis, are in the city, having been called here on account of the serious illness of Mr. Harland’s mother, who suffered a stroke of paralysis Saturday.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to thank our friends and neighbors for the many acts of kindness shown to our dear sister, Jessie Neadstine, during her illness and to us at her death, also for the many beautiful floral offerings.
George Neadstine
Harry Neadstine
 
DEATH OF MISS HENDERSON

Miss Anna Henderson, aged 74 years, died at the home of Mr. and Mrs. William Mertz, at 2:00 o’clock Thursday afternoon after an illness of many months of a complication of diseases.

Miss Henderson was born at Cincinnati and came to this city in 1857 with Mr. and Mrs. George Mertz and with whom she resided until the death of Mrs. Mertz.  Since that time she has been making her home with William Mertz and family.

Funeral services will be held at the Congregational church at 1:30 o’clock Saturday afternoon conducted by Rev. Roy B. Morgan.  Interment at Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.

(William S. Mertz, son of George E. Mertz and Susie Hawley, married Gracie G. Smith on 28 Jan 1901, in Pulaksi Co., Ill.  George E. Mertz married Susan E. Hawley on 23 Feb 1876, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 

Friday, 13 Apr 1917:
DEATH OF MRS. HARLAND

Mrs. L. A. Harland died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. William Allen on Saturday, April 7, at 6 o’clock from a stroke of paralysis from which she suffered a week prior to her death. Mrs. Harland was about 68 years old and has resided in this city for many years.

She is survived by two sons, Thomas, of Metropolis, and Edward, of Pine Bluff, Ark.; three daughters, Mrs. William Allen, of this city, Mrs. William Peasley, of Memphis, and Mrs. Emma Aldrich, of Olmsted. Funeral services were held on Tuesday afternoon at the residence conducted by Rev. Ray B. Morgan, pastor of the Congregational Church, interment at Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.

 

Mrs. L. A. Willis died Monday morning. (Ullin)

 

We were sorry to hear of the death of Lewis Guy, son of John Guy, of Olmsted, but formerly of Levings. We understand the boy was killed by a train that he had jumped on for a ride. He was about 17 years old and resided near Herrin with his mother, at which place he was killed. The family has our heartfelt sympathy. (Levings)

             (His death certificate records that Lewis Edward Guy, a coal miner, was born 20 Aug 1900, and died 8 Apr 1917, the son of John Franklin Guy married Mollie Haight.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Father Flowers, grandfather of Cham. Flowers, passed away last Saturday. His death was due to the infirmities of old age. His exact age is not known, but he was past 90 years old. He was buried Monday in the Wafford Cemetery. Several relatives and friends from adjoining places were in attendance. (Edith Chapel)

 

Tom McIntire, of Karnak, was called here (Grand Chain) by the death of his mother.

 

George McIntire and family were called here last week by the illness of his mother. (Grand Chain)

 

OBITUARY

             Friday evening death again, after the absence of only six weeks, entered the home of W. A. McIntire, and removed from the family circle his aged mother.

             Sarah Jane McIntire, or Aunt Jane or Grandma, as we all addressed her, would have been 80 years old next month, having lived a widow many years and raised a family of six boys and four girls, all of whom are married with families, but Miss Mollie, who is still single. All living but John, who preceded his mother several years ago. The surviving children are W. A., Stanton F., Mrs. G. W. Boyd and Miss Mollie, of Grand Chain, George, of Mounds, Mrs. Flora Laneere, Anna, Mrs. Delia Krepper and Thomas, of Kansas. All were present at the funeral but Mrs. Krapper. Grandma was a devout member of the Christian Church of this place (Grand Chain) and always tried to be present at the services when her health and age would permit. Funeral at the Christian church Monday at 10 o’clock a.m. conducted by Rev. Rube Smith, M. E. minister of Karnak. Interment in the Masonic cemetery. The many friends of the surviving relatives extend their deepest sympathy to them in this their darkest sorrow. Take comfort in what the scripture tells us of future reunion in Christ, parents and child, husband and wife, brothers and sisters and friends will clasp hands once more never to be torn asunder. In the New Testament our blessed Lord says, “I am the Resurrection and life, he that believeth in me though he were dead yet shall he live, and whosoever liveth and believeth in me shall never die.”

             (G. W. Boyd married Jane McIntire on 20 Apr 1887, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

            

We were sorry to hear of the death of Grandma McIntire, as she was a very sweet and lovable old lady and we know that her loved ones can rest assured that she is “Safe in the arms of Jesus.” (Ohio)

 

 

Friday, 20 Apr 1917:

DEATH OF MAJOR DOMMIT

             Major Daniel Dommitt, aged 71 years, and for the past two years superintendent of the National Cemetery, passed away on Saturday afternoon at 1 o’clock. Death was due to a paralytic stroke from which he suffered from Tuesday before his death. He never regained consciousness.

             The deceased is survived by his wife, one son, C. W., of this city, and one daughter, of Washington, D.C. The funeral services were held at the lodge on Sunday afternoon and early Monday morning the body was shipped to Arlington, Va., where it will be interred in the National Cemetery at that city. The remains were accompanied by his wife and son. Major Dommitt entered the army service at the age of fourteen.

             G. W. Robinson has succeeded the late Major Daniel Dommitt as superintendent of the National cemetery. Mr. Robertson has been assistant superintendent for some time past.

 

DEATH OF MISS SHELTON

             Miss Anna Magdalena Shelton, aged 16, and the only child of Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Shelton, of this city, died shortly before noon Saturday of spinal meningitis, after an illness of 36 hours. She was stricken on Thursday and lapsed into unconsciousness Friday and up to the time of her death never recovered consciousness.

             Anna Magdalena was a bright and lovable girl and her quiet and sweet disposition won for her many warm friends. She was a devout member of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church and took an active part in Sunday school and church work. For the past year she had acted as organist. Last fall she entered Brown’s Business College at Cairo, which school she was attending at the time of her death.

             The body was taken in the hearse at two o’clock Sunday afternoon to Mounds and interred in Beech Grove Cemetery, after which services were held at the grave conducted by Rev. Thomas Dyke, pastor of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church. Although friends and relatives were not permitted to go to the home, the services at the grave were largely attended. The floral offerings were many and beautiful.

             (Alonzo H. Shelton married Mary Watson on 30 Oct 1894, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

Friday, 27 Apr 1917:

CARD OF THANKS

             We desire to thank our many dear friends and neighbors for the many acts of kindness shown during the illness and death of the late Miss Annie Henderson, also for the many beautiful floral offerings.

George E. Mertz

William S. Mertz and Family

 

Mrs. John Lilly, aged 50 years, died at her home south of this city at 7 o’clock Tuesday evening. Funeral services were conducted at the grave at Beech Grove Cemetery at 1 o’clock on Thursday afternoon by Rev. Roy B. Morgan, pastor of the Congregational Church.

 

 

Friday, 4 May 1917:

CARD OF THANKS

             We desire to thank Mesdames John Schuler, George Wilson, Thomas Higgins and Lucy Robbins and our other many dear friends who so kindly and untiringly assisted us during the illness and death of our beloved daughter and granddaughter, Anna Magdalena Shelton, also to those who so liberally gave flowers and emblems. We also extend our thanks to the Brown’s Business College of Cairo for memorial.

Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Shelton

Mrs. M. C. Richardson

 

 

Friday, 11 May 1917:

KILLED BY LIGHTNING

             Joseph B. Woodard, a former resident of this city, was instantly killed last week in New Brunswick, Ga., by lightning. It is rumored that a number of his fellow workmen were also killed and a number received severe shocks.

             Mr. Woodard was in this city about two weeks ago gathering a crew of men to take to New Brunswick to work at the government docks and it was while he was employed at his duties he was killed.

The remains were brought to Metropolis, his former home, and laid to rest in the cemetery at that place.

He was well known in this city and worked at the Marine Ways for a number of years, leaving here about fifteen years ago for Metropolis where his wife and four children survive him.

 

Mr. and Mrs. John Herald were called to Joppa Sunday on account of the severe illness of Mrs. Herald’s brother. (Ohio)

 

The remains of Frank Haight were brought here Friday from West Frankfort for burial by his wife who preceded him in death several years ago. Three daughters and one son were present at the burial, one son being absent. (Grand Chain)

 

The many friends of Uncle Manny Baccus were sorry to hear of his sudden death. He lived here at Bryan several years. To know him was to love him. We extend our sympathy to his aged wife in this her darkest hour. Her loss is surely his gain.

 

 

Friday, 25 May 1917:

Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Robertson will leave Saturday for Culpeper, Va., where Mr. Robertson has been transferred to the National Cemetery at that place. Mr. Garit, of Newbern, N.C., will be the new superintendent of the National Cemetery at this place.

 

Grand Tower—Duff Cady, marshal, killed an unidentified burglar.

 

 

Friday, 1 Jun 1917:

Mrs. W. J. Price received a message Saturday informing her of the death of her brother, Capt. Henry Campbell, who died in Mobile, Ala.

             (William J. Price married Lena Campbell on 2 May 1867, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Samuel Thornton went to Wickliffe, Ky., Sunday where she was called on account of the death of her mother, who was killed near there in the cyclone Sunday.

 

Leonard Robinson, who was ill for several months with a complication of diseases, passed away last week. (Levings)

 

 

Friday, 8 Jun 1917:

The 5-day-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Williams was found dead in bed lying by the side of his mother on Tuesday morning. The coroner’s jury found that death was due to natural causes. The body was interred in Beech Grove Cemetery Wednesday afternoon.

 

Thomas Capes , a veteran of the Civil War, died at his home on upper Commercial Avenue Sunday evening at 9 o’clock, after an illness of a week. He was 76 years old. He is survived by his wife. The body was interred in the National Cemetery at 5 o’clock Monday afternoon.

             (Thomas Cape, private, U. S. Army, died 3 Jun 1917, and was buried in Mound City National Cemetery Section F site 4433A.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Will Herald, brother of John Herald, of this place (Ohio), died at his home at Joppa last Sunday night. Deceased had been an invalid for more than twenty years, but had not been bedfast, but three or four weeks. He leaves to mourn his loss a wife, father, mother, two sisters, two brothers and a number of friends. They have our sympathy.

 

W. A. Victor and wife, N. Holder and Dennis Swanrer attended the funeral of Will Herald at Joppa Tuesday. (Ohio)

 

 

Friday, 15 Jun 1917:

OBITUARY

             William David Herald, son of I. N. and Susan Herald, was born March 2, 1873, in Pope County, Illinois, aged 44 years, 2 months and 2 days. Died June 4, 1917.

             He leaves to mourn his death a loving wife, who nursed him through his sickness, a father and mother, of Joppa, three brothers, Guy, of Olmsted, John, of Grand Chain, Charles, of Baton Rouge, La., and two sisters, Mrs. Anna Bise, of Olmsted, and Mrs. J. L. Dougherty, of Mound City, and a host of other relatives and friends. The entire family was with him at his death except his brother Charles.

             To know him was to love him. He made a profession of faith in our Lord Jesus when about 18 years of age, but after he became a cripple from a stroke of paralysis about 23 years ago, and could not get about except by being wheeled in his chair, he did not take a very active part in church work, but was a believer and well wisher of the cause. During his illness, he told those at his bedside that he did not want to leave them, but was ready to go and not afraid to die.

             He was engaged in the milling business in Joppa and was a fine businessman, more industrious than the average considering his crippled condition. His death was caused from peritonitis, following a five weeks’ illness with blood poisoning.  Funeral services were conducted from the residence by Rev. Robert Smith, pastor of the M. E. Church at Karnak. Interment at Oak Grove Cemetery, Joppa, Ill.

 

Died, at her home two miles east of Pulaski, Wednesday morning, Miss Helen Calvin, after many weeks suffering from dropsy. Miss Helen was eighteen years of age and a sweet lovable girl and so patient. She bid all goodbye and said that she was going home. (Bryan)

 

 

Friday, 22 Jun 1917:

OBITUARY

             Helen M. Calvin was born Dec. 21, 1898, departed this life June 13, 1917, aged 18 years, 5 months and 22 days. She was a member of the Christian Church and confessed her Savior Oct. 12, 1913.

             Helen leaves a mother, two sisters, three brothers and a host of friends to mourn her loss, her father having preceded her to the great beyond. She suffered from dropsy for the past six months. We extended our sympathy to the bereaved ones in this their dark hour.

             Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Hollman, pastor of Christian Church at Anna. Interment at Liberty.

She was too good, too gentle and fair

             To dwell in this cold world of care

And God’s unseen angel o’er our pathway crossed

             Looked on us all and loving her most

Straightway received her to the Heavenly gold

             So fold her, O Father! in thine arms

And let her henceforth be

             A messenger of love between

Our human hearts and Thee.

 

Word has been received here of the serious illness of Fred Schoenfeldt, of Ravenswood, W. Va. Mr. Schoenfeldt is confined in the hospital at Huntington, W.Va., where he recently underwent an operation for the removal of a tumor.

 

James and Charles Rushing returned Tuesday from Anna, where they attended the funeral of their mother, Mrs. Mina Rushing, who died at the home of her daughter in that city Sunday morning.

             (Robert W. Rushing married Minnie M. Palmer on 30 Jun 1875, in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Mina M. Rushing Born Feb. 23, 1858 Died June 18, 1917.—Darrel Dexter)

 

PROMINENT MOUNDS CITIZEN DIES

             Lee Free, aged 42, died at 11:30 o’clock Wednesday at the home of Mrs. C. J. Morrow, on Oak Street, in Mounds, after an illness of five months duration. The deceased leaves to mourn two sisters, Mrs. Elizabeth Macy, of St. Louis, Mrs. Nellie Lloyd, of Tacoma, Wash., and one brother, James Free, of Tacoma, Washington.

 

The funeral was held from the residence of Mrs. Morrow in that city Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock, Rev. John P. Galvin officiating and interment in Beech Grove Cemetery.

 

 

Friday, 29 Jun 1917:

Nashville—H. C. Rice, miner, while searching for his daughter, sixteen, got embroiled with Sheriff J. K. May and City Marshal August Leher, and shot them dead, while he was probably fatally wounded.

 

Benton—Night Chief of Police, W. P. Murphy, shot and killed his assistant, Roy Toddon, of West Frankfort during an argument.

 

Nashville—Hiram Rice, sixty, who killed Sheriff May and Marshal Leker, and then shot himself, is dead.

 

The remains of Mrs. E. A. or Grandma Moyers were brought here Saturday from Poplar Bluff, Mo. Grandma was an old resident of Grand Chain, having reared ten children to manhood and womanhood here. Eight are still living, William and Jack, of Mound City, Lem, of Morrison, Iowa, Mikel, of Poplar Bluff, with whom she was living at the time of her death. Also four daughters, two of Morrison, Iowa , one of Mt. Carrol, Ill., and one of Kansas. Two daughters were unable to be present and one son arrived too late for the funeral. Mrs. Moyers lived to attain near the age of 82 years.

             Funeral was conducted Sunday at 11 a.m. at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Aliff, by Brother James Adams.  Interment in the Masonic cemetery beside that of her son, Charlie. There remains a host of relatives and friends to mourn her loss, but our loss is heaven’s gain, as she prepared for many, many years to meet her Savior and awaits with outstretched hands to gather her loved ones home in a happy reunion of a large family.

 

 

Friday, 13 Jul 1917:

Mrs. Monhundro died Tuesday of typhoid fever at the home of her son, C. B. Monhundro. The remains were taken to Grand Chain for interment.

 

The two-year-old son of Tom Disbennett died Tuesday night and was buried Thursday afternoon in Beech Grove Cemetery.

 

Quite a number of our folks attended the funeral of the late Mother Perkins, of Villa Ridge, last Saturday afternoon. (Edith Chapel)

             (Her death certificate records that Mary Elizabeth Perkins died 5 Jul 1917, in Villa Ridge Precinct, Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Rosa Tharp was buried in Pea Ridge Cemetery Monday. She leaves a husband and infant besides a host of friends. She is gone, but not forgotten. (Perks)

 

East St. Louis—Over 100 negroes were killed in the race rioting at East St. Louis. More than 500 were wounded. Mobs put the torch to the negro sections and the damage by fires will reach $3,000,000. Twenty thousand negroes were terrorized and most of them are in flight. White women and girls joined in the rioting, boarding cars and dragging forth negro women to the streets.

 

 

Friday, 27 Jul 1917:

A daughter born to Mr. and Mrs. Roy Parker, of Valley Recluse, Sunday afternoon, died afterwards and the body was buried in Beech Grove Cemetery Monday. Mrs. Parker was formerly Miss Adelaide Wehrenberg, of this city.

 

Word was received by W. W. Hough of the death of his brother, Jesse R. Hough, on Monday night at his home in Indianapolis, Ind.  He was a member of the Masonic order.

 

DEATH OF M. J. BARGER

             M. J. Barger, a well known and very highly esteemed real estate owner of Danville, Illinois, died last week Saturday afternoon at his home in that city from heart failure and was buried on Monday.

             The deceased was very well known in this county, being at the time of his death interested in many hundreds of acres of land in the northern part of the county, which is rented and leased out to many of the well known farmers of this county.

             Mr. Barger was connected with the Old Soldiers home in Danville for many years and was also circuit clerk of Vermillion County for a number of terms.

             He is survived by his wife, three sons and two daughters.

 

 

Friday, 3 Aug 1917:

Mrs. E. T. Snyder and children and Mrs. L. F. Orr, of Mayfield, Ky., arrived Saturday, being called home on account of the death of their father, W. R. Rodman. Mrs. Snyder and children were visiting their sister when the sad news was received.

 

 

Word has been received by Mrs. W. N. Moyers of the death of her uncle, T. N. Elliott, on July 17, at Springtown, Texas, at the Weatherford Hospital following an operation and illness of several weeks. Mr. Elliott was formerly a resident of Grand Chain and a number of his old friends will be pained to learn of his death.

 

LEONA FREEMAN COMMITS SUICIDE

             Word has just been received in this city by Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Sexton, telling of the death of Miss Leona Freeman at the home for feeble minded children at Lincoln, Ill.

             It will be remembered that the young lady was brought to this city some time ago with her sister, Lillie, to be tried for insanity, but both children were found to be of very sound mind, but were ordered by the court to be returned to the institution until a suitable home could be found for them.

             A letter from the institution states that the young lady was being punished for something she had done and was being wrapped in an ice blanket for the third time in an attempt to make her apologize for the act, when she leaped from the window of the third story and received injuries from which she never recovered.

             The young lady had remarked many times that she would rather die than to think of spending her life in such a place as she was in and which there is no doubt that it was the wrong place, as the two children were examined thoroughly by a number of physicians and found to be of perfectly sound mind, yet still ordered by the court to go back to the insane asylum.

 

The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Mack Davis died at their home Wednesday morning, funeral services were conducted at the residence Thursday afternoon and the body interred at Beech Grove Cemetery.

 

DEATH OF MIRIAH CROSS

             Miriah Cross was summoned July 19, 1917, by a death angel from this world and she answered the call to join a heavenly host. She was born in the State of Georgia in the year 1836, and was 81 years old. She was a faithful Christian and a dutiful member to her church, which she lived in over 60 years.

             The funeral was preached Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock by Rev. John Stovall, assisted by Rev. Cantrell at the F. W. Baptist church. She died triumphant in the faith of Christ. She is survived by one daughter, three sons. Interment took place at Villa Ridge cemetery.

A loved one from us is gone

             But we would not have her stay

The parting gives us pain

             For she has walked the narrow way

And reached a fairer plain

             And in the garden of God’s love

A flower she will be

             And we will join her up above

For all eternity.

Con.

             (A marker in Cairo City Cemetery in Villa Ridge reads:  Alex Cross  Born Nov. 13, 1883 Died July 12, 1916.  Mariah Cross Born May 15, 1837 Died July 17, 1917.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The aged father of Charles Dover died at his home near Thebes Friday and was buried in the Olmsted Cemetery, Saturday. Deceased had suffered with dropsy for quite a while. (Ohio)

 

 

Friday, 10 Aug 1917:

Mrs. John Oliver died suddenly at her home on Monday morning. She had been ill for some time of dropsy. The remains were interred in Beech Grove Cemetery Monday afternoon. She is survived by her husband and two small children.

 

Mrs. Rosa Farrington, a highly respected colored woman, died suddenly at her home Tuesday evening and was buried at Beech Grove Cemetery Friday morning.

 

John Herald and wife attended the funeral of their nephew, Robert Bise, near Friendship Monday. (Ohio)

 

Nick Dover, an old time resident of this place (Levings), was buried in the Masonic cemetery near Olmsted Saturday. (Too late for last week)

 

James McCormic died at St. Mary’s Infirmary at Cairo and was buried at Butter Ridge. Mr. Cormick lived here (Perks) for several yeas.  He leaves a wife and son, Arthur, two daughters, Alpha and one in Ohio.

 

 

Friday, 17 Aug 1917:

Mr. and Mrs. Med Travis, of St. Louis, Mrs. Ethel Sparks, of Kokoma, Ind., and Mrs. Rolla Collins, of Tulsa, Okla., who were called here on account of the death of their father, James Armstrong, left Tuesday for St. Louis. They were accompanied by Fred Armstrong, of this city, who will make his home with his sister, Mrs. Travis. Mrs. Sparks and Mrs. Collins will spend a week in St. Louis before returning to their homes.

 

The remains of Jodie Carr, who died at Muncie, Ind., last week were brought here for interment.

 

A GOOD CITIZEN DEAD

             Robert Lee Bise, second son of Joseph and Anna Bise, was born Feb. 5, 1893, died Aug. 4, 1917, aged 24 years, 5 months and 24 days. He united in marriage to Ruby Misenheimer, March 2nd, 1915. To this union was born a little daughter, Naoma Ruth. Robert made the wise choice and gave his heart to God and united with the Methodist Church, Aug. 9, 1912. Though not always living up to his duty and privileges, yet in the last few weeks of his life, he, like the Prodigal child, came back to his Father’s house and made his humble profession and was able to say in the last minutes of his life, “All is well.”

             Robert numbered his friends all over the county by the score. He was of a jolly disposition, which brought his acquaintances to him in close friendship that lasted to the end. While surrounded by his family and friends, as the day was fading Saturday evening, his soul took its flight home.

             He leaves to mourn his death, his wife and little daughter, Naoma Ruth, his mother, Mrs. Anna Bise, two brothers, Ralph and Russell, two sisters, Mrs. Frances Ledbetter and Miss Margie, grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Herald, of Joppa, and several uncles and aunts, other relations and many friends.

             Funeral services conducted at New Hope by Rev. H. E. Benton, pastor of M. E. Church, assisted by Rev. M. S. Bumpus, of Mt. Vernon, and W. F. Jackson, of Perks, Ill. Interment at New Hope Cemetery.

             (Joseph Bise married Annie Herald on 29 Nov 1887, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in New Hope Cemetery near Ullin reads:  Robert L. Bise Born Feb. 5, 1893 Died Aug. 4, 1917.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

Friday, 24 Aug 1917:

Mr. and Mrs. P. R. Dunsworth and son Leo went to Vienna Thursday where they were called on account of the death of a relative.

 

WIDOW COMMITS SUICIDE

             Mrs. John Knupp, a well known and highly esteemed resident near Wetaug, this county, committed suicide on Monday morning by taking an overdose of carbolic acid. Medical attention was immediately summoned as soon as the act was committed, but the physicians could not get to the farm in time to save the woman’s life.

             The deceased had been in the very best of health, but she had been worrying greatly over the war and it is supposed on account of her son George being drafted recently was the cause for the taking of the poison.

             Mrs. Knupp is survived by two sons and four daughters, her husband having passed away about two years ago from Bright’s disease. She also has a couple of sisters residing in the country.

             (John C. Knupp married Mrs. Mollie George, daughter of Anthony George and Louisa Augustine, on 15 Sep 1885, in Union Co., Ill.  Andrew J. West married Mollie George on 4 Nov 1881, in Union Co., Ill., and they divorced on 10 Sep 1885.  Her marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug reads:  John C. Knupp Born Jan. 1, 1866 Died March 18, 1915 Mollie Knupp his wife Born Feb. 7, 1860 Died Aug. 20, 1917.—Darrel Dexter)

 

An aged man, who has been working for Tom Tolley, one half mile below Echols Landing, died suddenly Monday evening. (Ohio)

 

Mrs. Nancy Steers died last Wednesday night of typhoid fever and was buried Thursday at Grand Chain Cemetery. She leaves a daughter, Mrs. Lee Walker, a brother, John Kline, and a sister, Mrs. Hileman, of Olmsted. Deceased was past 69 years of age. (Ohio)

 

Mrs. Nancy Steers departed this life Wednesday, Aug. 15th, at one o’clock p.m. Aunt Nancy (as she was called) was an old and highly respected resident of Grand Chain and had attained a good old age. She leaves one daughter, Mrs. Lee Walker, an aged brother, Uncle John Klein, and a sister, Mrs. Hileman, of Olmsted, some grandchildren and other relatives to mourn her loss. Interment in Masonic Cemetery Thursday p.m. (Grand Chain)

             (Cyrus Steers married Nancy Cline on 22 Jul 1877, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Lee Walker married Cyrus A. Steers on 22 Jul 1900.—Darrel Dexter) 

 

 

Friday, 7 Sep 1917:

WILLIAM PARKER DEAD

             William Parker, a prominent farmer of Valley Recluse, who has been ill for some time, passed away early this morning.

 

 

Friday, 14 Sep 1917:

Bart Craig, a well known and highly esteemed old colored resident of this city, died on last Tuesday night at his home here from a complication of diseases, at the age of about seventy-five years. The remains were laid to rest Wednesday afternoon at the National Cemetery. He is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Irene Clark, of Mounds, and Mrs. Mollie Henderson, of this city.

(Bart Carig married Mrs. Florence Kannedy on 11 Apr 1891, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The 18-month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Claud Smith died at their home Sunday afternoon and was buried on Monday afternoon in Beech Grove Cemetery.

 

WOMAN KILLED, DAUGHTER HURT IN A RUNAWAY

             Mrs. Mary King was killed and her daughter, Mrs. Laura McClelland, was seriously injured Thursday morning when the horse they were driving ran away on the Pulaski hill.

             Mrs. King formerly ran the Illinois Hotel here. The women were driving through to Cape Girardeau in a spring wagon. Robert Ozmond of Pulaski, son-in-law of Mrs. King, was in the wagon with them, on the rear seat. Mrs. McClelland was driving. It is believed that a rock flew up and struck the horse and he started running down the steep hill. All three were thrown out, and were severely bruised. Mrs. King lived for about half hour after the accident.

 

 

Friday, 21 Sep 1917:

Mrs. Eliza Lockhart, aged 87, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Henry Chamberlain, Wednesday morning after a lingering illness. The funeral services will be held at the residence at 2 o’clock this afternoon conducted by Rev. Roy B. Morgan. The body will be taken to Grand Chain on the Big Four train at 4 o’clock and will be interred in the Masonic Cemetery.

 

 

Friday, 28 Sep 1917:

DEATH OF PATRICK MCNEIL

             Patrick McNeile died suddenly of apoplexy in the office of Dr. J. J. Rendleman, of Cairo, at about 4 o’clock on Wednesday afternoon.

             Mr. McNeil had gone to the doctor’s office for treatment and was waiting his turn when he was suddenly stricken and he died in about 10 minutes. The news of his death came as a distinct shock to our citizens. Mr. McNeil was born in this city about 46 years ago and spent his entire life here. He was one of the leading young businessmen of this city and by his quiet manner had won for himself many warm friends among whom he will be greatly missed. He is survived by three brothers, Peter, John and William, five sisters, Misses Mary, Rose, and Catherine McNeil, and Mrs. Daniel O’Sullivan, of this city, and Sister Sebastine of Cairo.

             The funeral services were held at 9 o’clock Friday morning at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, conducted by Rev. F. Tecklenburg. Interment at St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds.

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We desire to thank our friends for their many acts of kindness and floral offerings during our sad bereavement.

Mrs. Annie Parker and Family

 

The remains of Mrs. Eliza Lockhart, of Mound City, were brought here Friday for burial. They were accompanied by her son, John Guy, and family, daughter, Mrs. Callie Chamberlain, Mr. and Mrs. Pink Dunsworth, Mesdames Harris, Norton and Rose, Miss Julia Yoakum, and Rev. Roy Morgan, the Congregational minister of Mound City. (Grand Chain)

             (Arthur Lockhart married Eliza F. Guy on 5 Apr 1874, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  John E. Guy, 26, married Martha Scarlot on 9 Jun 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  W. J. Yoakum married Callie Guy on 22 Dec 1885.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Jim Jones, an old and highly respected citizen, died at his home Thursday evening Sept. 20. Mr. Jones had been employed in the post office here (Grand Chain) for quite awhile. He has many friends here and in surrounding towns who were sorry indeed to hear of his death. He leaves an aged wife, three daughters, Mrs. Lela Calhoun and Mrs. Bessie Lamkin, of this place, Mrs. Clatie Wheeler, of Anna, three grandchildren and numerous other relatives and friends to mourn his loss. The entire community extends sympathy to the bereaved family.

 

Grandma Lockhart, of Mound City, formerly of this place (Levings), died Wednesday. She was quite old. (Too late for last week)

 

Drs. Tarr and Caraker were called to see the sick child Fred Trenton, Tuesday, but too late, the little one died about 2 o’clock Tuesday afternoon. It was the only child. The parents have our sympathy. Mrs. Trenton has been sick for quite awhile. (Ohio)

 

DEATH OF MR. BAGBY

             George W. Bagby, 74 years___ prominent farmer of Pulaski County and residing near Levings ___ home there at 4:30 o’clock ___ afternoon of last week after ___ of several weeks of can___ stomach. The remains were ___ the Concord Cemetery on Friday ___noon.

             He is survived by his wife ___ children, all of whom were ___side when he passed away ___ been a member of the Mason___ fraternity for thirty years.

             (His marker in Concord Cemetery near Ullin reads:  George W. Bagby Born March 4, 1844 Died Sept. 20, 1917.  George W. Bagby married Flora M. Freeze on 7 Jul 1878, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

Friday, 5 Oct 1917:

L. M. BRADLEY DEAD

             L. M. Bradley, of Carbondale, for many years a prominent attorney of this city, died at his home in Carbondale, Sunday afternoon at 12:15 o’clock after a long illness.

             Mr. Bradley removed to this city from Johnson County in the early ‘70s and established himself in the practice of law. At one time he was interested in the newspaper business here and was for five years State’s Attorney of Pulaski County. He removed from his city 15 years ago to Carbondale where he has since resided practicing his profession up to a few years ago when he retired. He owns considerable property in this county.

             Mr. Bradley was 65 years old and is survived by his wife, a son, Lloyd Bradley, a daughter, Miss Lucille Bradley. The funeral was held at Carbondale Tuesday afternoon.

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We desire to express our great appreciation of the kindness and sympathy shown by our friends in our bereavement at the loss of our brother Patrick McNeile. We also thank those who sent floral tributes and to parties for the use of their automobiles.

Brothers and sister of Patrick McNeile

 

 

Friday, 12 Oct 1917:

Gus Ewings’ daughter, Nellie, died on Tuesday afternoon on the 9th at 4 o’clock. Nellie had been sick for about eight months. She had been in Chicago for some time, but all done no good, as she had consumption and had to go. (Pulaski)

 

 

Friday, 19 Oct 1917:

David Kennedy, a well known and former resident of this city, died of paralysis Sunday at the Soldiers Home at Quincy, where he has made his home for the past few years.

 

 

Friday, 26 Oct 1917:

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bell, of upper Main Street, died at their home here Saturday. The body accompanied by the parents, was taken Sunday morning to Missouri for burial.

 

MRS. HAMBLETON DEAD

             Mrs. S. E. Hambleton, an old and highly respected former resident of this place, died Sunday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Joseph Berry, in Memphis, with whom she had made her home for the past few years.

             Deceased was 77 years of age and was married in this city to Capt. William Hambleton, Dec. 31, 1863. Her husband passed away several years ago. She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Joseph Berry, of Memphis, and Mrs. Ira Huckleberry, of this city, and one son, Albert, of Caruthersville, Mo.

             The body was brought to this city Monday afternoon and took to the home of her daughter, Mrs. Huckleberry. The funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the Grace M. E. Church conducted by Rev. J. B. Johnson. Interment in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.

             (Ira Huckelberry married Jessie Hambleton on 30 Dec 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mary Huckleberry, who is a member of the freshman class, has returned to school. Her absence was caused by the death of her grandmother, Mrs. Hambelton. This is the first time since Mary entered the first grade at six years of age that she has ever been absent from school. She has never been tardy, which shows that she is a very earnest and diligent pupil.

 

FARMER COMMITS SUICIDE

             James F. Beggs, a well known young farmer residing near Perks, committed suicide last Tuesday afternoon at the home of his neighbor, Clarence Wolf, who resides in the same neighborhood.

             Beggs, who had only been married about six months was among the many to be called before the local board for examination in the great national army, but was exempted. After the board had seen fit to grant exemption to the young man he decided that he wanted to go to the front with his friends, but it was then too late.

             It is stated that the young man had worried so much over his exemption that his mind became unbalanced and it was while he was in that condition that the act was committed.

 

A. J. Droney’s little child died Friday morning and was buried at Pea Ridge Saturday. (Perks)

 

 

Friday, 2 Nov 1917:
MRS. WEHRENBERG DEAD

Mrs. Mary Wehrenberg, wife of Charles Wehrenberg, died at her home in this city at 5:00 o’clock Tuesday morning after an illness of two weeks.

Mrs. Wehrenberg was born June 16, 1856, at Center, near Pulaski, in Pulaski County.  She was married April 16, 1873, and moved to Mound City in December 1889, when her husband was sheriff.  She is survived by her husband, two children, Mrs. Roy Parker, at Valley Recluse, County Clerk Charles E. Wehrenberg, of this city, eight grandchildren and one brother, John Curry.

The funeral services were held at the Grace M. E. Church at one o’clock on Thursday afternoon, conducted by Rev. J. B. Johnson.  The officers of the Queen of Egypt Chapter O. E. S. rendered the order’s last rites over the body.  Interment was in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.

(Charles Wehrenberg married Mary Curry on 15 Apr 1873, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
DIED AT CAMP TAYLOR

The fifth death to occur among drafted men was reported Thursday by Maj. Worthington, commanding officer at the Base Hospital.  The victim was William R. Crippen, who died of pneumonia at the city hospital in Louisville, Ky.  He was a private in the 333rd Infantry and came to the camp from Ullin, Ill.  His parents have been notified.  According to Maj. Worthington, there are sixty cases of measles in the hospital and thirty cases of pneumonia.  No new cases of measles were reported yesterday and the epidemic is believed to have been checked.
 
Mr. James Baggs died at the home of his stepfather Tuesday morning, Oct. 28, 1917, from a self inflicted wound.  His death was a great shock to his relatives, as well as to his host of friends.  Jim was a gentleman and respected by all who knew him.  His word was as good as gold.  He was married about three months ago to Miss Emma Sowers.  He seemed to be despondent over being examined for war service, although he secured an exemption, he wasn’t the same any more.  Rev. Karaker preached his funeral sermon at the Baptist church of which he was a member.  He was buried at Mt. Olive Cemetery.  He is gone but not forgotten.  (Perks)

(His marker in Mt. Olive Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Jim Beggs 1889-1917.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Amanda Johnson, one of our (Pulaski’s) oldest colored citizens, died here on Saturday night.  She had eaten three meals on Saturday and done her housework and diek (dishes?) that night.  She was the wife of Squire Johnson.  He is left alone and will probably go to the Soldiers’ Home.
 


Friday, 9 Nov 1917:
William Keeler died in a hospital at Birmingham, Ala., on last Monday and the body was interred at Birmingham Tuesday.  Mr. Keeler was about 49 years old and was a resident of this city for many years.  He is survived by his wife, formerly Miss Dora Meecham, of this city, and two children.  Mrs. T. J. Kinney, of this city, is a sister of the deceased.

(Thomas James Kinney married Cora F. Keeler, 24, born in North McGregor, Iowa, daughter of Oscar J. Keeler and Mary Mooney, on 14 Sep 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 
Mrs. Katie Mitchel received a dispatch from Kankakee on Wednesday telling her of the death of her oldest daughter, Birdie, who died suddenly.  She left by the next train for Kankakee.  (Pulaski)
 
Miss Minnie Cable is very low with pneumonia and is not expected to live.  Her mother is still confined to her room.  (Pulaski)
 


Friday, 16 Nov 1917:
Mrs. Louis Walbridge died in the Baptist Hospital in St. Louis Saturday night, following an illness of one week.  Mrs. Walbridge was formerly Miss Carrie Luker.  She was born and raised in this city.  She is survived by husband, two small children, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Luker, of Cairo, one brother, Harry Luker, of St. Louis.  The body was brought to Mounds and the funeral services were held at the Congregational church on Wednesday afternoon conducted by Rev. John Galvin.  Interment in Beech Grove cemetery.
 
Mrs. W. F. Lankston returned from Robinson, where she went to attend her father’s funeral.  (Perks)
 
Dr. and Mrs. A. W. Tarr and Mrs. Eperson attended the funeral of Thomas Stark at Salem Church Wednesday.  (Grand Chain)
 


Friday, 23 Nov 1917:
TAKES HIS OWN LIFE

James Willard, who has been making his home with George E. Lentz, one mile west of Wetaug, committed suicide Sunday morning at Mr. Lentz’s home by shooting himself in the right temple.  The deceased had been laboring under the false impression that the government was going to confiscate all his property and that he would be left destitute.  He was past 49 years of age and come to Pulaski County about two years ago from California and is said to have several thousand dollars worth of property and bonds. Deputy Sheriff A. B. Sexton was appointed special coroner and the inquest was held by him at 12 o’clock Sunday.—Ullin Times
 
Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Moyer and daughters, Misses Grace and Joyce, attended the funeral of Mrs. Moyers’ nephew, Johnny Evers, at Grand Chain Wednesday.

(William N. Moyers married Nellie McGee on 17 Aug 1893, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  James A. T. Evers married Annie E. McGee on 11 Sep 1865, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
BOY KILLED BY WAGON

John Evers, son of James Evers, of Grand Chain, was instantly killed on Tuesday when he fell beneath the rear wheels of a wagon loaded with corn.  The body had been driving the team, riding with his father to Grand Chain, where the boy attended school.  The boy growing cold turned the reigns over to his father and crawled back on the load to avoid the wind.

He laid down on the corn and when the corn shifted with a jolt of the wagon, the boy rolled off and fell under the back wheel.  As he fell, he screamed and when his father reached his side, he was dead.
 
Mr. Woods, living on Tick Ridge, died suddenly of heart trouble Tuesday. (Ohio)
 
Several from the vicinities of Ohio and Tick Ridge attended the funeral of James Evers’ little son Wednesday. (Ohio)
 
The angel of death crossed the threshold of the home of Mr. and Mrs. James Evers on Monday, Nov. 19th and with it the soul of little Johnny, their 10-year-old son, took his flight.  The little lad fell from a load of corn and was crushed beneath the wheels of the wagon, causing his instant death.  Little Johnny was a very bright and lovable child, loved by all who knew him and will be sadly missed by his relatives, friends and schoolmates.  Funeral services were conducted at the Salem M. E. church Wednesday, November 21st, at 10:30 a.m. by Rev. Robert Smyth, of Karnak.  Interment Salem Cemetery.  He leaves his parents, four brothers, four sisters, and numerous other relatives and friends to mourn his loss.  The bereaved family have the heartfelt sympathy of the entire community (Grand Chain).  May they find consolation in these words of our blessed Master, “Suffer, little children to come unto me and forbid them not, for of such is the kingdom of heaven.”
 
Quite a number of Pulaski County citizens, especially those living in Old Forest View neighborhood, remember T. N. or Tom Elliot, a brother-in-law of the late Judge Hugh McGee.  Tom was an orphan boy raised by Judge McGee and got the foundation of his education at Forest View School near where the McGees lived.

On July 17th, at a sanitarium in Weatherford, Texas, the death of Prof. T. N. Elliott occurred, aged 68.  Prof. Elliott was a well known educator of Texas, coming there from his native state, Kentucky, at the age of 32 years.  He was a man of extraordinary intellectual attainments, being a Greek and Latin scholar, as well as a modern language, history, and science.  He taught for 26 years in Texas, 18 of which were spent as superintendent of various schools in Ellis County.  After retiring from active education of work, he devoted himself to the elevation of the community in which he lived.  At the time of his death he was president of a national mathematics association.  Surviving him are his wife, who was Miss Mary Dance, of Woodville, Kentucky, and seven children.  (Grand Chain)

(Hugh McGee married Amanda Elliott on 7 May 1865, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 


Friday, 30 Nov 1917:
HENRY NIEMEYER DIES

Henry Niemeyer, a well known and highly esteemed resident and merchant of Karnak, died about eleven o’clock Wednesday morning at the St. Mary’s Hospital in Cairo, where he was taken after suffering an attack of apoplexy about a week ago.  Mr. Neimeyer was about seventy years of age.
The remains were taken back to his home town where they were laid to rest Thursday afternoon, the services being conducted at the Methodist church of which he was a member.

He leaves to mourn his death his wife and six children.

(George Niemyer, son of Henry Niemyer and Julia Baker, married Rosie E. Bange on 20 Jul 1901, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Robert Arnold and daughter, Christie Mae, have returned from Paducah, where they attended the funeral of the former’s father.
 
Mrs. Elmer Benjamin, of West Frankfort, Ind., arrived in this city on Saturday night to be at the bedside of her cousin, Mrs. J. R. Fullerton, who still remains in a very serious condition.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to thank our many kind friends and neighbors for the kindness and sympathy shown us in our recent bereavement in the death of our dead son and brother, Johnny Evers, also for the many beautiful floral offerings.
Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Evers and fmaily
 
Mrs. Ella Metcalf, Mrs. Laws Miller and Latney Miller, of Martin, Tennessee, were called here last week by the sudden death of little Johnny Evers.  (Grand Chain)
 
Philip Wiesenborn was called to Belleville last week on account of the death of his brother, William Wiesenborn, formerly of this place (Grand Chain).
 
We have several old veterans around here that are widowers.  Namely, A. P. Newhart and D. W. Kennedy, white, and Squire Johnson, Jerry Suiter, Sam Wilson, Henry Williams, colored, all drawing a good pension.  It looks like they might get married.  (Pulaski)
 


Friday, 7 Dec 1917:
Paul Darragh, who enlisted in the quartermaster’s department in Chicago a few days ago has been transferred from Columbus, Ohio, to Jacksonville, Florida.
 
Vivian Farr, the seven-year-old daughter of Mrs. Ida Farr, died Saturday after a week’s illness of pneumonia.  The funeral was held Sunday afternoon and the remains were interred in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.
 
Mrs. Mary Kelley, a former resident of this city, but now a resident of Chicago, died suddenly Thursday morning at the home of her brother, Charles Nugent, in Cairo.  Mrs. Kelley will be remembered by our older residents as Miss Mary Nugent.  The funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon.  Interment at Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.
 
The remains of John Douglass, a brother of Anderson Douglass, were brought here (Grand Chain) from Dexter, Missouri, Monday for burial.
 


Friday, 14 Dec 1917:
KENTUCKY MAN KILLED BY CAR

Robert Porter, a supposed resident of LaCenter, Ky., was run down and almost instantly killed last Sunday afternoon by the interurban car while it was coming through the drainage district.  The man had just started out of Futrell’s Drug Store and was going across the track when the car came in sight and as soon as she saw it he turned around to go back, but slipped on the track and fell in the path of the car, which struck him on the head, killing him almost instantly.

The body was immediately carried into Cairo where an inquest was held and the remains prepared for burial.

It was learned that the fellow had just been released from the Cairo jail where he had been confined on the charge of vagrancy and was making his way for Mound City, where it is claimed he had friends.
 


Friday, 21 Dec 1917:
Peter Coldwater received a message Monday announcing the death of his son, Harry, which occurred Sunday at Oraville, California.  Mr. Coldwater was born in this city and was about 45 years old.  He has resided in Oraville for several years.  He is survived by his father and sister, Mrs. John T. Betts.  The body was interred at Oraville.
             (John T. Betts married Minnie Coldwater on 3 Sep 1890, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


DEATH OF BERT BARNETT

Bert Barnett, engine foreman at Mounds, died in a hospital at Chicago Sunday, as a result of a stroke of paralysis, which came about a month ago, when he was there on business for the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen.

His wife and mother were with him when he died.  The body was brought down to Mounds Monday and will be buried Wednesday from the M. E. church at Mounds, with internment at the Beech Grove Cemetery.

The deceased was 34 years of age and is survived by a son and daughter in addition to his wife, father, and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Barnett, of Valley Recluse, and three brothers, George, of Texas, and John and Henry, of Valley Recluse.

An effort is being made to clear off and clean up the old Shiloh Cemetery—one of the oldest in southern Illinois.  Many of our oldest citizens of Pulaski County lie buried here.  Any friends or relatives who feel interested in this movement and wish to contribute funds for same can do so by leaving donations with J. H. Atherton, of Shiloh. 

 
John Sheets and wife went to Mounds to attend the Barnett funeral, he being a brother-in-law to the Sheets family. (Pulaski)
 


Friday, 28 Dec 1917: 
OBITUARY

Isaac Butram, son of D. F. and Mary J. Barnett, was born at Villa Ridge, Ill., July 19th, 1883, and departed this life at Chicago, Ill., December 16, 1917.  Age 34 years.

Deceased was twice married.  First to Luela Atherton, of Villa Ridge.  To this union was born a daughter, Mary Lucile, who survives her parents.  Second to Netta Brown, of Mounds City, who had a son from a previous marriage.  She and son, together with father, mother, three brothers and many other relatives survive.  The wife Luella died at Shawnee, Oklahoma, August 27, 1909.

Deceased was in Chicago representing the local Brotherhood of Trainmen when taken ill.  He died of paralysis from unknown cause.  He was attended by his wife and mother during his illness and made his confession of the Christ to his mother and a Chicago minister. He died in the triumph of a saving grace, and admonished his brethren to change their lives and live for Christ.  After asking his Christ to let him go easily, he simply went away without a struggle—falling asleep.  Funeral December 19th, 2 p.m. at M. E. Church by Rev. Dunn.  Interment in Beech Grove Cemetery.
 
Grandma Price died in Marion last week.  She was 93 years old and a descendant of Robert Fulton.  She could tell more history than one could learn from books. (Perks)

Pulaski Index Page

Next Page