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 Obituaries and Death Notices
in Pulaski County, Illinois Newspapers

 

The Pulaski Enterprise

7 Jan 1916 - 29 Dec 1916

Mound City, Pulaski County, Illinois

and

The Ullin Times

24 Mar 1916

Ullin, Pulaski County, Illinois


Transcribed and annotated by Darrel Dexter

darreldexter@hotmail.com

 

Friday, 7 Jan 1916:

Mr. Livingston, aged 46 years, died at his home on Commercial Ave., on Monday of dropsy.  Funeral services were conducted by Rev. M. B. Baker at the residence on Tuesday, interment at Beech Grove Cemetery.
 
Friday, 14 Jan 1916:
DEATH OF THOMAS SNYDER

Again our little city has been called upon to mourn the death of one of its oldest and most highly esteemed residents, Thomas S. Snyder, who passed away Tuesday morning at his home here at the age of seventy years.  The deceased had been a resident of this city for the past thirty-three years, having come here from Ozark, Franklin County, in this state, and had always been actively engaged in some kind of work up to a short time ago, when his health began to fail and he was compelled to take to his bed at times.  It was while nursing a severe case of grippe that he was stricken with paralysis, which caused his untimely death.

Mr. Snyder leaves to mourn his death his wife and three grown children:  Albert and Elihu, both of this city; Mrs. Ray Overstreet, of Harrisburg, and also a stepson, Elmer E. Boyd, of this city, besides a host of near relatives and friends.

The remains were taken to Beech Grove Cemetery Wednesday afternoon, where they were interred, Rev. Roy B. Morgan conducting the services.
 
JEALOUSY CAUSES MURDER

Early shoppers were thrown into quite a spell of excitement on last Saturday night when a pair of colored women engaged in a knife fight on our main street near the St. Charles Hotel and the result now is that Stella Warner is quietly lying beneath six feet of earth while three others have been bound over by the grand jury to await the action of the court.

Jealousy over a man with whom the Werner woman lived is said to have caused Grace Smith to attack her with a sharp knife.  She lived 45 minutes after she had been stabbed three times.  The Werner woman was prepared for the attack and severely cut her assailant about the head, face and breast.

The whole outfit engaged in the fight are said to have been pretty well tanked up on boozerine.
 
DEATH OF MISS KUTTERER

Miss Mary Kutterer, aged 15 years, and daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kutterer, of Grand Chain, died at St. Mary’s Infirmary at 2 o’clock Friday morning of appendicitis from which disease she had been a sufferer for about ten days.  She was brought to the hospital on Tuesday for an operation.
The remains were removed to the undertaking establishment of Karcher Brothers and prepared for burial and the body was taken to Grand Chain on the early morning Big Four train.  The funeral took place at the home Monday morning and interment was to be made in Grand Chain Cemetery.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We sincerely thank the many kind and considerate neighbors who so tenderly cared for our dear, departed husband and father, during his illness, and the earnest sympathy expressed at the funeral.
Mrs. T. S. Snyder and family
 
The remains of Mrs. Steward Goins, of Karnak, were brought here (Grand Chain) last week for burial.

(Steward W. Goins married Eunice Doll Hill on 28 Feb 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Stewart W. Goins married Lula Shafer on 11 Jun 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Perry Gaunt went to Metropolis Monday and brought home the remains of his father, Uncle Dick Gaunt.  Burial Tuesday in Masonic Cemetery.  (Grand Chain)
 
Miss Mary Kutterer, who was taken to Cairo last week for an operation for appendicitis, was brought home for burial last Friday and was buried Monday.  Funeral at the Catholic church, conducted by Father Tragressor. Mary was the youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kutterer and a beautiful, lovable girl.  Aged about 16 years.  She leaves father, mother, two brothers, two sisters and a host of other friends to mourn her loss.  Parents, your loss is heaven’s gain.  (Grand Chain)
 

Friday, 21 Jan 1916:
John L. Harder, aged 70 years, and a former, well-known and highly respected resident of this city, died at the home of his niece, Mrs. Fritz Schweiger, near Olmsted, Thursday morning.  The remains were brought here Thursday night and taken to Montgomery & Co., undertaking parlors.  The remains were taken to Mounds on the interurban at 2:15 o’clock this afternoon and interred in Beech Grove Cemetery.  Rev. George Dunn, of the Methodist Church, of Mounds conducted the funeral services.

(John L. Harder married Ella Tucker on 9 Sep 1889, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
DEATH OF J. W. GAUNT
(Contributed)

The community of Grand Chain and the people of Pulaski County, as well, were surprised and shocked to learn of the death of Joseph W. Gaunt, of Grand Chain, on Wednesday evening at 9:25 p.m., at his home in that village.  He had been ailing for some weeks, but reports were to the effect that he was better and would survive the winter, but a sudden change for the worse hastened the call, and the brittle thread was broken earlier than was expected.

Mr. Gaunt was one of Grand Chain’s most prominent citizens and one of the most prominent citizens of Pulaski County,   He was born in Hopkins County, Kentucky, on the 23rd day of April, 1827, and was, at the time of his death, eighty-eight years, eight months and twenty-six days old.  He came with his parents to Illinois, in 1839, where they settled on a farm on the Ohio River, about two miles north of Caledonia, afterwards locating on a farm near Grand Chain.  Some two years afterward his mother died, followed about three years later by the death of his father leaving him an orphan at the age of seventeen to make his way in the world.  He married at the age of twenty-three and followed the business of running a flat boat up to about 1860, when he went into the mercantile business at Grand Chain, in connection with farming and handling livestock and wheat, and industriously and successfully pursued this business up to 1902.  At this time he turned over the mercantile business to his two boys, Fred and Joe, and continued to deal in commercial paper and look after his various other interests until his death.  He accumulated during his business career an estate valued at about $65,000.00

He was a man of sterling honesty, and unimpeachable integrity.  He told the truth at all times and under all circumstances.  He exacted what was honestly due him and paid without a murmur what was due him from others.  He believed a moral obligation to be as strong and binding as a legal one, and acted accordingly.  He was a strong and ardent advocate of temperance, and a leading and inveterate foe of the liquor traffic, and was a recognized leader of the antisaloon forces in their various successful battles against the saloons in Grand Chain, and the happiest hours of his life seemed always to be when the results of the elections favored the closing up of the dram shops.  To this end he not only used his great personal influence among the voters, but his pocket book was equally open to the practical advancement of the results sought to be attained.

Mr. Gaunt also stood for civic righteousness and high standard of morals in the other avocations of life, as well.  His great success financially and otherwise, and the moral tone to which his town has been lifted by those efforts, is sufficient proof of the correctness of his ideas of right living.  The life of this man, taken as a whole, was based upon his familiar slogan, “Honesty, Industry and Truthfulness,” and is worthy of the emulation of the future generations and the world is better because of his having lived therein.

In politics, he was a staunch, uncompromising Democrat and was equally helpful and outspoken in the propagation of his political ideas and in assisting results.  Being conscientious, he had nothing to fear and therefore nothing to conceal, misrepresent, or for which to render an apology.  He believed that one positive man was worth ten negatives and carried this principle throughout his entire life, until the close of the drama.

He was a kind neighbor, and the community generally was his friend.  He will be missed by the people of Pulaski County as few other men might be.  There are not many such pillars left.  The community in which he is best known mourn with his other many friends in the great loss it has sustained.
Mr. Gaunt is survived by his widow, a daughter, Mrs. Georgia Braun, of Leighton, Ala., and two sons, Fred, of Cairo, and Joe, of Grand Chain.

The funeral was held at the Congregational church today 2 p.m. in that city and a large crowd from this city were in attendance.

(Joseph W. Gaunt married Margaret E. Ray on 14 Apr 1867, in Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 

Friday, 28 Jan 1916:
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to thank our many friends who so kindly assisted us during the illness and death of our beloved husband and father; also for the many beautiful floral offerings.
Mrs. J. W. Gaunt
Joe Gaunt
Fred Gaunt
 
Grace Browder and Virgil Coffee, two colored women who were recently bound over by the grand jury, the former for the murder of Stella Warner and the latter as an accomplice, were given a jury trial on Monday morning in the circuit court before Judge Lewis and acquitted.
 
TWO DEAD BODIES FOUND
Both Men and Resided Near Grand Chain

Word has been received here lately as to the finding of a couple of bodies near Karnak, one supposedly of drowning and the other froze to death.

Some days ago as the logging crew of the Main Brothers Box Company of Karnak were working along the big ditch near that city, a member of the crew noticed what he supposed to be a man’s head protruding through the ice, and which when seen found to be that of a farmer by the name of Lacy who had been missing for a number of ____.

The other case was that of Pack, a well known young fellow who had gone to Tamms to purchase of some boozerine and taking on a good load went ____ to purchase a ticket for his _____ agent noticing his condition _____ make the sale and Bennie _____ walk to his home which _____ twenty miles.  It is supposed he became tired and sat down, falling asleep and freezing to death.

Pack is a colored farmer near Grand Chain.  We have been informed as to just what the verdict was as returned by the coroner.
 
Uncle Bill Hall, an aged colored resident near Ohio, died last Saturday after an illness of quite a while.  He will be missed by both white and colored, as he was always ready and willing to help anyone that needed help.  He leaves a wife, two sons, a daughter and a number of grandchildren to mourn his loss.  (Ohio)
 
Several people from here (Karnak) attended the funeral at Belknap last Saturday when Mrs. Keniga was buried.  Mrs. Keniga died at Cairo in the hospital where she had been for some time.  The deceased leaves a husband and several children and a host of friends to mourn her loss.
 

Friday, 4 Feb 1916:
Miss Margaret Nesbitt has returned form Vienna where she attended the funeral of a relative.
 
MRS. STUBBLEFIELD DEAD

Mrs. George Stubblefield, aged 56 years, died suddenly at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Jesse Cunningham, on Commercial Avenue, about 11 o’clock Tuesday night.  Mrs. Stubblefield suffered a paralytic stroke several months ago, but at the time of her death was in good health.  She has resided in this city for several years, having moved here from Johnson County, Ark.  She is survived by her husband and a daughter.

Funeral services were held at the residence at 1 o’clock Thursday afternoon, conducted by Rev. Roy B. Morgan, pastor of the Congregational church, interment at Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.
 
DEATH OF HAZEL HURST

Little Hazel Hurst, the 8-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hurst, died at the home of her parents Saturday noon after an illness of a week of tonsillitis.  The funeral services were held at the residence Monday morning conducted by Rev. Roy B. Morgan of the Congregational church.  Interment at Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.
 
DEATH OF MRS. S. PRINDLE

Word has just been received in this city of the sudden death of Mrs. Solon B. Prindle, wife of a former Pulaski County boy, at their home in Chicago.  As to the funeral arrangement we were unable to learn, but no doubt the remains were laid to rest in Chicago.

Mr. and Mrs. Prindle had only been married a little over a year, the wedding being performed in Chicago during the last of November 1914.

The many friends and relatives of Mr. Prindle in an around Pulaski County join with us in extending to him our most heartfelt sympathies.
 
Mrs. Emma Dawson, teacher at District 11 School, was recently called to Mt. Vernon by the death of her uncle, Mr. C. Stokes.  Mrs. Ella D. Perkins took charge of her school during her absence.  (Edith Chapel)
 

Friday, 11 Feb 1916:
DEATH OF MRS. E. SCHULER

Mrs. Emma Schuler, widow of Edward Schuler, who was killed at Mounds some years ago by a freight train, died at her home in this city about noon on Tuesday, Feb. 8th, after a lingering illness.
The deceased was born and reared in this city and has resided here all her life, excepting a few years which she resided at Mounds with her family, but for the past five years has resided here.  She was a member of the Episcopal Church of this city and was a prominent worker of the same.

Mrs. Schuler leaves surviving her, two daughters, Misses Dorothy and Winifred, her mother, Mrs. Philip Stern, two sisters, Mrs. Lucy Robbins and Lena Stern, and a large number of friends and relatives.

The funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at the Episcopal Church and the remains were laid to rest in the family lot at Beech Grove Cemetery.  Rev. Dyke, pastor of the church, conducted the services.

(Edward Ira Schuler married Emma Stern on 20 Feb 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Will Hoopaw died at her home here Tuesday night of tuberculosis after an illness of two years.  She leaves a husband and one child, a little girl of seven years old, besides a host of other relatives.  The funeral services were held at the M. E. church, conducted by Rev. W. T. Graham, at 2 o’clock Saturday afternoon.  The Royal Neighbors lodge of which she was a member held short services and she was laid to rest in the Liberty Cemetery.  (Pulaski)

(Her marker in Liberty Cemetery reads:  Leona wife of W. D. Hooppaw Born 1880 Died Feb. 4, 1916.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Joe Boyd left Monday for Alto Pass, where she was called by the death of her uncle, Mr. Finch.   (Villa Ridge)

(William H. Finch married Mary Lindsey on 2 Mar 1865, in Union Co., Ill.  His marker in Alto Pass Cemetery reads:  W. H. Finch Born July 28, 1840 Died Feb. 7, 1916.—Darrel Dexter)
 
The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Moore, of Karnak, was brought here (Grand Chain) for burial.  Funeral services in the Catholic church, interment in Catholic cemetery.  Little Gladys died from the effects of pneumonia.  All was done that could be done for her.  She underwent an operation at St. Mary’s Infirmary at Cairo, but nothing could save her life.  She was four years old and leaves father, mother and an only brother and sister to mourn her departure.  Little Gladys is only gone on before, as she was pure and without sin.  Our Saviour said:  “Suffer little children to come unto me and forbid them not, for such is the kingdom of heaven.”
 

Friday, 18 Feb 1916:
DEATH OF MARIE CAHILL

Miss Marie Cahill, aged 17, died at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Cahill, at 10 o’clock Thursday morning after an illness of five months.  Miss Cahill was a student of the high school in the sophomore class until her illness forced her to give up her studies.

She leaves besides her parents, two sisters and two brothers, Mrs. Harold Dills and Wilhelmina Cahill and Hugh and Earl Cahill.

Funeral services will be held at 10 o’clock Saturday morning at St. Mary’s Catholic Church conducted by Rev. Fr. Tecklenburg, assisted by Rev. Fisher, of Cobden, and Rev. Tragressor, of Grand Chain. 

Interment at St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds.
 
R. C. Magill has returned form Spencer, Ind., where he was called by the death of his brother, Lou Magill, who was killed in a railroad accident.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to thank each and everyone who so kindly offered and gave assistance to us during the illness and death of our beloved mother and daughter, Mrs. Emma Schuler, also the beautiful floral offerings.
Miss Dorothy Schuler
Miss Winifred Schuler
Mrs. William Stern and Daughters
 
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to thank our many friends who so kindly assisted us during the illness and death of our little daughter, Hazel, also for the floral offerings.
Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Hurst
 

Friday, 25 Feb 1916:
Myrtle Juanita, one of the twin daughters of Mr. and Mrs. William Baccus, died Tuesday morning at the home of the parents after a very short illness.  The little child had just passed her first birthday.  The funeral services were held at the home Wednesday afternoon by Rev. Roy B. Morgan, pastor of the Congregational church, and the remains were laid to rest at Beech Grove Cemetery.
 
DEATH OF W. T. BAGBY

W. T. Bagby, one of the oldest and most highly esteemed residents of Pulaski County, was found dead in his bed Tuesday morning, by his colored servant, who had gone to call him to arise.  Deceased had been in fairly good health for many years and the sad news was received as a great shock to his many friends and relatives about the county.  Apoplexy was the cause of his sudden death.

Mr. Bagby had reached the age of over 80 and had been a resident of this county for the past fifty-two years and had resided at Olmsted all that time.  He was a veteran of the Civil War and had also been a member of the Odd Fellows Lodge of Cairo for nearly thirty years and the conducting of his funeral services was partly left in their charge, assisted by Rev. J. Martin, of Olmsted.  The remains were laid to rest in the Masonic Cemetery at Olmsted.

Among those left to mourn his death are his daughter, Mrs. Susie Fellinstein, of Grand Chain, his son, Dr. Burton Bagby, of Mounds, and a large number of other relatives.
 
Van Isom, a farmer living two miles east of town (Wetaug), died Monday of pneumonia fever.
 
Mrs. D. C. Hurst, 69 years old, wife of Rev. Hurst, died early Saturday morning at her home near Ullin, after an illness of five days.  She leaves, besides her husband, three children, Mrs. W. H. Crippen, of Ullin; Mrs. Mary Morton, of Daisy, Mo.; and John, of Oak Ridge, Mo., all of whom were with her at her death, also a number of grandchildren.  The funeral was held at the home Sunday morning by Rev. Guild, of Anna and interment at St. John’s Cemetery, near Jonesboro.

(Daniel C. Hurst married Melvina Dillow on 26 Jan 1871, in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker in St. John’s Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Melvina wife of D. C. Hurst Born Sept. 5, 1846 Died Feb. 19, 1916 Aged 70 Yrs. And 14 Ds.
 
Mr. Van Isom is seriously ill of pneumonia.  Dr. Parker is doing all he can to relieve him. (Perks)
 

Friday, 3 Mar 1916:
CAIRO SETTLES FOR SALZNER LYNCHING

The city council of Cairo voted last Monday to pay $750 and court costs already incurred to Emily Salzner, guardian of Freddie and William Salzner, for the death of their father, Henry Salzner, at the hands of a mob in Cairo a few years ago on the same night that Froggie James was lynched for the murder of Annie Pelly.

The Illinois law holds that a municipality is liable for the damages incurred by a mob and children deprived of their support can sue to recover damages.

The action of the Cairo council was taken on the recommendation of Corporation Dewey and the claim was allowed.  The case has been dragging along in the courts for about three years and the time had come for action and the city settled.

It was thought the plaintiff could not recover damages in Alexander County, but they took a change of venue and the city thought it wiser to settle than to take chances for a higher verdict and more court costs in some other county.
 
FORMER PULASKI COUNTY BOY DIES IN CALIFORNIA.

Lieutenant Governor John M. Eshleman, of California, died very suddenly at his home in that state this week, after a trip to Washington, where he had been called on business.

Mr. Eshleman was formerly a resident of this county, having moved to California some years ago, where he has since resided.  Some years ago he was appointed to the office of President of the Railroad Commission and was holding that office at the time of his election to the lieutenant governorship.  The popularity of this gentleman was shown when a vote of over three hundred thousand was cast for him, being the largest vote ever cast for any candidate in the State of California.  Arrangements were being perfected to place his name on the ticket for governor, and there is not the least doubt but that he would have been elected.

Mr. Hugh B. Eshleman, of Pulaski, brother of the deceased, was with him at the time of his death.
 
Mr. Van Isom died at his home Monday, Feb. 21, 1916, at 2 p.m.  He was sick only a few days.  All loving hands could do was done to relieve him, but all earthly help was over.  He leaves a wife, six children, several brothers and a host of friends to mourn his loss.  He was a good husband, a loving father and a true neighbor.  They laid him to rest in the Masonic cemetery.  What God’s hand has done let no man question.  But dear ones have faith in God, for he will help you to bear this burden.  (Perks)
 
Andrew Campbell died at his home near Boaz, Ill., Feb. 27, aged 85 years.  The funeral was held Feb. 29, interment at Salem Cemetery.
 
Henry Banes, one of our (Edith Chapel’s) oldest citizens, departed this life Feb. 18th, and was buried in the Unity and Edith Chapel Union Cemetery Feb. 20.  He leaves a son and one grandson to mourn his loss.
 

Friday, 10 Mar 1916:
DEATH OF A FORMER RESIDENT

Mrs. Ellen Cordingly died at the home of her son, Rev. George Cordingly, in Chicago, at 7:20 o’clock Saturday morning.  The remains were brought to Mounds at one o’clock Tuesday and the funeral services were conducted in the family lot at Beech Grove Cemetery by her son, Rev. George Cordingly, at her last request.

Mrs. Cordingly came to Mound City as a bride when it was a wilderness.  She was a great worker during the war days and took great pride in feeding the solders of the North and South.  She and her children moved to St. Louis from this city about thirty years ago, where they resided for some time, later moving to Chicago.  Her daughter, Miss Nellie Cordingly, was brought to Mounds a few months ago for burial.

She is survived by her husband, John Cordingly and a daughter, Mrs. Mollie Pollard, of St. Louis, and one son, Rev. G. V. Cordingly, of Chicago.  Quite a number of our citizens attended the funeral.
 
A letter received by Mrs. J. F. Hargan Monday announced the death of Rev. A. E. Wells, formerly pastor of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church of this city, which occurred at his home in Grand Rapids, Mich., the latter part of January.  Rev. Wells was 77 years old and was stricken while conducting the Sunday services and died the following Wednesday.  He was rector of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church here six years from 1874 to 1880.  He was well known to many Mound City and Cairo people.
 
Friday, 17 Mar 1916:
Sparta—Millard Fillmore Mann, fifty-six years old, was run down and killed by a Mobile & Ohio passenger train.
 
DEATH OF MR. ASHBAUGH

After several years of failing health, death, at eight o’clock, ended the earthly career of Henry C. Ashbaugh.

Mrs. Ashbaugh was born in Worthington, Ohio, August 27, 1844.  He was the eldest son of Harriet L. and Rev. L. S. Ashbaugh, the latter a Methodist Episcopal minister.

At the age of eleven years, Mr. Ashbaugh began his career in the newspaper business, which business he followed until the year 1909, when on account of nervous breakdown he was compelled to give up his office at Mound City, Illinois, and move to Minneapolis, Minn.  He later moved to Denver, where he resided four years and at the time of his death was living at the home of his only daughter, Mrs. S. L. Kern, at Lawrence, Kan.

In the year 1861, at Rock Island, Ill., he enlisted in Company H, 45th Illinois Infantry, better known as the lead mine regiment.  He participated in the tramps, fights and charges at Forts Henry, Donaldson, and Shiloh and at the expiration of his three and one half years services, he was honorably discharged.
Soon after his return from the army in 1865, Mr. Ashbaugh purchased an interest in the newspaper business at New Boston, Ill.

In 1870, at Camden, Ill., he was married to Emeline E. Archer, and in 1872 moved to Newton, Kan., where he started the first newspaper in Harvey County.  In 1882 he was appointed by President Arthur as postmaster at Newton, Kan., which office he held for six and one half years.  In 1888 he purchased a half interest in the Daily Union at Rock Island, Ill.  In 1890 he disposed of his interest in the Rock Island paper and purchased the Evening Free Press at Eau Claire, Wis.  In 1902 he sold out and moved to Mound City, Ill., where he published the Pulaski Enterprise until 1909, when on account of ill health he retired form the newspaper work.

To Mr. and Mrs. Ashbaugh were born three sons and four daughters.  His wife and four children survive him—Harriet L. Kern, of Lawrence, Kan., Fred N., of Eau Claire, Wis., Louis B., of Chippewa Falls, Wis., William H., of Mound City, Ill.

Mr. Ashbaugh was a member of the Masonic Royal Arch Chapter and Knight Templar Lodges and also a member of the Grand Army of the Republic.

The remains were taken to Eau Claire, Wis., for burial.

(Henry Ashbaugh married Emma E. Archer on 27 Apr 1870, in Rock Island Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
NOTICE

I, the undersigned, convicted of murder at the April 1895 term of the circuit court of Pulaski County, Illinois, and sentenced to a life term in the Southern Illinois Penitentiary, will make application for parole at the April 1916 meeting of the Board of Pardons, to be held at Springfield, Illinois, on the second Tuesday in April 1916.
William Hill
 
SUDDEN DEATH AT OLMSTED

Apparently in her usually good health, Mrs. Gussie Calvin, wife of Mr. Hiram Calvin, one of the most prominent farmers in the county, who resides in Olmsted, died very suddenly early Wednesday night, soon after retiring, the cause was attributed to heart trouble.

Mrs. Calvin, eldest daughter of the late Captain Cole Boren, was born in this county and principally reared in this city.  Her age at the time of her death was past sixty-two years.

Mrs. Calvin is survived by her husband, two sisters, Mrs. R. R. Hawley, and Mrs. Carrie Spence, of this city, a brother, Mr. Richard Boren, of Elkton, Md., also a son, Mr. R. C. Calvin, of Levings, Ill., and three daughters, Mrs. George Schuler, of Mounds, Ill., Mrs. Ernest Hogendobler, of Olmsted, Ill., Mrs. Edward Reichert, of Grand Chain, Ill.

Funeral services will be held at the Olmsted M. E. Church, at 9:30 a.m., conducted by Rev. W. T. Graham, of Pulaski.  Interment in the Calvin private cemetery.

(Hiram Calvin married Gussie Boren on 24 Jan 1883, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Robert H. Hawley married Mary A. Boren on 6 Sep 1876, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Thomas W. Spencer married Carrie Frances Boren on 8 Oct 1889, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Coleman Boren married Caroline F. McDonald on 8 Aug 1852, in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
We were very sorry to know of the death of little Aline Stephenson.  The father and sister have our sympathy.  (Ohio)
 
Departed this life, March 10, 1916, little Aline Stephenson, aged six years.  Little Aline was a bright, lovable child, beloved by all who knew her.  She goes to meet her mother, who preceded her only a few weeks.  Deceased leaves a father and little sister, also a host of relatives and friends to mourn her loss.  The heartbroken father and relatives will find consolation in the words of our Savior when he said:  “Suffer little children to come unto me and forbid them not, for such is the kingdom of heaven.”  (Grand Chain)
 
The two-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Marcus Biggerstaff, who lives southeast of town (Villa Ridge), died Monday night.  Funeral was held at two o’clock Tuesday afternoon, interment at Shiloh Cemetery. 
  
Friday, 24 Mar 1916:
Mrs. Emma Kennedy received a message this week announcing the death of her father, which occurred at his home in New Orleans last Friday.  He was 85 years old and his death was the result of a fall.
 
Cecil Allen Hall, the three-month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hall, died at their home Monday morning of membranous croup.  Funeral services were conducted at the residence at 1:30 o’clock Tuesday afternoon.  Interment in Beech Grove Cemetery.
 
Pinckneyville—William R. Blair, ninety-three years old, died here.  He was a well-to-do farmer and spent his entire life in the county were he died.  He is survived by several children.
 
THANKS

To the many dear friends who so kindly cared for us during the illness and at the death of our dear husband and father, and manifested their warmest sympathy, we extend our most sincere thanks.
Mrs. Mary J. Moore and Family
 
APPLICATION FOR PAROLE

Public notice is hereby given that application will be made to the state Board of Pardons of Illinois at its regular meeting to be held in the City of Springfield, in said state, on Tuesday, the 11th day of April, 1916, for the parole of Harrison Owens, who was convicted at the January Term, 1904, of the Circuit court of Pulaski County, Illinois, for the crime of murder and sentenced to the state penitentiary at Chester, Illinois, for a term of fifty-five years.
 
OLD RESIDENT DEAD

Death has again entered out midst and taken from us one of our oldest and wealthiest citizens, Richard Moore.

Deceased was born in Ohio, August 5th, 1835, and died March 17th, 1916, aged 80 years, 7 months and 12 days.  Mr. Moore was united in marriage to Miss Mary Hughes June 4th, 1865.  To this union was born seven sons, James, Hiram, Robert, and Henry, of Grand Chain; Gip, of Karnak; Andrew, of Pine Bluff, Ark., and Richard, who preceded his father in his youth; and three daughters, Mrs. Flora Ehrstein, Mrs. India Jerdon, of Grand Chain, and Mrs. Fannie Bristow, of Creal Springs.  Mr. and Mrs. Moore have sixteen grandchildren living.  Uncle Dick, as he was known, was an old soldier.  June 4th, 1915, Mr. and Mrs. Moore celebrated this fiftieth wedding anniversary.

Funeral services were conducted Sunday at the Congregational Church by the minister of Karnak, interment at the Calvin Cemetery.  The bereaved wife and family have the sympathy of the entire community.

“He is gone, his voice is still.  A place is vacant in the home, which never can be filled.”

(Richard Moore married Mary Jane Hughes on 4 Jun 1865, in Perry Co., Ill.  John D. Bristow married Fannie Moore on 3 Dec 1890, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Moore, who have been here (Grand Chain) several weeks on account of the illness and death of the farmer’s father, Richard Moore, returned to their home in Pine Bluff, Ark., Monday.
 
Mr. and Mrs. John Bristow, of Creal Springs, who were called here (Grand Chain) on account of the illness and death of Mr. Richard Moore, the latter’s father, returned to their home Monday morning.
 
Nearly everybody from Karnak and vicinity attended the funeral of Uncle Richard Moore, which was held at Grand Chain last Sunday.  Mr. Moore lived to be almost eighty years and leaves a wife, six sons and three daughters and a host of friends to mourn his loss. 
 
Mr. Floyd Moak died at the home of his brother, Robert, on March 16, 1916, of tuberculosis from which he had been a sufferer for a year.  He leaves wife, baby, father and several brothers and sisters.  He was taken to Hudgens for interment, which was his request as he wanted to be buried beside his mother. (Perks)
 
Mrs. B. E. Gillet was called to Elco Thursday on account of the sudden death of her uncle, who made his home with his sister, Mrs. Pervoe.  (Perks)
 
Friday, 31 Mar 1916:
The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Beck died Friday at noon, and was buried at Villa Ridge cemetery Saturday afternoon. (Villa Ridge)
 
Mrs. W. A. Crader was called to East St. Louis Saturday by the serious illness of her brother.  (Ullin)
 
Friday, 7 Apr 1916:

ACCIDENTAL SHOOTING

Wayne, the five-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Culp, of Olmsted, was accidentally shot and killed Wednesday morning by his playmate Amos Spence, 12-year-old son of John Spence.

According to the statement of young Spence and all the other boys present, the shooting was purely accidental.  Wayne was passing through the fence in the rear of the Crecilius store, and when noticed by Spence was told, “I’ll shoot you,” then fired.  The bullet entered the child’s forehead, rendering him unconscious and that evening died.

The remains of the little fellow were taken by auto to Anna where they were laid to rest in the Culp family cemetery.

(His marker in Casper Cemetery near Anna reads:  Wayne W. Culp Born Aug. 5, 1910 Died April 5, 1916.—Darrel Dexter)
 
DEATH OF G. V. HENDERSON

G. V. Henderson, one of the old and highly esteemed residents of this county, died early Wednesday morning at his home on Tick Ridge, near Grand Chain, after suffering for the past six months with a severe case of dropsy.  He was seventy-four years of age.

The funeral services were held at the residence Thursday afternoon and the remains laid to rest in the country cemetery near the ridge.

The deceased was an old soldier, having served with an Illinois infantry.

He leaves to mourn his death his wife and daughter, Mrs. W. O. Talley, of Grand Chain, one son, Oscar Henderson, of Grand Chain, and one stepson.

(Gillis V. Henderson, 18, of Johnson Co., Ill., native of Massac Co., Ill., enlisted on 12 Oct 1862, in Co. M, 6th Illinois Cavalry.  Gillis V. Henderson, 21, of Vienna, Johnson Co., Ill., enlisted on 10 May 1864, in Co. A, 145th Illinois Infantry to serve 100 days and was mustered out on 23 Sep 1864, at Camp Butler.  Gillis V. Henderson married Harriett E. Staton on 4 Dec 1864, in Franklin Co., Ill.  Gillis V. Henderson married Lucressa Linley on 21 Jul 1867, in Union Co., Ill.  Gillis V. Henderson married Julia A. Nicholson on 16 May 1869, in Williamson Co., Ill.  Giles V. Henderson married Elizabeth Hayes on 19 Mar 1878, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Ohio Chapel Cemetery reads:  G. V. Henderson Co. M, 6th Ill. Cav.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Aunt Sis Eddleman died at her home Friday, March 31st, 1916.  She had been ailing quite a while.  She leaves one son, James, who lived with her mother and quite a number of relatives.  She was a member of the Maple Grove Baptist Church, where her funeral was preached by Rev. McCall and was laid to rest in Mt. Olive Cemetery.  Gone but not forgotten. (Perks)
 
Chester—Frank R. McAtee, fifty-eight years old, editor of the Chester Herald, committed suicide by shooting himself in the right temple.  Ill health for several years coupled with financial troubles is thought to have been the cause.
 

Friday, 14 Apr 1916:
KILLED BY TRAIN HOPPING

Sullivan Draper, about nineteen years of age, who resided with his parents in this city, in company with a number of other boys, was footing it to Cairo Sunday afternoon last, and as they arrived at the I. C. bridge junction, near Cairo, a freight train came by and young Draper having the reputation of being an expert train hopper, leaped aboard the train, but it was going too rapidly and he lost his hold, falling along side the train sustaining injuries from which he died that night about eight o’clock at St. Mary’s Infirmary.

The funeral occurred at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clark Draper, Tuesday afternoon, Rev. Fr. Tecklenburg officiating.  Interment at Olmsted.

This deplorable incident should serve as a warning to the many youngsters of this city, who are daily risking their lives in that silly practice, but the warning will doubtless go unheeded so long as there are moving trains and thoughtless boys.

(Clark R. Draper married Emeline McColgan on 11 Oct 1900, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Thomas Dyke left Wednesday for Jackson, Tenn., where she was called by the serious illness of her brother-in-law.
 
Joe Martin went to St. Louis Tuesday to attend the funeral of his cousin.
 
Died, Wednesday morning, April 5, at 1 o’clock, G. V. Henderson, one of our oldest citizens and highest esteemed neighbors of the ridge (Tick Ridge).  Uncle Ben was 73 years, 7 months and 11 days old.  He was a devout Christian and a member of the Methodist church for many years and was loved by everybody.  He was an old soldier of the Civil War and drew a small pension.  He has been a sufferer of dropsy for the past three years and bore his affliction with great patience.  His last remarks to his wife were that he had nothing to dread and that he was ready to go to meet the great Judge.  He leaves to mourn his loss his wife, one son, Oscar Henderson, two daughters, Mrs. W. O. Talley of Grand Chain, Mrs. Low, of New Burnside, and many grandchildren and great-grandchildren.  The writer with many other friends sympathize with them in their bereavement.  He was buried at Ohio Chapel Cemetery.  Funeral services were conducted by Bro. Presley.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank our many friends and neighbors for their kind help and sympathy in our bereavement of our dear husband and father.
Mrs. G. V. Henderson and family
 
MRS. JAMES ARMSTRONG

Mrs. Elizabeth Smith Armstrong, wife of James Armstrong, of this city, departed this life Monday night and that quite unexpectedly.  Her age was 62 years.

Miss Elizabeth Smith was born in the State of Ohio, March 8, 1854, and was married to Mr. James Armstrong in 1870, since which time they have resided in this city and have reared a large family.  Those of the family surviving are her husband, three daughters, _____.  ____ M. E. Church, Thursday, 12:45 p.m., conducted by Rev. M. B. Baker.  Interment at Beech Grove Cemetery.

(James Armstrong married Elizabeth Smith on 9 Jan 1870, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
DuQuoin—Chief of Police B. O. Cook, who shot and killed Clee Smith, has been exonerated by the coroner’s jury.  Smith killed Coroner Ira Jones in a saloon and in attempting to escape was fatally wounded by Cook.
 

Friday, 21 Apr 1916:
THE LAST ROLL CALL

William White, of this city, passed away Friday night, after a continuous illness of more than a year.  His age being 83 years, 10 months and 2 days, having been born in Mattoon, Ill., June 13, 1832.
Mr. White was married November 13, 1860, to Miss Amanda C. Miller, who became parents of four children, one daughter, who died in infancy, three sons, William, who died at the age of 5 years, Charles, of this city, Robert, of Cairo, Ill., seven grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

Mr. White had resided in this city about twenty years.

Mr. White enlisted in Company I, 81st Illinois Volunteer Infantry, in the year 1862 and served until peace was restored.  He had been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church longer than half a century.  He was a member of the G. A. R. Post 558 at Anna, Ill.

Funeral Monday afternoon conducted by Rev. M. B. Baker, pastor of Grace M. E. Church.  Interred with military honors in the National Cemetery.
 
DEAD BODIES FOUND IN BARN

Charles Harvey, a well known colored farmer residing near Mounds and now being held in the county jail on charge of burglary, seems to be well surrounded by trouble of late and all of a serious nature.

Last week the bodies of three babies were found in his barn and concealed in boxes and Harvey states that they were placed in his care by Undertaker Hughes of Cairo, but failure of Hughes to supply funds with which to put the bodies away caused Harvey to lay them aside without burial.

Lack of sufficient evidence to substantiate the story told by the negro will no doubt lead to the dropping of the case.
 
AGED LADY PASSED AWAY

Mrs. Abbie Dougherty, of Villa Ridge, departed this life at the home of her brother, Mr. John H. Conant, Friday, April 14, 1916, aged 71 years, after an illness of several months.

Decedent is survived by a son, Charles Dougherty, and two grandchildren, of Grand Rapids, Mich., four brothers, J. H. Conant, of Villa Ridge, E. T. Conant, of Noblesville, Ind., A. W. Conant, of Smithland, Ky., and P. A. Conant, of Cairo.

Funeral Sunday afternoon.
 
A beautiful, story was related to The Enterprise this week, that of a fatherly-hearted octogenarian—82 years of age, by the name of Remington, who owns a valuable estate estimated to be worth a half million dollars.  This aged gentleman has become deeply interested in a twelve-year-old girl, Junie Alcott, of Union County, Ill., and Mr. Remington proposes to adopt her that she may heir his large estate, for the reason that Miss Junie resembles, very much, as he thinks, a little girl of his who died several years ago who would be now about forty or forty-five years of age, yet the old gentleman thinks of her only as his “little daughter,” and wishes to have little Junie with him in lieu of his long departed little one.
 
DEATH OF JOHN THOMPSON

John Thompson, aged 30 years, died in this city, at the home of his grandmother, Mrs. Anna Rucker, April 24th, 1916, after a lingering illness of several months with a complication of troubles.  He was a stepson of Judge C. M. Thompson, was born and reared in this city and has employed for a period of fifteen years as colored porter at the St. Charles Hotel, this city.  He was a member of the A. M. Church and a member of the Masonic order.  Funeral services were held in the A. M. E. Church, conducted by the pastor, Rev. Cole.  The funeral cortege was one of the largest, yet witnesses in this city, under the conduct of the Masons.  Interment at Beech Grove Cemetery, Wednesday afternoon, April 26, 1916.

(Benjamin F. Rucker married Mrs. Anna Lightfoot, 50, on 18 Jul 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Eddie Isiah Schofner was born Oct. 29th, 1881, at Cairo, Ill., and departed this life April 24th, 1916, at Edith Chapel, Ill., being 34 years, 5 months and 25 days old.  He died in the full triumph of faith.  He leaves a wife, two sons, a father, mother, one brother, one sister and a large circle of other relatives and friends to mourn his loss.  Funeral was held April 26th, at the church conducted by Rev. Douglas, of Cairo, and Rev. Williams, of Pulaski.  Interment at Union Cemetery.  (Edith Chapel)
 
The relatives and friends from Cairo and Dumaine who were here in attendance at the funeral of the late Ed Schofner have returned to their homes. (Edith Chapel) 


Friday, 5 May 1916:
OLD RESIDENT PASSES AWAY

Mrs. Jennie Armstrong aged 74 years died at the home of her ____, T. A. Armstrong, on Tuesday morning, May 2nd, at 10:30 o’clock after an illness of many months.  Mrs. Armstrong was one of the oldest residents of this city and was highest esteemed and respected by all.  She was a devout member of the Congregational Church and was very faithful to the church until ill health compelled her from being in attendance at church.

She is survived by her daughter, Mrs. Ida Hallin, of Chicago, and two sons, Charles Armstrong, of Peoria, and J. T. Armstrong, of this city.

The funeral was held at the residence at 2:30 o’clock Thursday afternoon, conducted by Rev. E. Morgan, interment at Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.

(George W. Armstrong married Jennie Conaway on 1 Nov 1863, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Ida Hallen, of Chicago, who was called here last week on account of the death of her mother, Mrs. Jennie Armstrong, returned to her home Sunday.
 
DIES FROM BURNS

Flora Curtis, a well known and highly respected colored resident of this city, died at 11:00 o’clock Monday night from burns received when she attempted self-destruction that afternoon.

She went a short distance from her home and built a fire, after which she saturated her clothing with kerosene and sat down in the flame.  When her clothing caught fire and began to burn, she screamed for help.  Several persons went to her rescue and removed her to her home and a doctor was called.  It is believed she was insane.  When questioned about her strange action, she said the Lord commanded her to be cremated.  She is the wife of James Curtis, and a sister of Coroner J. C. Steele.

(James A. Curtis married Flora Steel on 24 Oct 1889, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Miss Reba, the eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. McDonald, departed this life May 4th, 1916, after a lingering illness.  Miss Reba’s age was 17 years.
 
This community (Grand Chain) was shocked Monday evening when we received the sad news that Mrs. Elijah Harris, of Tick Ridge, just as she had finished washing the supper dishes fell dead.  She was as well as usual and had not the least warning of death.  Sister Harris is a member of the Christian Church at this place.  She leaves a husband, three sons, a three-year-old daughter, besides other friends and relatives to mourn her loss.  No one knows this terrible sadness, but those that have experienced it, and to the husband and children, they have the blessed Savior’s promise that they can go to her by living as pure Christian life as mother did.  The Savior said, “Come unto me all ye that labor and are heavy laden and I will give you rest.”  Remember that your loss, which is great, is heaven’s gain.  Funeral conducted in the Christian church Wednesday by our Christian minister Brother Harris, interment in Masonic Cemetery.
 

Friday, 19 May 1916:
Died, in this city, on Wednesday of this week, Haywood Cook, a well and favorably known colored man.  Haywood was born and reared in this city.  Funeral services and interment today.


We desire to thank our many friends for their words of cheer and comfort and acts of kindness in the late bereavement of Flora Curtis our dear mother and sister.
Thurlow Curtis
Sarah Miller
Lucy Steele
J. C. Steele
 
Herrin—Herman Stedman, twenty-five years old, was shot and killed at No. 9 Madison mining settlement by Stinson HenryStedman had been ejected from the Henry home and returned with a double-barreled shotgun.  He shot through the front door and Henry returned the fire.  The coroner’s jury exonerated Henry.  The men were miners.
 

Friday, 26 May 1916:
Mrs. Walter North, of Memphis, formerly Miss Kate Howard, of this city, died at her home there Tuesday morning after a lingering illness.  The remains were brought to Mounds Wednesday and interred in the family lot at Beech Grove Cemetery.  Quite a number from this city went over the Mounds to attend the funeral.

(Walter D. North married Katie Howard, 32, on 26 Nov 1898, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Rev. Thomas Dyke left Wednesday for Jackson, Tenn., to attend the funeral of his brother-in-law.
 

Friday, 9 Jun 1916:
Alice, the five-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Gassaway, died at their home on the Beaver farm north of this city Monday morning.  The funeral services were held at the residence Tuesday afternoon conducted by Rev. M. B. Baker of this city.  Interment at Beech Grove Cemetery.
 
Word was received here Saturday of the death of Miss Frona Howard, who died at the Masonic Home at Macon, Ill.  Miss Howard was a former resident of this city and has many friends here.  The funeral took place at Macon on Monday afternoon.
 
APPLICATION FOR PARDON

Public notice is hereby given that the undersigned, Silas Howard, Prisoner No. 6864 of the Southern Illinois Penitentiary, who was convicted of the crime of murder at the October term of the Pulaski County Circuit Court, A. D. 1898, will file his application for pardon or commutation of sentence, being life imprisonment to the July meeting of the Board of Pardons of the State of Illinois, to be held at Springfield, Illinois, on the 11th day of July 1916.
Dated this 8th day of June A. D. 1916.
Silas Howard
 
Mrs. Arvetta Thompson was born Jan. 13th, 1893, and passed away June 1, 1916, being 23 years, 4 months and 14 days old.  Burial June 2nd at the Unity and Edith Chapel Cemetery.
 
Rev. D. Barnes, of Mt. Vernon, brought his wife home to be buried beside her mother.  Mrs. Barnes leaves an infant two days old, besides several other children, a father and four brothers to mourn her loss.  Several from out of town attended the funeral.  (Perks)
 
Mrs. Josie Martin, of West Frankfort, and Mrs. Ivy Richey, of Cypress, spent the 30th of May visiting Mt. Olive Cemetery where their loved ones are laid.  (Perks)
 
 Friday, 23 Jun 1916:
Quite a number of residents (Ohio) attended the funeral of Dewey Pope, which took place at the Grand Chain cemetery Sunday.
 
The remains of Dewey Pope, of Levings, were laid to rest in the Masonic Cemetery here (Grand Chain) Sunday.
 

Friday, 30 Jun 1916:
Samuel Kelly, a stranger in this city, was struck by the Big Four train about seven o’clock Thursday night and seriously injured.  Kelley was struck behind the ear and knocked unconscious.  He was taken to Dr. Hargan’s office where it was found his skull was fractured.  His condition is considered serious and but little hopes are entertained for his recovery.
 
DEATH OF MRS. WILSON

Mrs. Sarah C. Wilson was born in Mixerville, Ind., August 26, 1851, and departed this life June 26, 1916, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Mary Barnett, of America.  She was a devoted mother, a noble sister, and was beloved by all who knew her.  She, with her parents, came to Illinois in 1855.
She is survived by her daughter, Mrs. Henry Barnett, of America, one son, B. F. Mangold, of Marianna, Ark., three sisters, Mrs. S. A. Steers and Mrs. Alice Full, of America, and Mrs. C. E. Leidigh, of Villa Ridge and three brothers, Oscar and William Mason, of America, and Hugh Mason, of this city.

The funeral services were held at the residence Wednesday afternoon, interment at Beech Grove Cemetery.
She was but as a flower

Must live, fade away and die
Tis then that death has claimed her

Our mother, our sister, whom we must bid good-bye
As we gaze upon the placid features

So beautifully, peacefully sleeping
A voice seems to whisper

Hush be still, cease thy weeping
For she whom thou thinketh dead

Is not dead, but lives again
Amidst the flowers of God’s beautiful Eden

Wherein peace and love doth reign.
M. D. M.

(Charles D. C. Wilson married Mrs. Sarah Mangold on 30 Dec 1883, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Thomas E. Mangold married Sarah C. Mason on 1 Jan 1873, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Stephen A. Steers married Mary E. Mason on 10 Mar 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Andrew F. Full married Alice Mason on 11 Mar 1877, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MRS. J. W. ROWLEY DEAD

Mrs. J. W. Rowley, of Pulaski, and one of the oldest and most highly esteemed residents of this county, died suddenly at her home there Monday afternoon.  Mrs. Rowley was as well as usual Monday morning, when her daughter, Mrs. A. M. Brown, left her to go to her son’s home.  She returned about 3 o’clock and found Mrs. Rowley sitting in chair and supposed she was asleep.  She sat down and read a paper and before she started home found that Mrs. Rowley was dead.  The funeral was held Friday.
 
Mrs. Sarah Wilson, aged 64 years, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Henry Barnett, Monday afternoon, at 3 o’clock.  Paralysis was the immediate cause of her death.  Mrs. Wilson is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Henry Barnett, of near America, and a son, Ben Mangold, of Mariana, Ark., two grandchildren, Sadie and Frank Mangold, three brothers, Hugh Mason of Mound City, Will and Oscar Mason, of America, three sisters, Mrs. A. L. Full, Mrs. S. A. Steers, of America, and Mrs. Charlie Leidigh, of Villa Ridge.

Funeral services were held at the residence Wednesday afternoon, interment at Beech Grove Cemetery. (America)
 
The entire community (Bryan) was shocked and grieved to hear of Herman Kraatz’s tragic death.  The band of affliction seems heavy indeed in this case.
 
The many friends of Judson Bankson, of Mounds, were shocked to hear of his death.  He was a former resident of this place (Bryan) and we wish to extend our sympathy to the bereaved family.
 

Friday, 7 Jul 1916:
Henry Hasenjager, a brother of Mrs. Fred Hoffman, of this city, died last Tuesday afternoon at his home in Cairo following a stroke of paralysis.  The funeral was held Thursday afternoon from the home of his brother Louis.  The remains were laid to rest at Beech Grove Cemetery.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to thank the many friends and relatives who so kindly assisted us during the illness and death of our beloved mother and sister, Mrs. Sarah C. Wilson.
Mrs. Henry Barnett
Brothers and Sister
 
DEATH OF GEORGE W. GREEN

George W. Green, one of Pulaski County’s most highly esteemed farmer residents, died last Tuesday night at his home near Villa Ridge of Bright’s disease, from which he had been a sufferer for some time.

Mr. Green had been a resident of this county nearly all his life and had reached the age of 74 years.

He leaves to mourn his death, his wife and two sons, Harry and George, both of Villa Ridge.
The funeral was held Thursday afternoon and the remains laid to rest in the cemetery at Villa Ridge.
 

Friday, 14 Jul 1916:
MAN KILLED AT OLMSTED

S. D. Woods, aged 72 years, colored, was shot and instantly killed by Obe McCallister, colored, Wednesday night, about midnight, when Woods was prowling around the home of Chris McCallister, of Olmsted.

Mrs. Chris McCallister awakened by a noise, called her brother-in-law, who armed himself with a shotgun.  He fired once and Woods dropped dead.

All the parties were neighbors.

The coroner’s jury after hearing the evidence exonerated the McCallisters.
 
SHERIFF BANKSON ARRESTS F. W. CALLAN

F. W. Callan, formerly a citizen and businessman of Mounds, was located and arrested in East St. Louis this week by Sheriff Mannon Bankson, who brought the prisoner to this city and placed him in county jail to await the action of the grand jury.

Some months ago, Mr. Callan, purchased an automobile from Mr. Samuel Blum, of Mounds, and upon making a small advance payment, Mr. Blum took a mortgage on the machine for the balance due.  The first trip out of Mounds in the machine resulted in a terrible accident, in which Mr. Callan’s son was killed and a number of others hurt.

The machine was put in good order and Mr. Callan departed for parts unknown and disposed of the machine, which has not yet been located by the officials.
 
DEATH OF INFANT DAUGHTER

Rosalee, the three-month-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hutcheson, of Metropolis, but former resident of this city, died on last Tuesday morning at the home of its parents after brief illness.

The funeral services were held in that city Wednesday afternoon and the remains of the little one were laid to rest at the Metropolis cemetery.

Mr. B. S. Hutcheson and family from this city and a party of relatives and friends from Cairo attended the funeral.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to express our thanks to our many friends who ___ sympathy and services were so beautiful ___tended to us during the illness and death of our darling baby daughter.
Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Stahleheber
 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Stahleheber’s little seven-month-old baby died Saturday of cholera infantum.  Funeral conducted by the Lutheran minister of Olmsted Sunday and remains laid to rest Sunday at five p.m. in Masonic Cemetery.  (Grand Chain)
 
Little Louise Elizabeth, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Stahlheber, passed away from this life into a higher one on Saturday morning, July 8th, 1916, after a brief illness at the age of 7 months.  The sympathy and sincere regards of their friends was exemplified by the many beautiful flowers and the large crowd, which gathered at the home of the bereaved parents.  The funeral was conducted at the Congregational church by Rev. Huebotter of the Lutheran Church of Olmsted.  Music by Mrs. Lucy Fellenstine’s class of Sunday school pupils. 

Sister Elizabeth Evers presiding officer of Yuba Vern Rebekah Lodge of which both parents are members had charge, assisted by the sister members of the order acting as pallbearers and flower bearers.  Interment 4:30 at Masonic Cemetery (Grand Chain).
The leaves may, the flowers may

Fade and pass away

They only wait through wintry winds

             The coming of the May
There is no death, the stars go down

The dear immortal spirit is tread
For all the boundless universe

is Life.  There is no death.
 

Friday, 21 Jul 1916:
Uncle Isaac Little, an old soldier and old resident of this place (Tick Ridge), died at his home Thursday night.  He has been ailing for about two years.  He leaves a wife, three sons and two daughters to mourn his loss.  Uncle Isaac was loved by everybody.  The writer, with the many other friends, extend sympathy to the bereaved relatives.
 
Mesdames Ruth Weaver and Nannie Aliff attended the funeral of Uncle Isaac Little at Anderson last Thursday.  (Grand Chain)
 
The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Full, of America, died here last Saturday at the home of Charles Wood, while the parents were here (Grand Chain) on a visit.
 
Word was received here (Villa Ridge) of the death of the five-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Furry, of Brooklyn, N.Y.  Mrs. Furry was formerly Miss Kate Powers, of this place. 

 

Winifred, the thirteen-month-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Aldrich, died Monday morning.  The funeral was held at the residence Tuesday morning at 9 o’clock conducted by Rev. Galvin of Mounds. (Villa Ridge)
 
DuQuoin—Raymond Hall, f___ years old, was killed while h___.  He dove off a springboard eight ___ high and struck a rock or ledge and broke his neck.
 
Friday, 28 Jul 1916:
Mrs. Bilderbeck and Mrs. Pate were called to Murphysboro Wednesday to the bedside of their two sisters who are seriously ill.
 
DEATH OF WILLIAM HAYS

William Hays, aged about 46 years, and for a number of years one of leading grocery merchants, shot and killed himself on last Saturday morning at his home on Maine Street.

Deceased had been in poor health for a number of years and it is thought that his failing health was the cause of the act.

He leaves to mourn his death, his mother, Mrs. Caroline Hays, and sister, Mrs. Pearl Hoffer, of Indianapolis.

The funeral was held from the Episcopal church and the remains laid to rest in Beech Grove Cemetery.

(Edward A. Hays married Caroline M. Wilson on 10 Dec 1866, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Charles D. Hoffar married Pearl May Hayes on 23 Jul 1897, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Some members of the Rafe family were called to Centralia Sunday by the death of a relative.  (Edith Chapel)
 

Friday, 4 Aug 1916:
The remains of Puss Batts, of Anna, brought here (Grand Chain) for burial Tuesday.  Miss Batts had been an employee of the Anna Insane Asylum for nearly thirty years.
 


Friday, 11 Aug 1916:
The funeral of William Clithroe was held at the Villa Ridge Cemetery Sunday afternoon.  The body was brought up on No. 6, he having died at Sikeston, Mo., at the home of H. L. McGee.  He was a brother of Mrs. A. L. Gould and lived here at one time at the home of O. Z McGee.  (Villa Ridge)
 
Word was received here (Villa Ridge) Tuesday of the death of Margaret Irene, the two-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Wafford, who reside at Zephyr Hill, Fla.  Mr. Wafford was a former resident of this place.
 
Friday, 18 Aug 1916:
Word was received here Sunday by friends, of the death of Mrs. H. D. Meyer, at her home at Chamita, N. M., on Sunday morning.  Mrs. Meyer was formerly Miss Tillie Hallerberg, of this city, and has many friends here.  Interment took place at Chamita on Monday.
 
DEATH OF GEORGE BLANK

George Blank, aged about fifty-one years, died on last Monday at his home in Mounds, after suffering for almost a year from injuries received while employed as conductor on the Illinois Central railroad.

The funeral services were conducted at the Methodist church by Rev. Hoar and Rev. Baker.  The services at Beech Grove Cemetery were conducted by Trinity Lodge A. F. & A. M., he being a member of that order in Hammond, Ind.

The deceased is survived by his wife and one daughter, eight brothers and six sisters.

The floral offerings were most beautiful and were received from many cities where he was well known and interested in lodge work.
 
Paul, the little son of Mr. and Mrs. John Reed, died at 6 o’clock Monday morning after an illness of a week with spinal meningitis.  Funeral will be held on the arrival of a sister from South Dakota.
 
Undertaker Parker, of Vienna, was called to John Reed’s Monday.  (Grand Chain)
 
 Friday, 1 Sep 1916:
Mrs. James McTyer died at her home Monday the 22nd.  Mrs. McTyre passed away suddenly before medical aid could be obtained.  (Perks)
 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Rose and Mrs. Kate Ellis returned from Harrisburg on the 22nd, where they attended the funeral of Dr. J. H. Rose, which was on Sunday the 21st.  (Perks)
 
Thomas Grace, “Blind Tom” as he was familiarly called, one of the conspicuous figures among the colored people in this city the past fifty years, died in this city Tuesday of this week, aged about 75 years.  Though he couldn’t read, few men in the city were more generally well informed as to the important events of the county.
 
The wife of Peter Rodgers, an aged and highly respected colored woman of this city, died on last Monday evening at her home and the remains will be interred at Beech Grove Cemetery on Friday.
 

Friday, 8 Sep 1916:
George Stoltz, of Hannibal, Mo., who was called here on account of the death of the late F. W. Handley, has returned home.
 
DEATH OF F. W. HANDLEY

Frank W. Handley passed away at his home in this city at 2:15 o’clock Saturday afternoon, after an illness of several months of a complication of diseases.

Mr. Handley was born at Grand Tower, Ill., on September 20, 1876, but moved with his parents to this city shortly afterwards.  He was a graduate of the Mound City High School and a member of the Mason, Knights of Pythias and Elk lodges.

Mr. Handley for a number of years held the position as sales manager and bookkeeper for the Williamson-Kuny Lumber Company, but up to the time of his illness was superintendent of the O. L. Bartlett Hoop Mill.  He was a director of the Mound City Building and Loan Association, and was prominent in the business affair of the city.

The deceased is survived by his wife, two sisters, Mrs. Harry Smith, of this city, and Mrs. Jessie Baker, of Detroit, Mich.; and one brother, Harry Handley of this city.

The funeral services were held at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church at 2 o’clock Monday afternoon, conducted by Rev. W. H. Mizner, of the Holy Cross Mission of St. Louis, assisted by Rev. Thomas Duke, of this city.  J. A. Waugh, master of the Masonic lodge delivered the address of that order at the grave. Interment at Beech Grove Cemetery.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to express through The Enterprise our sincerest thanks to the many dear friends who so thoughtfully and tenderly cared for our beloved husband and dear brother, Frank W. Handley, during his long illness and at his death and burial.
Very sincerely,
Mrs. Lillie Handley
Mrs. Harry Smith
Mrs. Jessie Baker
Harry V. Handley
 

Friday, 15 Sep 1915:
ACCIDENTALLY SHOT

Ralph Cauble, who resided with his parents on a farm near Pulaski, was accidentally shot and killed on Sunday afternoon by Orval Rife, the 15-year-old son of Henry Rife, of Pulaski.  Young Rife got hold of a pistol, which he thought was not loaded, and was merely demonstrating to Cauble how the gun was used.  The ball entered just below the heart and he died in about fifteen minutes.

The coroner’s inquest found that the shooting was entirely accidental.
 
JERRY NANCE DEAD

Jerry Nance, one of the most prominent and highly respected colored men of this city, died early Monday, Sept. 11, 1916.  Funeral and interment occurred Monday afternoon.

The deceased was past 75 years of age.  He was born and reared in Kentucky, not far from this city, and came to this county about 45 years ago, locating near America, and later came to this city, where he has resided ever since, having been employed many years as a blacksmith.  He was devoted member of the A. M. E. Church, the Odd Fellows Lodge and the Household of Ruth.  Funeral was conducted by his pastor, Rev. Cole.

Deceased is survived by his wife and two daughters, Mrs. James Bolen and Mrs. Frank Cornet, each of whom reside in this city.

(James R. Bolen married Lula A. Nance, 20, born in Ballard Co., Ky., daughter of Jeremiah Nance and Mary Mahan, on 20 Dec 1894, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Frank Cornell married Ora Nance on 25 Nov 1896, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FATAL AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENT

About midnight Monday, Mr. and Mrs. Cassel and a colored maid, Ethel Mandelson, were driving up from Cairo to see the big factory fire here, and when near the National cemetery the car skidded, both tires one side gave down, the car turned over twice, throwing the occupants out.

The colored maid was killed almost instantly.  Mrs. Cassel’s jaw was broken.  Mr. Cassel’s collarbone and wrist were broken.  The parties were brought to Dr. Wesenberg’s office, where the doctor attended to the injuries.  The remains of Miss Mandelson were brought to Montgomery & Stockton’s undertaking rooms.
 
MRS. ELLEN LEWIS DEAD

After a long and patiently borne illness, Mrs. Ellen Lewis, wife of Otha O. Lewis, died last night at 11 o’clock at her home on Reynolds Street, east.

Mrs. Lewis was about forty-one years of age, and a native of Illinois.  She was the daughter of the late W. N. Atherton, and is survived by her husband and three children, two girls and a boy, also her mother, Mrs. Sarah Atherton, to whom sincere sympathy will be felt in their time of sorrow.  The children bereft of their mother’s love and affection are all quite young.

The funeral will be held at the residence at 3 o’clock this afternoon.  The services will be conducted by Rev. M. J. Hoover, of the First Baptist Church, in the absence of Rev. R. F. Hodnett, of the First Methodist Church, who was pastor to the deceased.  Interment will be made at Oaklawn.—Platt City, Fla., paper.

(William N. Atherton married Sarah A. Stringer on 5 Aug 1864, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 

Friday, 29 Sep 1916:
Mrs. Nancy McCorkle, mother of Mrs. Lavina Fisher and George W. McCorkle, died here (Dongola) Saturday evening at 8 o’clock of cancer.  Funeral services were held at the Baptist church at 3 o’clock Sunday afternoon and burial was made in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery.

(George W. McCorkle, son of James A. McCorkle and Nancy J. Mayo, married Julia V. Fisher on 13 Jul 1889, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Vermont Sowers died at the home of his parents, September 23, 1916, at 4 p.m. after a brief illness of only one week.  Little Vermont passed to the land of light and freedom, his stay was only six brief years and yet they loved him so dearly.  He leaves several sisters and brothers and a twin brother to mourn his departure.  The funeral was conducted by Rev. Karraker.  Interment in Mount Olive Cemetery.  (Perks)

(John Sowers married Sarah E. R. Patterson on 30 Jun 1898, in Union Co., Ill.  His marker in Mt. Olive Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Vermont son of John and S. E. Sowers Born Sept. 5, 1910 Died Sept. 21, 1916 Aged 6 Yrs. & 16 Ds.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Iva Sowers was home to attend his little brother’s funeral.  (Perks)
 

Friday, 6 Oct 1916:
DEATH OF PAYTON JOHNSON

Died, at his home in this city, Saturday, September 30, 1916, Payton Johnson, aged 80 years lacking 1 month and 1 day.  Funeral occurred Monday afternoon from the A. M. E. Church, of which he had been a member many years, conducted by Rev. Sims, the pastor, interment at Beech Grove Cemetery.

The deceased was born in Crittenden County, Ky., October 29, 1836.  He came to this city in the year 1867, forty-nine years ago and has resided here continually since.  He was one of the most popular colored citizens in the city, industrious, trustworthy and law-abiding.  He is survived by seven children.  He had accumulated some real and personal property and was comfortably situated.

(Payton Johnson married Fanney Freeman on 9 Mar 1870, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Payton Johnson married Sallie Barker on 20 Jun 1882, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
The remains of J. T. Evers, a distant relative of J. O. Evers, was brought here (Grand Chain) Monday a.m. and buried at Salem Cemetery.  Deceased was a bachelor and leaves a sister, his only near kin, to mourn his departure.
 

Friday, 13 Oct 1916:
DEATH OF MR. D. D. HARRIS

Mr. David Doddridge Harris, one of the oldest and most highly esteemed residents of this city, passed away at the home of his son, David, at 10:30 o’clock Sunday night, October 8, aged 85 years and 1 month.

Mr. Harris has resided in this city for the past forty-five years and was one of the most widely known contractors in this part of the state, and worked at his trade up until the past few years.  He was very active for one of his years and mingled among our citizens up to Friday before his death, when he was stricken with his last illness.  Mr. Harris had been a member of the I. O. O. F. Lodge for over fifty years and on the occasion of his fiftieth anniversary, as a member, was presented by the Grand Lodge with a jewel in honor of his fifty years as a member in good standing.

He is survived by two sons, William Harris, of Cairo, and David Harris, of this city, one daughter, Mrs. Margaret McFarlain, of Greenwood, Ark., and several grandchildren.

Funeral services were held at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church at 2:00 o’clock on Tuesday afternoon, conducted by Rev. E. J. Batty of Cairo.  Interment at Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.

(R. W. McFarland married Maggie P. Harris on 29 Nov 1887, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
The infant babe of Mary Goins died from a congestive chill last Wednesday and was buried Thursday at Ohio Chapel.  (Ohio)
 
SCOTT AGAIN REPREIVED

Elston Scott, the convicted negro murderer at Murphysboro, has been once more reprieved by Gov. Dunne until December 15, if then.  The Governor and Sheriff White it seems have not been able to agree on how Scott should be hanged as regard publicity and he will no doubt go down in history as the most reprieved prisoner ever known in Illinois, this making the sixth or seventh time, as we remember.  Of course, Scott, is not objecting to the disagreement between the Governor and Sheriff.
 

Friday, 20 Oct 1916:
Christopher—The three-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Dock Hamilton at Christopher, was burned to death when playing near a pile of burning leaves.

NEGRO LYNCHED AT PADUCAH NOT CRIMINAL WANTED

The negro lynched at Paducah Monday morning for an attack on a woman was not the one whom committed the crime, according to many Mound City persons, who declare he was in Mound City at the time the crime was committed.  Brock Kenley, they declare, was working there until last Saturday morning, when he went to Paducah.

Kenley, according to State’s Attorney Miller, had been released on parole from the penitentiary at Chester only a short time ago, and was sent back to Mound City, where he had been convicted of burglary.  He was charged with robbing a house early one morning and was arrested.  The circuit court was in session and the petit jury was summoned as a special grand jury.  He was indicted, tried and convicted in less than six hours after the crime was committed.

It is said that while Kenley had a hole in his cheek, he did not otherwise answer the description of the negro wanted in Paducah.  No mention was made, it was said, of a limp in the description of the negro sent out and Kenly had a decided impediment in his walk.—Bulletin
 
CARD OF THANKS

We take this means of expressing our sincere appreciation and earnest thanks to the many very kind and faithful friends, who so tenderly cared for our dear father and grandfather, David Doddridge Harris, during his recent illness and at his death and burial.  And we especially remember the loving kindness manifested by the I. O. O. F. Lodge No. 250.
Very Sincerely,
D. D. Harris and Family
Will B. Harris
Mrs. R. W. McFarland

 
Friday, 26 Oct 1916:
MRS. W. SCHWARTZ DEAD

Mrs. Sadie Schwartz, wife of Walter Schwartz, of America, died very suddenly at her home at 5 o’clock Sunday morning.  She had been awake at 4 o’clock and was apparently in good health, but when her husband awakened later he found her gasping and in a few moments she was dead.  Death was due to heart failure.

Mrs. Schwartz was formerly Miss Sadie Richards and spent her childhood in this city.  She was married to Mr. Schwartz in St. Louis on December 13, 1915.  She is survived by her husband, a four-week-old daughter, mother, one sister and four brothers.

The funeral services were held at the residence at 1 o’clock Tuesday afternoon conducted by Rev. C. Root Dunlap, of Cairo.  Interment was made at Beech Grove Cemetery.
 
The sad news reached here Wednesday, from Akron, Ohio, from Mrs. George Snyder, that her little son, James, was not expected to live.  Mrs. Snyder was formerly Mrs. Mary Flynn, of this city.
 
JOHN SIMMONS DEAD

John W. Simmons, of Mounds, well and favorably known in this city, passed away at his home, Sunday night at 11 o’clock at the age of about 53 years.

Mr. Simmons had lived in Mounds about 25 years following the occupation of blacksmith until five or six years ago, when he was appointed Chief of Police of this city, making a very credible officer until Mayor Hudson’s incumbency, when he resigned but was soon appointed to the position of Street Commissioner, which office he held very efficiently until incapacitated by ill health a few weeks ago.  Mr. Simmons was well known in this city in the discharge of his official duties.

Mr. Simmons is survived by his wife, a daughter and a son.

Funeral services and interment occurred Wednesday afternoon, conducted by Grim, the local Baptist minister.  The K. of P. Lodge, of which he was a member, attended the services in a body.
 
CARD OF THANKS

I desire to thank the many friends who so kindly assisted me and extended sympathy during the time of death of my beloved wife Sadie.
E. Schwartz and Re__
 
OBITUARY

Henry Clarry was born in Tennessee, McNairy County, March 1856 and departed this life Oct. 20th, 1916, at Edith Chapel, Ill., being 60 years, 7 months and 19 days old.  He professed a hope in Christ in April 1893, and joined Edith Chapel A. M. E. Church, remaining a member of same until his demise.  He served as class leader and steward for a number of years respectively.  He served as superintendent of Sunday school 14 years.  He was of a quiet, unassuming character and a loyal citizen.  He leaves a wife, two daughters, one son, an aged aunt and a large circle of friends and acquaintances to mourn his loss.  But their loss is heaven’s gain, as he told his wife and others at his bedside that there was a portion of that Heaven for him and he was not afraid to die.  Funeral services conducted Sunday afternoon, Oct. 22, by Rev. Douglas of Cairo.  Interment at Lincoln Cemetery north of Mounds.  (Edith Chapel)
 

Friday, 3 Nov 1916:
Word was received here last Saturday by friends of the death of T. M. McCorkle, who died at his home in St. Louis on Friday.  Mrs. McCorkle was formerly Miss Mary Bowling, of this city.
 
Elmer Hall, who was injured in the John Lence auto accident, died in the Cairo hospital Saturday morning, and was brought here (Grand Chain) Sunday morning and buried at Tick Ridge.  This is the second death from the Lence automobile accidents.  Tom Snider lost his life more than a year ago in an auto crash.
 
Our (Edith Chapel’s) pastor, Rev. S. S. Smith, was not with us last Sunday, being called to St. Louis on account of the death of his brother.  So we had no preaching service, but had Sunday school and class meeting.
 
Friday, 10 Nov 1916:
JOSEPH GAMBLE DEAD

Joseph Gamble, a highly respected and esteemed resident of Villa Ridge, was found dead on the porch of his home early Monday morning by his son, J. C. Gamble, who was going to work at Mounds.

Mr. Gamble had lived alone since the death of his wife and there was no one in the house when he died.  Death was due to heart trouble from which he had been a sufferer for several years.  He was 72 years of age and was born in Perry County, March 28, 1844, and been a resident of Villa Ridge since 1875.

Mr. Gamble at one time conducted a box factory at Villa Ridge and was formerly agent for the Illinois Central railroad.  He was a member of the I. O. O. F. and Knights of Pythias.  The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon conducted by the I. O. O. F. lodge.  Interment at Villa Ridge cemetery.

(Joseph Gamble married Alice Price on 24 Oct 1869, in Perry Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Otis Miller left Tuesday for Joppa, where she was called on account of the illness of a relative.
 
Henry Senne, a resident of this city for many years, died at the Knights of Pythias Old Folks Home at Decatur Wednesday night after a long illness. He was 65 years of age and a charter member of the Mound City K. of P. lodge.  The body will be brought to Mounds and interred in Beech Grove Cemetery.
 
Our pastor was on duty last Sunday.  We had Sunday school and preaching service, after which in connection with out class meeting, a memorial service was held by the Sunday school honoring the memory of the late Henry Clarry.  (Edith Chapel)
 

Friday, 17 Nov 1916:
OBITUARY

Joseph Gamble was born near Swanwick, Perry County, Illinois, March 28, 1843, died Nov. 6, 1916, aged 73 years, 7 months and 8 days.  He was the son of William and Rebeccah Hood Gamble, who with all others of the immediate family have preceded him to the great beyond.

He was married in October 1869, to Alice Price, of Perry County, to which union three children were born, namely, Ella and William, who died in early life and James C. of Villa Ridge, Ill.

He studied telegraphy and in 1872 accepted a position with the Railroad Company at Chester, Ill.  In 1875 he removed to Villa Ridge as agent for the I. C. Railroad Company.  Later in 1893 he gave up his work with the railroad company and went into the box business, conducting the same successfully until his death.

He was Justice of the Peace and a member of the school board and had served the people in this capacity faithfully for several years and always took an active part in any enterprise that worked for the good of the community.

He held a membership in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias and Rebekahs.  Formerly he belonged to the Presbyterian Church, but after coming to Villa Ridge, joined the Congregational Church.  In his death, the lodges have lost a faithful member, the school a strong supporter, the church a consistent member and the community a clean, conscientious citizen.

Death resulted from heart failure, the deceased having suffered attacks at intervals for several years.  The sudden demise was a great shock to his relatives and friends, as he appeared Sunday evening to be in fair health and excellent spirits.  Being active in politics he was looking forward to the national election with much interest and pleasure.

He leaves behind one son, James C., and wife, and five grandchildren, Alys, Willie, James, Lewis, and Robert, besides other relatives and a host of devoted friends in all walks of life.

The funeral was held at the Methodist church Wednesday at 2 p.m. conducted by Rev. John P. Galvin, pastor of the Congregational Church at Mounds.  The service at the grave was conducted by members of the I. O. O. F. Lodge, of which he was a member.  The pallbearers were chosen from the order of Knights Pythias Lodge 444 and the I. O. O. F. Lodge No. 439, namely, William Pearson, R. L. Spaulding, G. E. Titus, Thomas Clancy, H. G. Hogendobler, and J. F. Parker.  From the church to the cemetery the remains were followed by a large concourse of sorrowing friends and relatives, preceded by the pupils of the Columbia School carrying the floral offerings, which were very beautiful and many in number, showing the high esteem in which he was held in the community.
 
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Eubanks died Tuesday, Nov. 7, 1916.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Schofner’s 8-month-old baby died Nov. 15, 1916.  It had the whooping cough and pneumonia.  (Edith Chapel)
 
CARD OF THANKS

To the dear friends and all who assisted us so kindly by act or sympathy in the death of our beloved father and grandfather.  No words can express our thankfulness.  May God bless and sustain you in any such bereavement you may be called upon to endure is our earnest prayer.
Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Gamble & Family
  
Friday, 1 Dec 1916:
APPLICATION FOR PARDON

Public notice is hereby given that application will be made to the Illinois State Board of Pardons, for the pardon or commutation of sentence of Irvin Rose, who was at the October Term A. D. 1911, of the Circuit Court of Pulaski County, Illinois convicted of the crime of murder and sentenced to the Southern Illinois state Penitentiary at Chester, Ill., for a term of sixteen years.
 

Friday, 8 Dec 1916:
A man by the name of Pete Hampton of White Hill was shot five times by another colored man last week.  He died after 24 hours.  The coroner’s jury exonerated the murderer on the grounds of self-defense.  The two men were originally from Red Bud, Okla.  They had a difference sometime ago, which resulted in the death of the forenamed man.  The deceased leaves a wife.  (Perks)
  
Friday, 22 Dec 1916:
SENTENCES COMMUTED

In keeping with his promise to prisoners at the Chester penitentiary working upon good roads and in honor camps, in order that all of them may be credited with the actual time so earned, Gov. Dunne on Thursday reduced by commutation sentences of five Pulaski County prisoners and over a hundred others.

The five prisoners from this county whose sentences were commuted are Jack Everett, Jesse Hutcheson, Homer Travis, Erwin Rose and William Meals.
 
DEATH OF A. M. PALMER

A. M. Palmer, for many years past an employee of the Enterprise, died at his home in this city very suddenly Friday night of heart failure, and the remains were laid to rest Sunday afternoon at the Beech Grove Cemetery.  Rev. Roy B. Morgan, pastor of the Congregational church officiating.

The deceased was born in Alexander County about sixty years ago and when a young man came to this city to reside and edited the Mound City Patriot and later on establishing the Sun, which was conducted for many years.  For the past four years he has been employed in the composing room of the Enterprise.

Mr. Palmer leaves to mourn his death his wife and two children, Miss May Palmer, a teacher in the public schools in this city, and Ray Palmer, of Texas.  He also leaves one sister, Mrs. R. W. Rushing, of this city.

(Robert W. Rushing married Minnie M. Palmer on 30 Jun 1875, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to thank our dear friends for the kindness and sympathy shown us in our recent bereavement, the death of our dear husband and father, also for the beautiful floral offerings.
Mrs. A. M. Palmer
Miss May Palmer 


Friday, 29 Dec 1916:
The Grand Chain correspondent regrets to hear of the death of Mr. Palmer.  No doubt several will remember when Mr. Palmer edited a paper here at Grand Chain and all who knew him held him in the highest esteem.  I was correspondent for some time to the Patriot and Sun, when Mr. Palmer run them and therefore extend my deepest sympathy to Mrs. Palmer and the son and daughter.  May their path be smooth till they meet their husband and father in the world beyond where no parting is no more and joy complete.

The Ullin Times

 

The Ullin Times, Friday, 24 Mar 1916:

Mrs. B. F. Gillet attended the funeral of her uncle at Elco last week.  (Perks) 

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