Obituaries and Death Notices

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen

1 Jan 1918 - 31 Dec 1918

Cairo, Alexander County, Illinois


Transcribed and annotated by Darrel Dexter

darreldexter@hotmail.com
 

Tuesday, 1 Jan 1918:
Miss Mary Uhler, who was called to Cairo by the death of her cousin, Beulah Hall, has returned to her home in Decatur.
 
LIFE LONG CAIRO RESIDENT IS DEAD

Mrs. Mary Cahill, widow of Patrick Cahill, of 2702 Poplar Street, passed away Monday afternoon at 3:45 o'clock, at the age of 73 years.  She had been ill only for four days, but her advanced age made her little able to resist the illness.  The death came very unexpectedly to the family, as Mrs. Cahill was seemingly in the best of health and spirits during the holiday celebrations, at which time a number of the family visited her.

An old resident of Cairo, Mrs. Cahill came to the city when it had just been hewn from the wilderness, which at that time still covered the greater part of what is now a paved city.  Mrs. Cahill was brought to the city a bride, Patrick Cahill settling here as a city of opportunity and the couple spent the remainder their life here. Patrick Cahill died two years ago.

Surviving the deceased are a son, M. T. Cahill, two daughters, Miss Josie Cahill and Mrs. T. Williams; and five grandchildren, Miss Mary Williams, Edward, Howard, Frank and Ralph Williams.

Funeral services will be held Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. at St. Joseph's Church, Rev. Father James Gillen officiating.  A special Illinois Central train will leave the corner of Fourteenth and Ohio streets at 2:30 p.m. for Villa Ridge, where interment will take place at Calvary Cemetery.

The pallbearers are honorary:  John Hogan, John Barry, Dave Barry, Mal Cullen, Martin Creighton, and Patrick Egan.

Active:  Ike LaHue, John Foley, Howard Phillips, James Cowell, Dave McCarty, William Magner.

(Patrick Cahill married Mary Casey on 11 Sep 1864, in Alexander Co., Ill.  T. J. Williams married Margaret Cahill on 20 Feb 1900, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Her marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Mary Cahill Born March 25, 1845 Died Dec. 31, 1917  Mother.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

Entered into rest. Mrs. Mary Cahill, wife of the late Patrick Cahill, 2702 Poplar Street, Monday, Dec. 31, at 3:45 o'clock, at the age of 73 years.

Funeral services will be held Wednesday, Jan. 2, at 1:30 p.m. at St. Joseph's Church, Rev. Father James Gillen officiating.  A special Illinois Central train will leave the corner of Fourteenth and Ohio streets at 2:15 p.m. for Villa Ridge, where interment will take place at Calvary Cemetery.

Friends of the family are invited.
 
FORMER CAIROITE DIED IN VIRGINIA

News reached Cairo Monday of the death at Bedford City, Va., of P. B. Houghawout, formerly of this city. Mr. Houghawout was an expert piano tuner and was connected with C. N. Buchanan's music store.  He married Mrs. Maggie Comings, sister of William H. McEwen, and widow of the late Walter Comings.

F. A. Post of Murphysboro was a nephew of the deceased and he went East to take charge of the remains, which will be cremated.

(Walter L. Comings married Margaret A. McEwen on 20 May 1885, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
The funeral services over the remains of John O'Sullivan, who died so suddenly at Cape Girardeau, Mo., were held this morning at 8:30 o'clock at St. Mary's Catholic Church. Burial at the Catholic cemetery northwest of Mounds.  (Mound City)

(His marker in St. Mary Cemetery at Mounds reads:  John O’Sullivan Born Dec. 1, 1885 Died Dec. 29, 1917.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Word was received here (Villa Ridge) several days ago of the death of Mrs. O. M. Goddard, at her home in Chicago.  Several years ago they lived in Villa Ridge, where Mr. Goddard taught two successful terms as principal of our school and both made many friends here, who regret very much to hear the sad news of her death.
 
Wednesday, 2 Jan 1918:
FUNERAL SERVICES FOR GEORGE MILLER

Funeral services for the late George Miller were held this morning at the family home at Clank, Rev. J. O. Manning, pastor of the Methodist Church at Thebes officiating.  Quite a large number of friends and relatives were in attendance.

The remains were taken to Beech Grove Cemetery for burial.
 
FORMER CAIROITE DIES AT COLUMBUS
Wife of Samuel Redman, Formerly of Cairo, Ill., Six Weeks

Mrs. Samuel Redman, formerly of this city, wife of Samuel Redman, passed away Tuesday night at 7:45 o'clock, at the family home at Columbus, Ky.  She had been ill for a period of more than six weeks before her death and died from a complication of diseases.

Mr. Redman, the husband, was a patient at St. Mary's Infirmary in Cairo for a period some months ago.  He is a stepson of Mrs. Helen Redman, of lower Walnut Street.

Funeral details are not known here, but the interment will probably take place at Columbus.
 
Mrs. B. Y. King is lying in a critical condition, with no hope of recovery.  (Mounds)
 
Thursday, 3 Jan 1918:
MRS. KING DIED AT MOUNDS EARLY TODAY
Wife of Ice Factory Head Passed Away after Brief Illness

Mrs. Liewella King, wife of B. King, head of the ice plant at Mounds, died at 6:30 o'clock this morning at the age of 37 years.  She had been sick for the past ten days.

Surviving are her husband and two sons, Donald, Bismarck, Jr., and George.

Funeral services will be held at the Congregational church at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon.

Mr. King in addition to being superintendent of the ice plant of the Central Illinois Public Service Company, is president of the school board.
 
Mrs. B. Y. King passed away at her home on Blanche Avenue this morning at 6:20 after a lingering illness of Bright's disease. She leaves to mourn her loss her husband and three sons, Donald, Mack and little George.  Funeral arrangements have not been completed but services will be held Saturday afternoon with interment here (Mounds).
 
BROTHER OF H. L. ARBOGAST DIES

A message was received Wednesday afternoon by Henry L. Arbogast, 915 Walnut Street, stating that his brother, Robert Arbogast, 67 years old, died at his home in Vicksburg, Pa., Wednesday morning.  The news was not entirely unexpected, as Mr. Arbogast had been an invalid for a number of years.  He was however not critically ill until the day before his death.  The funeral services will be held Friday and on account of the uncertain train service, Mr. Arbogast will not attempt to go East.
 
Friday, 4 Jan 1918:
DAWSON WATHEN DIES AFTER BRIEF ILLNESS
Ill Ten Days, Dies Suddenly after Leaving Bed

Dawson Wathen, aged 25, a member of the Cairo Council of the Knight of Columbus and a roomer at the club, died at 11 o'clock this morning at the club.  Wathen had been ill for about ten days and confined to his bed for the past three days.  It was not thought at first that his condition was especially dangerous, but the two last days he weakened greatly.

A nurse in charge this morning admonished him not to leave the bed, but while she was out of the room, he got up and went to the bathroom, where he was found by members of the club.  It is thought the exertion was too great for his weakened condition.

Dawson Wathen has been a resident of Cairo for five or six years, coming here from New Madrid, Mo., where he now has a sister living.  His mother formerly lived at New Madrid, but is thought to be now living at St. Frances, Ark.  He has been employed at the Illinois Central freight office as southbound rate clerk.  He also has a brother living at Newport, Ark., who has been notified of his death.

He was a member of Company K, when they went to the border, but received an honorable discharge for disability.

The body was removed to Karcher Bros. undertaking parlors to await word from relatives.

The body will be shipped to his home in New Madrid, Mo., Saturday morning.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to express our thanks to our many friends for their kindness and sympathy during our late bereavement the loss of our dear mother.
Mrs. Eliza Clutts and family
 
OBITUARY
Mrs. B. King

Mrs. King was the daughter of William G. and Mary Ann Thompson, of Walkerton, Ontario, Canada.  She is survived by three brothers and five sisters, William B. Thompson, with the 160th Canadian Overseas Battalion; Robert A., principal of the Otterville, Ontario public schools; and Andrew P., chief engineer for McNeill & Higgins Company, Chicago; Misses Winnie and Annie Thompson, teachers in the public schools there, Mrs. Cloe Clarke of Walkerton, Mrs. John C. Richardson, of the same place, and Mrs. Ed Anderson, of Owen Sound, Ontario.

She leaves her husband, Bismarck, district superintendent of the Central Illinois Public Service Company and president of the Tri States Ice Manufacturers Association, and three sons, Donald Lee, 14 years, Bismarck Earle, 12 and George Andrew, 7 years old.

She and Mr. King were classmates in the Walkerton high school in 1897-8 and were married in 1902, after she had taught school for a couple of years.  She came to Mounds seven years ago when Mr. King accepted the position he still holds.  She made a host of friends, who sincerely mourn her loss.

Death was the result of Bright's disease.

Mrs. King will be buried Saturday morning at Beech Grove Cemetery.
 
The many friends here (Thebes) of Mrs. Levi Clutts were shocked to hear of her horrible death.  Her sister, Mrs. S. Hiller, and niece, Miss Flora King and perhaps others from here attended the funeral.

(Levi Clutts married Elvira Hunsaker on 23 Mar 1854, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. E. J. Twente was called to Clank by the death of her father.  (Thebes)

 
The funeral services of Mrs. B. Y. King, who passed away at her home on Blanch Avenue Thursday morning, will be held from the Congregational church Saturday afternoon at 2:00 p.m., with Rev. G. A. Dunn, pastor of the Methodist Church. (Mounds)
 
Saturday, 5 Jan 1918:
OLD CAIRO RESIDENT PASSES AWAY FRIDAY
Funeral Services to Be Held Sunday Afternoon

Mrs. E. J. Wilson, one of the old residents of Cairo, died at the home of her daughter Mrs. Anna E. LaHue, 523 Thirty-fourth Street, after an illness of only three days of la grippe and complications.

She was born near Chicago 73 years ago and came to Cairo with her husband in 1881, where she has resided ever since.  Her husband, Van B. Wilson, died seven years ago.  Mrs. Wilson leaves surviving her daughter, Mrs. Anna E. LaHue, a son, William H. Wilson, of Chicago, and grandson, Will Wilson, of the U. S. Army, stationed at Camp Merrill, New Jersey.

The funeral services will be held at 1:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon at the residence, Rev. John S. Coontz, pastor of the Methodist Church of which Mrs. Wilson was a member, to officiate.
 
Remains of Dawson Wathen Shipped to New Madrid for Burial Probably Sunday

Ceremonies and funeral rites over the body of Dawson Wathen, late of Cairo, who died suddenly Friday, were held by the Cairo Council of the Knights of Columbus, Friday evening at the Karcher Bros. undertaking parlors.  Arrangements were made on advice of relatives to ship the body to New Madrid, Mo., at which place a sister is living.

Funeral services will be held at New Madrid, probably Sunday.  The body was shipped to that city this morning over the Missouri Pacific at 11:30 o'clock.  A delegation of two members of the local K. C. Council accompanied the body.
 
Mrs. Elizabeth McChristian is dead.  The subject of this sketch died at a greatly advanced age at the residence of her son, Charlie T. McChristian, Monday afternoon at five o'clock.  She was buried the following day at the Blandville Cemetery by the side of her husband, who had died just twenty-five years ago.  Funeral services were conducted by Rev. J. M. Burgess in the Baptist church, which had been beautifully decorated with evergreens.  Mrs. McChristian had been ill for some time, but an attack of pneumonia proved fatal in just three days.  She was consecrated Christian woman and was widely known and loved.  A rather large family survives her.   (Blandville, Ky.)
 
Monday, 7 Jan 1918:
WALTER THOMAS DIES
ILL FOR SIX WEEKS
Passes Away at St. Mary's Infirmary This Morning

Walter Thomas, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Thomas, of 327 Ninth Street, died this morning at 7:30 at St. Mary's Infirmary after an operation of appendicitis some time ago.  It is stated that other complications caused his death.  He was 17 years old and the only child.

The deceased was taken to the hospital about six weeks ago and after a stay of three weeks, during which the operation was performed, he was taken home, where he remained for a week.  He was taken back to the hospital and has been there until death. His parents are prostrated with grief and funeral arrangements will be arranged by J. J. Walker, an uncle of the boy.  Arrangements have not yet been completed.

E. A. Burke has charge of the funeral.
 
SECOND FISHER CHILD PASSED AWAY TODAY
Twin of Child that Died about a Week Ago

Baby Fisher, the child of Mr. and Mrs. John Fisher, of 2020 Poplar Street, died early this morning at the home of its parents.  The twin of the little one died about a week ago.  Funeral services were held at 2:00 o’clock this afternoon and the body was taken to Mounds with interment at Beech Grove Cemetery.

E. A. Burke had charge of the arrangements.
 
KENTUCKY MEN ARE DROWNED IN CHUTE
Two Drowned, One Escapes, When Wagon Overturns in Middle of Stream

Bardwell, Ky., Jan. 7—Perly Benton, a school teacher, and Henry Ashworth, a farmer of near this place, were drowned, and Newt Benton, a brother of the former, narrowly escaped death in Chute No. 2, an old channel of the Mississippi about eight miles above Bardwell, Saturday morning, between eight and nine o'clock.

The bodies of the two drowned have not yet been recovered.  Driving a heavy wagon and a team of horses, the three men attempted to ford the channel, where the water was known to be very shallow.  The current was swift though, and the stream was running with heavy ice.  When the wagon had made the middle of the stream, the force of the ice, as it piled against the wagon, turned it over, throwing the men into the stream and forcing the bodies of the two killed, beneath the rushing ice.

Newt Benton, the third man, jumped when the wagon began to turn and landing clear of the ice made the shore after a hard swim.  The wives of the men were watching from the bank, when they were drowned, and are prostrated with grief.  Neither have any children.

Both horses were drowned and the wagon lost.  The man had started for corn, it is thought, which was on some land they had been cultivating across the stream, and as they had crossed often at that place, were inclined to think they could make the crossing.

Farmers of the vicinity have been dragging the channel bed continually since the accident, but have been unable to locate the bodies of the men.  The horses were found about 100 yards down the stream when searching for the men, but the wagon has not been seen.  The current is very swift at that point and it is thought to have carried the bodies for some distance.  Work in the search of the bodies will continue. It is thought they will use dynamite in an attempt to locate the bodies.
 
MISSOURI BOY DIES OF APPENDICITIS
In Hospital Only Four Days, Was Too Late for Help

Earnest V. Williams, aged 17, of Sikeston, Mo., passed away Sunday morning, after an operation for appendicitis. He was brought to the hospital by his brother, Robert Williams, who is a resident of Elkhorn, Texas.

The brother, after bringing the boy to the infirmary, went back to Tennessee and some difficulty is being experienced in locating him.  It is said that the boy waited too long to be saved by an operation.  He has been at the hospital for about four days.

The body was removed to the undertaking parlors of Karcher Brothers, where it will await instructions from the brother, who is expected to arrive or telegram this evening.
 
BUCKEYE MAN DIES IN CAIRO HOSPITAL
Aged Merchant of Missouri City Dies at 74 Years

Byron Rowe, an aged resident of Buckeye, Mo., passed away at the age of 74 years at St. Mary's Infirmary Sunday evening at 10:30 o'clock.  He has been a resident of Buckeye for many years and was a merchant of that city.

He leaves a wife and daughter, Mrs. W. A. Hamand, of Bertrand, Mo., both of whom were at his bedside when he passed away.

The remains were taken to the Karcher Bros. undertaking parlors and prepared for burial and were shipped to Buckeye over the Missouri Pacific at 3:30 p.m.  Funeral services will be held at that place Tuesday with burial at Armor Cemetery.
 
Dr. J. B. Mathis, Sr., died at his home in this city (Mound City) Sunday morning at 7 o'clock after a lingering illness of dropsy.  He had been confined to his home for several weeks.  He leaves a widow, five sons, J. W. Mathis, of America, Dr. J. B. Mathis, Jr., of Ullin, Dudley Mathis, of this city, Patrick Mathis, of Kowana, Okla., and Arch Mathis, of Tamaroa; one daughter, Mrs. Harry Neadstine, of Murphysboro.  In addition to this, 18 grandchildren survive the doctor.  Mr. Mathis was a veteran of the Civil War and had reached his 78th birthday the day previous to his passing away.  For a number of years before locating here, he resided on a farm and practiced medicine. Being a member of the Christian Church, the burial service and some pastor of that church will conduct the funeral, which will be announced later.  His son, Patrick, and wife arrived Saturday and all the other children will be present at the funeral services.

Funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at the M. E. church, with burial at Beech Grove Cemetery.

(John B. Mathis married Mary S. Mason on 24 Jul 1865, in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Tuesday, 8 Jan 1918:
DEATH CALLS OLD CAIRO RESIDENT
Mrs. Charles Cunningham Dies This Morning after Long Illness.

Mrs. Anna Cunningham, wife of Charles Cunningham, died this morning at 9:30 o'clock at their residence, 2503 Washington Avenue, after an illness of nearly a year.  Since June, Mrs. Cunningham has been practically bedfast, having been able to be taken out in a wheeled chair a portion of the time.
She was unusually well New Year’s Day, seeming brighter and more like herself than for months, but on last Thursday was taken much worse and has been gradually sinking since that time.  The end came peacefully and she fell asleep without a struggle or pain.

Mrs. Cunningham, formerly Miss Anna Swathney, was born in Louisville, Ky., on December 19, 1850, and came to Cairo in 1870.  She was married to Charles Cunningham, of Cairo, February 9, 1874.  She was a most devoted wife and mother and was of a bright, jolly disposition that made her dearly loved by a large circle of friends.  She was a member of the Cairo Baptist Church.

Mrs. Cunningham leaves surviving her, her husband, a daughter, Miss Belle Cunningham, and a son, William G. Cunningham. She has no other near relatives living.

Definite arrangements have not yet been made for the funeral, but it will probably occur Thursday.  Interment will be made at Beech Grove.

(Charles Cunningham married Anna Marshall Gwaltney on 9 Feb 1874, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MRS. GEORGE BRANKEL PASSED AWAY TODAY.

Mrs. Dora Brankel died at her home, No. 2217 Pine Street, at 5 o'clock this morning, after an illness of several years, of tuberculosis.  She was 43 years of age.

She is survived by her husband, George W. Brankel, two children, Loretta Ionee, aged 13, and William Joseph, aged 15, and two sisters Mrs. E. J. Sullivan and Miss Loretta Fitzgerald, both of Tamms, and one brother, Patrick Fitzgerald, also of Tamms.

The deceased was a daughter of the late Maurice Fitzgerald, of Unity.

Funeral services will be held Thursday from St. Joseph's Church and interment will be at Villa Ridge Cemetery. Karcher Brothers will be in charge.

(Eugene Sullivan married Ellen Fitzgerald on 25 Apr 1899, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Her marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Dortha May Brankel 1876-1918 Mother.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FUNERAL NOTICE.

Cunningham—Died, Tuesday, Jan. 8, Mrs. Anna Cunningham, wife of Charles Cunningham.
Funeral services will be held at the family residence, No. 2503 Washington Avenue, at 1:30 o'clock Thursday, Jan. 10, conducted by Rev. L. D. Lamkin, pastor of the Cairo Baptist Church, and Rev. A. T. Tomshany, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church.

Special interurban cars will leave Twenty-fifth and Walnut streets at 2:15 o'clock for Beech Grove Cemetery, where interment will be made.

Friends of the family are invited.
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

Thomas—Entered into rest, Monday, Jan. 7, 1918, J. Walter Thomas, aged 17 years, beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Thomas.

Funeral cortege will leave family residence, No. 327 Ninth Street, at 1:15 o'clock, Wednesday, Jan. 10, for First M. E. Church, where funeral services will be conducted by Rev. Mr. Coontz, at 1:30 o’clock p.m.

Special funeral cars will leave Eighth and Washington Avenue at 2:30 p.m. for Beech Grove Cemetery, where interment will be made.

Friends of the family are invited.
 
The funeral services of Mrs. Bismark King, which were held at the Congregational church, of which she was a member, Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock were very largely attended by friends of the family.  Rev. G. A. Dunn, pastor of the Methodist church, was in charge of the services.  The music was furnished by a quartet composed of Mrs. Robert Ent, Mrs. I. N. Taylor, William Gallion, and J. C. Meuch, with Miss May Gallion at the piano.  The floral offerings, which were many and beautiful, were in charge of members of the Red Cross Society, of which Mrs. King was an ardent worker as long as her health would permit.  Mrs. King was a loving and devoted wife and mother, never slighting her home duties for work in church, club and Red Cross societies, although always ready to do her part when duty called her.  The sympathy of the whole community is extended to Mr. King and the three sons, who are left to mourn the loss of a devoted wife and mother.  (Mounds)
 
Mr. Andrew Thompson, of Chicago, attended the funeral services of his sister, Mrs. Bismark King, on Saturday. (Mounds)
 
Mr. King, of Chicago, attended the funeral services of his sister-in-law, Mrs. Bismarck King, on Saturday. (Mounds).
 
Wednesday, 9 Jan 1918:
FORMER CAIROITE DIES IN CHICAGO

Robert Castle, formerly of Cairo, late of Chicago, died in Chicago on Friday of last week, according to word received in Cairo.  He was 75 years of age and lived in Cairo about 30 years ago.  He was buried at Oakwood Cemetery Monday.

The deceased leaves three children, Hiram, Lydia, and Ida, and a cousin, Thomas J. Sloo, of Cairo.  His wife was Miss Ida Harrell, before her marriage.

(Robert Castles married Ida L. Harrell on 3 Nov 1889, in Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Card of Thanks

We wish to thank our friends for the beautiful floral offerings and their kind assistance during the illness and death of our beloved wife and mother.
B. King and Family
 
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to express our thanks and appreciation to the many friends of Dawson Wathen, who were so kind to him in his illness and to us in our bereavement, for the flowers sent and to the Knights of Columbus for their kind services.  Especially do we wish to thank his brother Knights, Messrs. Cain and Devlin.
Mrs. W. Wathen and Family
Mrs. William Hoehn and Family.
 
CHARLESTON GIRL HAS PASSED AWAY
Dies After Attack of Appendicitis While Being Taken to St. Louis Hospital

Charleston, Mo., Jan. 9.—Miss Ezelle Howlett, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Howlett, a prominent family of this city, died this morning at the home of her aunt, Mrs. Jennite Gruner, at Farmington, Mo., after an attack of appendicitis.

She was taken to St. Louis to enter a hospital for treatment for appendicitis and became sick on the train.  She was taken off at Farmington and taken to the home of her aunt, where she passed away. 

She was 20 years old on the eighteenth of last May.

The deceased was a very well known and popular young lady of Charleston and has a great number of friends who will sincerely mourn her death.  She has visited in Cairo many times, where she has relatives and friends.  She is a cousin of Mrs. C. C. Terrell, of Cairo.

The body will be brought to Charleston, tomorrow afternoon and the funeral will be held later; no arrangements have been made at this time.  Interment will probably be at this city.
 
THOMAS FUNERAL AT M. E. CHURCH TODAY
Services Over Remains This Afternoon, Burial at Beech Grove

Funeral services over the remains of J. Walter Thomas, who died Monday at St. Mary's Infirmary, were held this afternoon at 1:15 o'clock at the First Methodist Church, with Rev. J. W. Coontz officiating.

A large number of friends of the deceased and his family were present at the services, and many beautiful floral pieces were offered his memory.

Special interurban cars left the corner of Eighth and Washington Avenue, at 2:20 p.m., carrying the funeral party to Mounds, where interment took place at Beech Grove Cemetery.

The pallbearers were members of the deceased's Sunday school class.  They were:  William Tippitt, William Shoemaker, Russell Coombes, Edward Miller, John Koontz, John Snyder, Phillip Abell, Sam Reed, Harold Beashe, Harry Stitles, John Messenger, Leslie Samuels, Howard Watwood, Harold Jones, Heirl Smothers, Lorane Koonce, Edward Norris, Hall Walker and Ralph Smith.
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

Cunningham—Died, Tuesday, Jan. 8, Mrs. Anna Cunningham, wife of Charles Cunningham.
Funeral service will be held at the family residence, No. 2503 Washington Avenue, at 1:30 o’clock Thursday, Jan 10, conducted by Rev. L. D. Lamkin, pastor of the Cairo Baptist Church, and Rev. A. T. Thomshany, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church.

Special interurban cars will leave Twenty-fifth and Walnut streets, at 2:15 o'clock for Beech Grove Cemetery, where interment will be made.

Friends of the family are invited.
 
BRANKEL FUNERAL TO BE THURSDAY
Service to Be Held at St. Joseph's Church

Funeral services over the remains of Mrs. Dora Brankel, who died Tuesday morning at her home, 2117 Pine Street, will be held Thursday morning at 8:20 o'clock at St. Joseph's Church, Rev. Father James Gillen officiating.

A special Illinois Central train will leave the corner of Fourteenth and Ohio streets, for Villa Ridge, where interment will take place at Calvary Cemetery.

The pall bearers will be:  Tim Donovan, George Fisher, Tom Darmody, Mert Kelly, Tom Moran, and Martin O'Donahue.
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

Brankel—Died at 5:30 o'clock Tuesday morning, Jan. 8, 1918, after a lingering illness, Mrs. Dora Brankel, wife of George W. Brankel, age 43 years, at her home, 2117 Pine Street.

Funeral services will be held Thursday morning at 8:30 o'clock at St. Joseph's Church, Rev. J. J. Gillen officiating.

A special Illinois Central train will leave Ohio and Fourteenth streets for Villa Ridge, where interment will take place in Calvary Cemetery.

St. Louis papers and Helena World, Helena, Ark., please copy.
 
The funeral of Dr. J. B. Mathis, which was held from the Methodist church Tuesday, Rev. J. S. Clements, of the Christian Church of Cairo conducted the services.  Dr. Mathis had been a member of the Christian Church at America for a great number of years.  His grandchildren acted as flower bearers.  The interment was at Beech Grove Cemetery.  (Mound City)
 
Jack Johnson, an old resident (Pulaski), ended his life by shooting himself Monday evening.  Poor health is supposed to be the cause.
 
FOUNDER OF HERRIN DIES

Ephraim Herrin, prominent Herrin citizen, died at his home in Herrin Saturday and was buried Monday according to the Carbondale Free Press.  He enlisted in the 128th Illinois Volunteer Infantry in 1862 and with the other survivors of that regiment was merged with the 9th Illinois and was mustered out in 1865.  He was the first person to make a home where the city of Herrin now stands.

(Ephraim Herrin married Fatima Brown on 6 May 1869, in Williamson Co., Ill.  Ephraim S. Herrin, 19, native of Williamson Co., Ill., enlisted as a private of Company D, 128th Illinois Infantry on 26 Sep 1862, and was transferred to Co. H, 9th Illinois Infantry.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Thursday, 10 Jan 1918:
FUNERAL SERVICES FOR MRS. CUNNINGHAM

Funeral services were held for Mrs. Charles Cunningham this afternoon at the family residence, 2502 Washington Avenue, conducted by Rev. L. D. Lamkin, pastor of the Cairo Baptist Church, of which she was a member.  Rev. A. T. Tomshany, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, assisted in the service.

A large number of friends of the deceased and of the family were in attendance and the flowers were profuse and beautiful.  Pallbearers were chosen from among the friends of the family.

The remains were taken by special interurban cars to Beech Grove Cemetery for interment.
 
MRS. DORA BRANKEL LAID TO REST TODAY
Funeral Services Held This Morning at St. Joseph’s

The funeral services of Mrs. Dora Brankel, who died Tuesday morning, were held this morning at 8:30 o'clock at St. Joseph's Church conducted by Rev. James J. Gillen.  There were an abundance of beautiful floral offerings sent by friends of the deceased and her bereaved family.  Interment was made at Calvary Cemetery, Villa Ridge.

The pallbearers were Messrs. Tim Donovan, George Fischer, Thomas Darmody, Merl Kelly, Tom Moran, and Martin O'Donahue.
 
Mrs. Clark and sister, Mrs. Richardson, of Canada, who were called here (Mounds) by the illness and death of their sister, Mrs. B. Y. King, will return home Friday.  George King, the youngest son, will return with them to make his home with his aunt, Miss Winnie Thompson.
 
FUNERAL SERVICES OVER J. H. JOHNSON AT PULASKI TODAY

The funeral of J. H. Johnson, who committed suicide Monday night, was held in Pulaski today.  Mr. Johnson, who was a prominent farmer living near Pulaski, shot himself in the head as the result of despondency caused by illness.  His wife, who was in the house at the time, did not notice the shot as boys in the street were shooting at sparrows and if she heard the shot she thought it was the boys. 

When she discovered him, he was dead.

He leaves surviving him his wife, a daughter, Mrs. John Moore, of Pulaski, and a daughter by a former wife, Mrs. Peter McComber, of Olmsted.

(J. H. Johnson married Mrs. Parmelia Bankson on 16 Nov 1879, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Alfred C. Bankston married Permelia J. King on 29 Jun 1867, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  The 11 Jan 1918 issue gives the daughter’s name as Mrs. Peter McCormick.  Peter McCormick married Alma Bankson on 15 Sep 1898, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  John Moore, 21, born in Pulaski, Ill., son of Silas John Moore and Cynthia Ann Littlejohn, married Ethel Mae Johnson, 18, born in Pulaski, Ill., daughter of John Henry Johnson and Permelia King, on 29 Jan 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Charles Neeley received a message Sunday, stating that his mother was dead at Carrolton, Ill.
 
Rev. M. M. Williams went to Neilson Saturday to fill his regular appointment and while at one of their homes Sunday night he was struck with paralysis and only lived a few hours.  They brought him home Tuesday morning; all of his children are here (Perks).  He will be taken back to Herrin, Ill., and will be buried at the family cemetery.

Perks has lost a good man:  one of its best citizens and one of its best church workers that has ever been here.
 
PIONEER PULASKI FARMER ENDS LIFE
Jack Johnson Shot and Killed Himself—Poor Health Cause

Pulaski, Ill., Jan. 10—Jack Johnson, a pioneer citizen of Pulaski and a very highly respected citizen, committed suicide at his home here while lying in bed, by shooting himself in the right temple on the evening of Jan. 7.  He had been in very poor health the past year and had suffered and endured much pain.  He was 73 years of age and had raised a family, all of whom were grown.  He owned a farm and was one who had made farming a success.  During the past 15 or 20 years, he had retired from active farming and lived a very quiet inoffensive life, although eccentric in his ways, yet he will be missed by all and the sad way in which the tragic end came to his well spent life.
 
Friday, 11 Jan 1918:
MRS. BINKLEY DIES EARLY THIS MORNING
Passes Away at Home after Ten Weeks' Illness

Mrs. Elizabeth Binkley, died at her home, 204½ Washington Avenue, at 2:26 o'clock this morning after an illness of nearly ten weeks.  She suffered a stroke of paralysis ten weeks ago next Sunday and has been bedfast since then.  She was 68 years old and leaves surviving her one daughter, Mrs. Agnes Bearden, of St. Louis, and three sons, Messrs. James Binkley, of Thebes, Robert Binkley, of Cairo, and Loyd Binkley of St. Louis.

The funeral services will be held at Carbondale Sunday, the funeral party leaving Cairo at 4 o'clock Sunday morning.
 
HARRISBURG MAN KILLED IN FRANCE

John Maltman, of Harrisburg, has received a letter informing him of the death of his brother, William Maltman, who was killed on the firing line in France.

He was 28 years of age and had been in the war for more than two years.
 
CARD OF THANKS

During the long illness and upon the death of our dear son, Walter Thomas, we received so many evidences of sympathy that it will be impossible to see and thank in person all those who comforted us in our dark hours.

We, therefore, take this means of expressing our gratitude to all who contributed in any way to the alleviation of our sorrow, those sending flowers, those furnishing automobiles, the choir, the pastor, the Sunday school class and especially Mr. Carter, the teacher, and all others who remembered us in any way.
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Thomas
 
Mrs. John Moore, of Pulaski, was here Thursday handling some business matters at the courthouse.  She was bereaved by the death of her father, J. H. Johnson, who died Monday afternoon.  Deceased also leaves another daughter, Mrs. Peter McCormick.  (Mound City)
 
Saturday, 12 Jan 1918:
Mrs. Jennie Hall, of Kirbyton attended the burial of her brother, J. F. Epperson, here (Blandville, Ky.) Thursday.
 
J. F. EPPERSON DIED AT BLANDVILLE

Blandville, Ky., Jan. 12—J. F. Epperson, of this place, died Wednesday morning after an illness of four days from pneumonia.  His health had been failing for several years and he was not able to sustain an attack of this disease.

He was born in Middle Tennessee sixty-two years ago and came to Ballard County in 1870.  His father had come the year before, but died before he could remove to the home he had bought.

He had married twice, his first wife being Miss Lulu Peacock, to whom two children were born.  A daughter, Mrs. Jennie Watson lives here, but the son, Ed Epperson, has been living in Canada for several years.

His second marriage was to Miss Ann Pease.

Dr. T. A. Pease, of Kirbyton, and Dr. Barrow, of Dunningham, were the attending physicians.

Funeral services were conducted from the residence.  The sermon was preached by Rev. J. M. Burgess of the local Baptist church.

J. F. (Mark) Epperson was a very antique character and was widely known all over West Kentucky.

Interment was made in the local cemetery Thursday afternoon.
 
Monday, 14 Jan 1918:
Mr. Bismark King was called to Chicago by the death of his mother.  (Mounds)
 
Mrs. Bert Humphrey has gone to Dover, Tenn., having been called there by the serious illness of her mother. (Charleston, Mo.)
 
Mrs. Webb Wilker, of Poplar Bluff, and Mrs. Melotta, of Boyle, Miss., are the guests of their mother, Mrs. Sue Hewlett, having been called by the death of their niece, Miss Ezelle Howlett. (Charleston, Mo.)
 
MISS LOIS TWENTE DIES AT HER HOME
Thebes Girl Dies After an Illness of a Year

Thebes, Ill., Jan. 14—Miss Lois Twente, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Asa D. Twente, died at the age of seventeen years at the home of her parents near here Friday morning.  The deceased has been ill with tuberculosis for the past year and up until three weeks ago had been under treatment in the southwest.  She was brought home after the climate failed to improve her condition.

The young lady was well known throughout the county and was a student at the Carbondale Normal School before her illness.  She is survived by her parents, two brothers, George and DeWitt, and one sister, Lucy.  She is related to Sidney B. Miller, Jesse Miller and Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Twente, of Cairo.

Funeral services were to be held today at the Methodist church here, with interment in the Twente Cemetery near the city, but owing to the weather it has been postponed until sometime Tuesday.
 

Tuesday, 15 Jan 1918:
A. H. Twente returned this morning from Olive Branch, where he has been with his brother, Asa D. Twente, and family since the death of their daughter, Miss Lois, Friday.
 
L. C. ROBERTS DIES IN CHAMPAIGN, ILL.
Passes Away at Home of Father Early This Morning.

L. C. Roberts, of 428 Thirty-fourth Street, died this morning at 5 o'clock at the home of his father in Champaign, where he has been for the past two months under medical treatment.  He has been ill since early in the fall with heart trouble and a complication of diseases.  He was 32 years of age and leaves surviving him his wife, formerly Miss Hazel Neff, of Cairo, and one son.  He was before his illness a boilermaker for the Big Four Railroad and was highly esteemed by his associates.

Mr. Roberts was a member of the Knights Pythias Lodge, which organization will have charge of the funeral services.  The body will be shipped to Cairo and is expected to arrive here at 7 o'clock Wednesday evening.  Definite arrangements have not been made.
 
Wednesday, 16 Jan 1918:
PIONEER RESIDENT HAS PASSED AWAY
Resident of Cairo for 64 Years Dies after an Illness at 85 Years.

Mrs. Anna Margaret Koch, a pioneer resident of Cairo, widow of Emil Koch, passed away at 11:20 o'clock Tuesday evening at the home of her son, George Koch, 226 Eighteenth Street.  She had been ill for some time and was 85 years old.

She came to Cairo about 1854.  When the first levee broke in 1858, she was living in the city and experienced some difficulty in escaping the waters.

As a girl, Mrs. Koch came to America from Germany and soon after her removal to Cairo she married Emil Koch, who also came from Germany.  Seven children were born to the couple, six boys and one girl, the girl and Emil, of the boys, are deceased.  Those surviving the deceased are Henry R. Koch, of Louisville, Ky., L. H. Koch, Will Koch, both of Anna, and E. H. Koch, and George Koch, of Cairo.

The sons will be present at the funeral services with the exception of Henry R. Koch, who will be unable to get through from Louisville.

Funeral services will be held at the residence Thursday morning at 9 o'clock conducted by Rev. C. Robert Dunlop, and the remains will be taken by Illinois Central train at 11 o'clock to Anna for burial.

Mrs. Falconer has charge of the funeral arrangements.

(William Koch, 27, born in Cairo, Ill., son of Emil Koch and Anna Johnson, married 2nd Mable Julia Hight, 25, born in Grand Chain, Ill., daughter of Frank Hight and Polly Wilson, on 14 Dec 1898, in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  A. Margarite Koch Born Nov. 18, 1832 Died July 15, 1918—Darrel Dexter)
 
LITTLE CHILD DIED EARLY THIS MORNING

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Myers, of 223 Sixteenth Street, died at 12:30 o'clock this morning at the age of 5 months.

The remains were taken to Ullin for burial this afternoon. E. A. Burke was in charge.
 
FUNERAL OF MISS LOIS TWENTE HELD MONDAY

The funeral of Miss Lois Twente, who died at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Asa D. Twente, in Olive Branch, Friday, was held Monday morning.  The services occurred at the family residence and were attended by many friends and relatives.  Rev. Mr. Browning, pastor of the Olive Branch Methodist Church, conducted the service.
 
Card of Thanks

We wish to thank our friends for their kind assistance in the illness and death of our mother.  Their help to us during her illness and their sympathy at all times has been a great comfort to us.
J. W. Brinkley and Family
Robert Brinkley and Family
 
ROBERTS FUNERAL TO OCCUR THURSDAY

The remains of L. C. Roberts, who died in Champaign, will arrive tonight and the burial will occur Thursday at Villa Ridge Cemetery.  E. A. Burke was in charge of the interment.
 
Thursday, 17 Jan 1918:
L. C. ROBERTS TO BE BURIED TOMORROW

Funeral services over the remains of L. C. Roberts, who passed away at Champaign, Ill., and whose body was brought home for burial, will be held Friday afternoon at the home of Mrs. Peter Neff, mother of Mrs. Roberts, at 428 Thirty-fourth Street.  Services will be held at 1:30 o'clock conducted by Rev. L. D. Lamkin.

A special interurban car will leave from the residence at 2 o'clock for Fourteenth and Ohio streets, from where a special Illinois Central train will leave at 2:15 for Villa Ridge, where interment will take place at Villa Ridge Cemetery.

E. A. Burke has charge of the arrangements.

(A marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Leslie Roberts 1885-1918.—Darrel Dexter)
 
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to thank our many friends for their kind assistance in our late bereavement, the death of our beloved mother, Mrs. Anna M. Koch.  Their help to us during her illness and their sympathy at all times has been a great comfort us.
Louis Koch
Henry Koch
Edward Koch
William Koch
George Koch
 
Card of Thanks

We wish to thank our friends for their kind assistance in the illness and death of our mother.  Their help to us doing her illness and their sympathy at all times has been a great comfort to us.
J. W. Binkley and family
Robert Binkley and family
 
FUNERAL SERVICES HELD THIS MORNING

The funeral services for Mrs. Anna M. Koch, who died at her home, 226 Eighteenth Street, Tuesday night, were held this morning at 9 o'clock at the residence conducted by Rev. C. Robert Dunlap, Ph. D. of the Immanuel Lutheran Church. Interment was made at Anna where the funeral party went at 11 o'clock on the Illinois Central.
 
Friday, 18 Jan 1918:
MRS. THOMAS TOUHEY DIES IN BUFFALO
Only Sister of Thomas W. Gannon Passes Away

Mrs. Thomas Touhey, only sister of Thomas W. Gannon, formerly of Cairo, died at her home in Buffalo, New York, Tuesday, the funeral taking place today, according to a message received by Mrs. J. J. Lane, sister -in-law of Mr. Gannon.  Mr. and Mrs. Gannon, who now reside in Little Rock, Ark., were with Mrs. Touhey when she passed away, arriving in Buffalo a few hours before her death.  Mrs. Touhey is survived by her husband and ten children.  Mr. Touhey is general superintendent of the Buffalo Creek Railway Company.
 
THOMAS H. SHERIDAN ONCE OF CAIRO DIES
Passes Away at Home in Hutsonville

Attorney Thomas H. Sheridan, who practiced in Cairo for several years and who is well known in Southern Illinois, passed away Thursday afternoon at his home in Hutsonville, Ill., to which place he removed from this city.

Funeral services will take place at Vienna, the old home of Mr. Sheridan, and the city in which he once established a newspaper.  It was from Vienna that the attorney came to Cairo.  Interment will take place at Vienna.

When he left Cairo, about a year ago, Mr. Sheridan retired from active practice because of illness. He never recovered his health after going with Mrs. Sheridan to Hutsonville.

Thomas H. Sheridan served at one time in the Illinois Senate and on another occasion was a candidate for the Republican nomination for circuit judge in this judicial district.  He was in the newspaper business at various places besides practicing law.  It was in Vienna that he published the Vienna News.
 
THOMAS J. FAGIN DIES IN ST. LOUIS THURSDAY
Well Known Businessman Succumbs after Long Illness

Thomas J. Fagin, of the Thomas J. Fagin Company, died at his home in St. Louis Thursday afternoon.  Mr. Fagin was a pioneer in the collecting business and for six years had a branch house in Cairo, which was managed by L. E. Profilet.  The office was closed up a year ago on account of Mr. Fagin's ill health.  He was a well-known and prominent businessman throughout the country.
 
SHERIDAN FUNERAL TODAY

Vienna, Ill. Jan. 18—Funeral services over the remains of Thomas H. Sheridan will be held here Sunday afternoon, January 20, with interment here also.
 
Saturday, 19 Jan 1918:
TIPTONVILLE MAN PASSES AWAY HERE
Body of W. B. Pierce Shipped to Paris, Tenn.

W. B. Pierce, of Tiptonville, Tenn., passed away Friday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock at St. Mary's Infirmary.  He was affected with peritonitis and died at the age of 37 years.

At the bedside of the deceased at the time of his death were his wife and brother, who will accompany his body to Paris, Tenn., where it will be interred. He leaves two children and his wife.
The remains were taken to Karcher Brothers undertaking parlors and prepared for burial was shipped to Paris today.  Services will be held at that place.
 
Mrs. Jennie Gruner and children, Ray and Elizabeth, who came for the funeral of Miss Ezelle Howlett, have returned to their homes in Farmington.  (Charleston, Mo.)
 
H. M. Winslow went to Mayfield this week to attend the funeral and burial of his brother, David Winslow, who died there several days ago.  (Bardwell, Ky.)
 
The many friends of Marcy Hall were grieved and surprised to hear of his sudden death, Thursday afternoon of one beloved.  Mr. Hall had been ill for only a week with typhoid and pneumonia, which had set up in the last few days.  Besides a host of friends, his parents, sisters, and brothers, he leaves a young wife who was formerly Miss Orvie McElya.  The sympathy of the entire community (Wickliffe, Ky.) is extended to the grief stricken ones.
 
Monday, 21 Jan 1918:
MRS. MARY YOCUM DIES HERE SUNDAY
One of Cairo's Oldest Residents Passes Away Peacefully

Mrs. Mary Jane Yocum, aged 89 years, and one of the oldest residents of Cairo, died Sunday at noon at the home of her sister-in-law, Mrs. S. A. Watts, 1701 Washington Avenue.  Mrs. Yocum has been very low for several months, but was feeling better Sunday morning and was able to sit up for a while.  A short time before she died, she asked to lie down and passed away peacefully a few minutes later.

She was the widow of the late George Yocum, and leaves surviving her two daughters, Mrs. Cantwell, and Mrs. Susan Broderick, of Cairo, and a number of grandchildren, three of whom, Mrs. F. W. Cox, Mrs. F. M. Harrell, and Robert Cantwell, reside in Cairo.  She leaves fourteen great-grandchildren.

Mrs. Yocum was born in Montgomery Co., Pa., Sept. 22, 1828, and came to Cairo in 1854, 64 years ago.

The funeral services were held this afternoon at 1:15 at the residence, Rev. A. T. Tomshany, pastor of the Presbyterian church, officiating.  Interment was made at Villa Ridge, the funeral party going up on a special Illinois Central train.  The pallbearers were Messrs. E. J. Walder, George J. Gilmore, John C. Gisher, R. H. Spann, D. S. Lansden, Harvey Karraker, H. C. Steinel, and Henry Steinel.

(Nicholas Cantwell married Emma L. Yocum on 2 Sep 1869, in Alexander Co., Ill.  John P. Broderick married Susan A. Yocum on 24 Jun 1877, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Frederick M. Cox married Ruby M. Cantwell on 6 Oct 1891, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Her marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  George W. Yocum 1827-1912 Father.  Mary Yocum 1828-1918 Mother.—Darrel Dexter)
 
J. C. FISCHER DIES SUNDAY MORNING
Resident of the City for 34 Years Passes Away at 72 Years of Age.

John Charles Fischer, a resident of Cairo for 34 years, passed away at the age of 72 years, at his home, 1915 Poplar Street, Sunday morning at 6:38 o'clock.  He had been in very poor health for a long time.

The deceased is survived by his wife, Christina, a daughter, Miss Flora L. Fisher, and J. Albert Fischer.

J. C. Fischer came to Cairo 34 years ago from Mound City, where he had been located for three years previous.  He was born in Bacharath, Germany, and came to this country at the close of the Civil War, making his home at Tell City, Ind., where he remained four years before removing to Mound City.

Within a short time after coming to Cairo, Mr. Fischer engaged in the painting and paper hanging business at the corner of Twentieth and Poplar located throughout his long residence in this city.
He was a member of St. Joseph's Church of the Catholic Knights of America, the K. M. K. C. and the Cairo Casino.

Funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon at St. Joseph's Church, conducted by Rev. James Gillen.  The funeral cortege will leave the residence at 2 o'clock for the church, where services will be held at 1:30.  A special Illinois Central train will leave the corner of Fourteenth and Ohio streets at 2:15 for Villa Ridge where interment will take place at Calvary Cemetery.

Pallbearers are Peter Day, L. E. Profilet, Peter Lind, Gus Muthig, William Brinkmeyer, Phillip Burkhardt, Thomas Ward and Thomas Bechdel.

Karcher Brothers have charge of the arrangements.

(His marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  John C. Fischer 1846-1918.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

Fischer—Died at his residence, 1915 Poplar Street, in this city, Sunday, Jan. 20, John Charles Fischer, age 72 years.

Funeral services will be Tuesday afternoon at St. Joseph's Church conducted by Rev. J. J. Gillen.  The cortege will leave the residence for the church at 1:15 o'clock.

A special Illinois Central train will leave Ohio and Fourteenth streets at 2:15 o'clock for Villa Ridge, where interment will be in Calvary Cemetery.

Friends of the family are invited.
 
Tuesday, 22 Jan 1918:
M. B. SADLER DIES IN ST. LOUIS TODAY
Was Owner of Two Valuable Pieces of Cairo Real Estate

M. B. Sadler, well known in Cairo as the owner of two valuable pieces of real estate on Commercial Avenue, died at his home in St. Louis today, according to a telegraphic advice received by Commissioner M. J. Howley, from his son, Norman J. Sadler, a St. Louis attorney.

He had been sick for some time.

Mr. Sadler was a brother of Rabbi B. Sadler, who was in the clothing business here, while serving as rabbi of Montefiore congregation, and who later removed to Easton., Pa.

The deceased was formerly a resident of Centralia and served as mayor of that city.  He owns the building occupied by Fry & Rossman's clothing store and also the building at 813 Commercial occupied by the Golden Eagle.
 
LIFE RESIDENT OF CAIRO DIED MONDAY
Born in This City in 1864, Dies after Paralytic Stroke

Oliver McNulty, a life long resident of Cairo, passed away Monday evening at 6:30 o'clock at his home, 3237 Park Place West, after suffering a stroke of paralysis Monday morning.  He was 53 years old and lived in Cairo his entire life.  He was born in Cairo in 1864.  His health had been fairly good up until the time of the stroke at 11:30 Monday morning.

Surviving the deceased are his wife, Louise; two stepsons, Charles and Fred Wild; three brothers, John McNulty, of East St. Louis, and Charles and William McNulty, of Cairo; and one sister, Mrs. Lee Harrison, of Cairo.

Funeral arrangements have not yet been completed and will be decided this evening.

(Lorenzo Lee Harrison married Anna M. McNulty on 20 Jan 1897, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
WILLIAM VAN METER DIES AT HOME MONDAY
Had Been Ill for Several Days of Pneumonia

William Van Meter, of 3110 Sycamore Street, died at his home Monday at 5:20 p.m. after an illness of several days of pneumonia.  He was 55 years old and had been a long resident in this city.  He is survived by a wife and children.

Funeral services were held this morning at 11 o'clock.  The remains were taken to Mounds on the regular 1 o'clock car, where interment took place at Beech Grove Cemetery.
 
NEPHEW OF CAIRO MEN KILLED IN ACCIDENT

W. L. Gillespie and brother of J. B. Gillespie, left this afternoon for Springfield, Ill., where they go to attend the funeral of their nephew, Alfred Gillespie, son of George B. Gillespie.  The young man is the eldest son and was a member of the Quartermaster's Department, U. S. Army, at Camp Houston, Texas.  He was killed in a motorcycle accident at Austin, Texas.  The funeral will be held Wednesday at Springfield.
 
MOTHER OF REV. HENLEY DIES AT NASHVILLE.

Word has been received by the family of Rev. Curwin Henley, of Tigert Memorial Church, of the death of his mother, Mrs. Mary A. Henley, at Nashville, Ill., Monday.  He was 73 years old.
 
FUNERAL SERVICES FOR J. C. FISCHER

Funeral services for the late J. C. Fisher were held at St. Joseph's Catholic Church this afternoon conducted by Rev. Father James Gillen, and the remains were taken to Villa Ridge Cemetery for burial.
 
Wednesday, 23 Jan 1918:
BALLARD FARMER IS GUN SUICIDE VICTIM

G. J. Reeves, 40, a farmer residing two miles from La Center, Ballard County, shot himself through the head at 2 o'clock this morning while lying in his bed.  Death was instantaneous. Reeves left no note of any kind to explain his act.  He had been bedfast for a week with measles and physicians believed the disease affected his brain.  Despondency or temporary mental disorder are the only reasons advanced by his family for the deed.

The Reeves family have all been ill with measles for several weeks.  Reeves took the disease a week ago and was under a physician’s care.  Financially he was in good shape, according to relatives, and this could not have been his motive.

A wife and five children survive Reeves.
 
DOC WATERMAN DIED AT LAKELAND, FLA.
Remains Are Expected to Arrive Here Thursday.

Word was received in Cairo today of the death of Cyril Waterman, known for years as "Doc," of Mounds.  He had been at Lakeland, Fla., since Dec. 19 for his health, but never materially improved.
The remains are expected to arrive sometime Thursday and will be taken to the home of a sister, Mrs. A. W. Ledbetter, of Mounds.  He also leaves three brothers, Paul and Marion, of Mounds and Mide Waterman, of Miller City, and two sisters, Mrs. A. W. Ledbetter, of Mounds and Mrs. P. W. Clanton, of Cairo.

Funeral arrangements will be made upon the arrival of the body.

(A. W. Ledbetter married Anna Waterman on 24 Feb 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  W. T. Clanton married Estella E. Waterman, daughter of Charles Waterman and Martha Cauble, on 31 Dec 1896, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FUNERAL NOTICE

             McNulty—Died, Oliver McNulty, aged 53 years, Monday evening.  Funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon at 1 p.m. at the residence 3237 St. Mary's Place West.  Funeral party will leave the house at 1:30 on the interurban for Fourteenth and Ohio streets, where the Illinois Central will be taken at 2:15 for Villa Ridge.  Rev. C. Robert Dunlap will conduct the services which are in the hands of the Woodmen of the World.
 
NEGRO FREEZES

Paducah, Ky., Jan. 23—Sam Adams, aged 62 years, a negro laborer, was frozen to death in his cabin on the farm of Green Bennett, a farmer in this county.  When found in the cabin, the negro's body was frozen stiff, there being no fire in the house.  He is the first person frozen to death in McCracken County within the past few years.
 
The funeral services of Mr. J. F. Kelly, who dropped dead of heart disease Saturday morning in the Illinois Central yards where he was employed, were held Monday afternoon at his late home in the Scrugg and Chapman addition at 1:30 p.m., with Rev. G. A. Dunn, pastor of the Methodist Church, in charge.  In spite of the heavy snowfall at that time, a large number of friends from Mounds were in attendance.  The floral offerings were many and beautiful.  Interment, which took place in the Beech Grove Cemetery, was in charge of the Odd Fellow Lodge, of which decease was a member.  Mr. Kelly leaves to mourn his loss, a wife and one daughter.
 
ONE DEAD, 137 ILL AT HARRISBURG, ILL.
Smallpox Takes 7 Year-old Boy Saturday

Harrisburg, Ill., Jan. 23—The first death from smallpox since a quarantine was placed on this city by the state board of health, occurred Saturday morning, when Raymond Galton, a seven-year-old boy, died.  There are now 137 cases of the disease in this city.  It was expected that the quarantine would be lifted some time this week.

With 135 known cases of small pox in Harrisburg and county, towns and state officials leagued in a fight to stamp out the malady, relief may or may not be in sight within the next two weeks.  Harrisburg's business is suffering.  The town is isolated.  After the rail and road quarantine is lifted, Harrisburg must expect the local quarantine to continue until the last danger has given way.—Murphysboro Independent
 
BODY OF MAKANDA BOY IS RECOVERED
Supposed Accidentally Shot While Hunting

Makanda, Jan. 23—Early Saturday morning the dead body of Ben Wright, 17 year-old son of James Wright, of Makanda, was found in the snowdrifts southeast of town.  The boy had died from a shotgun wound.
Supposedly Self-Inflicted.

Young Wright went hunting a week ago today and failed to return.  Searching parties failed to find him.  A reward was offered.

(James R. Wright married Effie Jackson on 7 Dec 1899, in Jackson Co., Ill.  His marker in Evergreen Cemetery at Makanda reads:  Benjamin son of J. R. & E. Wright Born Sept. 17, 1900 Died Jan. 14, 1918.—Darrel Dexter)
 
J. B. Peters Coal Man Dies

Carbondale, Ill., Jan. 23—J. B. Peters, 74 years of age, died in New York City, Wednesday, according to word received here.  He owned property in the Williamson County coalfield and was general manager and vice president of the Chicago and Carterville Coal Company for ten years.  He was a Civil War veteran.
 
Thursday, 24 Jan 1918:
McNULTY FUNERAL WAS HELD TODAY

Funeral services over the remains of Oliver McNulty, who died here Monday, were held at the family residence, 3237 Park Place West, this afternoon at 1 o'clock, conducted by Rev. C. Robert Dunlap, pastor of the Immanuel Lutheran Church.

A special interurban left the family residence at 1:30 for the corner of Fourteenth and Ohio streets.  A special Illinois Central train conveyed the funeral party to Villa Ridge, where interment took place at Villa Ridge Cemetery.

A large number of friends of the family were present at the services.

A many floral offerings were received.

(His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Oliver McNulty Born May 30, 1864 Died Jan. 21, 1918.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MRS. M. C. DWYER PASSED AWAY TODAY
Son, Member of Company K, Home to Attend Funeral.

Mrs. Mary Catherine Dwyer, aged 54 years, died early this morning at her home, 2304 Washington Avenue.  She is survived by her mother, Mrs. Ann Cusick, aged 87 years; a brother, R. E. Cusick, of Emmet, Ark.; two daughters, Mrs. E. F. Darmody, of East St. Louis, and Miss Catherine Dwyer, of Cairo; and three sons, Thomas Dwyer, of Galveston, Texas, Stanly Dwyer, of the U. S. Army at Camp Logan, Houston, Texas, and Bruce Dwyer, of Cairo.  Thomas and Stanly Dwyer arrived this afternoon.

The funeral services will be held at St. Joseph’s Church probably Saturday.  Karcher Brothers are in charge of the arrangements.
 
W. J. COCHRAN DIED WEDNESDAY NIGHT
In Declining Health for Over Year, Cairo Druggist Gives Up Fight

William John Cochran, one of Cairo's well known and respected citizens, died at 9:55 o'clock Wednesday night at St. Mary's Infirmary.  He has been in rapidly declining health for some time.  He was 48 years old at the time of his death and has been engaged in the drug business in Cairo for a number of years.  His death as caused by pernicious anemia.

Several specialists were consulted by Mr. Cochran, as his health grew poorer, including the Mayo Brothers, at Rochester, Minn., but nothing could be done for him and he returned to Cairo, his home.  He has spent periods of time at the hospital within the past years and was taken there recently, where he could have the best of care, and Sunday he lapsed into unconsciousness, from which state he had only a few brief rallies.

When his sisters arrived at this bedside he was able to recognize them.

Mr. Cochran came to Cairo from Benton, Ill., his birthplace, and began his work in the drug business at the G. P. Crabtree Store.  Later he engaged in business for himself and has remained in the business since.

Surviving Mr. Cochran are two sisters, Mrs. J. L. Marton, of Jackson, Miss., and Mrs. Davis, of Wilmington, Ohio; and one brother, R. A. Cochran, of Mt. Pleasant, Mich.  The brother is on his way to Cairo and is expected to arrive by tonight.

Funeral services will be held in the Elks Lodge room Friday evening at 7:30 o’clock.  The body will lie in state there all day tomorrow.

The services will be conducted by the Elk Lodge and Rev. C. Robert Dunlap will deliver the eulogy, assisted in the service by Rev. L. D. Lamkin.

Saturday morning at 4:30 o'clock the body will be taken on the Illinois Central train to Benton, Ill., where it will be buried.  An escort from Cairo Commandery No. 13, Knight Templar, will accompany the body and the Masonic fraternity will have charge of the services at the grave. S. G. Richardson, master of Cairo lodge No. 237, will officiate.

The active pallbearers will be chosen from intimate friends of the deceased in the Elks and Masonic lodges.

Mrs. Falconer has charge of the funeral arrangements at Cairo.
 
Card of Thanks

We desire to express our sincere thanks to all the friends who were so kind and sympathetic during the illness and after the death of our beloved husband and father, J. C. Fischer, and especially do we wish to thank those who contributed the beautiful floral tributes.

Mrs. Christina Fischer and family

Mr. and Mrs. G. J. Fischer
 
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Thomas of Chicago were called here last week on account of the illness and death of her niece's husband, Marcy Hall. (Wickliffe, Ky.)
 
Friday, 25 Jan 1918:
C. C. VICK PASSED AWAY EARLY TODAY
Prominent Resident of Olive Branch Dies at Infirmary

C. Columbus Vick, of Olive Branch, died at St. Mary's Infirmary at 6:45 o'clock this morning of apoplexy, where he was taken following a stroke received on Jan. 12.  He had been unconscious since Saturday, with the exception of a lapse into consciousness for a few minutes Tuesday.

Mr. Vick was born at Mill Creek on Aug. 29, 1857.  He leaves three sisters, Mrs. Israel Cauble, of Elco, Mrs. George Braddy, of Ullin, and Mrs. John Knight, of Carbondale, and three brothers, Louis Vick, of Diswood, Eli Vick and Cephas Vick, of Mill Creek.

Mr. Vick removed to Olive Branch in 1889 and has resided there ever since.  He taught school for many years and has been one of the prominent farmers of his neighborhood.

Funeral services will be held at the residence Sunday with E. A. Burke in charge.

Mr. Vick leaves a wife and two children, Miss Mabel Vick and Claude Vick.  The latter was secretary of the Y. M. C. A. at Bridgeview Park when Capt. Tuggle's men were on guard there, and has since been teaching school at Joppa.

(Christopher C. Vick married Josephine Coakly on 18 Jul 1889, in Alexander Co., Ill. Israel Cauble married Mary Vick on 13 Sep 1891, in Alexander Co., Ill.  George L. Braddy married Sarah Jane Vick, daughter of Joshua C. Vick and Tiney T. Henry, on 24 Nov 1895, in Union Co., Ill.  His marker in Olive Branch Cemetery reads:  C. C. Vick 1857-1918  Josephine Vick 1865-1942.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

Dwyer—Died at her home, 2304 Washington Avenue, Thursday, Jan. 24, Mary Catherine Dwyer, at the age of 54 years.

Funeral services will be Saturday afternoon at St. Joseph's Church conducted by Rev. Father J. J. Gillen.  The cortege will leave the residence at 12:55 o’clock for the church.  Services at 1:10 o'clock.
A special interurban car will leave the church at 1:30 for Mounds, where interment will take place at St. Mary's Cemetery.

Friends of the family are invited.
 
THREE BODIES TAKEN FROM BENTON MINE

That portion of Mine No. 11, of the Old Ben Mining Co., at North City, where the explosion occurred Thanksgiving night, killing seventeen men, was opened last week and three more bodies were found and removed according to the Benton Republican.
 
The remains of Cyril Waterman who passed away at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Atherton, of Lakeland, Florida, after a several days' illness, have been brought to the home of his sister, Mrs. A. W. Ledbetter, on Front Street.  Surviving him are three brothers, Marion and Pearl Waterman of our city and Mide Waterman, of Miller City, and two sisters, Mrs. W. T. Clanton, of Cairo and Mrs. A. W. Ledbetter.  (Mounds)
 
D. E. DeField, one of Charleston's best citizens, died here (Charleston, Mo.) on Monday.  The funeral was conducted from the Christian church on Thursday afternoon by the pastor, Rev. Minor, under the auspices of the Charleston Lodge No. 84 I. O. O. F.
 
Saturday, 26 Jan 1918:
BOYLE MURDERERS GET LIFE SENTENCE
Three Men Murdered Wife of Mt. Vernon Merchant

Mt. Vernon, Ill., Jan. 26—Adam Malendez and William Harris, of East St. Louis, and Lehman Liannigan, of Mt. Vernon, were found guilty today of the murder of Mrs. J. P. Boyle, the wife of a local merchant, on Dec. 15.  They were sentenced to life imprisonment.
 
LAST CEREMONY OVER W. J. COCHRAN
Large Attendance at Last Rites Held Friday at Elks Hall

Funeral services over the remains of William J. Cochran, who died Wednesday night at St. Mary’s Infirmary, were held at the rooms of the Elks’ Club Friday night, a large number of the members of the Elk and Masonic orders being in attendance.  The ceremonial was the last service for the deceased in Cairo, where his body has lain in state since death.

Rev. C. Robert Dunlap delivered the funeral eulogy.  Rev. L. D. Lamkin involved the benediction.  Mrs. M. C. Whiting sang a solo.

A large number of beautiful floral offerings accompanied the body to Benton, Ill., this morning where final services will be held and interment made.  The body was accompanied by a number of the deceased's fellow lodgemen, who will attend the funeral.

All Cairo drug stores were closed from seven to eight o'clock last evening in respect to his memory.
 
FUNERAL OF MRS. DWYER HELD THIS AFTERNOON

Funeral services for Mrs. Catherine Dwyer were held this afternoon at 1:10 o'clock at St. Joseph’s Church, Rev. Father J. J. Downey officiating.  Interment was made at Mounds, the funeral party going up on a special interurban train.

The pallbearers were Messrs. John VanCleve, Joe Brankel, M. J. O'Shea, E. J. Walder, Frank Storman, and George Darmody.
 
KARNAK MAN DEAD
LEAPS UNDER TRAIN
Believed Mentally Deranged at Time of Action

Karnak, Ill., Jan. 26—George Falker, a young man, 20 years of age, of Karnak, was instantly killed Friday afternoon when he sprang in front of the northbound Big Four passenger train, just as it drew into the station here.  Falker, it is thought, was mentally deranged and is thought to have been for some time.

At the time of the death, a brother-in-law of the dead man was taking him to Vienna, where he could be under the care of relatives and in the hope that the change would benefit him.

An invalid father, who resides at Karnak, and a sister at Vienna survive the deceased.

(The 29 Jan 1918, issue reports his name as George Felker.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The infant baby of Mr. and Mrs. Will Lackey died on Tuesday evening and was buried at Rose Hill on Thursday. (Pulaski)

 
Mr. Mide Waterman, of Miller City, has been called to Mounds by the death of his brother, Dr. Waterman.  (Mounds)
 
DEATH CLAIMS OLD RESIDENT OF ELCO
Henry Whitaker Passed Away at Home of Daughter at Mounds

Henry Whitaker, an old resident of Elco, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. John Newell, at Mounds, this morning, after an illness of about five days.  Mr. Whitaker had spent the winter in Mounds and death was the result of a complication of ailments.  The deceased, who was 75 years of age, had lived practically his whole life at Elco.  The only exception being a few years spent in Cairo when his children were in school here.

Funeral services will be held Monday afternoon at 2:30 at the residence in Mounds, and burial will be in the cemetery there.

Surviving the deceased are three daughters, Mrs. Newell, Mrs. D. Sutherland, of Marion, Ill., and Mrs. Chester Webb, of Cairo; and three sons, Charles F. Whitaker, of Elco, Jesse Whiteaker, of Miller City, and Dr. George Whiteaker, of St. Louis.  One sister, Mrs. W. W. White, of Elco, also survives.  Mrs. Whitaker passed away seven years ago.

Mr. Whitaker was a veteran of the Civil War.  He was regarded as one of the dependable citizens of the county, a man of integrity, and worth, living a life devoted to his home and family, quietly going his own way, but wielding a pronounced influence in the community.
 
Monday, 28 Jan 1918:
CHARLES POTTS IS HELD FOR MURDER

Otho Metcalf Dies of Fractured Skull after Being Felled by Blow

Charles Potts, of Wickliffe, Ky., who has been around Cairo for the greater part of his life, was bound over to the grand jury by action of the coroner's jury at an inquest held Sunday afternoon, over the body of Otho Metcalf, of Grand Chain.

Potts struck Metcalf in a saloon at Thirty-fourth Street and Commercial Avenue, Saturday evening, after Metcalf had applied a vile name to him, according to the testimony.  Metcalf fell and, striking his head on the cement floor, sustained a fractured skull from which he died at St. Mary's infirmary, Sunday morning at 6:30 o'clock.

Potts was held without bond.  According to Potts' defense and according to those who heard the testimony, the case will rest largely as one of "self defense."  Potts is a young man, while Metcalf is 48 years of age.

Potts was taken to the county jail today.

The body of Metcalf was removed to the undertaking parlors of E. A. Burke and was shipped to Grand Chain this morning.  Metcalf is survived by a wife and seven children.

(Otto M. Metcalf married Julia Dixon on 5 Nov 1890, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  A marriage license for Otho M. Metcalf and Lottie Gray was issued on 20 Jul 1893, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter) 

 

WELL KNOWN COLORED RESIDENT IS DEAD

             Charles Phelps, Sr., for years janitor of one of the public school buildings, died late Saturday night.  He was one of the widely known colored citizens of Cairo and was respected by all who knew him.

 

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR HENRY WHITAKER

Funeral services for the late Henry Whitaker were held this afternoon at the home of his daughter in Mounds and the remains were buried at Beech Grove Cemetery.  A number of relatives and friends attended the burial from Cairo as well as other places in the county.

 

Tuesday, 29 Jan 1918:

Card of Thanks

             We wish to thank our many friends for their kind assistance in our late bereavement, the death of our beloved father, Henry Whitaker.  Their help to us and their sympathy has been a great comfort.

Children of Henry Whitaker

 

WILLIS TREMPER DEAD IN INDIANA

             Willis E. Tremper, formerly wire chief for the Home Telephone Company of Cairo, died Monday afternoon at Grand View, Ind.  While his death has been expected for some time, it came suddenly after a hemorrhage.

             He is a resident of Grand View, his home, and will be buried at that place.  Mrs. Tremper was formerly Miss Ruth Reed, of Cairo.  Word was received Monday night of the death of Mr. Tremper by her parent, Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Reed, of 636 Thirty-fourth Street.  They left this morning for Grand View.

             Mr. and Mrs. Tremper left Cairo in April 1917.  They have no children.

 

The funeral services of Cyril Waterman who passed away in Lakeland, Fla., last Monday were held at the Baptist church here (Mounds) Sunday afternoon with Rev. M. L. Turner pastor of the Calvary Baptist Church of Cairo in charge.  Interment took place in Beech Grove Cemetery.

 

OBITUARY

Henry Whitaker

             Henry Whitaker, son of Thomas and Prudence Whitaker, was born at Elco, Ill., July 22, 1842, and departed this life in Mounds, Ill., at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Mary P. Newell, Jan. 26, 1918, aged 75 years.

             The deceased was married to Margaret S. Miller, at Elco, Ill., May 30th, 1866.  To this union were born twelve children, six of whom, together with the companion and mother, preceded him in death.  Three of the children died in infancy.  Dr. Henry H., departed Feb. 22, 1903, Thomas M. departed April 28, 1905, and Mrs. Gertrude DeGelder who parted to the beyond, Dec. 17, 1913.

             The children living are Mrs. Mary P. Newell, of Mounds, Mrs. Ollie J. Sutherland, of Marion, Ill., Charles F., of Elco, Ill., Jesse E., of Miller City, Ill., Mrs. Margaret C. Webb, of Cairo, Ill., and Dr. George W., of St. Louis, Mo.  One sister, Mrs. W. W. White, of Elco, Ill., and also a number of other relatives and a host of friends who together with the family mourn their loss.

             When the country was engaged in the Great War of the Rebellion and was calling men to the colors, the deceased volunteered in the spring of '62 and served till the close of the war.  He was a member of Elco Post G. A. R.

             Henry Whitaker was a devoted father and enjoyed much the association of his children among whom he lived during the latter years of his life.  He joined the M. E. church in the old log church at Elco about 50 years ago.  Later he moved his membership to Cairo M. E. Church, but following the death of his wife, he transferred his membership back to Elco, where he was a member at the time of his death.  He was always an active churchman, laboring and giving to promote its interest.  A long happy and useful life has arrived at its close, not death, but passing into eternal life.

             (Henry Whitaker married Margaret S. Miller on 31 May 1866, in Alexander Co., Ill.  John David Sutherland married Evolody Josephine Whitaker on 10 May 1896, in Alexander Co., Ill.  William W. White married Catherine Whitaker on 13 Dec 1868, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Henry Whitaker, 18, native of Alexander Co., Ill., enlisted as a private in Co. B, 109th Illinois Infantry, on 15 Aug 1862.  He was transferred to Co. G, 11th Illinois and was mustered out 14 Jul 1865, at Baton Rouge, La.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Last Friday morning, Jan. 25, a young man by the name of George Felker committed suicide by leaping in front of the early morning train.  He was mentally deranged and his brother-in-law was taking him to Johnson County, thinking the change would help him.  As the train was approaching the station platform he tore himself loose and leaped in front of the engine and his body was dragged for about 75 yards, being pulled out from under the tender in an awful mangled condition.

             The remains were taken in charge by Kendall and James, our local undertakers, and then taken to the residence of Mrs. Tapley for the night.  He was buried Saturday near Cypress.  He is survived by a father and several brothers and sister.  (Karnak)

 

Wednesday, 30 Jan 1918:

MRS. ANASTATIA GAYER DIES THURSDAY NIGHT

Old Resident of Cairo Passes Away after Week's Illness

             Mrs. Anastasia Gayer, aged 77 years, died at her home, 2107 Pine Street Tuesday night after an illness of about a week.  Her death was caused by a complication of diseases superinduced by old age.  She was the widow of the late Charles Gayer and had resided in Cairo for 59 years.  She leaves surviving her daughter, Mrs. Clara Gayer Aydt, wife of R. W. Aydt, and five grandchildren:  Raymond C. Aydt, William Eugene Aydt, Earnest Aydt, Gayer Aydt, and Louis AydtHuette's Shoe Store owned by Mrs. Gayer will be closed for two days on account of her death.

             The funeral services will be held at St. Joseph's Church Thursday morning at 8:15 o'clock, conducted by Rev. James J. Gillen.  The funeral party will leave the residence at 8 o'clock.  At 9:15, a special funeral train will leave Fourteenth and Ohio streets for Villa Ridge, where interment will be made at Calvary Cemetery.  Karcher Brothers are in charge of the arrangements.

             The pallbearers are Messrs. M. J. Howley, W. P. Greaney, James Bennett, M. S. Carter, E. J. Walder, William Schatz, James S. Galligan, and Leo Carrico.

             (Charles Gayer married Anastatia Kerscher on 26 Nov 1859, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Robert W. Aydt married Clara M. Gayer on 7 Jun 1893, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FUNERAL NOTICE

             Gayer—Died:  Mrs. Anastasia Gayer, Tuesday, January 29.  Funeral services will be held Thursday at St. Joseph's Church, Rev. Father James J. Gillen officiating.  The funeral party will leave the residence, 2107 Pine Street, at 8 o'clock.  Services at 8:15 sharp. Special Illinois Central train leaves Fourteenth and Ohio streets at 9:15 o'clock for Villa Ridge, where interment will be made at Calvary Cemetery.  Friends of the family are invited.

 

MISS JESSIE GREIG PASSED AWAY AT ANNA

             Miss Jesse Greig, sister of Mrs. Margaret McCarthy, and of Charles Greig, died at Anna Tuesday evening at 4:30 o'clock according to word received here.  She was 58 years of age.  Funeral services will be held from Mrs. Falconer's undertaking parlors at 2:30 o'clock tomorrow afternoon.

 

FUNERAL NOTICE

             Greig—Entered into rest Jan. 29, 1918, Miss Jessie Greig, sister of Charles Greig and Mrs. Margaret McCarthy.

             Funeral services will be held at 2:30 o'clock Thursday, Jan. 31, from Mrs. Falconer's undertaking parlors on Sixth Street.  Remains will be taken by interurban to Beech Grove Cemetery for interment.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wilkerson's little daughter, Myrtle, was called to rest after several days' illness. She was laid to rest in the Mt. Olive Cemetery.  Dear parents mourn not as those that have no hope.  For our Savior says, Let little children come unto me for such is the kingdom of heaven—so prepare yourselves to become as little Myrtle and meet her on the other shore, where parting will be no more.  (Perks)

 

Thursday, 31 Jan 1918:

A large number of relatives and friends from Cairo were in attendance at the funeral services for Mr. Whiteaker, which were conducted by Rev. G. A. Dunn, of the Methodist Church, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. John Newell Monday afternoon.  (Mounds)

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We wish to thank our friends for their kind assistance in our bereavement, the death of our beloved mother, Mrs. Anastasia Gayer. Their help to us during her illness and their sympathy at all times has been a great comfort to us.  We also wish to thank those who sent the beautiful flowers in such abundance.

Mrs. R. W. Aydt and family

 

MRS. GAYER'S FUNERAL HELD THIS MORNING

Interment at Calvary Cemetery Villa Ridge

             Funeral services for the late Mrs. Anastasia Gayer were held this morning at 3:15 o'clock at St. Joseph’s Church conducted by Rev. Father James J. Gillen.  The service was largely attended by friends of the family and the floral offerings were beautiful and abundant.  The funeral cortège left at 9:15 on the Illinois Central for Villa Ridge, where interment was made at Calvary Cemetery.  Karcher Brothers were in charge.

 

Friday, 1 Feb 1918:

MRS. KINSLOW DIED AFTER LONG ILLNESS
Passed Away Thursday Night at Her Home on Union Street

Mrs. Nannie E. Kinslow, 58 years of age, died Thursday night at 5 o'clock at her home, 524 Union Street, after a prolonged illness.

The deceased is survived by a son, J. Kinslow, a daughter, Mrs. Frank Walters, a sister, Mrs. Hartwood, of Portland, Ore., and one brother, I. N. Peyton, of Horse Cave, Ky.

FORMER CAIROITE DIES AT KEWANEE
Died at Age of 77 Years after Contracting Smallpox

Mrs. Mary E. Wilson, aged 77 years, passed away this morning at the home of her son, Jerry Wilson, at Kewanee, Mo., after a brief illness of smallpox. She was the widow of the late A. Wilson, and with her husband formerly resided in Cairo, living at 2025 Washington Avenue for a number of years.

Surviving her are six living sons, William and Charles Wilson, of Cairo, George and Jerry Wilson, of Kewanee, Guy B. Wilson, of Minneapolis, Minn., and Joseph N. Wilson, of Lawrenceville, Ill. She is also survived by one daughter, Mrs. Sarah Lovely, of California.

Funeral arrangements have not yet been made, but they will probably take place at Kewanee Sunday afternoon.

Little Michael, son of Mrs. Hattie Hurst, is very low at this writing. He is suffering from pressure on the brain caused by a knock on the head he received some 2 years ago. His suffering is intense and his little life is despaired of, in as much as medicine cannot relieve or reach his troubles.

Mrs. Daisy Walker and Mesdames Sutton and Nelms, of Cairo, are here this week at the bedside of their little nephew, Michael Hurst, who is seriously sick. (Pulaski)

Saturday, 2 Feb 1918:
W. A. Sinks was called to Johnston City Tuesday on account of the death of his brother, John. (Cache)

KINSLOW FUNERAL TOOK PLACE TODAY
Mrs. Nannie E. Kinslow Buried at Beech Grove Today

Funeral services over the remains of Mrs. Nannie E. Kinslow, who died Thursday night, were held this afternoon at the residence of 524 Union Street at 1:30 o'clock, Rev. M. L. Turner, of the Calvary Baptist Church officiating.

A special interurban car leaving the corner of Union and Sycamore streets at 2:30 conveyed the funeral party to Mounds, where interment took place at Beech Grove Cemetery.

E. A. Burke had charge of the funeral arrangements.

Monday 4 Feb 1918:
CAIRO BOY FOUND GUILTY OF MURDER BY CHICAGO JURY
Lloyd Bopp, Slayer of Chicago Policeman, Is Again Sentenced to Hang
CONVICTION RESTED ON TESTIMONY OF GIRL
Who Was Member of Party Which Was Joy Riding When the Officer Was Shot

Chicago, Feb. 4.—Loyd Bopp was found guilty of murder by a jury Saturday afternoon and sentenced to be hanged. This is the second time Bopp has been convicted of murdering Policeman Herman Malow, and the second time he has been doomed to death.

The case went to the jury at 12:45 o'clock after Assistant State's Attorney James C. O'Brien made a closing argument in which he asked the jurors to inflict the death penalty.
Strong Plea for Bopp

The greater part of the closing session was occupied with the final plea of Attorney Charles Williams for the acquittal of Bopp. In impassioned tones the young prisoner’s defender assailed the evidence of the state as "the copper riveted case of coppers," and told the jury that Albert Michelinie, companion of Bopp on the night of the shooting, was the principal witness against him is "dyed in the blood of Herman Malow."
Girl Called Perjurer

The testimony of Grace Lytle, the young girl who was a member of the joy ride party when Malow was shot and who was herself the victim of a murderous attack several months ago by alleged friends of Bopp, who are charged with trying to prevent her from testifying again, was attacked as a perjurer. Letters of the Lytle girl, on whose testimony Bopp was once before convicted and sentenced to hang, were pointed to Mr. Williams in support of his charge.

FORMER RESIDENT OF CAIRO IS DEAD

George M. Young, former resident of Cairo, whose articles upon early Cairo history have been read with such great interest by readers of The Citizen, died very suddenly on January 15th, while sitting quietly in his chair, according to a letter just received by Commissioner Howley. He had not been very well for a week or more, but had kept around the house as usual.


SAMUEL B. POOR DIES HERE SUNDAY

Samuel B. Poor, age 83 years, died at St. Mary's Infirmary Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock. The body was taken to the residence of his son, Harry Poor, 517 Twenty-second Street, and on Tuesday will be taken to Dongola, Ill., for interment. Mr. Poor formerly resided in Dongola, where he was in the milling business. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Annetta Poor, and daughter, Mrs. Dora Moss, both of Washington, D.C., and by his son, Harry Poor, of Cairo.

The funeral will be held Tuesday morning at 9:30 at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Poor, 517 Twenty-second Street, conducted by Rev. A. T. Tomshany, pastor of the Presbyterian Church. Interment at Dongola.

(Samuel B. Poor married Annette Hight on 10 Dec 1863, in Union Co., Ill.  His marker in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Samuel B. Poor 1835-1918.—Darrel Dexter)

FUNERAL NOTICE

Poor—Died Sunday, February 3, Samuel B. Poor, age 83 years. Funeral services will be held at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Poor, 517 Twenty-second Street, Tuesday morning at 9:30 o'clock conducted by Rev. A. T. Tomshany. Interment will be made at Dongola. Karcher Brothers are in charge of arrangements.

Mr. and Mrs. M. P. Mathis and daughter Catherine, who were called here (Mound City) on account of the death of Mr. Mathis' father, returned today to their home in Kawana, Okla.

Mr. Middleton Britt is dangerously sick at his home at Friendship. Dr. Royall was called to prescribe for him and pronounced the disease typho-malaria. The ice was so thick the doctor could not drive his team more than halfway. Mr. Britt’s son-in-law met the doctor at Grandma Curry's and took him on with his team while the doctor’s team was resting. Mr. Britt is slightly better today. (Curry)

Tuesday, 5 Feb 1918:
AGED WOMAN OF PULASKI FOUND DEAD AT CACHE
Mrs. Catherine Myers Attempted to Walk to Cairo and Met Her Death at Bridge
BODY FOUND TODAY BY SON, WILLIAM MYERS
Coroner Steel Held Investigation This Afternoon to Find Cause of Her Death

Mrs. Catherine Myers, aged 74 years, of Pulaski, Ill., was found dead beneath the Illinois Central railroad bridge over Cache, a few miles north of this city, this morning by her son, William Myers. Whether she slipped off the bridge or was knocked off by a train was to be determined by Coroner J. C. Steele, who summoned a jury to hold an inquest this afternoon.

Mrs. Myers planned a visit with her sister in Cairo. She had expected to come down Monday on Illinois Central train No. 5, but it was very late. It is believed that, impatient over the delay, she started out to walk the sixteen miles to this city. She left her home about 10:30 Monday morning.

This morning her sons started out in search for her. He walked the railroad track from his home searching carefully for any trace of her. When he reached Cache Bridge, he found her shawl lying on the bridge. Beneath he found her dead body. It was bruised and bloody. He went back to Mounds and notified Coroner Steel and Undertaker William Montgomery took charge of the remains.

FUNERAL OF S. B. POOR HELD TODAY

The funeral services of the late Samuel B. Poor were held this morning at 9:30 o'clock at the residence of Mr. Poor’s son, Harry Poor, of 517 Twenty-second Street, conducted by Rev. A. T. Tomshany, pastor of the Presbyterian Church. The funeral left at 11 o'clock on the Illinois Central for Dongola, where interment was made this afternoon.

Mrs. Mary Warren was called to St. Louis Sunday on account of the death of her sister-in-law. (Mounds City)


H. A. Mann went to Cairo Sunday being called there on account of the death of Samuel B. Poor, father of Harry Poor, formerly of this city (Mound City).

Nathan Metcalf and daughter are visiting relatives and friends here (Karnak) before returning to their home at Martin, Tenn. They were called here on account of the death of Otho Metcalf, who came to his death by the hands of another person at Cairo.

Gus Osterloh was called to St. Louis this morning by the death of Mrs. Martha Leonard. Mrs. Leonard was the mother of Mrs. John Gockel, of St. Louis.

FORMER CAIRO MAN DIED AT CLINTON, KY.
Son of Late Fred Hofheinz Died Tuesday Evening

Fred B. Hofheinz, son of the late Fred Hofheinz, who was for a long period a member of the Cairo police force, died Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. at his home at Clinton, Ky.

He was born in Cairo and spent the greater part of his life in this city. He died at the age of 41 years and has been away from Cairo about ten years.

He is survived by a sister, Mrs. William Boyle, of Dallas, Texas, and a brother, John Hofheinz, of Memphis, Tenn. While funeral arrangements have not yet been completed; it is thought the body will be taken to Villa Ridge, where interment will take place beside the bodies of his parents.

The deceased was a blacksmith, having learned the trade under this father, who conducted a shop in Cairo for many years prior to his appointment on the police force.

Thursday, 7 Feb 1918:
FUNERAL NOTICE

Hofheinz—Died, Tuesday, February 5, in Clinton, Ky., Fred B. Hofheinz, aged 41. Funeral services will be held in Cairo Friday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at Mrs. Falconer's undertaking parlors conducted by Rev. C. Robert Dunlap, Ph. D., pastor of the Immanuel Lutheran Church, and the Woodmen of the World. Interment at Beech Grove Cemetery.

CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank our friends for their kindness in our bereavement, the death of our beloved father, Samuel B. Poor. Their help to us during his illness and their sympathy at all times has been a great comfort to us.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Poor
and Daughter Helen

Mrs. H. V. Handley and Robert Hurst were summoned to Pulaski on account of the death of their nephew, Martin Michael Hurst. (Mound City)

Fred Hoffheinz, horseshoer at Hudson's shop, died very suddenly at Kaler's boardinghouse Tuesday night. He was a former citizen of Cairo and has been here (Clinton, Ky.) several years. He is survived by a brother at Memphis and one sister at Dallas, Texas. He will probably be buried at Villa Ridge beside his father and mother. He was a member of Clinton W. O. W. Lodge. No funeral arrangements can be made until the arrival of his brother.

Friday, 8 Feb 1918:
FUNERAL SERVICES FOR FRED HOFHEINZ

Funeral services were held this afternoon from Mrs. Falconer's undertaking parlors over the remains of Fred B. Hofheinz, conducted by Rev. C. Robert Dunlap, pastor of the Immanuel Lutheran Church, and the remains were taken to Beech Grove Cemetery for interment, with the Woodmen of the World, of which he was a member in charge.

Miss Lucy Lee died here (Charleston, Mo.) Sunday morning from burns she received by the explosion of a lamp in her home on East Commercial Street on Friday evening. On Tuesday the remains were taken to Miss Lee's former home in Columbus, Ky., for burial.

Henry S. Cochran left Monday for Sheppardsville, Ky., where he was called by the death of his father. (Charleston, Mo.)

Capt. James R. Lee and wife of San Antonio, Texas, arrived here (Charleston, Mo.) Monday night for the funeral of Miss Lucy Lee.

Saturday, 9 Feb 1918:
Mrs. William Boyne, of Dallas, Texas, and brother, John A. Hofheinz, of Memphis, who were called to Cairo by the death of their brother, Fred Hofheinz, will go to Clinton, Ky., Sunday for a brief visit with friends before leaving for their homes.

There were 10 enlisted from this village (Wetaug) for the Cuban War and all returned but two. John Hankles, who died in a hospital in the Philippines, and Young Sydenstricker, who was accidentally killed in California on the way over.

Monday, 11 Feb 1918:
J. M. MATTINGLY AT HOME THIS MORNING
Death Relieves Suffering after Two Years' Illness

J. M. Mattingly died this morning at 2:30 o'clock at his home, 722 Twenty-first Street, after an illness of two years during which time he has been confined to his bed a majority of the time. He was 69 years of age and had resided in Cairo for the past thirteen years, during which time he has been in the furniture business in the firm of Mattingly-Ellsworth. He was born in Raywick, Marion County, Kentucky, in 1849.

Mr. Mattingly leaves surviving him his wife and two sons, Brashear and George, both of Cairo. He also leaves three brothers and four sisters.

The funeral services will be held tonight at 7:30 o'clock at the residence conducted by Rev. Fr. James J. Downey, pastor of St. Patrick’s Church. The remains will be taken to Hardenberg, Ky., Tuesday morning for interment.

John A. Hofheinz, who was called to Cairo by the death of his brother, Fred Hofheinz, the latter part of last week returned to his home in Memphis, Sunday.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Mattingly—Died, Monday morning, February 11, J. M. Mattingly.  Funeral services will be held tonight at 7:30 o'clock at the residence, 722 Twenty-first Street, conducted by Rev. James J. Downey. The remains will be taken Tuesday morning to Hardensberg, Ky., where interment will be made.

Tuesday, 12 Feb 1918:
Henry Leach and Billie Goin were indicted for murder. They both stated they were unable to arrange for counsel and Alexander Wilson was appointed to act for them. These men are the two who in a fit of anger drove Carey Belew, a negro, into the Ohio River, and according to the charge, caused him to drown. The negro's body was never recovered, as the ice covered the surface of the river for a long period after the occurrence. Leach is from Bird's Point, and Goin is from Cairo.

Charles Potts, of Cairo, was indicted for murder. He stated he would not be able to provide for counsel at once, but thought he might be able to. He still ___ with Attorney George H. Baker ___ the recommendation of ______.

MRS. ARTHUR GUNTHER DIED THIS MORNING
Passed Away After Illness of About Four Years.

Mrs. Arthur Gunther, aged 38 years, passed away at 6:30 o’clock this morning at the home of her mother, Mrs. Sara Wilbourne, No. 530 Twenty-first Street. Death was not unexpected as she had been in failing health for the past four years.

Mrs. Gunther, who was Miss Gertrude Wilbourne, was born on Nov. 27, 1880, and reared in Cairo. She was a member of the Cairo High School graduating class of 1898. She was also a member of the Cairo Baptist Church for many years.

She was married to Mr. Gunther on Jan. 16, 1916.

Surviving her are her husband, her mother, two sisters, Mrs. Amos Twente, of Thebes, and Mrs. Parker Burnham, of Ullin, and three brothers, Harry and John Wilbourne, of Cairo, and George Wilbourne, of the U.S. Army now in Texas.

Funeral arrangements had not been completed today.

Mrs. Wilbourne was a consistent Christian woman and devoted to her family and friends.

FUNERAL SERVICES ON MONDAY NIGHT
J. M. Mattingly Buried at Hardinberg, Ky., This Afternoon

Funeral services for J. M. Mattingly were held Monday night at 7:30 o'clock at the residence on Twenty-first Street. Rev. Father James J. Downey read the service and made a brief talk. There were many beautiful flowers and the services were attended by a large number of friends. The remains were taken to Hardinberg, Ky., this morning where interment will be made.

MRS. LOUISE WAHL DIES THIS MORNING
Funeral at Residence Wednesday Conducted by Father Downey

Mrs. Louise Wahl, wife of William Wahl, of 1707 Poplar Street, died this morning at 4:30 o'clock at their home. She was 45 years of age and leaves surviving her husband and one son. The funeral services will be held Wednesday at the residence, Rev. Father James J. Downey officiating. Interment will be made at Mounds Cemetery, the funeral party going on a special interurban. E. A. Burke is in charge of the arrangements.

(Her marker in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Louise Wahl 1873-1918.—Darrel Dexter)

DEATH CLAIMS OLD RESIDENT OF ELCO
Moses Lentz Passed Away Suddenly—Burial Today

Moses Lentz, one of the prominent citizens of Elco and reputed to be the wealthiest citizen of that part of the county, died very suddenly last Saturday and was buried today.

Mr. Lentz, who lived between Elco and Ullin, is survived by two sons, Joseph and Charles, and two daughters, Mr. Josephine Gannon, of Cairo, and Mrs. Elizabeth Newell, formerly of Ullin. A granddaughter, Mrs. Derrell James, also lives in Cairo.

(John E. Newell, 24, born in Rushville, Ill., son of Richard Newell and Mary Dean, married Ella Lentz, 28, born in Elco, Ill., daughter of Moses G. Lentz and Mary Hartline, on 18 Feb 1897, in Union Co., Ill.  His marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Moses Lentz Born March 1840 Died February 1918.—Darrel Dexter)

Wednesday, 13 Feb 1918:
FUNERAL NOTICE

Gunther—Entered into rest Tuesday, Feb. 12, 1918.

Mrs. Gertrude T. Gunther, 37 years of age, beloved wife of Arthur Gunther. Funeral services will be held at the family residence, 530 Twenty-first Street, Thursday, Feb. 14th, at 1:30 p.m. Conducted by the Rev. L. D. Lamkin, pastor of the Cairo Baptist Church.

Special interurban cars will leave Twenty-first and Walnut streets at 2:30 p.m. for interment in Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds, Ill.

Friends of the family invited.

3 LOST LIVES IN STORM AT PULASKI
Two Children of Thomas Mize Killed—Aged Lady Falls Dead

Two children, a girl 14 and a boy of 12, in the family of Thomas Mize, living a mile northwest of Pulaski, Ill., were killed in the storm which struck that locality at 5 o'clock Tuesday morning when the Mize home was blown down. The rest of the family escaped although Mrs. Mize was slightly injured. They lived on the Sam W. Heilig farm.

At the same time while the storm was on, their neighbor, P. G. Anderson, a quarter of a mile away, was also having their trouble when the storm commenced to blow. Mr. Anderson arose from his bed and lit the lamp, went into another room to fasten the door. While gone, his wife and grown daughter also got out of their beds and were dressing. On his return to the room, his wife cried out and fell to the floor dead. Mrs. Anderson had been in poor health all winter and it is presumed the excitement of the storm overcame her weakened condition and the shock to her heart was more than it could stand. This is a great shock to the community and a very sad affair.

Thursday, 14 Feb 1918:
ALBERT R. DEEM DIED AT PARSONS, KANSAS

Albert R. Deem, a former resident of Cairo, who resided here some time ago, while auditor for the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, died at Parsons, Kan., Jan. 16, after an operation at Mercy Hospital.

Mr. Deem had been a resident of Parsons for the past eight years, during five of which he has been auditor for the M. K. and T. Railroad. He was survived by a wife and one daughter, Miss Aline, aged thirteen. Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in Parsons and the body taken in his home, Columbus, Kansas.

 

CARD OF THANKS

We desire to sincerely thank our many friends and acquaintances who assisted so nobly and generously in the sickness and death of our esteemed and beloved wife and mother, Louise Wahl.
W. T. Wahl and son, Matthew

Mrs. William Albright, of whom we spoke of being at a St. Louis hospital a couple of weeks ago, was operated on at the Barnes Hospital for cancer, but survived the operation only a couple of days. A weak heart is said to have caused her death. Mrs. Addie Albright was born in Elco 41 years ago. She was married to Mr. Albright in 1892 and was the mother of eight children, seven of whom, survive. Mr. Albright has always been in poor health and she has had a hard time keeping them together and educating them and was taken away in the midst of her work. Such women as she are the real martyrs among women. Their names are written in letters of gold on snow white tablets that they will stay luminous through all eternity; their deeds are imperishable, and their memory immortal and their rewards are sure. Interment was made at Mt. Pisgah Cemetery by the pastor at 2 p.m. Saturday.

(William H. Albright married Addie May Douglas on 14 Aug 1892, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker at Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug reads:  William H. Albright 1874-1919  Addie M. Albright his wife 1876-1918.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. Sarah Stoner, wife of the late Moses Stoner, died Tuesday night of Bright's disease. She had been ill for several months. Interment will be made at Mt. Pisgah. She leaves a host of friends and relatives and was a highly esteemed woman. (Wetaug)

(Moses Stoner married Mrs. Sarah J. Wiard on 24 Feb 1884, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  A marriage license was issued on 27 Jul 1864, in Pulaski Co., Ill., for Amos Wiard and Sarah Jane Wright.  Her marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Pulaski reads:  Moses Stoner Born Oct. 6, 1849 Died Aug. 6, 1914  Sarah J. Stoner his wife Born April 23, 1847 Died Feb. 19, 1918.—Darrel Dexter)

Mr. Joe Garrett died at his home last Friday and was buried Saturday. Mr. Garrett had been ill all winter, but it was thought that death was due to old age. He had been a member of the Baptist Church since childhood and was greatly respected and loved by everyone and will be greatly missed not only by his wife, children and grandchildren, but a host of friends and distant relatives. (Wickliffe, Ky.)

Friday, 15 Feb 1918:
ILLINOISAN'S BODY BURIED IN HOME-MADE CASKET

White Hall, Ill., Feb. 15.—Walter Bushnell, who died near here Monday on the farm where he was born 84 years ago, was buried in a casket made by himself from a walnut tree which was one of a grove planted by him when a boy.

His instructions that his funeral be without ostentation and that the casket should be carried to the cemetery on a lumber wagon were observed.

BOAZ WOMAN DIES OF APPENDICITIS

Mrs. Lucille A. Brooks, of Boaz, Ill., died at St. Mary's Infirmary this morning at 10 o'clock of appendicitis. The deceased was 21 years of age and leaves a husband, H. D. Brooks, and a three-year-old son. Her husband and parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Griffith, were at her bedside.

The remains will be taken to Boaz by way of the Big Four to Karnak, Ill., Saturday morning, and the burial will be Sunday. Karcher Brothers are in charge of the burial.

Mrs. Sallie Powell died at her home here (Bardwell, Ky.) Monday morning. She sustained injuries about two months ago, in a fall and being of advanced age it undermined her general health with fatal results. Mrs. Powell was a member of the Methodist Church, a woman of gentleness of manner, kind deeds and strong friendship. Her remains were interred at the LaCenter Cemetery Tuesday.

Mrs. Hattie Horner attended the funeral of Uncle Mose Lentz at Anna Tuesday. (Wetaug)

(Daniel Horner married Hettie Lentz on 1 Jan 1889, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Saturday, 16 Feb 1918:
BOAZ WOMAN DIED AT ST. MARY'S FRIDAY
Mrs. Lucile A. Brooks Dead after Operation for Appendicitis

Mrs. Lucile A. Brooks, of Boaz, Ill., died at St. Mary's Infirmary, Friday morning at 10 o'clock following an operation for appendicitis. She was 21 years of age. At her bedside during her last illness were her husband, H. D. Brooks, and parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Griffiths, of Metropolis.

Surviving the deceased are her husband, one son, Horace, aged two years, her father and mother, two sisters, Mrs. Bessie Melcher, of Vienna, Ill., and Mrs. Lillian Zimmerman, of Tuscola, Ill., and a brother, Harry Griffith.

The remains were taken to the Karcher Brothers undertaking parlors and prepared for burial. The body was shipped to Karnak this morning and from there taken to Boaz, where interment will take place. Services will be held at Boaz Sunday.

Paducah Man Dies from Pneumonia in France
Gen. Pershing Reports

Washington, Feb. 16.—Gen. Pershing notified the War Department of one death from an airplane accident, one from gunshot wound, and five from pneumonia.
Cadet Conrad P. Hazen, Signal Corps, aero plane accident, February 11.
Private Randolph Faunleroy, stevedore, gunshot wound, Center Cross., Va.
Private Thomas H. Kirkpatrick, Quartermaster Corps., pneumonia, Fayetteville, N.C.
Civilian Samuel Rodgers, contractor, pneumonia, Paducah, Ky.
Corp. Gordon E. Gilman, supply train, pneumonia, Medford, Minn.
Private John H. Squire, stevedore, pneumonia, St. Matthews, S.C.
Private John C. Bett, infantry, pneumonia, Scotland.

Monday, 18 Feb 1918:
RESIDENT OF CAIRO HALF CENTURY DEAD

Mrs. Margaret O'Donnel, aged 74 years, died this morning at 4:45 o'clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Margaret Lutz, 2200 Washington Avenue, after an illness of three weeks. She died of bronchial asthma. She is the widow of John O'Donnell, who died in Cairo 37 years ago.

Mrs. O'Donnell was one of the old residents of Cairo and has been a resident of the city for 50 years. She came to Cairo from Canada to which place she went from County Tipperary, Ireland. Coming to Cairo she met John O'Donnell, who lived here the greater part of his life, and married him. They resided in the city from that time on.

Surviving the deceased is one daughter, Mrs. Margaret Lutz, of 2200 Washington Avenue, and seven grandchildren, Margaret K., John, Allan, Thomas, Wallace, Mary and O'Donnell Lutz.

Funeral services have not been completed, but will be tonight. Services will be held at St. Patrick's Church, conducted by Rev. Father Downey, and interment will take place at St. Mary's Cemetery at Mounds.

E. A. Burke has charge of the funeral arrangements.

(Melcher Lutz married Margaret E. O’Donnell on 20 Jun 1900, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


LEWIS TO OPEN MURDER TRIALS

Judge A. W. Lewis arrived from Harrisburg on the noon train over the Big Four today to preside over the circuit court here this week. The cases set for today were two murder cases against Howard Jackson and another against Charles Potts.  Judge Butler will preside at Marion.

Court convened at 2:00 o'clock with Judge Lewis presiding and the jury for the case of Howard Jackson was under examination. It is not thought the jury will be completed today.

Jackson killed Henry Baker and shot L. Bunch on the Jackson farm at Dog Tooth Bend after an argument. He is defended by Alexander Wilson and M. J. O'shea. Milton C. Anderson, county attorney of Ballard County, is assisting State's Attorney Wilbourn.


THREE SHOT RIOT AT JONESBORO, ILL.
City Marshal Shot and Two Others Dangerously Wounded after Labor Trouble

JONESBORO, Ill., Feb. 18.—S. Emory, city marshal, was wounded and two others shot and dangerously wounded last night when a party of "loyalists" attempted to enter the home of a miner, Clifford Donaldson, where L. P. Irwin, a labor agitator, accused of I. W. W. actions, was supposed to be hiding. The crowd of "loyalists" at first went to the home of Irwin.  Emory, the city marshal went with them, urging that the crowd preserve order, and avoid anything that might disgrace the town. He asked them to remember that he had been marshal for years and had succeeded in preserving order.

When the crowd arrived at the Irwin home, the man they were seeking was gone. Thinking that he was at the home of Donaldson, the crowd then went there. As they appeared about to force the door, someone in the house, thought to be Donaldson, fired, striking the city marshal in the arm and striking Earnest Fath in the crowd, in the abdomen. Someone in the crowd then fired and hit Donaldson. He is expected to die.

The crowd then went to the office of Irwin, dragged the furniture out into the street and burned it.

Word has been received here (Mound City) of the death of Robert Martin, at Mobile, Ala. Mr. Martin was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. William Martin, of this city, and was born and reared here. He moved several years ago to Mobile, where he died of cancer of the face. He leaves a wife and two grown children, a daughter and a son, and his parents and three brothers, William and George, of this city, and Ed, of Cairo, and two sisters, Miss Blanch and Mrs. Anna Lawler.

(Harry C. Lawler married Anna E. Martin on 4 Nov 1898, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

MRS. J. L. LEEK DIES SUNDAY AT HOSPITAL
Funeral Services at Home in Karnak, Illinois

Mrs. Iona Leek, of Karnak, Ill., died Sunday morning at 9:45 o'clock at St. Mary's Infirmary, where she has been since Thursday. The remains were taken to Karnak this morning where the funeral services will be held Tuesday. She leaves surviving her, her husband, J. L. Leek, and two sons, Lyell and Thalmage, aged respectively 2 and 4 years. She also leaves four sisters, Nora Elder, of Hilderman, Ill., Etta Bayliss, of Grand Chain, Cora Miller, of Karnak, Lydia Fisher; and two brothers, William Peek, of Grand Chain, and Alvin Peek, of Karnak.  She was the daughter of H. H. Peek, of Grand Chain.  Karcher Brothers are in charge of the funeral arrangements.

(Her marker in Salem Cemetery in Massac County reads:  Iona P. Leek 1894-1918.—Darrel Dexter)

TENNESSEE MAN DIED AT HOME OF HIS SON
Remains Will Be Taken to Dukedom, Tenn., for Interment

Aaron Frields, aged 84 years, an old resident of Dukedom, Tenn., who has been visiting his son in Cairo for the past five weeks, died Sunday afternoon at the home of his son, D. A. Frields, of 208 Twenty-ninth Street. He had been ill for about a year and died at 3:30 o'clock.

The deceased leaves three sons, D. A. Frields, of Blodgett, Mo., one daughter, Mrs. Mattie Merrill, of near Dukedom, Tenn., and a sister, Mrs. Mima Bryan, of Montrose, Colo. His sister has been at his bedside for the past week, arriving from Colorado Sunday, Feb. 10.

Services will be held over the remains at 7 p.m. and the remains will be shipped to Dukedom, the home of the deceased, where interment will take place in the family cemetery. Rev. Langston of the Church of God will conduct the services.

E. A. Burke has charge of the funeral arrangement.


Tuesday, 19 Feb 1918:
JURY SECURED IN JACKSON MURDER CASE
Panel Completed to Try Paul Jackson for Killing Henry Baker

Circuit court convened under Judge Lewis this morning, with the Jackson murder case before the court. At adjournment Monday evening, four jurors had been selected. Examination was continued this morning and at adjournment at noon, the state and defense had passed for more jurors, a total of eight. The panel was exhausted and 12 new men from Cairo were subpoenaed for the jury.

The panel was completed at 3:15 o'clock, the full jury being: Fred E. Martin, Everett Prosser, Andrew Serbian, William A. Magner, D. B. Nelson, Nathan Weeks, P. G. Leschner, Nat Webster, George Kobler, C. E. Bissell, J. O. Zimmerman and William Burke.

The defendant Paul Jackson shot and killed Henry Baker and wounded L. Bunch on the farm in Dogtooth Bend.

3 SHOT WHEN LIGHTS TURNED OFF AT DANCE

JOHNSTON CITY, Ill., Feb. 18.—Three men were shot at dance given here last night in Columbus Hall.  The wounded men are: Harlan Hall, shot through the lung; Carl Ruff, in the stomach; and Houston Hunter, in the hip.

Italians and Americans were dancing and at a certain signal, when the trouble started, the lights were turned off.

CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank our friends for their kindness to us during our bereavement, the death of our little daughter Grace. Their help and sympathy has been a great comfort to us.
Mr. and Mrs. James Benefield and family

Mrs. W. F. Smith left Sunday night for Chicago, called by the death of a relative.

Rev. Robert Smith conducted the funeral at Boaz, when Mrs. Delbert Brook was buried at Anderson Cemetery. (Karnak)

Jane Gray, wife of J. H. Gray died Saturday night at Goreville, Ill., and will be buried at Salem Cemetery Monday. She lived to a good old age and is survived by her husband, one brother, one sister, and several children and grandchildren, besides numerous friends and relatives. (Karnak)

(Her marker in Salem Cemetery in Massac County reads:  Emanda J. Gray 1855-1918.—Darrel Dexter)

Little Harrison Wayne Coleman, only child of Mr. and Mrs. Harrison Coleman, died on Feb. 15.
The funeral was held Sunday at the Baptist Church and the remains were buried in Beech Grove Cemetery. Rev. Mr. Webb, pastor of the Missionary Baptist Church at Anna, officiated. The flowers, which were carried by four girls, were most beautiful and profuse.  (Tamms)


Wednesday, 20 Feb 1918:
LEADING CITIZEN OF McCLURE DEAD
Royal Matthews Passed Away Monday Night—Funeral Thursday

Royal O. Matthews, prominent resident of McClure, died Monday night. Funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon, with interment at McClure.

Mr. Matthews was about 65 years of age. He is survived by his wife and two sons, Stanly G. Matthews, who is in the draft army at Camp Taylor, and Leigh Matthews, cashier of the bank at McClure.

Mr. Matthews is a large land owner in the McClure district.

Stanley Matthews will arrive from Camp Taylor tonight to attend the funeral.

SELF DEFENSE IS PLEA OF SLAYER OF HENRY BAKER
Howard Jackson on Trial Today for Homicide in Dogtooth Bend
TRAGEDY OCCURRED ON JUNE 11 OF LAST YEAR
Prosecution Completes Case This Forenoon and Witnesses for Defense Take Stand

Pleading self-defense on a charge of murder, Howard Jackson this afternoon took the stand in his own behalf. He shot Henry Baker and Lafayette Bunch on the Jackson farm in Dogtooth Bend on the morning of June 11, 1917. Baker died at St. Mary’s Infirmary early in the morning of June 16.

Howard Jackson's story was almost identically that told by his brother, Clarence Jackson, and Clarence Jackson's wife. The defendant told his story in a straight forward, simple manner with no evidence of passion. His plea was entirely self-defense, he stating that Baker and Bunch rushed upon him as he expected when he came to the door of the house.

Evidence by witnesses for the defense was finished at 3 o'clock this afternoon and the argument of the attorneys was begun.

State's Attorney Wilbourn assisted by Attorney Clifford Anderson, of Ballard County, Ky., presented the summary of the case for the People and Attorneys Alexander Wilson and M. J. O'shea made the plea for the defendant. The case went to the jury late this evening.

Evidence in the case of Howard Jackson charged with murder was continued at the opening of the circuit court his morning.

After the procuring of the jury Tuesday evening, State's Attorney Wilbourn opened the case with a presentation of the case of the People against Howard Jackson, of Alexander County, charged with the willful murder of Henry Baker, at which time he shot and wounded Lafayette Bunch, who has since recovered.

After the statement by the defense, the state opened its case calling Mr. Bunch, the injured man to the stand. Following his testimony, his son, Charles, a twelve year-old boy took the stand, being an eye witness to the affair. Dr. McManus and Dr. Dickerson were called to the stand to testify as to the case of the deceased, Baker's death. The state continued its case this morning by calling John Hood and Leo McDaniel to the stand to testify in regard to the injured man's condition and statements at St. Mary’s Infirmary, on the night before the morning of which he died. The state finished at 10:15 this morning and the defense began the hearing of witnesses.
Witnesses Tell of Shooting

According to the testimony of the witness the two men, Baker and Bunch, were standing at the entrance to the garden before the house of Clarence Jackson, brother to the defendant, where the opening representing the gate led from the yard. Bunch was whittling on one of the gate posts with a knife. Bunch testified that he and Baker were standing in conversation when Howard Jackson came from the front door of his brother's house, with a repeating shot gun in his hands.

According to the testimony of the prosecuting witness, Jackson hurried off the end of the porch, and with the words, "Now, you ___, I'll get you," began shooting. The first shot struck Bunch, knocking him down and then Jackson turned the gun on Baker, who had turned to run. Baker fell and Jackson took another shot at Bunch, who also ran and was joined by his son, Charles, who had been working in the garden, two yards beyond the first fence.

Bunch testified that he and Baker had no time to take any hostile action toward Jackson and the boy's story was along with the same line, though he was not near enough to hear anything that might have been said. The boy was hoeing corn and beans in a garden removed from the place by another garden with two wire fences between him and the scene of the tragedy.

In the garden with the boy were Clarence Jackson and his wife, who had just come from the house to give the boy instructions as to the hoeing.
Gives Baker's Statement

Opening this morning, John Hood was called to the stand after a preliminary hearing was held before Judge Lewis to determine whether his testimony should go to the jury. There was no objection, so the jury was called. Mr. Hood testified he, in company with Leo McDaniels and Leslie Wilbourn, had visited the man Baker as he lay in St. Mary's Infirmary on the night before the morning on which he died and told of the weakened condition of the man, who declared according to Mr. Hood and the following witness, Mr. McDaniels, that he was too weak to sign any statements. He was too weak and sick to make a formal statement, but he had been told he was going to die and repeated it, wondering who was to pay his doctor’s bill. He stated before these three that Howard Jackson had shot him and that he did not know the cause. He told of seeing Jackson shoot Bunch and of turning to run. He declared he was then shot in the back and returned saying, "Howard, you have killed me."

Mr. McDaniel's testimony was identical, except that he did not seem to remember Baker's statements as to the shooting.

Dr. McManus was then called and testified that the man was rational, and had been informed by him (Dr. McManus) that he would die.
Prosecution Rests Case

The prosecution then rested its case and the defense called as its first witness, Mrs. Clarence Jackson, wife of Clarence Jackson, brother of the defendant. On the day of June 11, 1917, the day of the shooting, Henry Baker, the dead man, had been called to the farm of the elder Jackson to be paid off and on that morning, Mrs. Clarence Jackson went to her father-in-law's house to get a check for that purpose. She saw Steve Jackson and Henry Baker in conversation there. Returning to her home, she filled out the check for $1.80 and going to the door called to Baker, who was now standing near her home, in conversation with some of the Jackson boys. Baker took the check, according to the testimony and remarked that it was so big that he had better give it to her.

What followed between Baker and Mrs. Jackson was not admitted, but she testified he was under the influence of liquor.

The story of what followed was told in the same manner by Clarence Jackson and his wife. Clarence was not there at the time. Howard came to the house and asked for some matches and, according to Mrs. Jackson, got them. About that time Clarence came into the house and with his wife went then out the front door, past the two men, Baker and Bunch, who were standing at the gate, and on to the garden where the boy was working. He had his arm around his wife's waist and they passed within fifteen feet of the two men, but nothing was said.

At the time, Mrs. Jackson was in the house and before Howard entered, she testified, Baker and Bunch were standing at the gate, talking in loud manner about Howard, urging what she characterized as rough language. She stated Bunch had a large knife in his hand and was whittling on the post.
Claimed Baker Had Knife

Both Clarence Jackson, and Mrs. K. Jackson testified they were standing with their back to the yard talking to the boy, when they were attracted by the slamming of the front screen door. Howard, they stated, came out with Clarence's pump gun in his hand held "candlestick" and started off the end of the porch. They stated he did not say a word, but that Baker and Bunch, the latter with his knife in his hand rushed toward Howard. Without raising the gun to his shoulder, Howard fired; striking Bunch and then as Baker wheeled in flight, striking him.

At the third shot, Mrs. Jackson fainted and Clarence left her lying in the garden and ran to Howard. Bunch and the boy Charles were then running across the fields, away from the scene. Clarence took the gun away from Howard according to the evidence, and Howard went back to his father’s home, where he lives. Clarence then went back to his wife and took her to the house.

Clarence and his wife testified in regard to trouble between Bunch and Howard a previous winter when Howard had ordered Bunch out of the Jackson house for making remarks against their belief in spiritualism. At the time, a Cairo man by the name of Moreland was at the Jackson house. He claimed spiritual powers, which gave rise to the argument. Bunch left when ordered, and according to Clarence Jackson, said, "I'll leave, but I'm a man just as you are." Mrs. Jackson quoted him as saying, "I'll see you later." Clarence testified he knew of ill feeling between Bunch and Howard, but none between Baker and Howard. Baker had been employed at the Jackson farm for about three months.

Ossie Jackson, an elder brother was then called to the stand and testified that he had talked to Baker the morning of the shooting, before the tragedy and that Baker was under the influence of liquor. He quoted Baker as saying he was "going to kill your brother." This happened in the blacksmith shop and the witnesses stated he talked to Baker, telling him he had his money and that the best thing he could do would be to go on. He stated Baker promised to and left.

Ossie Jackson was not at the scene of the shooting and learned of the happening two hours after he had talked to Baker. He testified that Baker had a bad reputation for being troublesome when drinking.
H. C. Mulcahy, of Miller City, testified that he had heard though he did not have any personal opinion, that Baker and Bunch were bad men at times. He testified that Baker was a large man of about six feet and 180 pounds in weight.

Malphus Brown, son of James Brown, of Dog Tooth Bend, testified he had heard Baker had a bad reputation and had personally experienced his disposition on a certain occasion, when Baker had attempted to kill him.

Brown was then excused.

At this point adjournment was taken for noon, until 1:30.

ALFRED G. JOHNSON DIES AT ST. MARY'S
Funeral Services Held this Afternoon—Interment at Olmstead

Alfred G. Johnson, of Olmstead, Ill., died Tuesday night at 8:30 o'clock at St. Mary’s Infirmary, where he has been a patient. The deceased was 55 years of age and leaves surviving him three daughters, Mrs. Violet Milar, of Chicago, Miss Leona Johnson, of Minneapolis, Miss Dorothy Johnson, of Appleton, Wis., and a son, Clemson Johnson, of Olmsted, and J. M. Johnson, of Chicago. Mr. Johnson was engaged in the drug business at Olmsted.

The funeral services were held this afternoon at 2 o'clock at Karcher's undertaking parlors and conducted by Rev. Father James J. Gillen. The remains were taken at 3:45 to Olmsted where interment was made in the family cemetery.

WELL KNOWN WOMAN DIES IN MOUND CITY
Mrs. J. W. Fullerton Passes Away Early This Morning

Mrs. J. W. Fullerton, died this morning at 2 o'clock at her home in Mound City after an illness of some time. Mr. Fullerton was born August 14, 1858, in Owen, Ind., and on December 24, 1874, was married to J. W. Fullerton in Stenter, Ind. She has resided in Mound City for 35 years. She was the mother of two sons, who died in infancy, and one daughter, Miss Cora Fullerton, who survives her. She is also survived by her husband and two nieces, Mrs. W. H. Ashbaugh, and Mrs. C. A. Griffith, of Mound City, and a nephew, Ray Overton, of Harrisburg, Ill.

Mrs. Fullerton was affiliated with the Congregational Church in Mound City since its organization and was a well-known and popular woman.

The funeral services will be held Friday at the Congregational Church, conducted by Rev. Roy B. Morgan.

Thursday, 21 Feb 1918:
JACKSON IS FREED MURDER CHARGE
Jury Only Out an Hour Arrived at Verdict of "Not Guilty"

Howard Jackson, who was charged with murder after the killing of Henry Baker and the shooting of L. Bunch, Dog Tooth Bend, on the farm of his father, Steve Jackson, June 11, 1917, was freed by the jury last night in a verdict of “not guilty,” brought in at 8:45 o’clock last night.

Jackson took the stand in his own behalf Wednesday evening, and the arguments of the attorneys which followed lasted until 5:30, when adjournment was taken for supper, until 7 p.m.  At the convening of the court at 7 o’clock, Judge Lewis instructed the jury on the law in the case of a killing such as this.  The case went to the jury just before 8 o’clock, and the verdict was brought in with an hour.

Court convened before Circuit Judge A. W. Lewis this morning with the murder case of Charles Potts for the killing of Otho Metcalf in a saloon at Thirty-fourth Street and Commercial Avenue and that of Henry Leach and Billie Goin for the murder of Carey Belew, negro, whom the two are alleged to have driven into the river.

Court opened at 9 o’clock, but things moved slowly, as none of the cases were ready for trial.

Discussion between attorneys and parties in the two murder cases was carried on during the morning, and finally both cases were presented with a request for continuance until the next term of court in order that both sides might be more ready to present the case, and particularly the defense.  Attorney George H. Baker is representing Charles Potts, having been appointed by Judge Butler.  This case was continued.

Attorney Harry Hood is defending Billie Goin and Henry Leach, and this case, upon the action of Judge Lewis, was continued until May 20.

The funeral of Mrs. J. R. Fullerton will be held Friday morning at 9:30 o'clock from the Congregational Church. Interment at Beech Grove Cemetery. (Mound City)

Mr. Alfred G. Johnson, whose death occurred at St. Mary's Infirmary Tuesday evening, was a former resident and businessman of Mound City being in the drug business here several years ago.

HOLD SERVICES FOR CAIRO RESIDENT
Mrs. Margaret O'Donnell Is Buried Wednesday

Funeral services over the remains of Mrs. Margaret O’Donnell, who passed away at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Margaret Lutz, were held Wednesday afternoon at St. Patrick's Church at conducted by Rev. Father Downey.

A special interurban car carried the funeral part to Mounds, where interment took place at St. Mary's Catholic Cemetery. A large number of friends of the family and friends of the deceased who was 74 years of age, at her death, were present. Mrs. O'Donnell was a resident of Cairo for fifty years.

CARD OF THANKS

We desire to thank our friends for the kindness and assistance rendered during the long illness and death of our beloved wife, daughter and sister, Gertrude Wilbourn Gunther.

We wish especially to thank those who sent the beautiful floral emblems and those who assisted in the service.
Arthur Gunther
Mrs. Sarah Wilbourn and family

Friday, 22 Feb 1918:
Mrs. M. F. BROWNER DIES AT ST. MARY'S
Wife of Mayor of Mound City Passes Away Thursday Evening

Mrs. M. F. Browner, of Mound City, died Thursday evening at 5:15 o'clock at St. Mary's Infirmary. She was taken critically ill early in the afternoon and was brought to Cairo at 3:30 hoping that her life could be saved, but nothing could be done. Her little daughter, who was born a few minutes before she passed away, is also dead.

Mrs. Browner was the wife of Mayor M. F. Browner of Mound City and was formerly Miss Etta Kennedy of Cairo. She was the daughter of Mrs. Margaret Kennedy, of 2036 Pine Street, who survives. She also has two sisters, Mrs. James Ross, of Kansas City, Mo., and Miss Maude Kennedy, of Cairo. She was married to Mayor Browner, June 25, 1912. She was formerly member of the firm of Moran-Kennedy and after her marriage her sister Miss Maude Kennedy took her place in the firm.

INFANT DAUGHTER DIES

The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Raylor died this morning at 3:30 o'clock at their home 412 Ninth Street. The baby was but one day old. Interment was made at St. Mary's Cemetery at Mounds today.

Mrs. Iona Leek and Mrs. John Gray were buried at Salem Cemetery Tuesday; both were buried at the same time, but in different parts of the cemetery. It sure was a sad affair and one that will be remembered many days by those who witnesses it. They were both mothers. (Karnak)

Mr. John Campbell from Salem, Ill., is spending a few days with D. M. Campbell, being called here on account of the death of Mrs. Iona Leek. (Karnak)

Malinda Wade, wife of George Wade, died Wednesday morning after a lingering illness. She lived to be a good old age. She is survived by her husband and several children and grandchildren. Funeral services will be held at Anderson Thursday at 2 p.m. (Karnak)

The remains of Mrs. Susan Swank, who died in Caruthersville, were brought here (Charleston, Mo.) Sunday evening. The funeral was held from the Methodist Church on Monday afternoon, conducted by Rev. M. T. Han of Cape Girardeau. Interment was in Oak Grove Cemetery. Mrs. Swank was the mother of Messrs. Ben and Edgar Swank, of this city.

Saturday, 23 Feb 1918:
ARTHUR MAGNER DIED EARLY TODAY
Cairo Man Passes Away after Illness of Three Months

Arthurs S. Magner, aged 47, passed away at his home, No. 300 Twenty-eighth Street, at 9:15 o'clock this morning after an illness of three months’ duration. He underwent an operation about a year ago, and since then has been in impaired health.

Mr. Magner was assistant engineer at the Cairo Waterworks under his brother, Engineer William M. Magner, and had been in the employ of the company for twenty-four years.

He is survived by his wife and three children, two girls and a boy, the eldest 13 years old. In addition to his brother here, he leaves another brother, Edward, of Lafayette, La., and a sister, Mrs. Edward Moore, of Fort Smith, Ark.

Funeral arrangements had not been concluded today, but the services will probably be at St. Joseph's Church, of which he was a member and burial will be at Calvary Cemetery, Villa Ridge. Karcher Brothers are in charge.

Mr. Magner also conducted a grocery at Twenty-eighth and Poplar, but his fondness for machinery kept him from giving up his position at the waterworks and his wife looked after the store.

MRS. BROWNER'S FUNERAL SUNDAY
Services at St. Joseph's Church at Eight O’clock

The funeral services of Mrs. M. F. Browner, of Mound City, who died at St. Mary’s Infirmary Wednesday evening, will be held in Cairo at St. Joseph's Church Sunday morning at 8 o'clock, conducted by Rev. Father James J. Gillen. The funeral cortege will leave the residence of Mrs. Browner's mother, Mrs. Margaret Kennedy, 2036 Pine Street, at 7:30 for the church. A special train will leave Fourteenth and Ohio streets at 9:15 for Villa Ridge, where interment will be made.

The active pall bearers will be Messrs. Thomas J. Keefe, James H. Galligan, George J. Fischer, Egbert Bloms, Charles O. Patier, Frank J. Fitzgerald, John Sullivan, Isaac L. LaHue, E. J. Langan, George C. Beede, and E. J. Walder, all of Cairo.

The honorary pallbearers will be Messrs. L. C. Perks, A. W. Williamson, Peter McNeille, Thomas Higgins, Joseph Lutz, Edward Westerman, A. Schuler, Fred Hood, J. F. Kuny, George Martin, C. M. Gaunt, and Dr. J. F. Hargan, all of Mound City.

The funeral will be in charge of Karcher Brothers.

(Her marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Rosetta K. Browner & Baby Feb. 21, 1918.—Darrel Dexter)

THREE FATALITIES AT WEST FRANKFORT

BENTON, Ill., Feb. 23.—Three fatalities occurred at West Frankfort. The first was when the home of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Hogg was destroyed by fire, burning their 7-month-old baby to death. The child had been left in the house alone. The second was when John Swobsher, aged 55, was struck by a Burlington train, his body being cut in two. The third was when a 16-year-old boy named McClintock cut down a tree, the tree falling upon him.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Browner—Died at St. Mary's Infirmary, Thursday afternoon at 5:15 o'clock, Feb. 21, 1918, Mrs. Etta Kennedy Browner, wife of M. F. Browner, of Mound City.

Funeral services will be held at St. Joseph's Church Sunday morning at 8 o'clock. The cortege will leave the residence of Mrs. Browner's mother, Mrs. Margaret Kennedy, 2036 Pine Street, at 7:50 o'clock for St. Joseph's Church, where Rev. Father James Gillen will conduct the services.

A special train will leave Fourteenth and Ohio streets for Villa Ridge at 9:15 o'clock. Interment will be in Calvary Cemetery.

Friends of the family are invited to attend.

SON OF OSCAR MAN DIED TODAY IN CAIRO
Had Been Attending School in Cairo, Living with Aunt

William V. Penn, ten-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Penn, of Oscar, Ky., died at 5:30 o'clock this morning at the home of J. B. Whitlow, of 415 Thirty-fourth Street. Mr. Whitlow is a son-in-law of the elder Penn. The boy had been attending school in Cairo and lived with his aunt.

The boy ran a nail in his foot Saturday while at play with small companions and the wound became infected. Tetanus setting in caused his death.

The remains will be taken to Oscar, Ky., at 7 a.m. Sunday. Services will be held at Oscar, Sunday afternoon at the Oscar Baptist Church and interment will take place in the Oscar Cemetery.

MOTHER OF CAIROITE DIES AT EVANSTON

Mrs. Elizabeth Tiernan, mother of John Tiernan, of Cairo, passed away at her home in Evanston, Ill., Wednesday, after an illness of several months. The funeral occurred Friday.

Mr. Tiernan and his wife have been in Evanston since before Christmas, and were at her bedside. A daughter, Miss Elizabeth Tiernan, also survives.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Magner—Died, Arthur S. Magner, at his home, 300 Twenty-eighth Street, Saturday, February 23. Funeral services will be held Monday morning, February 25, at St. Joseph's Church, Rev. Father James J. Gillen officiating. The funeral party will leave the residence, Twenty-eighth and Poplar streets, at 8 o'clock for the church, where the service will be held at 8:15 o'clock. A special I. C. funeral train will leave Fourteenth and Ohio streets at 9:15 o'clock for Villa Ridge, where interment will be made at Calvary Cemetery.

Mrs. J. P. Buchanan, of Cairo, attended the funeral of Mrs. J. R. Fullerton Thursday. (Mound City)

Miss Ruth Kelley, daughter of J. W. Kelly, died at her home west of town (Bardwell, Ky.) Sunday morning, following a long illness. For many years, Miss Ruth had been a victim of tuberculosis and everything known to the ingenuity of man had been resorted to in an effort to save her life. She was a member of the Christian Church and the funeral services were conducted by Rev. W. W. Morris, of Paducah, after which the burial was in the Bardwell cemetery.

JUDGE KELLER DIES

Mount Vernon, Ill., Feb. 22—Judge Columbus A. Keller, formerly of Mount Vernon, died at his home in San Antonio, Texas. He was 67 years old. He served as county judge of Jefferson County when 26 years old and was the youngest county judge in the state. He had served as grandmaster of the Odd Fellows in Illinois and in 1913 was grand sire of the Grand Lodge of the United States. He was a graduate of McKendree College at Lebanon, Ill.

OFFERS REWARD FOR RECOVERY OF BODY

Mrs. Clara Schmidt, of 919 Hawthorne Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio, is offering a reward of $100 for the recovery of the body of Oscar Schmidt, who was last seen at Aurora, Ind., on the morning of Dec. 13. He was 5 feet 6 inches in height, had dark brown hair, and his arms were tattooed with woman's head and heart pieces with a sword. He wore a brown corduroy suit, leather leggings, dark blue shirt, overshoes with buckles and a plaid overcoat.

She writes to Dr. Dodds that “chances are he froze up in the ice and when it thaws out his body may wash ashore."

Monday, 25 Feb 1918:
GEORGE C. KOEHLER DIED THIS MORNING
Passed Away in Sanitarium in Chicago

Word was received today that George G. Koehler died in a sanitarium in a suburb of Chicago.
Mr. Koehler has been in failing health for a number of months and for some time was a patient at St. Mary's Infirmary.

The deceased was the proprietor of Teichman's cigar factory and tobacco store at 703 Commercial Avenue. He was for years in the grocery business in Cairo and served in the city council under the aldermanic form of government for a number of years, as a member of the second ward.

He is survived by his wife, one daughter, Miss Fay Koehler, and a son, George E., in California, who started east on learning of his father's death.

When a member of the council, Mr. Koehler was regarded as one of the most valuable members. He served when the improvement policy was underway and was a strong advocate of the improvements.
Mr. Koehler was a member of the Elks Lodge and was a director of the Central Building and Loan Association.

Mr. Koehler was also a member of Ascalon Lodge No. 51 Knights of Pythias and of the Modern Woodmen.

George C. Koehler was a native of Cincinnati, where he was born 59 years ago. He came to Cairo in his boyhood and has since spent his whole life here.

Mr. Koehler has been in failing health for the past four months and ten days ago went to the North Shore Sanitarium at Winnetka, Ill., where it was hoped he could gain some benefit. An examination by the physicians there brought no encouragement and his son, who was at Los Angeles, was advised of his father's condition and made arrangements to come back to Cairo to take charge of the business. It is believed that he is now en route here.

J. O. Davies will leave for Chicago tonight to bring the body back to Cairo for burial.

(George Koehler married Carolena Ehs on 5 Jan 1886, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  George G. Koehler 1858-1918.—Darrel Dexter)

HARRY NAETER DIED AT CAPE GIRARDEAU

Harry A. Naetter, youngest of the Naeter brothers, publishers of the Cape Girardeau Republican, died Friday morning in a hospital there following an operation. He was 37 years old and had been a resident of Cape Girardeau since 1904, when with his brothers, George and Fred, he came to Cape Girardeau. He leaves a wife and baby boy.

MAGNER FUNERAL HELD THIS MORNING
Services at St. Joseph's Church Largely Attended by Friends

Funeral services for Arthur Magner, who died at his home in Cairo Saturday morning, were held this morning at 8:15 o'clock at St. Joseph's Church, Rev. Father James J. Gillen officiating. There was a large crowd in attendance and the floral offerings were abundant and beautiful. Interment was made at Calvary Cemetery, Villa Ridge, and the funeral party going up on a special Illinois Central train.

The pallbearers were Messrs. M. J. Walder, M. F. Kelly, Frank J. Fitzgerald, Harry Stout, T. P. Caraher, John Hogan, John Barry, and Thomas Galvin.

G. W. COATS DIED IN ST. LOUIS SUNDAY
Former Manager Robert Cotton Oil Succumbs to Pneumonia

G. W. Coats, died at 1 o'clock Sunday morning at the home of his brother, Neal Coats, in St. Louis after a brief illness. He left Cairo last week for a few days visit with his parents in Mt. Vernon, Ill., before going to Colorado where he intended to locate. He contracted a heavy cold which developed into pneumonia to which he succumbed. His wife was with him, having joined him in St. Louis from a few days visit with her father, J. W. Rule, in Indiana.

Mr. Coats was born in Mt. Vernon, Ill., August 19, 1892, and had resided in Cairo for four years, having been manager of the Roberts Cotton Oil Company for three years. He was connected with the Louisiana Lumber Co., during his first year in Cairo. His marriage to Miss Carrie Rule, of Cairo was solemnized June 20, 1917. He leaves surviving him his wife, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Coats, of Mt. Vernon, Ill., a sister, Mrs. Clark Hutchinson, of Mt. Vernon, and two brothers, F. E. Coats, of Cairo, and Neal Coats, of St. Louis.

The funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock Tuesday afternoon at the home of his sister, F. E. Coats and Miss Eva Rule, Mrs. Coats' sister, of Cairo, went up to St. Louis Sunday.

(John W. Coats married Catherine E. Waite on 24 Oct 1867, in Jefferson Co., Ill.  Claud Hutchison married Louise Coats on 4 Jul 1897, in Jefferson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

MRS. E. P. HALLIDAY PASSED AWAY SUNDAY

Mrs. Lottie Halliday, aged 23 years, wife of E. P. Halliday of 3301 Park Avenue, died at her home Sunday morning at 9:30 o'clock after an illness of several months. Surviving the deceased are her husband, E. P. Halliday, and a son 6 years old.

The remains will be shipped to Ragland, Ky., her former home, Tuesday, where services will be held and interment will take place.

E. A. Burke has charge of arrangements.

FORMER CAIRO WOMAN DIES IN COLUMBIA

Mrs. T. T. Moore, of Doniphan, Mo., formerly of Cairo, died the latter part of last week in a hospital at Columbia, Ohio.  She was formerly Miss Mary Magee, and was employed at Rhodes-Burford in 1913.

He leaves surviving her husband, and two children, a daughter 3 years old and an infant son fifteen days old. The funeral was held at Doniphan Sunday. Dr. and Mrs. I. G. Otey, of Lelber, Ky., passed through Cairo Sunday en route home from the funeral. Mrs. Otey was a sister of Mrs. Moore.

LITTLE SON DIES SUNDAY MORNING

Eugene, the six-month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Roberts, of 628 Thirty-seventh Street, died Sunday morning at 4 o'clock. The body was taken to Fulton, Ky., today where funeral services were held. Interment was made in Good Springs Cemetery. Karcher Brothers were in charge of the arrangements.

A large number of Mound City people attended the funeral of Mrs. M. F. Browner, which was held from St. Joseph’s Catholic Church in Cairo Sunday morning.

Tuesday, 26 Feb 1918:
CAPT. THORWEGIAN RIVER CAPTAIN DEAD

St. Louis, Feb. 26.—Capt. William H. Thorwegian, 80 years old, president of the Columbia Excursion Company and one of the oldest steamboat captains on the Mississippi River, died of hemorrhage of the brain Monday night at the Missouri Baptist Sanitarium, where he had been ill for nine days.

Old river cronies of the veteran captain regard it as significant that he should be called to the port of landing from which there is no return, a few weeks after the wreck of his "pet" the Grey Eagle, a famous St. Louis excursion steamer, which was crushed and sunk in the recent ice smashup at Paducah, Ky.

At the age of 18, Bill Thorwegen, as he was known to his intimate friends, began his career on the river, starting as a pantry boy on one of the old side-wheel packets that flourished before the Civil War.

His ambition then was to save $10,000. At the age of 21, he bought his first steamboat, the La Creole, for $16,000. The La Creole ran out of St. Louis and was a famous up the river picket, generally stopping at Keokuk.

During a recent reminiscent chat, the captain stated that he personally had owned more than 18 big boats. Many of them were destroyed by fire, including the Grand Republic, which cost $300,000. The City of Providence, owned by Thorwegen, was smashed in the ice and the City of Vicksburg, another famous Thorwegen steamboat, was wrecked in the famous tornado of 1896.

At the age of 75, Capt. Thorwegen decided to quit the Mississippi River and spent his last days in the sunny climate of California. He and wife moved their household goods to Los Angeles and bought a bungalow there. But the old Mississippi kept calling and the captain came back.

The last boat he commanded was the Grey Eagle. The captain always boasted of the fact that he had carried 6,000,000 passengers during his 61 years on the river and never lost a life.

A widow, Lilly J. Thorwegen, and two sons, William J. and Frank E. Thorwegen, survive him.

MAGNER FUNERAL HELD MONDAY
Services at St. Joseph's Church Largely Attended by Friends

Funeral services for Arthur Magner, who died at his home in Cairo Saturday morning, were held Monday morning at 8:15 o'clock at St. Joseph’s Church, Rev. Father James J. Gillen officiating. There was a large crowd in advance and the floral offerings were abundant and beautiful. Interment was made at Calvary Cemetery, Villa Ridge, the funeral party going up on a special Illinois Central train.

The pallbearers were Messrs. M. J. Walder, M. F. Kelly, Frank J. Fitzgerald, Harry Stout, T. P. Caraher, John Hogan, John Barry, and Thomas Galvin.

ANOTHER CAIRO CITIZEN PASSES AWAY

The death of C. F. Phelps, who passed away Saturday morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Frank L. Lyons, in Chicago, removes another old resident of Cairo. Mr. Phelps lived in recent years with his son, Paul Phelps, who conducted the saloon and rooming house on Ohio Street just above Fourth. His son, Paul, and wife were at his bedside when he died.

Mr. Phelps was in the photograph business in Cairo in the early days. He came here from Muscatine, Iowa. He was a brother of A. O. Phelps, for many years Cairo's well known photographer.

ILLINOISAN DIES IN KENTUCKY

Louisville, Ky., Feb. 26.—Norman James Tweedie, of Wheaton, Ill., is dead at Camp Zachary Taylor, of pneumonia. He was 23 years old and a candidate in officer’s training scamp.

The funeral services of Mrs. McFarland, who passed away at her home in St. Louis last Friday, were held at the Methodist church Sunday afternoon, with Rev. G. A. Dunn, the pastor in charge. The church was filled with relatives and friends of the family. The remains accompanied by her husband and daughter, Mrs. Eric Sanders, and husband, arrived Saturday afternoon and were taken to the daughter's home on South McKinley Avenue (Mounds) where they laid in state until Sunday afternoon.

IN MEMORY OF BROTHER FRANK KELLY BY MOUNDS LODGE NO. 949 OF THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF ODD FELLOWS

It is a custom followed by time and the reverent regard of Christian people in the busy march of life to pause and pay fitting tribute to friends and associates who have "gone before."

We, as Odd Fellows, among whom this custom has ever prevailed, are again called upon to mourn the loss of a beloved brother, who in life was a living exemplification of what true Odd Fellowship teaches.
In all the relations of life, his example left its impression for good, as a citizen he always was found upright and loyal to his obligations of citizenship; in business matters, his honor was above reproach; as a member of the church, his membership was an honor to his church and as an Odd Fellow he was careful, of the honor and reputation of the fraternity.

With all he was an upright gentleman, complying with the "Golden Rule" as nearly as it is possible for poor Humanity to do.

Brother Frank Kelly was laid to rest in the beautiful Beech Grove Cemetery on Monday, January 21, 1918, by the members of his order, the members of his church and many others of his numerous friends, and peace be to his ashes.

This lodge extends their sympathy to the bereaved family and to the many relations and friends.
A copy of the above to be sent to the family, one to be placed on the lodge records and one sent to the county paper.
C. J. Spencer, N. G
M. C. Davis, Sec.
O. E. Burnett, P. O., Committee

Wednesday, 27 Feb 1918:
KOEHLER FUNERAL MAY OCCUR FRIDAY
Remains Brought Home from Chicago This Morning

The body of George G. Koehler was brought back to Cairo this morning from Chicago, accompanied by John B. Koehler, brother of the deceased, his son and daughter, and Joseph Davies, who went up to bring the remains home. The body was taken in charge of E. A. Burke and at 1:30 this afternoon was taken to the Elks Lodge, where it will lie in state until 1:30 Thursday, and then taken to the home of the deceased on Eighth Street.

Funeral services will probably be held Friday, but definite arrangements are awaiting word from Mr. Koehler's son, George E. Koehler, now on his way home from California.

Miss Lucy Barnett, about seventy years old, died Saturday afternoon from blood poison after a few days illness. She accidentally smashed her hand about a week before and blood poison set up immediately. Miss Lucy had been living in Ballard County for many years, but the later years of her life were spent here (Wickliffe, Ky.). She was greatly respected by everyone who knew her, and will be greatly missed. Her only relative was a niece who lived in Kansas City, but could not be located.

LUMBERMAN DIED MONDAY AT CHICAGO
Arthur Gregerson Died Suddenly.  Known as Big Cypress Man

Arthur Gregerson, of the lumber firm of Gregerson Brothers of Chicago, known throughout the lumber world as Big Cypress Man, died very suddenly Monday in Chicago. The Gregerson Brothers Lumber Company has a large scale yard at the west end of Tenth Street in Cairo.

Arthur Gregerson is well known personally by the lumbermen of Cairo and was a member of the Cairo Lumbermen's Club. He has visited Cairo a number of times.

Funeral services for little Louise Palmer, who died at the home of her parents in East St. Louis, Tuesday morning at 11 o'clock will be held in Mounds Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. G. A. Funn to officiate. The little girl was the two-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Palmer and died after a two-week illness of bronchial pneumonia.

Friends of the family are invited to attend the funeral services. (Mounds)

Thursday, 28 Feb 1918:
GUILTY IS VERDICT OF JURY;
GIRL GETS 7-YEAR SENTENCE
Lillian Wilmouth, of Near Bardwell, Ky., Shot Sleeping Father
VERDICT RETURNED WITH LITTLE DELAY
No Motion Was Made for New Trial; Girl Is Just Realizing Deed

             BARDWELL, Ky., Feb. 28.—Returning a verdict last night after being out for an hour and a few minutes, the jury trying Miss Lillian Wilmouth for the murder of her father, James Wilmouth, found the 17-year-old girl guilty of murder in the first degree and fixed her sentence at seven years in the penitentiary.

Miss Wilmouth, a young girl of the country near Bardwell, attractive and well liked by her friends, shot her father as he lay asleep in the night.  The shooting was with a revolver at 11 o’clock on the night of Dec. 1.  The day previous she was said to have had trouble with her father over her friendship with a certain young man of the neighborhood to whom her father had a violent dislike.  The trouble was but the culmination of several warnings and according to the defense, the father on the last occasion threatened to kill the girl.

Insanity Is Defense

Temporary insanity was the plea of the defense on the ground of extreme nervous tension, brought on by the high feeling between the girl and the father, at a period of her life verging from girlhood into womanhood, that rendered her very susceptible to any deranging influence.

Friends of the girl fought desperately, it is said, for her acquittal.

Evidence was introduced by the defense to show that James Wilmouth had actually threatened the life of his daughter.  Dr. T. J. Marshall and Dr. W. L. Moby, physicians of Bardwell, each of whom had at various times had occasion to call on the Wilmouth family in the course of their practice, were witnesses for the defense, in testifying as to the defendant’s mental condition at the time of the crime.

Both testified that in their opinion the girl was probably temporarily insane, and at her age, it was their observation, that a young girl’s mental and nervous system, was very susceptible to strain.  This was the mainstay of the defendant’s case.

Wilmouth Not Brutal Man

             The prosecution on the other hand endeavored to show that to all appearance, Mr. Wilmouth was a polite and kindhearted man.  Other members of the family then questioned on the stand admitted that the father was ordinarily kind and though he had a rather high temper at times, was not given to unreasonable outbursts, or in any way vicious.  Other friends of the family and neighbors testified that he was not unusually harsh or cruel.

The girl took the stand in her own behalf, but gave little testimony.  Giving no reason for the shooting, she stated she did not know why she had committed the act, and upon cross examination held to her testimony, though it was considered that she had practically admitted the planning of the affair.

Murder Alleged Premeditated

             The murder was stamped by the attorneys for the People as premeditated and planned with malicious care, carried out in the cold-blooded manner while the victim lay defenseless, asleep in bed.  The prosecution laid great stress on the fact that the girl was in full possession of her reasoning powers, and was in no way mentally deranged, at the time of committing the crime.  In the arguments of the case, the prosecution denounced the manner in which the act was committed, and demanded that the law, regardless of sympathy of personal feeling, be invoked according to the statutes and declared that a verdict of guilty was necessary on the basis of the evidence shown.

No Motion for New Trial

             There will be no motion for a new trial according to the attorneys for the defense as the case is considered concluded as far as any efforts in the court for her acquittal could have effect.  Formal sentence by the judge has not yet been passed, but it is expected that he will pronounce judgment Saturday. The girl will be taken to the reformatory, until she has become of age, when she will be removed to the state penitentiary, if her sentence has not been commuted or a pardon granted.

According to the jailer this morning the full realization of the seriousness of the matter is just beginning to break upon the girl and her condition today is described as "greatly depressed." She has little to say. It is thought she will be taken to the reformatory next week.

KOEHLER FUNERAL TO BE HELD FRIDAY
Services at Residence and Burial at Villa Ridge Cemetery

Funeral services for the late George G. Koehler will be held Friday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at the family residence, No. 329 Eighth Street, conducted by Rev. C. Robert Dunlap, pastor of the Lutheran Church, and Ascalon Lodge No. 51 Knights of Pythias.

The remains will be taken by special Illinois Central train to Villa Ridge, where interment will be made.  Cairo lodge No. 651, B. P. O. E. will officiate at the grave.

After lying in state in the Elks lodge rooms, the remains were taken this afternoon to the family residence.

B. P. O. E. ELKS NOTICE

All members of the Cairo Elks Lodge are requested to meet at their hall Friday afternoon at 1:15 o'clock to attend the funeral of our late brother, George G. Koehler.
M. C. Whiting, Exalted Ruler

NOTICE ASCALON LODGE NO. 51

I would be pleased to have as large an attendance as possible of all Knights of Pythias at our meeting tonight to make arrangements to attend the funeral of our deceased brother, George G. Koehler.
Charles Williford, C. C.

JOHN OVERSTREET DIED AT GRAND CHAIN

John D. Overstreet aged 72 years, died at his home in Grand Chain, Wednesday morning. Burial will be at LaCenter, Ky.

Mr. Overstreet is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Frank Lipe, at Grand Chain, and a son, Mack D. Overstreet, of Murphysboro.

He formerly lived in Mound City and Cairo. He was a member of the Odd Fellows Lodge.

Friday, 1 Mar 1918:
FUNERAL SERVICES FOR GEORGE G. KOEHLER

Funeral services over the remains of the late George G. Koehler were largely attended this afternoon, as they were held at the residence of the deceased, No. 329 Eighth Street.  Rev. C. Robert Dunlap officiated with Ascalon Lodge No. 51, Knights of Pythias assisting in the service at the residence and Cairo Lodge No. 651 B. P. O. E. at Villa Ridge cemetery.

Loads of flowers were in evidence, the gifts of the large circle of friends of deceased.

The pall bearers were:  Honorary—W. H. Wood, H. S. Antrim, L. Lazarus, H. H. Halliday, J. W. Wenger, Fred Teichman, Herman C. Schuh, and George Becker, Sr.

The active pallbearers were:  J. W. Howe, Henry Steinal, E. T. Aisthorpe, E. E. Cox, Floss Buder, Mike Egan, Peter Lind, Sr., and Harry Becker.
 
PAYS TRIBUTE TO KOEHLER'S MEMORY
Building and Loan Association Passes Resolutions

The following resolutions were passed by the Central Building and Loan Association as a tribute to George G. Koehler, who was a director of the association.

Whereas our fellow director, George G. Koehler, has passed into the Great Beyond, after years of active usefulness and service, not only in behalf of this association, but also as a businessman and a citizen of this community.  For many years he has been a member of the board of directors of this association, which office he filled faithfully and well, being always interested in and mindful of its welfare and success.  Upright in all his dealings, fair and just to every stockholder, and always solicitous of the good name and general welfare of the association, he proved himself the right man in the right place, and was repeatedly re-elected as director.  He will be greatly missed by us, his friends, associates and co-workers.

Be it, therefore, Resolved that we, the Board of Directors of the Central Building and Loan Association of Cairo, Illinois, do hereby express our sincere sorrow and regret for the death of our associate director, George G. Koehler, which occurred at Chicago, Illinois, on the 25th day of February, 1918, after a lingering illness, and our appreciation of the valuable service he rendered this association in his lifetime, and that we extend to his family and relatives our sympathy in their hour of bereavement and sadness.

Be it further Resolved, that these resolutions be spread upon the records of this association and a copy thereof sent to the family of the deceased.
By the Board of Directors
H. S. Antrim, President
W. P. Greaney, Secretary.
 
After deliberating for two hours, the jury in the trial of Miss Lillian Wilmouth, on the charge of murdering her father, returned a verdict sentencing the accused to the penitentiary for seven years.  The verdict was a surprise, as the prevailing opinion among those who had followed the course of the trial was that she would be acquitted.  The largest crowd that ever attended a Carlisle circuit court was in attendance at each day's session of the trial.  We understand her attorneys will make a motion for a new trial in a few days.  (Bardwell, Ky.)
 

Saturday, 2 Mar 1918:
FUNERAL SERVICES FOR CONDUCTOR KELLY

Funeral services will be held Sunday at Centralia over the remains of Conductor Charles Kelly, who died early Friday morning.  Conductor Kelly had been on the Cairo Centralia run on the Illinois Central for the past six years.  He leaves a wife and an adopted daughter.


Mr. and Mrs. Earnest Palmer and Mr. Palmer, of Pulaski, attended the funeral services of little Louise Palmer, Thursday afternoon.  (Mounds)
 
The funeral services of little Louise Palmer, the eight-month-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Palmer, who passed away at the home of her parents in East St. Louis Tuesday at 11 a.m. after a two-week illness of bronchial pneumonia, were held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. William Gallion, of our city (Mounds) Thursday afternoon.  Rev. G. A. Dunn, pastor of the Methodist Church, was the officiating minister.  A large number of sympathizing relatives and friends were present.  At the close of the service the procession wended its way to Beech Grove Cemetery, where the little one was laid to rest under a wealth of beautiful floral offerings.  She leaves to mourn her loss a devoted father and mother and one brother.  (Mounds)
 
John Oliver and wife attended the funeral of Charles Todd and two children, who were burned to death when their house burned in Joppa, a few nights ago.  The remains of the three were put in one casket and buried at Oak Grove Cemetery. (Karnak)

 

Arm and Leg Severed by Pile Driver

Olive Branch, Ill., March 2.—Ralph Chalmus, of Creal Springs, Ill., was probably fatally injured this morning at Thebes.  His right leg and arm were cut off by a pile driving machine, which has been stationed here during the winter.  He was just alive at 1:45 p.m.

(The 12 Mar 1918, issue gives his name as Ralph B. Chamness.—Darrel Dexter)

 
Monday, 4 Mar 1918:
HARDIN COUNTY MAN DIES IN FRANCE
Herrin Man Also Among Severely Wounded, Pershing Reports
WITH THE AMERICAN ARMED
FORCE

Corp. Elliott Forner, infantry, severely wounded, March 1, J. C. Fortner, father, Herrin, Ill.
Private Artue O. Ledbetter, engineers, sarcoma, March 1, J. Q. A. Ledbetter, father, Elizabethtown, Ill.

Marion, the 12-year-old daughter of Albert Danforth, died Wednesday at her father's home in New York City.  The body, which was brought here (Charleston, Mo.) for burial, arrived here Friday evening and was taken to the home of Judge Levi Danforth on Virginia Street.  The funeral was conducted by Rev. Lemons of the Baptist Church and Rev. Minor of the Christian Church on Saturday morning.  Interment was in the Odd Fellows Cemetery.
 
Mesdames W. H. Grace and daughter, Mrs. Josh Meshew and E. B. Howle attended the funeral of J. Will Dunn at Wickliffe Friday, who died in St. Louis Tuesday of pneumonia.  (Barlow, Ky.)
 
EAST PRAIRIE CHILD DIED HERE SATURDAY
Swallowed Piece of Steel Which Caused Death

Paul Burn Morgan, the four-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Morgan, of East Prairie, Mo., died at midnight Saturday, after physicians were unable to remove a ragged piece of steel from his throat.

The child had swallowed the steel at home and was brought to St. Mary's for attention when the local physician could not remove the object.

The remains were removed to the E. A. Burke undertaking parlors, where they were prepared for burial.  The body was taken to East Prairie Sunday morning where funeral services were probably held today.
 
Tuesday, 5 Mar 1918:
CHILD OF PRIVATE VANCE DIED TODAY

Viola May Vance, daughter of Edward Vance, one of Cairo’s enlisted men at Camp Taylor, died at the home of her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Richards, near the Suburban Hotel this morning.  The remains were taken on the 2 o’clock interurban car to Beech Grove Cemetery for interment.  E. A Burke had charge of the funeral.  The father returned from Camp Taylor at noon today for the funeral.

 
Wednesday, 6 Mar 1918:
DIED AT INFIRMARY OF APPENDICITIS

Mrs. Ida F. Kirkwood, 210 Twelfth Street, died at St. Mary's Infirmary at 10 o'clock this morning of appendicitis.

The remains were prepared for burial by E. A. Burke, and will be taken to Beech Grove Cemetery on the interurban car at 10 o'clock Thursday morning for interment.

Mrs. Kirkwood was a widow and conducted a rooming house on Twelfth Street.
 
OLD RESIDENT OF MILL CREEK DEAD

Mrs. Saminthia Pool, aged 72 years, widow of the late William Pool, died on March 1 at her home in Mill Creek, after a residence of 66 years in this section.  She came here from Whitely County, Ky., with her parents, William and Matilda Price.  She was the mother of 12 children, three of whom survive, Louis and Charles Pool, and Mrs. Sarah Cruse, and leaves also three sisters, Mrs. Susan Keith, aged 83, of Wolf Lake, Mrs. Malinda Jordan, and Miss Elsie Price, of Mill Creek.  A number of grandchildren are also left.  Funeral services were held Sunday morning at the Baptist Church, conducted by Rev. Mr. Lockard, and burial was in St. John’s Cemetery.

(William Pool married Semantha Price on 2 Apr 1863, in Union Co., Ill.  Peter A. Cruse married Sarah M. Poole on 31 May 1888, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Richard M. Nimmo married Susan Price on 28 Jun 1862, in Union Co., Ill.  William M. Keith, 41, of Willard’s Landing, married Mrs. Susan Nimmo, 36, of Anna, on 6 Jun 1876, in Union Co., Ill.  John F. Jordan married Malinda Price on 18 Jul 1875, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Charles O. Aden, 23, married Caroline Pool, 19, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., daughter of William Pool and Samantha Price, on 27 Sep 1891, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank our friends for their kind assistance in our late bereavement the death of our little daughter, Mildred Marie.  Their help to us during her illness and their sympathy at all times has been a great comfort to us.
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Palmer
 
Mrs. William Danforth and daughter, Mrs. Randolph Compton, of St. Louis, Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Welsh, of Oklahoma City, Mrs. Rowan Lemley, of Washington, D. C., and Miss J. Pullman, of New York City, who were here (Charleston, Mo.) for the funeral of Marion Danforth on Saturday, have returned to their homes. 

 

Thursday, 7 Mar 1918:
A. R. PRICE DIES AT ST. MARY'S INFIRMARY

E. R. Price, aged about forty-four years, died early this morning at St. Mary’s Infirmary after a lingering illness.  He was employed in the Illinois Central freight offices and has no relatives residing in Cairo.  His mother, Mrs. L. E. Work, who lives in Wetherford, Texas, has been notified of her son's death and the remains are at Burke's Undertaking Parlors awaiting word from her.

CIVIL WAR VETERAN DEAD AT BARDWELL
Died of Pneumonia at Age of 74 Years

John S. Ray, aged 74 years, of Bardwell, Ky., died Wednesday of pneumonia, at the home of his niece, Mrs. Gid Shepard, near Bardwell, according to word received in Cairo last night.

Mr. Ray was an old Civil War veteran and fought on the side of the south under General A. S. Johnston, at Shiloh.

Surviving him are two sons and one daughter, two brothers, Curran Ray and Lee Ray, of Bardwell, and Paducah respectively.

Funeral services will be held Friday or Saturday.

AGED EAST CAIRO RESIDENT IS DEAD
Mrs. Katherine Gentry Dies of Heart Failure Wednesday

Mrs. Katherine Gentry, of East Cairo, died Wednesday morning, at 9 o'clock of heart failure at the age of 70 years.  She was the wife of C. H. Gentry, a prosperous farmer of East Cairo, and the couple are well known in Cairo and adjoining Kentucky points.

Funeral services will be held Thursday at 4 p.m. at Barlow, Ky.  E. A. Burke has charge of arrangements.

FRANK COX DIES AT GRACEY, KY.

Ellis E. Cox and Will Howe were called to Gracey, Ky., last night by the death of an uncle of Mr. Cox, Frank Cox, of that place.  No details were given in the message.

Mr. J. Willie Dunn, who died in St. Louis Wednesday, was brought here (Wickliffe, Ky.) Thursday night for burial.  Mr. Dunn had been ill for a number of weeks.  He was formerly a resident of Barlow.  Besides his wife and brother, he leaves a host of friends to mourn his loss.

Saturday, 9 Mar 1918:

E. R. PRICE BURIED AT BEECH GROVE TODAY
Mrs. Price Arrives from Whitlock, Tenn., to Inter Remains

Funeral services over the remains of E. R. Price, who died Thursday at St. Mary’s Infirmary, were held this morning at Burke's undertaking parlors, and the body was taken to Beech Grove Cemetery for burial.  Mrs. Price, of Whitlock, Tenn., arrived in Cairo this morning.

John Ray died at the home of his niece, Mrs. Gid Shepherd, Monday night after a few days’ illness of pneumonia, and on account of his feeble condition he was unable to withstand the ravages of the disease.  He was a brother of C. H. Ray, of this city, and the father of the Ray sisters, who were murdered near their home several years ago.  (Bardwell, Ky.)

Monday, 11 Mar 1918:
PROMINENT INSURANCE MAN DIES THIS MORNING
Charles H. Barry Passes Away at Home in Philadelphia

Charles H. Barry died suddenly in Philadelphia this morning, according to a message received by relatives here today.  Mr. Barry was president of the Pennsylvania Fire insurance Company of Philadelphia and was prominent and well known in insurance circles.  He was a brother-in-law of Messrs. W. B. and Miles Frederick Gilbert, of Cairo.

Health Officer W. C. Clarke reported 28 deaths for February, 16 white and 12 colored and 4 resident and 24 non-resident.

Tuesday, 12 Mar 1918:
CREAL SPRINGS MAN IS KILLED
Ralph Chamness Fatally Injured When He Is Caught in Pile Driver on Dredge Boat at Thebes

A Creal Springs dispatch gives the following account of the death of Ralph Chamness, at Thebes:

The body of Ralph Brose Chamness, 18 years old, son of Mr. and Mrs. Brose Chamness, formerly of this city, was brought to Creal Springs from Thebes Monday afternoon.

The young man was fatally injured Friday afternoon while employed on a dredge boat on the Mississippi, being caught in a pile driver.  He was reared in this place and attended the city schools.

The family lived 1,500 yards of the river at Illmo, where Ralph was employed in the Civil Service Department at Gray's Point.

(Brose Chamness married Maude Foster on 27 Sep 1893, in Williamson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

SUDDEN DEATH AT WICKLIFFE, KY.

R. L. Scott, agent for the Illinois Central, died very suddenly at 6 o'clock Monday evening according to word received in Cairo today.  No details are given.  He leaves a widow and three daughters, Misses Lucille, Emily, and Malone, and one son, Richard Scott.

R. L. Scott was 58 years of age and had been agent for the Illinois Central and Mobile and Ohio at Wickliffe for 29 years.  He was stricken with heart failure at 1:30 in the afternoon while at work, and died at 5:45 p.m.

The funeral will be held Wednesday at 2 o'clock.

Wednesday, 13 Mar 1918:
INFANT SON DIED TUESDAY

Clarence S. Alvey, Jr., the three-day-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Alvey, of 223 Twenty-eighth Street, died early Tuesday morning.  The body was removed to Burke's undertaking parlors and prepared for burial.  It was shipped to Wetaug this morning at 4:30 o'clock, where interment will take place at Pisgah Cemetery.

William Gibson went to Wickliffe, Ky., this afternoon to attend the funeral of R. L. Scott, who died Monday evening.

Thursday, 14 Mar 1918:
The whole community (Wickliffe, Ky.) was greatly shocked when they learned of the death of Mr. R. L. Scott, depot agent, who died Monday afternoon at five thirty o'clock after an exceedingly short illness of apoplexy.  He felt entirely well and did not complain at all at dinner.

The funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon.  The song and prayer services were held at two o'clock at the Christian church by Brother McCave.  Afterwards the remains were taken to the cemetery by the Masons with all the Masonic honors.  Mr. Scott was about sixty years of age, was born and raised in Salisbury, Tenn., and had been employed as depot agent here for the last thirty-five years with the exception of about three months about two years ago, when the people elected him for county clerk, although he did not run for office.  He quit the railroad and served as county clerk about two or three months and then resigned and returned to the railroad and has been a constant and faithful employee since, as he was before and will certainly be missed greatly by all the people all over the county.  He was a member of good standing of the Christian Church.  He was greatly loved and respected by everyone who came in contact with him and his employment being such, he met many people.  Besides a host of warm friends, he leaves five brothers and one sister, his wife and three daughters and one son.  The funeral offerings were beautiful.  The bereaved family have the greatest sympathy from the entire community.


Will Bland, of Cairo, was in town (Wickliffe) Wednesday to attend the funeral of R. L. Scott.

G. W. Ellenwood died this morning at 9:30 o'clock of pneumonia.  He leaves a widow and two sons and three daughters.  One daughter is Mrs. Ollie McClelland, of Pulaski.  The deceased was employed at the Williamson-Kuny mill.  (Mound City)

Raphael Bowlander, fifteen-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Bolander, died quite suddenly last Tuesday evening at his home in St. Marie.  (Perks)

SCOTT FUNERAL AT WICKLIFFE WEDNESDAY
Largely Attended by Hosts of Friends of Popular Man

Funeral services for the late R. L. Scott, who died at his home in Wickliffe Tuesday, were held Wednesday afternoon in the Christian church.  The services were in charge of the Masonic lodge of which Mr. Scott was a member.  A large crowd was present and there were many floral offerings.  Mr. Scott was a veteran and one of the best known and most popular men in the vicinity.

Mr. and Mrs. Devees and daughter of Fulton, were here (Wickliffe, Ky.) for the funeral of Mr. R. L. Scott.

School was dismissed Wednesday afternoon in order that the members of the faculty and children could attend the funeral of R. L. Scott.  (Wickliffe, Ky.)

William Gibson, of Cairo, was in town (Wickliffe, Ky.) to attend the funeral of R. L. Scott.

Miss Emily Scott, who left Thursday for Louisville to attend school, was called home Monday on account of the death for her father, R. L. Scott.  She arrived Tuesday morning.  (Wickliffe)

Friday, 15 Mar 1918:
CAPT. LARSEN DIED HERE EARLY TODAY
Body Will Be Taken to Galesburg, Ill., for Burial.

Captain William S. Larson, of the Cairo Corps of Salvation Army, died at the Army home, 2705 Commercial Avenue, this morning at 8 o'clock after a long illness, which extended through the period he has been stationed in this city.  He was brought home from St. Mary’s Infirmary Thursday and died of arterial sclerosis.

Surviving the deceased are his wife, Mrs. Rebecca Larson, and four children, Louis, Ruth, Noma, and Jessie.  His body was taken to Burke's undertaking parlors and prepared for burial.  The body will be shipped to Galesburg, his home, Sunday morning, at 2 o'clock, where interment will take place.

Capt. Larson succeeded Capt. Lewis at Cairo last October, Capt. Lewis going to Marion, Ill.  Mrs. Larson will retire from active service for a period at least and will remain at Galesburg, or will go to her home at Warsaw, Ind., where her people are located.

PRISON PHYSICIAN AT CHESTER DEAD
Dr. J. P. Grimes Succumbs to Meningitis at Murphysboro

Special to The Citizen

MURPHYSBORO, Ill., March 15—Dr. J. P. Grimes, prison physician at the Sothern Illinois Penitentiary at Chester, died at St. Andrew's Hospital here today, as the result of meningitis that developed suddenly Tuesday night.

Dr. Grimes came to Murphysboro with Warden James A. White to perform a critical operation upon Mrs. White.  The operation was performed Tuesday morning.  That night the surgeon became very ill, was delirious Wednesday and was taken to the hospital and later became unconscious.

Mrs. Jakes S. Brewer returned Thursday night from Bartlesville, Okla. where she was called by the illness and death of her uncle.


The funeral of G. W. Ellenwood, who died Thursday morning, will be held at the home Friday evening and the remains will be taken to Grand Chain Saturday morning for interment.  (Mound City)

             (G. W. Ellenwood married Maggie Hale on 19 Nov 1893, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  George W. Ellenwood Born Oct. 19, 1864 Died March 14, 1918.—Darrel Dexter)

Saturday, 16 Mar 1918:
LITTLE MABEL FORD DIES THIS MORNING

Mabel, the seven-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Ford, 326 Thirty-third Street, died this morning at St. Mary’s Infirmary after an illness for four days of pneumonia.  The little girl was a pupil of the Elmwood School.  The remains were removed to Karcher Bros. undertaking parlors, where they were prepared for burial.  The body will be taken to Wickliffe this evening, where the funeral will occur Sunday.

MRS. ANNIE KOBLER PASSES AWAY TODAY

Mrs. Annie Kobler died this afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at her home, 711 Center Street, after an illness of about six weeks.  She suffered a paralytic stroke on February the first and has been gradually growing weaker since that time, having been confined to her bed constantly.  Mrs. Kobler has lived an extremely active life and had been in the best of health until the stroke.

She was 75 years old and was born in Tippah, Miss.  She came to Cairo in 1863.  For a number of years she has carried on a daily business at her home in Center Street.  She is the mother-in-law of James Hoffman, of 704 Center Street, and leaves surviving her two sisters, Mrs. Mary Major, of DuQuoin, and Mrs. Josie Swayne, of Sandoval, Ill.  Mrs. Swayne is in Cairo and Mrs. Major will arrive Sunday.

No funeral arrangements have been announced.

The funeral of G. W. Ellenwood was held at 8 o'clock Friday evening services were conducted by Rev. R. B. Morgan at the home and the remains were taken to Grand Chain this morning where interment took place.  (Mound City)

John H. McGary, one of the oldest citizens of the county and a resident of Arlington, died at his home in that place Wednesday.  Mrs. McGary was assisted with his two sons, Vester and James B., in the mercantile business in Arlington for many years.  He is survived by his wife and three children.  Mr. McGary was a good citizen and will be greatly missed in this locality (Bardwell, Ky.).

Monday, 18 Mar 1918:
Marion Hoffman, of Indianapolis, Ind., arrived Sunday afternoon called by the death of his grandmother, Mrs. Annie Kobler.

FUNERAL SERVICES TUESDAY AFTERNOON
Mrs. Annie Kobler to Be Buried at Beech Grove Cemetery

Funeral services for Mrs. Annie Kobler, who died at her home on Center Street Saturday afternoon, will be held at the First Methodist Church Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock.  The funeral party will leave the house at 1:15.  Rev. John W. Coontz, pastor of the church, will officiate.  Interment will be made at Beech Grove the funeral cortege will be conveyed to the cemetery in a special interurban car.

The pallbearers will be Messrs. John W. C. Fry, M. J. Howley, W. H. Gibson, Jesse E. Miller, Taylor C. Clendenen, and John Dewey.

Mr. and Mrs. Ollie McClellan of Pulaski are the parents of a second heir, a son being born Saturday morning at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Imon Bankson, in this city.  Mrs. McClellan had been summoned here (Mound City) on account of the death of her father, G. W. Ellenwood, and was taken sick here.

Mrs. James Barber and Hiram Calvin, of Olmsted, and Mrs. John Lewis, of Grand Chain, were called to Mill Creek Sunday, where they attended the funeral of their brother-in-law, Norman Keller, who died at a hospital in Carbondale. (Mound City)


Wednesday, 20 Mar 1918:
HARRISBURG MAN SHOT IN QUARREL OVER GARDEN

HARRISBURG, Ill., March 19—David Nally was shot and killed by Richard Weir, during a quarrel over the ownership of a garden of onions.

Both men lived in the same house. It is alleged Weir threatened to shoot Nally, whereupon Nally told Weir if he did not shoot he was a coward. Weir emptied the gunshot into Nally's body, causing instant death. Weir was arrested.


MRS. KOBLER'S FUNERAL TUESDAY AFTERNOON

The funeral services of the late Mrs. Annie Kobler were held Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at the First Methodist Church. Rev. John W. Coontz officiating. The services were largely attended and the floral offerings were abundant. Interment was made at Beech Grove where the funeral party was conveyed in special interurban cars. The pallbearers were Messrs. John W. C. Fry, John M. Dewey, W. H. Gibson, Jesse E. Miller, T. C. Clendenen, and B. McManus, Jr.


FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—March 19, 1918, Mrs. J. J. Webster, age 54 years, at family residence, 3515 Commercial Avenue, Cairo.

Funeral cortege will leave residence at 9:30 a.m. Thursday morning, March 21st. Funeral services will be conducted by Rev. L. D. Lamkin, pastor at Cairo Baptist Church, Tenth and Poplar streets, at 10 a.m. Interment at Central City, Ills., leave via Illinois Central at 11:15 a.m.


MRS. J. J. WEBSTER DIED AT HER HOME
Passed Away Tuesday Night after Two Weeks' Siege of Pneumonia

             Mrs. Matilda Webster, wife of J. J. Webster, of Thirty-fourth Street and Commercial Avenue, died at 8:20 o’clock Tuesday night at her home after an illness of more than two weeks.  She was 53 years old at the time of her death and had been a resident of Cairo for over 25 years.  She died of pneumonia.

             Harry Webster and Ralph Brisbin, her sons, and only children, were called home from Camp Taylor, where they are members of the National Army to be at her bedside and arrived on the night of Saturday, March 16.  A sister of the deceased, Mrs. Bennett Jarvis, of Centralia, Ill., was also at her bedside, when the end came.

             Mrs. Webster came to Cairo from Centralia, where she had married J. E. Brisbin.  She came to Cairo a widow and married J. J. Webster here in 1888.  She had a son by each marriage.  The Webster Hotel at Thirty-fourth Street and Commercial Avenue has been operated by Mr. and Mrs. Webster for a long number of years.

             Surviving the deceased are the husband, J. J. Webster, two sons, Harry Webster and Ralph Brisbin, two brothers, Edward and William Altenbeumer, of Centralia, four sisters, Mrs. Bennett Jarvis, Mrs. Augusta Jansen, Ms. Amelia Murphy, and Mrs. Lizzie Skipper, all of Centralia.  She also leaves one granddaughter, Miss Juanita Brisbin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Brisbin.

             Mrs. Ralph Brisbin is also in a critical condition and may be unable to attend the funeral services.

             (Jacob E. Brisbin married Matilda W. Altenbaumer on 24 Sep 1885, in Marion Co., Ill.  John J. Webster married Mrs. Matilda Brisbon on 29 Nov 1888, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Albert Yanson married Mary A. Altenbaumer on 22 Dec 1898, in Marion Co., Ill.  William H. Murphy married Amelia Altenbaumer on 29 Sep 1892, in Marion Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Thursday, 21 Mar 1918:
MRS. TURBAVILLE DIES AT MOUNDS

             Mrs. Edie Jane Turbaville died Tuesday morning at 8:30 a.m. at her home in Mounds. She is survived by her husband, Joseph Turbaville, two sons, Paul and Otis T., and one daughter, Doris. Interment will be at Pulaski, Ill., Friday afternoon, leaving on I. C. train No. 6.

Funeral services will be conducted at 1:30 p.m. at the M. E. church at Mounds, Rev. J. A. Dunn officiating.

(Joseph Turbyville married Ettie Jane Lackey on 26 Feb 1891, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Rose Hill Cemetery at Pulaski reads:  Etta J. wife of Joe Turbaville Born March 7, 1873 Died March 20, 1918.—Darrel Dexter)


MISS BAILEY DIES IN ZANESVILLE, O.

Miss Clara P. Bailey died Wednesday at her home in Zanesville, Ohio, according to a message received in Cairo today.  Miss Bailey is well known to many of the older residents of Cairo, where she used often to visit as the guest of the late Mrs. Charles Galigher.

FORMER RESIDENT OF CAIRO VERY ILL

J. A. Goldstein, former Cairo resident, when he was senior member of the firm of Goldstein & Rosenwater, is very low at his home in New York and not expected to survive.

Ben Griffith, who has been a victim of tuberculosis for a year, died at his home in South Bardwell, Monday.  He was buried at the Bardwell Cemetery Tuesday afternoon.  Mr. Griffith leaves a wife and several children.  (Bardwell, Ky.)

Mr. Fred Sizemore, formerly of Bardwell, died at his home near Wickliffe Monday of Bright's disease and was brought to Bardwell and interred in the cemetery Tuesday.  He is survived by a wife and six children. (Bardwell, Ky.)

Aunt Jennie Hodge, colored, died of heart trouble at her home here Saturday.  Aunt Jennie has long been a resident of Bardwell and was highly respected by all who knew her.  (Bardwell)

Friday, 22 Mar 1918:
D. W. SAMMONS DIED AT THEBES LAST NIGHT
Old Resident of County Passed Away at Age of 70 Years

D. W. Sammons, an old resident of Alexander County, died at his home at Thebes, at 8:30 o'clock last night, at the age of 70 years.  The deceased leaves a widow and four daughters, three of them married and the other, Ruth, aged 8 years, who lived at home with her parents.  His widow was formerly Miss Scenea Felter, of Cairo.

Mr. Sammons also leaves two brothers, John A. Sammons, formerly of Cairo, but now of Thebes, and D. Sammons, of Olive Branch.

(Webster Sammons married Louisa J Baygard on 15 Sep 1870, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Webster Sammons married Malinda A. Rose on 4 Apr 1883, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Thebes Cemetery reads:  Daniel Webster Sammons Born Feb. 10, 1848 Died March 21, 1918.—Darrel Dexter)

FATHER OF JUDGE W. A. WALL DEAD
James B. Wall Passed Away at Mound City This Morning

James B. Wall, aged 75 years, father of Judge William A. Wall, of Mound City, passed away at his home there at 2:18 o'clock this morning.  He had been in failing health for over a year and on Thursday of last week he was taken down with pneumonia, from which he was unable to recover.

Religious services will be held at the residence in Mound City Saturday at 10 a.m., conducted by Rev. J. B. Johnson, of the M. E. church and the remains will be taken to Mounds by automobile where the Illinois Central train will be taken at 11:35 for Anna.  Burial will be at the family burying ground at Western Saratoga beside his wife who passed away twenty years ago.  Funeral services will be held at the old home conducted by Rev. W. C. Locker, pastor of the Missionary Baptist Church there.

Mr. Wall was a native of Lebanon, Tenn., where he was born on Sept. 2, 1842.  He removed to Union County with his parents and spent the greater part of his life there as a farmer at Western Saratoga.  About twelve years ago he retired and moved to Mound City, where he has since lived with his son, Sherman B. Wall.

Four daughters are also left besides the two sons.  They are Mrs. Maude Southall, of Louisville, Mrs. Minnie Adams, of Centralia, Mrs. Rhoda Pender, of Western Saratoga, and Mrs. Clem Wright, of Lick Creek.

Mr. Wall was a member of the Baptist Church at Mound City.  E. A. Burke, of Cairo, is in charge of the burial.

(James Wall married Ann E. Wright on 4 Oct 1863, in Union Co., Ill.  Eli Keith, son of Amos Keith and Mary Crayton, married Rhoda Agnes Wall, 21, born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of James Wall and Annie Wright, on 15 Mar 1891, in Union Co., Ill.  W. M. Pender married Mrs. Rhoda Keith on 1 Oct 1899, in Johnson Co., Ill.  His marker in Wall Cemetery near Western Saratoga reads:  James B. Wall 1842-1918 Father.—Darrel Dexter)

OLD CAIRO CITIZEN DIES IN NEW YORK
Jacob A. Goldstine Passed Away Thursday—Burial Here Tuesday.

Jacob A. Goldstine, former Cairoite and at one time leading dry goods merchant in this section, passed away at his home in New York Thursday noon.  The infirmities of age are believed to have caused his death.

The body will be brought back to Cairo and buried in Villa Ridge cemetery.  Miss Rose Goldstine, daughter of the deceased, and Chester White, grandson, will accompany the remains here, arriving Tuesday morning.  The funeral arrangements here will be in charge of the Masonic order, Mr. Goldstine having kept up his membership in Cairo Commandary, No. 14, Knights Templar, until his death.

Mr. Goldstine was born in Hungary on Aug. 17, 1832, and was 86 years at his death.

Mr. Goldstine received a liberal education in the schools of his native land and on May 22, 1859, he was married to Miss Mary Roth.  Two daughters were born and with his wife and children in 1863 Mr. Goldstine came to America.  First locating in Cleveland, Ohio, he removed to Cairo on Feb. 10, 1864, and the following year formed a partnership with Samuel Rosenwater, and the firm of Goldstine & Rosenwater was for years the leading dry goods store in this whole section.

Mr. Goldstine took active part in the life of the community.  He was a member of the Cairo Board of Education for many years.  His daughters, of whom, Miss Anna Goldstine, afterward married Samuel White, both attended and graduated from Vassar College.

After his retirement from the dry goods business here, Mr. Goldstine for a time conducted a book store, later moving to New York where he has lived quietly since, with his wife and daughter Miss Rosa.

Upon the arrival of the body at 6 o'clock Tuesday morning, it will be taken to Mrs. Falconer's undertaking parlors, where it will lie in state until 9 o'clock.

At 9:30 o'clock it will be taken by Illinois Central train to Villa Ridge cemetery, where burial will be under the auspices of Cairo lodge No. 237, A. F. & A. M. Worshipful Master S. G. Richardson will conduct the services.  There will be a Knight Templar escort.  Friends of Mr. Goldstine and family are invited to attend the burial.

(Samuel White married Anna B. Goldstine on 24 Jun 1891, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Jacob A. Goldstine 1832-1918 Our Father.—Darrel Dexter)

NEPHEW OF DR. DUNN DIES FOR COUNTRY
Andrew Donna Scaggs, of Aviation Corps Killed in France

Andrew Donna Scaggs, of Tyler, Texas, who was killed in an aviation fight in France recently, was a nephew of Dr. J. W. Dunn, of 229 Sixth Street.  The young man was but twenty-one and give up his life for our country.  In appreciation of this there was a big memorial meeting in Tyler, when for the first time in history, stated a Tyler paper, "Ministers of every denomination spoke from the same platform, honoring the first citizen of Tyler who gave up his life on the battlefield of France."

Mrs. Herman Buckner has returned from Memphis, Tenn. where she was called by the death of her sister.  (Charleston, Mo.)

Saturday, 23 Mar 1918:
The funeral services of Mrs. Joseph Turbaville, who passed away at her home in South Delaware Avenue Wednesday morning after a short illness with appendicitis, were held Friday afternoon at the Methodist church at 1:30.  Rev. G. A. Funn, the pastor officiated.  At the close of the services the funeral party accompanied by a large number of friends, proceeded to the I. C. depot, where No. 6 was taken for Pulaski, where interment was made in the Rose Cemetery.  (Mounds)

CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank our friends for their kind assistance in our late bereavement, the death of our wife and mother, Mrs. Edie Jane Turbaville.  Their help to us doing her illness and their sympathy at all times has been a great comfort to us.
Joseph Turbaville and Family

Otis Turbaville was called home Thursday from Camp Taylor by the death of his mother, Mrs. Joseph Turbaville.  (Mounds)

Mrs. George Ulins, of Pine Bluff, Ark., arrived Thursday to attend the funeral services of her sister, Mrs. Joseph Turbaville, which were held Friday afternoon.  (Mounds)

Mrs. Ambrose Myers died at her home here (Bardwell, Ky.) Tuesday night after a few hours illness of acute indigestion.  Funeral services were conducted at the Baptist church Thursday afternoon by Rev. B. T. Huey after which the body was interred in the Bardwell Cemetery.

Miss Clyde Garner, of Paducah, came home Tuesday to attend the burial of her grandmother, Mrs. Lizzie Moore.  (Bardwell, Ky.)

Monday, 25 Mar 1918:
ELCO WOMAN LOSES ONLY TWO SONS
Mrs. Eliza Sackett Twice Bereaved within Four Months

Mrs. Eliza Sackett, widow of the late James L. Sackett, has recently lost both of her sons by death.  The lived on the Sackett farm one mile south of Elco in this county.

James L. Sackett, aged nearly 41 years, died in Chicago, Nov. 17, while on his way home from a sanitarium at Buffalo, where he had been hoping to obtain relief from tuberculosis from which he had been a sufferer for several years.  George B. Sackett also died in Chicago, where he had gone to receive medical treatment.  He was also 46 years of age.

Mrs. Sackett is left alone on her farm.  Her four daughters are Miss Minnie Sackett, of Waco, Texas; Mrs. Silas Slack, San Gabriel, Calif., Mrs. P. T. Loeschner, of Tamms.

(James L. Sackett married Eliza J. Anson on 24 Mar 1858, in St. Clair Co., Ill.  William F. Dunning married Clara M. Sackett on 5 Jul 1895, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Silas Slack married Mrs. Clara M. Dunning on 16 Sep 1899, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Paul Loeschner married Rosa S. Sackett on 7 Feb 1886, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Two markers in Hazlewood Cemetery near Elco read:  James L. Sackett Born July 14, 1877 Died Nov. 18, 1917.  Peace Be Thine.  George R. Sackett Born Dec. 8, 1878 Died March 17, 1918.  Peace Be Thine.—Darrel Dexter)

CARD OF THANKS

We wish to express our thanks and appreciation to the many friends who were so kind and untiring in their devotion during the illness and death of our loved one.
James A. Hoffman and children
Mrs. Mary Major
Mrs. Josie Swayne

Carl Truman, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Noah Talley, died at the home in the Drainage District Friday.  The funeral was held Saturday, Rev. J. B. Johnson, of the Methodist Church, officiating.  Burial was made in Beech Grove Cemetery.  Mrs. W. O. Talley of Grand Chain was in attendance at the funeral.  (Mound City)

Tuesday, 26 Mar 1918:
C. F. PHELPS WAS BURIED AT WICKLIFFE

Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Lyons, of Chicago, Ill., and Mrs. Lyon's daughter, Mrs. Howard Kendee, and little son Billy, are visiting Mr. and Mrs. Paul Phelps of 422 Tenth Street.  They came down with the body of C. F. Phelps, whose death and funeral took place in Chicago one month ago.  He was placed in the vault in Oakland Cemetery.  He was buried yesterday in the family lot at Wickliffe, Ky.  They will remain for a few days visiting Mr. and Mrs. Phelps and other relatives.  C. F. Phelps was the father of Mrs. Lyons and Paul Phelps.

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR J. A. GOLDSTINE
Remains of Former Cairoite Laid at Rest at Villa Ridge

Funeral services over the remains of the late Jacob A. Goldstine were held this morning at Mrs. Falconer's undertaking establishment on Sixth Street, where they were taken immediately upon their arrival from New York at 6 o'clock this morning.

The services were conducted by S. G. Richardson, Worshipful Master of the Cairo Lodge, A. F. and A. M., and with an escort from Cairo Commandary, No. 51, Knights Templar, the body was taken by special train to Villa Ridge cemetery for interment.

Samuel White came on from New York to attend the funeral and Chester White, his son, and Miss Rosa Goldstine, accompanied the body of their grandfather and father back to Cairo.

Mrs. Maude Southal, who was called home from Louisville on account of the illness and death of her father, was the guest of her sister, Mrs. Adams, at Centralia on her way back to school.  (Mound City)

Daniel Webster Sammons was born in Alexander County February 10, A.D. 1848 and died March 21, A. D. 1918.

He leaves surviving him Asenath Sammons, his widow, and three daughters, Mrs. Charles H. Clifford, of Cleveland, Ohio, Mrs. Richard T. Emmerson, of Nameoki, Ill., and Ruth Sammons.  Three former companions and eight children have preceded him in death.  He united with the Baptist Church in 1879 and was a member at his death.  Burial was at Thebes on March 23.


Card of Thanks

We desire to express our thanks to friends and all who assisted us in any way during the long illness and death of our husband and father and for the beautiful floral offerings.
Mrs. D. N. Sammons and Family

Wednesday, 27 Mar 1918:
SWITCHMAN KILLED AT MOUNDS TODAY
Barney Pickett Caught Between Two Cars and Crushed to Death

Barney Pickett, a switchman, was killed at Mounds at 5:30 this morning while at work on the repair rack.  He was caught between two cars and crushed to death.  He died immediately.

Pickett was 24 years old and leaves a wife who boards with the Frizelles at 314 Eighteenth Street in Cairo.  He made arrangements to move his residence to Mounds next week.

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We wish to thank our many friends for their kind and loving expressions of sympathy for the death of our beloved mother and wife.  We also wish to thank those who sent the beautiful floral offerings.

J. J Webster

Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Brisben

Harry O. Webster


Mrs. G. C. Trammell received word of the death of her nephew, Louis Bowman.  He was in the aviation service and met his death in an accident at Kelley Field.  (Mound City)

 

Mrs. Allie Watwood, who has been ill for several weeks from dropsy, died March 16.  She leaves two brothers, Mr. Gene Watwood, of this city, and Mr. Henry Watwood, of Jefferson City Mo., also several nieces and nephews and a host of friends to mourn her loss.  She was buried at the Wickliffe cemetery, the funeral services being conducted by Rev. Rudolph.  (Wickliffe, Ky.)

Miss Nina Cross, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Cross, of Birds Point, Mo., who died Friday of pneumonia, was brought here (Wickliffe, Ky.) for burial.

Mr. Calvin Voyles, of Greenfield, Tenn., is the new agent sent here (Wickliffe, Ky.) to fill the vacancy left by the death of R. L. Scott.  His wife and little son, Marcus, who have been visiting him, left Tuesday. 

Thursday, 28 Mar 1918:
INFANT SON DIES IN NEW ORLEANS
Child of John A. Hofheinz Passes Away Tuesday Morning

The infant son of John A. Hofheinz, died in New Orleans Tuesday according to a message received by Cairo friends today.

Mr. Hofheinz was recently transferred from New Orleans to Memphis, where he has charge of the Columbia graphophone department in a large department store.  His wife and baby have been with Mrs. Hofheniz's parents in New Orleans and expected to join him in Memphis this spring.  The little fellow underwent a surgical operation last week and was thought to be getting along nicely when the news of his death came.  Mr. Hofheinz was in Cairo, his old home recently called by the death of his brother, Fred Hofheinz.

SWITCHMAN's BODY BURIED AT BARDWELL

The remains of Barney Pickett, switchman who was killed at Mounds Wednesday morning, were taken to Bardwell, Ky., today for burial there.

Bob Anderson died at his home here (Bardwell, Ky.) Monday morning after a lingering illness of stomach trouble.  He leaves surviving him his wife and two children, Mrs. G. E. Fisher and Robert, Jr.  The funeral services were conducted at the house by Rev. Keener Rudolph, after which the remains were interred in the Bardwell cemetery.

Mrs. Ben Adams left Tuesday for her home at Chase City, Va., in answer to a telegram calling her to the bedside of her father, who is seriously ill at that place.  (Bardwell, Ky.)

Friday, 29 Mar 1918:
WOMAN EXONERATED IN CHILD'S DEATH
18-Year-Old Mother Came to Cairo from Kentucky Point

An inquest was held this morning over the body of the infant found dead in the rear of the Green Tree Hotel Thursday afternoon and a verdict returned by the coroner's jury that the child was stillborn, removing the mother from any liability as to its death.

The child was found by the housekeeper at the hotel Thursday morning and reported to the proprietor who in turn notified Officer Fitzhugh.  Fitzhugh went to the hotel, heard the story of the dining of the body and found that the mother was Mrs. Guy Major, of Lutesville, Ky., according to her statements.    The officer took her to police headquarters where she was detained, pending investigation.

He called Dr. Clarke and the two viewed the body and then interviewed the mother.  The coroner was notified and the inquest set for nine o'clock this morning.

Testifying before the coroner's jury, the proprietor and housekeeper of the hotel stated the woman, who is but 18 years of age, had been given a room Tuesday night she had applied for work and been told that the hotel was not in need of help at the time.  From Tuesday until the time of finding the body, neither heard any disturbance in the room.  When the body was found, the mother was about to leave the city.

The mother laid the coroner’s jury at St. Mary’s Infirmary this morning, where she is being cared for, that she had come to Cairo to look for work.  She denied knowing of her condition and stated she came from Lutesville, Ky.  She was unable to say where the town was located beyond the fact that it was a small place without a station in the coal mining territory.  She declared the child was dead when born Tuesday night.

Miss Rosa Goldstine, who came to Cairo a few days ago to accompany the remains of her father, the late Jacob Goldstine, left Wednesday for her home in New York City.

Rilas Roberson, one of Columbus' prominent negroes, was placed in jail here (Clinton, Ky.) this week, charged with causing the death of his wife.  Joe W. Bennett, S. V. Craig, and John R. Evans, are defending him.

 

Saturday, 30 Mar 1918:

Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Anglin lost their infant son 11 months old the first of the week from a severe attack of measles and complications.  (Pulaski)

 

Barney Pickett was killed by a switch engine and Mounds Tuesday night.  He was a grandson of Capt. R. Randol of this place (Bardwell, Ky.)  The remains were brought for interment Thursday.

 

REV. HARDISON’S WIFE PASSED AWAY

             Mrs. J. A Hardison, wife of Rev. S. A. Hardison, pastor of the A. M. E. Church on Seventeenth Street, died at her home, 2715 Park Avenue, at 10:25 Thursday morning and funeral services will be held from the residence at 8:45 o’clock tonight.  The body will be taken to her former home at Minneapolis, Minn., for interment.  Malarial fever and a general rundown condition resulted in her death.

             Mrs. Hardison is survived by her husband and mother and a brother, who lives in Minneapolis.


Monday, 1 Apr 1918:
BROTHER OF CORPORAL LIEBERMANN DEAD
Body of Boy Missing Five Weeks Found Drowned Near Chicago

Corporal Arthur Liebermann, officer in charge of the Cairo Recruiting Station of the United States Army, received a message this morning from his home in Chicago stating the body of his brother, William, aged 15 years, had been found near Chicago.  The body had been missing from home for five weeks and was found drowned.

Corporal Liebermann had been informed that the lad started out on a hunting trip from his Chicago home five weeks ago and had not been seen again; a smaller boy who accompanied the party, also failed to return home.  It is thought possible by Corporal Liebermann that one or more others may have been missing also.  The telegram received this morning stated that the boy with others had been found drowned, giving the impression that the smaller boy and perhaps another had been also drowned.
According to the message, which was filed during the night, the mother had not yet been told of the finding of the body, but would be informed this morning.  Corporal Liebermann left for Chicago at 11 this morning.

FUNERAL SERVICES OF MRS. PERGANDE
Held Sunday Evening, Funeral Party to Metropolis This Morning

The funeral services of Mrs. Fannie Pergrande, who died Saturday night at the home of her sister, Mrs. E. C. Miller, were held Sunday night at 9:30 o'clock, conducted by Rev. C. Robert Dunlap, pastor of the Immanuel Lutheran Church.  Interment was made at Metropolis this morning.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Entered into rest—March 31, 1918—Mrs. Martha B. Richardson, age 81 years, at family residence, 524 35th Street.  Funeral services will be conducted by Rev. J. S. Clements, pastor of Christian Church, at the residence, Tuesday, April 2nd, at 1:30 p.m.  Special interurban train will leave 34th and Washington Avenue at 2 o'clock p.m. Interment Beech Grove Cemetery.  Friends of family invited.

TELL CITY MAN DIED AT SON'S HOME HERE
Jacob Hauenstein, Father of Edward Hauenstein Died Sunday Morning.

Jacob Hauenstein, of Tell City, Ind., father of Edward Hauenstein, of 502 Commercial Avenue, of this city, died at the home of his son at 2 o'clock Sunday morning at the age of 76 years.  He died of capillary bronchitis, after an illness of about a week.  He arrived a week ago from Tell City to visit his son.

Surviving the deceased are five sons, Edward, of Cairo, Charles, of Davenport, Iowa, Albert, of Tell City, Ind., John, of Kent, Ohio, and Harry, of Akron, Ohio.

Funeral services were conducted by Rev. C. Robert Dunlap at 9 o'clock at the undertaking parlors of Karcher Brothers.  The body was shipped to Tell City, Ind., this morning, over the Big Four Railroad. Accompanying the body were Mr. and Mrs. Edward Hauenstein and Mrs. Willie Oehler and son.

MRS. M. B. RICHARDSON DIES SUDNAY EVENING
Funeral Services to Be Held Tuesday Afternoon at Residence

Mrs. Martha V. Richardson died Sunday night at 7:30 o'clock at the home of her son, Thomas T. Richardson, 524 Thirty-fourth Street, after an illness of several months due to the infirmities of old age.
She was 81 years of age and was born in Christian County, Ky., March 27, 1837.  She came to Cairo from Bardwell, Ky., in 1889.  Her husband, Samuel F. Richardson, died ten years ago.  Mrs. Richardson has been a member of the Christian Church for sixty years.

Mrs. Richardson leaves surviving her seven children, three daughters Mrs. Adelaide R. Buchanan, of Cairo, Mrs. Sue H. Olinger, and Mrs. R. H. Sharp, of Chicago, and four sons, Thomas T. and Samuel G. Richardson, of Cairo, R. A. Richardson, of Kansas City, Mo., and J. S. Richardson, of Tampa, Fla.  Mrs. Olinger and R. A. Richardson arrived in Cairo before their mother's death and Mrs. Sharp arrived this morning.  Mr. J. S. Richardson will be unable to get here for the funeral.

Funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at the residence, 524 Thirty-fifth Street, conducted by Rev. J. S. Clements, pastor of the First Christian Church.  The funeral party will go in a special interurban car to Beech Grove Cemetery where interment will be made.

The pall bearers are Messrs. H. C. Steinel, David Johns, Ed Riddle, C. C. Terrell, R. P. Flack, and William Bryant.

E. A. Burke is in charge of the funeral arrangements.

(Paschal S. Buchanan married Addie L. Richardson on 5 Mar 1890, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Tuesday, 2 Apr 1918:
FUENRAL SERVICES FOR MRS. RICHARDSON

Funeral services were held this afternoon for Mrs. Martha B. Richardson, whose death occurred Sunday night.  The services were held at the family residence, 524 Thirty-fifth Street, by Rev. J. S. Clements, pastor of the First Christian Church, and burial was at Beech Grove Cemetery.

Wednesday, 3 Apr 1918:
FOUR WERE KILLED IN CYCLONE WHICH SWEPT HICKMAN CO.
Property Loss Amounting to $75,000 Result of Severe Storm Last Night
ROBERT JACKSON'S HOME WAS WRECKED
And His Wife and Two Children and Another Lady Killed by Falling Wreckage

CLINTON, Ky., April 3—Four persons were killed and property to the value of $75,000 was destroyed in a storm that swept over Hickman County about 8:30 last night, traveling from the northwest to the southeast.

The dead are:  Mrs. Robert Jackson, two Jackson children, Mrs. Delia Courtney.

The dead were in the Jackson home three miles northwest of Clinton.  Mr. Jackson was in Clinton at the time.  A young man who was in the house at the time picked up one of the Jackson children, who was sick and taking another child with him, escaped from the house.  The others remained in the house and were instantly killed or so badly injured that they died later.

The storm spent itself before it reached Wingo.

Mrs. Jackson is the fourth victim in one family to lose their lives in a cyclone within a year, her sister, Mrs. Wheeler, having lost her life in the last cyclone.

Mrs. G. C. Trammell left Sunday for Centralia, Ill., where she joined her sister, Mrs. Williams, and they went to Washington, D.C., and there they met their brother and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Bauhman, and the remains of Louis Bauhman, who met his death in an accident in an airplane at Miami, Fla.   He will have a military funeral and will be interred in the National Cemetery at Arlington, Va., Tuesday.  (Mound City)

Thursday, 4 Apr 1918:
MERCHANT KILLS SELF

PADUCAH, Ky., April 4.—Presumed to have been despondent over ill health, Ed Hall, 45 years of age, a well-known merchant of Ballard County, Ky., shot and killed himself.  He had been in bad health for several months.  The deceased is survived by his wife and three children.

JULIUS MYERS DIED AT INFIRMARY TODAY
Brother of Al Myers Passed Away of Blood Poisoning

Julius Myers, brother of Al Myers, of the Gem Theater, died at 3 o'clock this afternoon of blood poisoning.  He had been a patient at St. Mary’s Infirmary for a couple of weeks and his death was not unexpected as his physician held out no hope of his recovery.

Mr. Myers had been in poor health for a number of years.  He spent some time in the southwest and gained in strength, so that he was able to come to Cairo and assist his brother in the management of the two playhouses here, the Gem and the Kimmel.  It was while at work that he injured one of his hands and though it was thought to be slight at the time, blood poison set in and soon his condition became a matter of serious concern.  He was taken to the hospital and given every attention, without avail.

The deceased was unmarried and leaves four brothers. Sam, Al, Rob and Ed Myers, besides a sister, Mrs. Keller.

(Abe Keller married Annie B. Meyers on 28 May 1885, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

The year-old daughter of Will Adams died Friday and was buried Saturday in the city cemetery. (Clinton, Ky.)

The Adjutant General of George Curry's regiment cabled to his sister and his sister received a letter from the Red Cross nurse this week who took care of him.  George's wounds are healing finely and he was allowed a short walk the day the nurse wrote.  The nurse assured his sister that he had the best of care.  (Curry)

One of Grandma Curry's sons was struck and killed last Monday night. (Curry)

Friday, 5 Apr 1918:

MRS. JULIA MORRIS DIES AT SON'S HOME

Mrs. Julia Morris, widow of George G. Morris, 426 Twenty-fifth Street, died Thursday night at 7:30 after a brief illness due to the infirmities of old age.  She was past 85 years and was born in Madison, Ind., Jan. 21, 1834.  She moved with her husband, the late George Morris to Mound City in 1866 and from there to Cairo in 1886, where she has resided since.  Her husband died some twenty-five years ago.  She passed away at the home of her son, J. J. Morris, 426 Twenty-Fifth Street.

The funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon at 1:45 o'clock at the residence, 426 Twenty-fifth Street.  A special interurban car will leave Twenty-fifth and Commercial Avenue at 2:30 for Beech Grove Cemetery, where interment will be made.  Karcher Brothers are in charge of the arrangements.

MRS. CLARA McGAHEY DIES IN ST. LOUIS
Former Cairo Resident Passes Away Early This Morning

Mrs. Clara McGahey. of St. Louis, died this morning at 2 o'clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. M. Johnson, in St. Louis, after an illness of about ten weeks following a paralytic stroke.  Mrs. McGahey was for many years a resident of Cairo, having left here several years since to reside in St. Louis.  She was 80 years old.  Mrs. McGahey was a sister of Mrs. A. S. Ent, of Cairo, and leaves surviving her her daughter, Mrs. Johnson, and son, Mark McGahey, both of St. Louis.  Her grandson, Raymond G. Abell, of Cairo, was at her bedside when she died.

(Alexander G. Abell married Nellie McGahey on 22 Aug 1883, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

JULIUS MYERS TO BE BURIED IN BROOKLYN
Remains Taken Today for Interment There Sunday Afternoon

The body of Julius Myers, whose death occurred Thursday afternoon was taken by Illinois Central train today on its way to New York, where burial will be Sunday afternoon in the beautiful Mount Pleasant Cemetery in Brooklyn, in the family lot, where his father, the late Herman Meyers and mother are buried.

Al Meyers and Robert Meyers and Mrs. A. Keller, brothers and sister of the deceased, accompanied the remains.

Mr. Meyers, who was a native Cairoite, was associated with his father here in the wholesale tobacco business and later in the same line in Cincinnati and St. Louis.  It was when ill health took him to the southwest that he located at Flagstaff, Arizona.  He was a member of the Elks Lodge of that place.

Mrs. C. A. Stotts was called to Hot Springs, Ark., on Monday by the death of her brother-in-law, N. M. Moody.  (Charleston, Mo.)

CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank our friends for their kind assistance in our late bereavement, the death of our brother, Julius Meyers.  Their help to us during his illness and their sympathy at all times has been a great comfort to us.
The Meyers Family

FUNERAL NOTICE

Morris—Died:  Mrs. Julia Morris, April 5, at home of her son, J. J. Morris, 426 Twenty-fifth Street.  Funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon at 1:45 at the residence, conducted by Rev. John W. Coontz, pastor of the First Methodist Church.  Special interurban car will leave Twenty-fifth and Commercial Avenue at 2:30 for Beech Grove Cemetery, where interment will be made.

Saturday, 6 Apr 1918:
LOGAN PARHAM DIED OF PNEUMONIA FRIDAY

Logan Parham, well known locally, died at the home of his mother, Friday night at 8:40 o'clock.  He has been ill of pneumonia for some time.  He has been secretary for the Cairo Bartenders Union for some time.  He was bartender at J. F. C. Berbling's saloon at Twelfth Street and Commercial Avenue, until the place was closed at the first of the year.

The body was taken to the E. A. Burke parlors and prepared for burial.

MRS. ELLA HUMITSCH DIES IN NEW YORK
Body to Be Cremated and Placed in Evergreen Cemetery Sunday

Mrs. Ella M. Mumitsch died at her home in New York City early Thursday morning, the cause of her death being despondency over the death of her husband, who died about three months ago.  She had grieved continually over his death and for various reasons it is thought that the step was planned several weeks ago.

She was the daughter of M. J. Farnbaker, of Cairo, and leaves surviving her besides her father, her brother, Fred Farnbaker, and her grandfather, Smith Torrance, of Cairo.  Mrs. Humitsch was in Cairo in October 1916 during the last illness and death of her stepmother, Mrs. M. J. Farnbaker.

The body will be cremated according to her expressed wish and the ashes placed in the urn with the ashes of her husband and deposited in Evergreen Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y., Sunday, April 7.  This request was made of the executrix of her estate, Mrs. Laura King Gibney.

Carl Humber and wife have gone to St. Louis to attend the burial of Mr. Humber's brother, who was killed in San Domingo. Mr. Humber was a member of the U. S. Marines and was stationed in San Domingo and during an uprising of the natives there he was killed.  His home was in St. Louis and his remains were brought back to that city for burial.  (Bardwell, Ky.)

COLUMBUS KY. BOY DIED AT ST. MARY'S
Herbert Bershers Died after Operation for Appendicitis

Herbert Bershers, son of G. B. Bershers, of Columbus, Ky., died at the age of 16 years at St. Mary’s Infirmary at 3 o'clock Friday afternoon, after an operation for appendicitis.  His father, a prominent farmer of near Columbus, was with him at death.  The remains were taken to Burke's undertaking parlors and prepared for burial.  The father took the body home this morning and interment will probably take place Sunday.

BUD JOHNSON BRIDGE WATCHMAN, RUN DOWN
Killed When He Steps in Path of Train Owing to Poor Vision

"Bud" Johnson, aged 55 years, was run down and killed on the Missouri Pacific bridge at Thebes Friday at 8:40 o'clock when he stepped in front of an eastbound Missouri Pacific train.  The Missouri Pacific train arrived at the bridge approach on the east bound track, but a Cotton Belt train running west on the wrong track, because of temporary congestion, it is said, forced the Missouri Pacific train on the wrong track.

Johnson, who is said to have been near-sighted, stepped on the west bound track, thinking that it would not be used by the eastbound train, and was run down and killed.  His body was badly mutilated, his head being crushed and his right foot cut off at the ankle.  He leaves a wife and five children.

SIKESTON MAN KILLED IN ST. LOUIS MONDAY
Was Robbed, Shot, and Finished by Automobile

ST. LOUIS, Mo., April 6—William Wright, 52, of Sikeston, Mo., came to St. Louis last Saturday to see the city.  On the same day he reported to the police that he had been robbed of $80.

On Monday he was stuck by an automobile at Ninth and St. Clair streets, and was killed.  S. Sachs, 1167 Walton, who was driving the machine, testified at the inquest today that he was going very slowly and that Wright, who seemed to be in a dazed condition, stepped directly in front of the car.  An examination showed that Wright had been shot, not later than Sunday.  No clues to the shooting has been found.

FUNERAL NOTICE

McGahey—Died in St. Louis, Friday, April 5, Mrs. Carrie McGahey.

Remains will be brought down to Beech Grove Cemetery on Illinois Central train No. 5, Sunday afternoon and burial will be on arrival of the train.  Cairo friends invited to attend.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—April 5, 1918, Logan L. Parham, age 30 years.  Funeral services will be conducted by Rev. C. Robert Dunlap, pastor Lutheran Church, at E. A. Burke's undertaking parlors, Sunday, April 7, 1918, at 2 p.m.

Special interurban cars will leave at 2:30 p.m.  Interment Beech Grove Cemetery.  Friends invited.

NOTICE BARTENDERS

All members of local 627 Bartenders' International League are hereby notified to meet at their hall Sunday, April 17, at 1 o'clock p.m. to attend the funeral of our late brother and secretary Logan Parham.  A large attendance is requested.  By order of
F. A. Crisp, President
C. S. McCann, Chairman-Trustee

Monday, 8 Apr 1918:
COL. GUTHRIE DIED TODAY AT CAMP TAYLOR

Camp Taylor, Ky., April 8—Col. William L. Guthrie, of the 309th Engineers, died today of pneumonia.

Mr. and Mrs. Morgan Johnson, and daughter, Miss Catherine, Mr. and Mrs. Alex G. Abell and Mr. and Mrs. Mar McGahey, of St. Louis, who came down Sunday morning to attend the funeral of the late Mrs. Carrie McGahey left Sunday night for their homes.  Mrs. W. E. Matthews, of Kansas City, who also came down for the funeral, will remain in Cairo for a few days’ visit with relatives.


Mrs. G. C. Trammell returned Saturday evening from Washington, D.C., where she went to attend the funeral of a nephew, who was killed in an airplane accident in Florida, where he was in training. The body was interred in the Arlington Cemetery, a national burying ground.  (Mound City)

Wednesday, 10 Apr 1918:
MISS MARY McELLIGOTT DIES THIS MORNING
Passes Away at Home after Illness of Three Years

Miss Mary Catherine McElligott died this morning at 12:45 o'clock at her home, 221 Twelfth Street, after a lingering illness of three years.  She was born September 3, 1884, and leaves surviving her mother, Mrs. Fanny McEliggott, three sisters, Mrs. Gus Swoboda, Mrs. George Shafer, and Miss Lucy McElligott, and four brothers, John, Harry, Maurice and Joseph McElligott, all of Cairo.

The funeral services will be held Friday morning at 8:15 o'clock at St. Patrick’s Church, Rev. Father Downey officiating.  The funeral cortege will take a special Illinois Central train to Villa Ridge where interment will be made.

MATTOON CORPORAL COMMITS SUICIDE

Fort Benjamin Harrison, Ind., April 10—Corporal Hogan, of Mattoon, killed himself by shooting here Thursday, April 4.  He was with the 10th United States regulars.  He had been despondent for some time.

Private Loren Stevens was called home from Camp Taylor, Ky., on account of the death of his infant son.  (Olmsted)

Thursday, 11 Apr 1918:
FUNERAL NOTICE

McElligott—Died in this city, Tuesday, April 10, 1918, Mary K. McElligott.

Funeral services will be held at St. Patrick’s Church at 8:15 o'clock Friday morning, conducted by Rev. J. J. Downey.  The funeral cortege will leave the residence, 221 Twelfth Street, at 8 o'clock for the church.

Special Illinois Central train will leave Fourteenth and Ohio streets for Villa Ridge at 9:15 o'clock where interment will be made in Calvary Cemetery.

Friends of the family are invited.

The pallbearers will be Frank Schaefer, Andy Schaefer, Ike LaHue, Arthur Kessler, John Tidwell, William Bambrick, John Lehning, and Will Langan.

(A marker in Calvary Cemetery in Villa Ridge reads:  Mary Catherine McElligott Died April 9, 1918.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. W. L. Toler received word on Monday that her nephew, Lieut. John Cabot Blood, was seriously wounded March 22 in action on the battlefield of France.  Lieut. Blood had visited in Mounds several years ago.  (Mounds)

Scott Minnich, only son of Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Minnich, who were old residents at this place (Villa Ridge), but now reside in Fairhope, Alabama, died in Detroit, Mich., April 3, after a short illness of pneumonia.  The remains accompanied by his father, mother and uncle, A. B. Brown, of St. Louis, arrived on No. 5 Monday, where they were met by a large concourse of old friends and acquaintances.  Funeral services were held at the grave conducted by Rev. J. P. Galvin, of Mounds.

(William P. Minnich married Emma G. Brown on 5 Dec 1881, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Word was received here (Wickliffe, Ky.) today telling of the death of Taylor Rollins, who was stationed at Camp Pike.  None of the particulars could be found out, but he was one of the first lot of drafted men sent from here to Camp Taylor.

Friday, 12 Apr 1918:
W. R. SMITH DIES EARLY THIS MORNING

W. R. Smith, aged 64 years, died this morning at 12:30 o'clock at his home, 618 Thirty-seventh Street, after an illness of some time of heart trouble.  He is survived by his wife.  The funeral services will be held tonight at 8 o'clock at the residence conducted by Rev. M. L. Turner.  The remains will be taken Saturday morning on the Illinois Central to Metropolis, where interment will be made.  E. A. Burke has charge of the funeral arrangements.

SIKESTON MAN DIED AT ST. MARY'S THURSDAY
Body Shipped to Sikeston this Afternoon for Burial.

Joseph Seufert, aged 62 years, of Sikeston, Mo., died Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at St. Mary’s Infirmary, after an illness of four weeks, the last two weeks of which he had been in the hospital.

He is a farmer of near Sikeston, and leaves his wife, Mrs. Dillie Seufert, two brothers, Frank, of St. Louis, and Adam, of Texas, and two sisters, Mary and Sofa.

The body was taken to Karcher Brothers undertaking parlors and prepared for burial.  William Ramsey, a son-in-law, accompanied the body to Sikeston this afternoon, where burial will take place Saturday.

FUNERAL SERVICES HELD THIS MORNING
Miss Mary McElligott Laid to Rest at Calvary Cemetery

Funeral services of the late Miss Mary K. McElliggott were held this morning at 8:15 o'clock at St. Patrick’s Church, Rev. Father James J. Downey officiating.  The remains were taken in a special Illinois Central train to Villa Ridge where interment was made in Calvary cemetery.

The pallbearers were Messrs. Frank Schaefer, Andy Schaefer, Isaac LaHue, Arthur Kessler, John Tidwell, William Bambrick, John Lehning, and Will Langan.

Mr. and Mrs. Jerry McCarthy were called to St. Louis today by the illness and death of Mrs. D. May.  Mrs. May was the mother of Mrs. William Page, who has visited Cairo frequently the guest of Mrs. McCarthy.

(William Page married Agnes May on 26 Aug 1885, St. Clair Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

FUNERAL NOTICE

Smith—Died Friday morning, April 12, at his home, 618 Thirty-seventh Street, W. R. Smith, aged 64.  Funeral services will be held at the residence tonight at 8 o'clock conducted by Rev. M. L. Turner, pastor of the Calvary Baptist Church.  Interment at Metropolis, Ill., Saturday morning.

Saturday, 13 Apr 1918:
The funeral services of Taylor Rollins, who died at Camp Pike, Little Rock, Ark., after a short illness of meningitis and pneumonia, was held here (Wickliffe, Ky.) at the Baptist Church, Thursday afternoon at two o'clock.  Mr. Rollins was one of the first of our fine young men who were in the draft and stationed at Camp Taylor in the fall, he being recently moved to Camp Pike.  From the reports of his comrades he was greatly to be envied in his ability to carry out the maneuvers that they were being taught.  He had expected to leave for France in about two weeks and because he could not get a furlough he had asked his young wife, who was formerly Miss Gladys Maxbury, to come to Little Rock and in this way she was able to be at his bedside when the end came.  Besides his wife, he leaves a mother, Mrs. Webb Rollins, and nine brothers and one sister, and a host of friends, who will greatly mourn his loss.  Brother Pitman, of Blandville, preached the funeral and it was under Brother Pitman that Taylor joined the Baptist Church while in early childhood.  The floral offerings were beautiful.  Interment took place at the Wickliffe Cemetery, where his father and brother were buried.  The entire family, all the relatives, have our heart-felt sympathy during this hour of sad bereavement.

Monday, 15 Apr 1918:
CHARLESTON BOY DIES IN NAVY CAMP
John Favors Died of Pneumonia at Paris, Island

A telegram from Charleston, S.C., Monday to Mr. and Mrs. James Favors, of near Charleston, announced the death of their son, John Favors, in the U.S. Navy containment at Paris Island, the death being due to pneumonia, says the Charleston Enterprise Courier.

Favors is the first of the Mississippi County boys, so far as is known, who has made the "supreme sacrifice" in the nation’s service in the war.  He enlisted in the Marine Corps about two months ago.

RICHARD ALDRICH DIES IN KENTUCKY
Funeral to Be Held at Mound City

Richard Aldrich dropped dead on the street at his home in Sturgis, Ky., Sunday according to word received this morning.  The remains will arrive in Cairo on the Paducah train this evening and from here will be taken to Mound City, where the funeral services will be held at the home of Mrs. Will Allen, sister-in-law of Mr. Aldrich.  The funeral arrangements have not been announced as a daughter residing in Lilburn, Ky., has not been heard from.

PROMINENT FARMER DIES IN BARDWELL
John L. Tegethoff Passes Away Sunday after Brief Illness

BARDWELL, Ky., April 15.—John L. Tegethorff, a prominent farmer whose home was a mile from Bardwell, Ky., died Sunday after a brief illness of pneumonia.  Mr. Tegethorff was 70 years old and was born in Germany.  He came to America when fourteen and has lived near Bardwell since then.  He was a charter member of the Baptist church in Bardwell and has been a deacon in the church for the past 35 years.

He leaves surviving him five children, a daughter, Mrs. Will Haws, of Cunningham, Ky., and four sons, Ed, Robert, Lon and Floyd, of Bardwell.  Floyd is in training at Camp Zachary Taylor with the U. S. Army.  Mr. Tegethoff also leaves two brothers, Will L. Tegethoff, of Cairo, and Charles Tegethoff, of Bardwell, and a sister, Mrs. J. W. Dowd, who lives in Mississippi.

The funeral services were held this afternoon in the Baptist church, Rev. W. J. Gardner, of Martin, Tenn., officiating.

29 DEATHS IN CAIRO IN MONTH OF MARCH

City Health Officer Clarke reported that there were 29 deaths in Cairo in March.  Of the total, 21 were residents and 15 where whites and 14 were blacks.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Brown—Died April 15th at 4:30 a.m. Claude Allison Brown, age 11 months old, of measles, son of J. Ben Brown.

Funeral will be held at home of granddfather, Mr. Stone Jackson Tuesday, April 16.  Interment at Beech Grove Cemetery.  E. A. Burke has charge of arrangements.

CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank our friends for their kind assistance in our late bereavement, the death of our father, W. R. Smith.  Their help to us during his illness and their sympathy at all times has been a great comfort to us.
Mrs. W. R. Smith
Mrs. Rosa Clayton
Mrs. W. T. Hall

Tuesday, 16 Apr 1918:

Walter Hall, who was called to Cairo by the death of his grandfather, the late W. R. Smith, left today for his home in Quapaw, Okla.
 
Horace Bobo, one of the county’s most successful young farmers, died at his home, one mile southwest of town (Bardwell, Ky.) Thursday night, after a lingering illness of tuberculosis.  He leaves his mother, Mrs. Sallie Bobo and one brother, Paul, of Oklahoma, and a host of relatives who reside in this county.  The funeral services were conducted from the family residence Friday afternoon by Rev. Joe Ratcliffe, after which the remains were interred in the Bardwell Cemetery.
 
MISSOURI INFANT DIES AT ST. MARY'S
John Wesley Childers Died after Reaching Hospital.

John Wesley Childers, the 17-month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Childers, of Marshton, Mo., died at St. Mary's Infirmary Sunday night after an illness of pneumonia.  The child was brought to the hospital in a dying condition early Sunday.

The body was taken to Farensburg by the parents today, their former home, where burial will take place Tuesday.
  
Wednesday, 17 Apr 1918:
ARTHUR WINSDOR SHOT AND KILLED SON OF C. G. MILLER
Dupree Miller Died after Accidental Shooting Tuesday Night
BULLET PASSED THRU LEFT SIDE OF HEART
Ran to Street after Bullet Pierced Most Vital Organ

Dupree Miller, aged 16 years and a high school student, son of C. G. Miller, vice president of the Peterson Miller Box Company, was accidentally shot and killed last night by Arthur Windsor, aged 15 years, son of Nelson Winsdor, superintendent of the Singer Manufacturing Company veneer mills.  The shot was from an automatic revolver, of .25 caliber.

The parents of the two boys had left the children at home while attending the Liberty Loan meeting at the opera house and Dupree came from his home to play at the Winsdor residence, bringing the revolver with him.  He showed it to the others, including Arthur, on the lawn and later when the children went into the house to play.  The Miller boy removed the magazine from the gun, but left one shell in the magazine, unthinkingly and laid the gun on the table.  The gun was snapped several times by the children and a little later the Winsdor boy picked it up and snapped it again at Dupree.  The cartridge fired and Dupree shot through the heart, turned to run home.  He passed out the door, across the lawn, and fell at the grass plot on the edge of the gutter.  Dr. Bondurant, who was calling at the residence of H. H. Halliday, across the street, examined the boy, but saw that he was beyond assistance.  The bullet pierced the left ventricle of the heart and internal hemorrhage resulted in death in a few moments.

The magazine was found today, upstairs in the Winsdor home, where it had been carried by one of the children, showing that the gun had never been reloaded.  Why the cartridge did not explode during the first times it was snapped is unexplained.

The parents of both boys are prostrated and the young Winsdor boy refused to be comforted in the death of his playmate by his hand.  Lieut. Robert Miller, who is at Camp Grant, Clifton, at the University of Illinois ground school, and Allan, at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis., have been called home.  Allan is en route, while the other two brothers are expected to start as soon as they can obtain military leave.  It is thought all will be here some time tomorrow.
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

Miller—Died, April 16, 1918, Dupree Goodwin Miller, son of Clannie G. and Ethel M. Miller, aged 15 years and 10 months.

Funeral services will be held at the family residence, No. 2904 Elm Street, at 2:45 p.m. Thursday April 18.  Special interurban train will leave Elm and Twenty-eighth Streets for Beechwood Cemetery at 3:30 p.m.  Friends of the family are invited.
 
EUGENE CARTER DIED EARLY TODAY

Eugene Carter, aged 42, died at 3 o'clock this morning, at his residence, No. 307 Third Street.
He was employed at Lee Hicks place and was a member of the Bartenders' Union.  Funeral arrangements will be made upon advice from relatives who have been notified of the death.  E. A. Burke will have charge of the burial.
 
The funeral of Richard Aldridge, who died Sunday, at Sturgis, Ky., was held this afternoon from the home of Mr. and Mrs. Will Allen.  (Mound City)
 
The infant son of J. B. Brown was called by sudden death yesterday morning by an attack of measles.  (Miller City)
 
O. M. Dickerson was called to Mt. Vernon to his father's bedside by a sudden stroke of paralysis (Miller City).
  
Thursday, 18 Apr 1918:
FUNERAL SERVICES OF DUPREE MILLER

Funeral services were held this afternoon at the family residence over the remains of Dupree Miller, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Miller, whose tragic death shocked Cairo Thursday night.  Rev. A. T. Tomshany, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, officiated and the remains were taken by special interurban train for Beechwood Cemetery, where they were buried under a mound of the most beautiful flowers.
  
Friday, 19 Apr 1918:
MRS. McFADDEN DIES SUDDENLY
Funeral Services at Fulton, Ky., Saturday Afternoon

Mrs. Mary McFadden, aged 60 years, died suddenly at her home, 712 Thirty-fifth Street, Thursday.  She was apparently in good health and her death was a shock to her many friends in Cairo.  She leaves surviving her seven sons, Luther McFadden, of Mayfield, Ky., Allen McFadden, of Austin, Texas, Clarence, Leonard, Arthur, Walter and Eddie McFadden, all of Cairo.

Funeral services will be held Saturday at Fulton, Ky., conducted by a Missionary Baptist minister.  Interment will be made at McGuire Cemetery.  The funeral party leaves Cairo early Saturday morning for Fulton.
 
W. G. SPILLER DIES IN MURPHYSBORO
Father of Mrs. O. O. Rule Passes Away Early This Morning

Mr. W. G. Spiller, father of Mrs. Oris Rule, of Cairo, died this morning at his home in Murphysboro, after an illness of several months. He was 77 years of age.  Mr. and Mrs. Rule went to Murphysboro this morning to attend the funeral, which will be Saturday.  Mr. and Mrs. Spiller visited their daughter here last winter.

(William G. Spiller married Henrietta Murphy on 31 May 1866, in Jackson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Hattie Huff Cooper, wife of Claude Cooper, died here (Charleston, Mo.) Sunday night at her home on Cleveland Street.  The funeral was held at the First Baptist Church on Wednesday afternoon by the pastor, Rev. R. L. Lemonds.  Interment was at the Odd Fellows Cemetery. Mrs. Cooper was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Tandy Huff.
 
John Favors, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Favors, who enlisted in the Marine Corps about two months ago, died at Paris Island, S.C., Sunday the 6th.  The body reached here (Charleston, Mo.) Saturday evening and was taken to the home of his sister, Mrs. Murry Hequembury.  The funeral was held from St. Henry's Catholic Church on Sunday afternoon by Father Petri.  This was one of the largest funerals ever held in this city.  Mr. Favors, who was 21 years old, was the first Mississippi County man to die in the service.
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

Carter—Died, April 16, 1918, Jeane D. Carter, aged 42 years, at residence, 307 Third Street.
Funeral services will be conducted at the residence by Rev. Father J. J. Downey, Sunday, April 21, at 1:30 p.m.  Special interurban car will leave Third and Washington at 2 p.m.  Interment at Beech Grove Cemetery.  Friends of the family are invited.
 
BODY OF MAN FOUND FLOATING IN OHIO
White Man's Body in Bad Shape Was Probably in Water Since Winter Ice

The body of a white man was discovered in the Ohio River Thursday afternoon by Thomas Leshur and Morgan Pulham, and pulled to the bank at the foot of Eighteenth Street and Dr. Dodds, coroner, was summoned.  The body was scarcely recognizable and had been in the water for a long period, the coroner stated, and was probably a life lost during the heavy ice storm of last winter.  Nothing could be found on the body by which he could be identified.

On examination the man was five feet eight inches in height, was thought to be about 35 years of age, and by the coroner's estimate, and weighed about 140 pounds before death.  He wore blue serge trousers and vest and Douglas shoes.  Two old cuff links of peculiar pattern, but not mates, were in his shirt sleeves.  Two upper front teeth were banded and one upper front fully crowned.  One tooth in the upper front and two in the lower fronts set were missing.  The body was turned over to E. A. Burke and buried at once, its condition demanding the immediate step.
 
Saturday, 20 Apr 1918:
EARL SNOW NAMED IN CASUALTY LIST
Unknown Whether Man Killed in Action Is Cairo Boy

Is Earl Snow, reported killed in action in the casualty list reported last night, Earl Snow, of Cairo?
According to Mrs. Harry Stout, of 3503 Elm Street, mother of Earl Snow, the last she heard from him was in England, where he was in training.  He was then sergeant in an engineering company.  The letter was received Thursday.

The Earl Snow reported in the casualty list is a corporal, but the branch of the service is not given.
Earl Snow, of Cairo, went to Camp Taylor with the first draft contingent and letters to him are addressed to "Second Camp Taylor" at New York and are forwarded from there.
 
STONEFORT MAN HIT BY WAR RELIC TRAIN
Has Little Chance for Life with Skull Fractured

George M. Hutson, of Stonefort, Ill., was probably fatally injured Friday when he was struck the War Relic train at Stonefort.  According to the story, Hutson thought the Liberty Loan train, running on the regular train time, was the regular afternoon Big Four train.  He was walking down the track toward the train at Stonefort, but did not get off when the train approached head on, thinking it would stop at the station.  Before he could get off the track, when he saw it was not to stop, he was struck by the engine and dragged some distance before the train could be stopped. 

His skull was fractured, a leg broken and injured internally.  He was brought to Cairo on the relic train and hurried to St. Mary's Infirmary.  His condition late this evening was practically unchanged as from last night, the man being still unconscious, and hovering between life and death.  According to the physician in charge, it is impossible to tell whether he will live or not.
 
WILLIAM A. NICHOLS DIED AFTER LONG ILLNESS
Survived by Wife, Daughter and Two Sons

William Allen Nichols, aged 68 years, died after a long illness, at 10:50 a.m. Friday at his home, 515 Walnut Street.  He was well known to residents of Cairo.

Surviving the deceased are his wife, a daughter, Mrs. Lena Green, of St. Louis, and two sons, H. R. and William Nichols, of Cairo.
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

Nichols—Died, April 19, 1918, William Allen Nichols, aged 68 years, at family residence, No. 515 Walnut Street.

Funeral services will be conducted at the residence by Rev. John W. Coontz, pastor of the First M. E. Church, Sunday, April 21, at 2 o'clock p.m.  Special interurban car will leave Sixth and Washington Avenue at 2:30 p.m.  Interment at Beech Grove Cemetery.  Friends of the family are invited.
 
Col. Paul B. Moore went to Jefferson City the first of the week to attend the funeral of Senator William J. Stone.  (Charleston, Mo.)
  
FUNERAL NOTICE

Carter—Died, April 16, 1918, Jeane D. Carter, aged 42 years, at residence, 307 Third Street.
Funeral services will be conducted by Rev. Father J. J. Downey, Sunday, April 21, at 1:30 p.m.  Special interurban car will leave Third and Washington at 2 p.m.  Interment at Beech Grove Cemetery.  Friends of the family are invited.
 
NOTICE TO BARTENDERS

All members of local No. 627, Bartenders' Union, Cairo, are requested to be at the hall, 712 ½ Commercial Avenue Sunday afternoon at 1 o'clock for the purpose of attending in a body the funeral of our late brother, Gene D. Carter.
By order of the President:
F. A. Crisp
Philo G. Ward, Secretary
 
Mrs. Ruby Williams Ray died at her home near town (Bardwell, Ky.) Tuesday morning at 2:30 o'clock of tubercular meningitis.   Mrs. Ray was a member of the Bardwell Baptist Church and a devoted wife, mother and Christian.  The funeral services were conducted at the cemetery Tuesday afternoon by Rev. B. T. Huey, of Martin, Tenn., and interment occurred immediately afterward.  The deceased is survived by her husband and child, her father, John H. Williams, of this place, one brother, James M. Williams, traveling auditor for the Illinois Central Railroad, and one sister, Mrs. Bee Bishop, of Mounds, Ill.
 
Floyd Tegethoff, who is in camp at Camp Taylor, was called home (Bardwell, Ky.) Monday on account of the death of his father.
 
Mrs. George W. Fisher died suddenly at her home a short distance from town (Bardwell, Ky.) Wednesday.  She was a member of the Methodist Church and her devotion to the cause was great. Being a kind and affectionate lady, she numbered her friends by the score and there is greater regret because of her untimely and sudden death.  She is survived by her husband and three children, the latter being John W. and Robert Fisher, of this place and Mrs. George Thompson, now of Sheffeld, Ala.  Mrs. Fisher's remains were buried Thursday afternoon at the Elsey Cemetery, the funeral services being conducted at the home by Rev. Keener Rudolph.
  
Monday, 22 Apr 1918:
MOUND CITY MAN IS KILLED IN ACCIDENT

John W. Sims, age 60 years, of Mound City, engineer at the shutes for 12 years, was found dead in the coal shute in the Illinois Central yards at Mounds Sunday evening.  Workmen looking for the man found the body just after dark after first having found his dinner basket and organizing a search party.
It is thought Sims, while on his round of oiling the machinery of the chute, was thrown into the chute, when his clothing became entangled in the chain.  The man had been dead for some time when his body was found.

The body was not mangled, but he was hurt about the shoulder and hip.  The night man was the first to discover something was wrong, when he found Sims' dinner bucket, after failing to see him on the change of watches.

The dead man is survived by a wife, three daughters Mrs. Lyman Reed, of Pine Bluff, Ark., and Misses Ora and Mildred Sims, and one son, John Sims, of the U.S. Medical Corps, stationed at Camp Logan, Texas.  The son was formerly employed in Cairo at the drug store of the late W. J. Cochran.
The body was removed to the Montgomery Undertaking Parlors and then to the Mound City home.
 
MISS MELVA McCUTCHEON DIES HERE SATURDAY
Remains Taken to Home at Greenville, Ill., for Interment

The death of Miss Melva McCutcheon, at St. Mary’s Infirmary, Saturday afternoon was a shock to her Cairo friends, who supposed that she was getting along well following a surgical operation about ten days ago.  Her death was due to pneumonia, which developed Saturday morning and to which she succumbed at 5:45 o'clock.  So confident were her friends that she was recovering that there was no one with her when her death came.

Miss McCutcheon was born in Greenville, Ill., Oct. 11, 1888, and leaves surviving her mother, two sisters and two brothers. She has resided in Cairo for a number of years and was exceedingly popular in a large circle of friends.  She was a member of the choir of the First Methodist Church and for the past two years has been private secretary for W. J. Crossley, of the Cairo Electric and Traction Company.

The remains were taken to the residence of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Moore, with whom Miss McCutcheon had made her home for some time and the funeral services were held at the First Methodist Church, Sunday afternoon, conducted by Rev. John W. Coontz.  The body was taken to Greenville this morning accompanied by Mr. W. J. Dewey, an old friends of the family of that city, who came down Sunday afternoon.
 
GEORGE M. HUTSON DIED AT INFIRMARY
Died of Injuries Received in Accident at Stonefort.

George M. Hutson, the man who was struck by the Liberty Loan relic special at Stonefort, and who was brought to St. Mary's Infirmary for treatment, died there Sunday morning at 10:40 o'clock.  Death was caused primarily by a fractured skull.  He was 37 years of age and a minister of the Church of God.  His wife and one child were at his bedside when he passed away.

The remains were removed to Karcher Brothers undertaking parlor and prepared for burial.  They were taken to Tunnel Hill Sunday evening.  Funeral services will be held there today, with interment at Zion Cemetery.
  
Tuesday, 23 Apr 1918:
F. L. OGDEN DIED OF PNEUMONIA MONDAY
Passes Away after Illness of One Week at His Home

Frederick Luther Ogden died at his home, 208 Thirty-second Street, at the age of 28 years, Monday at 2 p.m., after a brief illness of pneumonia.  Mr. Ogden, who had been ill for but one week, was truck driver for the Woodward Hardware Company.

Surviving the deceased are a wife and children.  The body was taken in charge by E. A. Burke, and prepared for burial.  The remains will be taken to Barlow, Ky., Wednesday, where funeral services will probably be held on that day.
 
AGED WOMAN DIED AT EAST CAIRO EARLY TODAY

Mrs. Celia Dougherty, aged 73 years, died at the home of C. H. Gentry, at East Cairo, Ky., this morning at 6 o'clock.  Burial will be at Barlow on Wednesday, in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at 3 p.m.  E. A. Burke has charge of the burial.
 
TWO BABIES ARE FOUND MURDERED

The bodies of two 6-month-old children were found in a pond near Willisville, southeast of DuQuoin late Saturday. Evidence points to murder, as both bodies showed evidence of violence, according to the Union Evening Post.

State's Attorney N. B. Layman and Coroner G. J. Drysdale were notified of the discovery and the coroner went to investigate the circumstances.

Sensational disclosures are expected to develop within the next few days.
  
Wednesday, 24 Apr 1918:
OLD RESIDENT OF CAIRO DIED TODAY
Cornelius Sheehan Passed Away at Daughter's Home in St. Louis

Cornelius Sheehan, an old resident of Cairo, died at St. Louis today, where he has been making his home with his daughter for a number of years.

Will Sheehan, his son, who is bartender at Ray Olmsted's saloon, was called to St. Louis Monday by his father's illness.  A wire from him to Karcher Brothers today told of his death.  The remains will be brought to Cairo for burial tomorrow evening.

The deceased, who lived for years at Thirty-third and Sycamore Street, was formerly employed by the Illinois Central and retired under pension a number of years ago.  He was said to be over 90 years of age.
 
SERGT. EARL SNOW IS REPORTED SAFE
Telegram from Navy Department Settles Uncertainty as to Identity of Casualty

"Earl Snow, of Cairo, was not listed in the casualties, and is safe as far as we know."

The above report coming in a telegram from Washington, in reply to the query of an anxious mother, quiets the uncertainty attending the official announcement of the death of Corporal Earl Snow, without address.

Mrs. Harry Stout, mother of Earl Snow, of Cairo, telegraphed the navy department asking whether Earl Snow of Cairo had been reported killed.

The appearance of the name Earl Snow in a casualty list gave rise to the uncertainty, as to whether or not it was the Cairo boy.  The casualty, however, was listed as corporal, while the Cairo boy is a sergeant and as the mother had not been notified, it was considered doubtful that it was her son.
 
The funeral of Mr. J. W. Sims was held from the home this afternoon.  The services were conducted by Rev. J. B. Johnson. Mr. Sims was a member of the Methodist Church and as a member of the Modern Woodmen.  Those in attendance at the funeral from out of town were Mrs. Lyman Reid, a daughter and three sons, J. W. Sims, of Camp Roos, of Pine Bluff, Ark., Mr. W. H. Sims, of Bloomington, Ind., a brother, of the deceased.  Rev. W. J. Neal, of Bloomington, Ind., a brother of Mrs. Sims, and John Jones, of Ellettsville, Ind., a nephew of the deceased.  Interment was at Beech Grove Cemetery.
  
Thursday, 25 Apr 1918:
MRS. McCRITE DEAD AT WALLA WALLA, WASHINGTON

Mrs. F. L. Storman, of 608 Center Street, received a telegram announcing the death of her sister, Mrs. John W. McCrite, which occurred at her home in Walla Walla, Wash., Tuesday.  The funeral was held from White Chapel Baptist Church of which she had been a devoted member for more than 20 years.  She leaves a husband and one son and besides Mrs. Storman, two sisters, Mrs. George Laidley, of Medford Avenue, who has been at her bedside several weeks, and Mrs. Sarah Dugan, 631 Thirty-fifth Street, Cairo.  She also was a niece of Solomon Hazelwood and Mrs. Sarah Durham, of Elco, Ill.

(John W. McCrite married Lou Hazlewood on 3 Dec 1884, in Alexander Co., Ill.  John Dugan married Sarah E. Hazlewood on 4 Feb 1879, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
JOHN H. LEE DIED AT INFIRMARY TODAY
Prominent Mississippi County farmer Succumbed to Bright's Disease

John H. Lee, aged 54 years, of Charleston, Mo., died at St. Mary's Infirmary of Bright's disease at 2 o'clock this morning.  The remains were removed to Burke's undertaking parlors and prepared for burial.
Mr. Lee was a well-known and prominent farmer of Mississippi County. He leaves two brothers and one sister, Walter Lee and W. J. Lee, formerly state's attorney, and Miss Bell Lee, all of Mississippi County.
The funeral will be held at Charleston on Friday at 2:30 p.m. with burial at Oak Grove Cemetery.
 
REMAINS OF CORNELIUS SHEEHAN TO ARRIVE
Body Will Lie at Karcher Brothers Undertaking Parlors

The remains of Cornelius Sheehan, who died in St. Louis, will arrive this evening over the Illinois Central at 6:45 o'clock and will be taken to Karcher Brothers undertaking parlors, where it will lie in state until funeral arrangements have been made.
 
Fred Odgen, who died in Cairo Monday, of pneumonia was brought over Wednesday morning.  The funeral was held at the residence of James Freeman. Rev. Pique of LaCenter preached the funeral.  The body was interred in the Barlow Cemetery.  (Barlow Ky.)

 

Friday, 26 Apr 1918:
STEAMBOAT MAN DIED EARLY TODAY

George Dorris, aged 37 years, died at St. Mary's Infirmary at 2 o'clock this morning.  He was employed on the towboat J. B. Finley.  The remains were removed to Burke's undertaking parlors where they are awaiting word from the sister of the deceased, who lives in Louisville, Ky.

Saturday, 27 Apr 1918:
E. N. BOSCO FOUND CRUSHED TO DEATH IN A FREIGHT CAR
Atlanta, Ga., Man Killed by Shifting Lumber When He Fell Asleep
MOTHER AT ST. LOUIS HAS BEEN NOTIFIED
Identification Papers of Young White Man Are Direct and Complete

MOUNDS, Ill., April 27.—E. N. Bosco, an unknown man in this vicinity, was found crushed to death at 7:15 a.m. today in a car of lumber in the Illinois Central yards here.  His neck had been broken and several bones of his body broken, though the skin was not badly torn.  The man had been riding in the car, a coal car loaded with lumber, and had evidently gone to sleep in the corner.  The heavy load of lumber shifted while the train was speeding over the road and crushed the life out of him.  Death was probably almost instantaneous.

Luther Hodge and J. L. Malley, two employees of the Illinois Central office, were crossing the yards to work when they noticed blood beneath one of the cars.  Investigating, they found the body of the man in the corner.  The coroner was notified and an inquest held.  The verdict of the jury returned at 10:45 this morning, was death due to accident, when the lumber of the car shifted in transit.

The man was white, about 25 or 30 years of age and carried identification papers in his clothes.  His address was evidently 283 Whitehall Avenue, Atlanta, Ga., and his mother lives at 2226 McCausland Avenue, St. Louis, Mo.  The address of his mother was given with a request to notify her in case of accident and gave her telephone number.

The body was turned over to M. O.  Coles, undertaker, and prepared for burial.  A telegram was sent to the mother at St. Louis, but no reply had been received at 3 p.m. as to the disposition of the body.

(The 1 May 1918, issue of the newspaper recorded the name as E. M. Bisso.—Darrel Dexter)

MOUND CITY MAN DIES THIS MORNING

Roscoe Wilson, aged 21 years, died this morning at 1 o'clock at his home in Mound City after an illness of several years of tuberculosis.  He is the son of Mrs. L. Wilson and the late George Wilson, who died two years ago.  He also leaves a brother, Roy Wilson, residing in Mound City.

Rev. W. J. Neal and Mr. J. W. Sims, of Bloomington, Ind., and Mr. John Jones, of Eliotsville, Ind., have returned to their homes after attending the funeral of Mr. J. W. Sims.  (Mound City)

Monday, 29 Sep 1918:
The funeral services over the remains of Roscoe Wilson, who died Saturday morning, was held this afternoon from St. Peter’s Episcopal Church.  Burial taking place in Beech Grove Cemetery.

Tuesday, 30 Apr 1918:
STRANGER FOUND INJURED DIED AT ST. MARY'S TODAY
Will Brown, Young White Man Found Under Big Four Trestle
NEVER REGAINED FULL POSSESSION OF MIND
Worked for Iron Mountain on Section at Bush, Illinois

Will Brown, a man unknown in this vicinity and who was found by Officer Fitzhugh, in the mud beneath the Big Four trestle below the Halliday elevator, died this morning at 9:20 at St. Mary's Infirmary of injuries received in some accident.

The man, who was very large about 25 or 30 years of age, and a white man, was thought to be drunk at the time of his arrest, as well as injured, as he was only partially conscious, and could only mumble when he attempted to speak at all.  It was supposed at the time he wandered on to the trestle, while drunk and fell off sustaining the injuries, which later caused his death.

In the morning, however, after a night in the station, he was still incoherent, and the police, realizing he was dangerously hurt, sent the man to St. Mary's Infirmary, where he was attended by Drs. Clarke and Woelfle.  He was semi-conscious for a time after reaching the hospital.

When questioned, the man was able to state his name was Will Brown, but initials tatooed on his arm were not W. B.  He said he was unmarried, and had been working recently on a section gang on the Iron Mountain at Bush, Ill. (a town in the mining district near Herrin).  He said he was a Catholic, but could give no details as to relatives.  No means of identification were found on the man.

According to the attending physicians the man had been probably struck by a train or an automobile as the injuries could not have resulted from a fall.  After being injured he probably wandered in his half-conscious state to where he was picked up.  His body was turned over to Burke and will be given county burial.

J. W. Ibach returned Sunday from Reading, Pa., where he was called several weeks ago by the illness and death of his brother, Charles Ibach.  Mrs. Ibach and their niece, Miss Barbara Statt, who have been visiting in St. Louis, accompanied him home.

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Wilson, of Metropolis were here Monday to attend the funeral of their nephew, Roscoe Wilson.

John Sims, who was called home on the account of the death of his father, has returned to his company at Camp Logan H. Root, at Little Rock. Ark.

Wednesday, 1 May 1918:
AGED RESIDENT OF MOUND CITY IS DEAD
Edward Lawler Passed Away Early This Morning

Edward Lawler, aged 88, died at his home in Mound City at 5:30 this morning of the infirmities of age.  He had been in poor health for the past three months.

The deceased is survived by two daughters, Misses Mollie and Carrie Lawler, and a son, Jack Lawler, and three grandchildren, Dorris, Gilbert and Floyd Derr, all of whom lived with him, and Mrs. Edna Little, of Cairo.

Mr. Lawler was a member of the Catholic Church, under whose auspices the funeral will be held.

Mr. Bisso, of St. Louis, came Saturday after the body of his brother, E. M. Bisso, who was found dead in a coal car here (Mounds) early that morning.

(The 27 Apr 1918, issue recorded the name as E. N. Bosco.—Darrel Dexter)

Thursday, 2 May 1918:
FORMER POPLAR BLUFF MAYOR DIES IN STREET

POPLAR BLUFF, Mo., May 2—Robert Felts, twice mayor of this city, dropped dead yesterday on the principal street from apoplexy.

The many friends of Mrs. John W. Baker here (East Prairie, Mo.) will regret to learn of her death at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Harry Nichols, in Cairo.  Mrs. Baker had been a resident of this county for many years and the deep sympathy of our people is expressed to the bereaved husband and children.

Friday, 3 May 1918:
Senator Sidney B. Miller went to Murphysboro this morning to attend the funeral of Mrs. James A. White, wife of Warden White, of Chester, whose death occurred Thursday.

DIED ON VISIT TO CAIRO

Mrs. J. W. Baker, 55 years old, wife of J. W. Baker, of East Prairie, died at the home of her son-in-law, Harvey Nichols, of Cairo, Monday morning.  Mrs. Baker went to Cairo a few days ago for a visit to her daughter, Mrs. Nichols, and was ill only a short time.—Charleston Enterprise Courier

WIFE OF WARDEN WHITE DIED AT MURPHYSBORO
Passed Away after Many Operations During Prolonged Illness

MURPHYSBORO, Ill., May 2—Mrs. James A. White, wife of the warden of Chester penitentiary, died at St. Andrew's Hospital here, Wednesday night, after a prolonged illness.
The patient was said to be too weak to undergo another operation this week, the need of which was becoming more imperative.  Likewise she was far too exhausted to make a journey to Mayo Brothers institute at Rochester, Minn., no matter how much Warden White desired such a last report.

The patient's decided change for the worse set in Saturday, accompanied by what must have proved to be her exquisite pain, minimized to a degree by the use of sedatives.

Mrs. White's extremity follows a winter replete with tragic uncertainty for her relatives and friends.  The last but one climax came when the patient underwent a third operation described as one of the most delicate known to surgery, nerve strain over which, it is said, precipitated the fatal attack of cerebral meningitis, which took her surgeon, Warden Surgeon John Grimes, of Chester.

MRS. J. C. MYERS PASSED AWAY AT ST. MARY'S
Remains Will Be Taken to Clinton, Ky., for Burial

Mrs. J. C. Myers, of 3206 Sycamore Street, died after a long illness, at St. Mary’s Infirmary, at 4:30 o'clock Friday afternoon.  She was 44 years of age.

Surviving the deceased are the husband and three children.

The remains were prepared for burial by Burke and were taken to Clinton, Ky., today, where interment will take place probably tomorrow.

Saturday, 4 May 1918:
FUNERAL NOTICE

Lemen—Died Friday, May 3, Mrs. Sarah E. Lemen, at her residence, 816 Twenty-second Street, Cairo, Ill.  Funeral services will be held Sunday afternoon at 1:15 at the Cairo Baptist Church.  Special Illinois Central train leaves at 2:30 for Villa Ridge where interment will be made.

CAIROITES ATTENDED FUNERAL OF MRS. WHITE

Senator Sidney B. Miller and Judge William N. Butler attended the funeral of Mrs. James A. White, at Murphysboro Friday.

The funeral was very largely attended, the church being filled with men from all walks of life, testifying to the esteem with which Mr. White and his wife were held.  One touching incident was a beautiful floral gift from the prisoners in the penitentiary at Chester, where Mr. White is warden.  They contributed $50.00 and sent the flowers.

MRS. SARAH LEMEN DIES FRIDAY EVE
Funeral Services Sunday Afternoon at Cairo Baptist Church

Mrs. Sarah E. Lemen died suddenly at her home, 816 Twenty-second Street, Friday afternoon at 5 o'clock of heart failure.  She had been suffering from heart ailment for some time though was not in a critical condition.

Mrs. Lemen was 78 years old and was one of Cairo's old residents having resided here most of her life.  She was a devout member of the Cairo Baptist Church.  She leaves surviving her one son, Ernest Lemen, foreman at the P. T. Langan Mill.  She was a sister of the late Charles Lancaster.

The funeral services will be held Sunday afternoon at 1:15 o'clock at the Cairo Baptist Church conducted by Rev. M. L. Turner, pastor of the Calvary Baptist Church in absence of Rev. L. D. Lamkin.  The cortege will leave the residence at 1 o'clock for the church.  A special Illinois Central train will leave at 2:30 for Villa Ridge where interment will be made.

The pallbearers are Messrs. P. T. Langan, G. A. Hilburn, Earl Stout, William Barnhardt, J. W. Cozby, H. C. Steinel, and C. L. Keaton.

CAIRO MAN DIED AT EAST ST. LOUIS FRIDAY
Passed Away in Few Minutes after Paralytic Stroke

W. L. Storey, of East St. Louis, who resided in Cairo for the past five years until a week ago, died Friday morning at the former city.  According to word received by relatives in this city, he suffered a severe paralytic stroke Friday morning and died within a few minutes.  He was 55 years of age.  The deceased came to Cairo from Charleston, Mo., five years ago and was employed at the Mississippi Box Company, as night watchman for the last three years of his residence in Cairo.

Surviving the deceased are his wife, Emma Storey, two daughters, Mrs. Gertrude Phillips, of Cairo, and Mrs. Lena Stone, of Little Rock., Ark., one son, L. M. Storey, of East St. Louis, one foster son, H. S. Mitchell, of Cairo, three sisters, Mrs. Faree Holland and Miss Ella Storey, of Cairo, and Mrs. Mary Goins, of Knoxall, Mo., and one brother, J. J. Storey, of Cairo.

Mr. Storey was a member of the Knights and Ladies of security and the Woodmen of the World.

The remains arrived in Cairo from East St. Louis at 1:26 this afternoon.  Funeral arrangements have not yet been made.  E. A. Burke has charge.

The funeral of Mr. Edward Lawler was held Friday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Mary’s Catholic Church conducted by Fr. Techlenburg and the interment was at the Catholic cemetery at Mounds.  (Mound City)

(His marker in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery reads:  Edward Lawler 1832-1918.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. W. R. Rodman and daughter, Mrs. E. T. Snyder, attended the funeral of Mrs. Ann Jones, at Vienna, today.  Mrs. Jones was a sister-in-law of Mrs. Rodman.  (Mound City)

(Wiley Riley Rodman married Susanna J. Jones on 5 Jun 1878, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Elihu T. Snyder, 28, born in Franklin Co., Ill., son of T. S. Snyder and Mary Dobbins, married Minnie Rodman, 19, born in Johnson Co., Ill., daughter of W. R. Rodman and Julia Jones, on 20 Nov 1900, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Arthur Hinds, son of Roy Hinds, died at his home in Thebes last night May 1, 1918, at 9 o'clock.  (Thebes)

Monday, 6 May 1918:
John Lawler, who has been employed at Morgan City, La., for some time and came home last week, being summoned here on the account of the death of his father, has decided to remain here (Mound City).

Tuesday, 7 May 1918:
CHARLES KARCH DIED AT HIS HOME IN APRIL
Father of U. S. District Attorney Died After Long Illness

EAST ST. LOUIS, Ill., May 7—Charles Karch, 75 years old, father of United States District Attorney Charles A. Karch, of East St. Louis, and widely known in St. Clair County, died at his home six miles east of Freeburg, at 1 o'clock Tuesday morning, April 30.  He had been in failing health since March 1.

Karch lived all his life in St. Clair County and passed away on the same farm where he was born.  He was an extensive land owner and served as treasurer of the township school district there for 25 years.  He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Mary Karch, two sons, Charles A. and Gustave H. Karch, and one daughter, Miss Laura Karch.

His funeral was held at 1 o'clock Friday afternoon.  Services were conducted at the family home and burial took place in the Mascoutah cemetery.

BODY OF INFANT GIRL IS FOUND IN FREIGHT CAR

OTTAWA, Ill., May 7—County and city authorities are investigating the death of a baby girl whose body was found in an empty box car here which has been traced as coming from Rockford, Ill.  The baby's body wrapped in a flour sack was discovered by a car cleaner.

CARD OF THANKS

To those whom we have never met and who have their love and sympathy to us by their kindness to my daughter, Melva McCutcheon, we wish to express our most sincere thanks.
Mrs. L. E. McCutcheon and family

E. W. Allen, of 1615 Poplar Street, went to Stonefort, Ill., today to attend the funeral of his sister-in-law, Mrs. H. E. Seller.  Mrs. Allen was at the bedside of her sister, when death came.  She has been in Stonefort a week.

Russell Bush, a Bardwell man, aged 21 years, was killed early Sunday morning, when he fell between the cars of a freight train at Bardwell, and was badly mangled.  Bush, who worked at Bardwell for the railroad, up until about two weeks ago, had been employed at the Chicago Mill and Lumber Company here, and caught the train to Bardwell Saturday night.

The train probably failed to stop at that place and, in attempting to get off while it was under full speed, Bush was thrown beneath the cars.  His body was cut in two and his limbs badly cut up.  Assistant section Foreman Jennings discovered the remains Sunday morning.

Bush is survived by his wife, two children, his parents, three sisters and two brothers.  The body was interred Monday evening at Bardwell.

Wednesday, 8 May 1918:
CITY CLERK ENDS LIFE WITH POISON AT WEST FRANKFORT

BENTON, Ill., May 8—W. A. Gray, aged 36, committed suicide at his home in West Frankfort Thursday night by taking carbolic acid.  Gray was city clerk and also collector of special assessments of that city.  He left the following note:  "To the Mayor and City, Greetings—Ill health causes me to do this.  You will find no shortage."

Thursday, 9 May 1918:
HARRISBURG BOY IS SEVERELY WOUDNED

Private Edward P. Antourie, Harrisburg, Ill., wounded severely

INFANT SON DIED

Ben F., Jr., the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Ben F. Richardson, died Monday afternoon at 5:30 o'clock.  Interment took place at St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds.

Saturday, 11 May 1918:

ILLINOIS LIEUTENANT IS KILLED IN ACTION
Lieut. Adrian C. Edwards, Carrollton, Ill., on Casualty List

WASHINGTON, May 11—The casualty list today contains 69 names, which are the following:
Lieut. Adrian C. Edwards, Carrollton, Ill., and Private Williams Johnson Reger, Mo., killed in action;
Private William J. Hamilton, Decatur, Ill., died of wounds

Private Glenn Hockenberry died of disease

Corporal Frank J. Downin, of Danville, Ill., and Claude H. Meyers of Browning, Mo., slightly wounded

Capt. John F. Hardesty, Winfield, Mo., prisoner.  He was previously reported missing.

MRS. NANNIE DECKER DROPS DEAD TODAY

Mrs. Nannie Decker, matron at the day nursery, dropped dead this afternoon at 2:50 o'clock.  Mrs. Decker was a sister of Mrs. Evelyn McGee, 228 Eighteenth Street and was formerly matron at the Cairo Orphan's home.

(Ben W. McGee married Evelyn S. Dickey on 11 Aug 1884, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Thomas Shepherd, of the eastern section of the county, was found dead by neighbors Tuesday afternoon near Zoar Church.  Mr. Shepherd had been to Bardwell and was on his way home, when, according to reports, he was seized with heart failure and died.  The first report was that he had been struck by lightning, but we are told the doctors pronounced this a mistake and attributed his death to heart failure.  Mr. Shepherd is a good citizen and his untimely end is a matter of real regret.  (Bardwell, Ky.)

Thomas Dougher died at the home of his parents-in-law, W. N. Bard and wife, Wednesday night, the cause of his death being tuberculosis.  Mr. Dougher's home was in Wilkesbarr, Penn., but he had been in this vicinity for a number of years.  He had made many friends here and was quite a pleasant and companionable gentleman.  Until a few months ago he had been at work for the Illinois Central at Pinckneyville, Ill.  He is survived by a wife and several children.  His remains were interred in the Bardwell Cemetery Thursday afternoon.

About two hours before he died a serious accident occurred to the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dougher and for some time the child was in a critical condition.  The child had been having chills and someone was giving it a dose of chill tonic.  In the excitement, carbolic acid was given to the child instead of chill tonic.  A report from there Friday says she has recovered from the first shock, but it could not be told what aftereffect the acid might have.  (Bardwell, Ky.)

Word has been received here (Mound City) of the death of Frank Marple at Camp Sherm, Ohio.  He was mess sergeant of Truck Co., 308.  He had been ill for some months of diabetes and was waiting his discharge, when he contracted typhoid fever and pneumonia and passed away May 12 at the hospital.  His father and mother, of Cleveland, Ohio, were at his bedside when the end came.  The remains were given a military escort to the train, when the remains were shipped to Cleveland, his home.  Lawrence Livesay, who is a member of the same company, was one of the pallbearers.  The Marple family were former residents of Mound City and the young man was born and lived here until he was 9 years of age and will be remembered by many of our residents.

Monday, 13 May 1918:
MRS. DECKER'S FUNERAL HELD THIS AFTERNOON

Funeral services for Mrs. Annie Decker, who died suddenly Saturday afternoon, were held this afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at Mrs. Falconer's undertaking parlors conducted by Rev. A. T. Tomshany, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, officiating.  Interment was made at Villa Ridge, the funeral party going up on the regular Illinois Central train at 2:35.

MRS. G. H. HORNBERGER PASSED AWAY AY CACHE

Mrs. George H. Hornberger, aged 39 years, died at home near Cache at 11 o'clock Saturday morning, after a brief illness of nephritis.

Surviving her are the husband and eight children, the youngest of which is nine months.  Services were held today with interment at Bumbguard Cemetery.

(Her marker in Baumgard Cemetery reads:  Eva Hornberger 1879-1918.—Darrel Dexter)

 

THREE KILLED IN CYCLONE AT HARRISBURG

HARRISBURG, Ill., May 13—Three persons are near death today and eight others were injured as the result of a cyclone which destroyed nine residences and wrecked a number of barns near Delwood, 12 miles southeast of here late yesterday afternoon.

TWO BOYS DROWNED NEAR MURPHYSBORO
Buggy Containing Three Brothers Overturns in Swollen Creek

MURPHYSBORO, Ill., May 13—Tom Burton, aged 12 years, and George Burton, aged 8 years, brothers, were drowned at noon yesterday, when their buggy overturned while fording Town Creek, about two miles from the city.

The stream was swollen by the recent heavy rains and, when the buggy reached the middle of the stream, it was toppled over.  A sixteen-year-old brother in the buggy made his way to the bank, as did Tom, who went back after the younger boy.  In the attempted rescue, he went down with his brother.
The boys were sons of Thomas Burton, of near Murphysboro.

CHESTER McELWAYNE DIES AT INFIRMARY

Chester, the four-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. McElwayne, of Anniston, Mo., died this morning at St. Mary’s Infirmary, where he has been a patient for the past five days.  The little boy succumbed to an attack of appendicitis.

The remains were prepared for burial at Karcher Brothers and were taken to Anniston this afternoon.  The funeral will be held Tuesday.

Rev. L. R. Jenkins has turned form Shiloh, Ga., where he was called by the death of his mother. (Charleston, Mo.)

Tuesday, 14 May 1918:
HOLY ROLLER KILLS WIFE AT FAIRFIELD
John Mason, Paroled from Anna Asylum Thought Unbalanced

FAIRFIELD, Ill., May 14—John Mason, a farmer five miles east of this city, shot and instantly killed his former wife, Julia Vincel Mason, and then fired two shots through his body at her home.

Mason was paroled a month ago from the Southern Illinois Insane Asylum at Anna on the entreaties of his wife.

Mason was a Holy Roller.  His wife, it is said, recently confessed indiscretions with a Holy Roller minister at Golden Gate.  This, it is said, unbalanced the mind of the husband.  Mason, it is thought, will die.

(This may refer to John J. Mason and Mrs. Julia A. Brewer Lambert on 31 Mar 1900, in Wabash Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. Brady, an aged lady, died at her home in this city (Mound City) Monday morning, having been ill for some time and afflicted with an inward goiter.  She was about 65 years of age.  Montgomery and Stockton have charge of the funeral.  

Wednesday, 15 May 1918:
BIRD'S POINT MAN DIED HERE TUESDAY
W. G. White Died after Two Weeks’ Illness

W. G. White, aged 64 years, died at St. Mary’s Infirmary Tuesday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock after an illness of two weeks.  Mr. White made his home at Bird's Point, Mo., and farming in partnership with F. W. Taylor, of that place and years ago was employed as switchman by the Illinois Central railroad here.  He is well known in Cairo.

The body was removed to Karcher Brothers undertaking parlors and prepared for burial.  It was taken to Bird's Point on the 2 o'clock boat.  Burial took place this afternoon at Bird's Point.

FRANCES MARIAN BAKER DIES THIS AFTERNOON

Little Frances Marian Baker, the three-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Baker, 611 Twenty-second Street, died this afternoon at 1 o'clock at the home of her parents after a three weeks illness.  The little girl was the second daughter.

The remains will be taken to Hopkinsville, Ky., Thursday morning at 9 o'clock for burial in the family cemetery.

Mrs. Margaret Mantle, aged 83 years, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Turner Black, a few miles north of town, Friday morning at 4 o'clock, the cause of her death being the infirmities of old age.  Mrs. Mantel was the widow of the late Jeff S. Mantel and was one of the pioneer residents of the county.  She leaves one daughter, Mrs. Turner Black, and seven grandchildren beside a host of relatives to mourn her loss.  The funeral services were held from the family residence by Rev. J. S. Dean, a Christian minister from Clinton, after which interment was made in the Bardwell Cemetery. (Bardwell, Ky.)

The remains of Mr. John Church, who dropped dead in the kitchen of the Colonial Hotel Sunday evening while in the act of turning on the electric light, accompanied by his two daughters, were taken to Anna Tuesday where funeral services and burial took place.  (Mounds)

Thursday, 16 May 1918:
ILLINOIS MARINE DIES OF DISEASE IN FRANCE

WASHINGTON, May 16—Wednesday Marine Corps casualty list contained only one name that of Private Herman Lesley Wilson, of Franlinville, Ill., dead of disease in France.

YOUTH DIES AFTER TETANUS DEVELOPS
Had Punctured Foot with Nail, but Foot Was Thought Better

Frank Richard Bullard, age 13 years, son of Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Baker, of 411 Thirty-sixth Street, died Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock of tetanus.  The boy, who was a pupil at the Elmwood School on Thirty-sixth Street was wading in the flooded street after the recent heavy rains and on Monday of last week stepped on a nail in a board beneath the water.

He had a touch on tonsillitis at the time and was kept at home by his parents for the rest of the week.  He visited his grandmother on Sunday and on Monday morning, at home dressed and went to school.  In a short time he returned, saying he felt unwell, but not until Tuesday morning did the case develop enough to show its seriousness.

Funeral services were conducted at the residence at 2 o'clock this afternoon by Rev. Curwin Henley, of the Tigert Memorial Church.  Special interurban cars left Thirty-fifth and Sycamore streets at 2:30 o'clock for Mounds, where interment took place at Beech Grove Cemetery.

OLD RESIDENT DIES WEDNESDAY NIGHT
Miss Mary Hawkins Passes Away at Home in Twenty-second Street

Miss Mary Hawkins died Wednesday night at 10 o'clock at her home 810 Twenty-second Street after a lingering illness due to the infirmities of old age.  She was 77 years of age.  She had resided in Cairo for about 60 years and was many years ago a teacher in the public schools here and was born in Cincinnati.
Miss Hawkins leaves surviving her five sisters, Mrs. C. C. Marshall, Selma, Tenn., Mrs. James Baker, Olmsted, Ill., Mrs. Lucy Lynn, Columbia, Mo., and Mrs. Katherine B. Lemen, of Cairo.

The funeral services will be held at the residence Friday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock conducted by Rev. John W. Coontz, pastor of the first Methodist Church.

Hawkins:  Died, Miss Mary Hawkins, aged 77, Wednesday night, May 15, 1918, at her residence.  Funeral services will be held at the residence 810 Twenty-second Street Friday afternoon by Rev. John W. Coonts.  Funeral party will go in automobiles to Villa Ridge, where interment will be made.

(Charles C. Marshall married Harriett E. Hawkins on 16 Sep 1874, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter) 

WELL KNOWN RIVER PILOT PASSES AWAY
Capt. Matt Fitchner Died at Caruthersville, Mo.

Capt. Matt Fitchener, well known river pilot, died last night at Caruthersville, Mo., where he has been employed by the Caruthersville Sand and Gravel Company.  He was over 70 years of age and had been in failing health for the last year or two, but had continued at work.

Word of his death was received today by Gus Osterloh.  So far as can be learned, he leaves no relatives now living in Cairo and arrangements were made to bury the body there.  His wife is a patient in the hospital at Anna.  Capt. Fitchner formerly lived at Thirty-fourth and Elm streets, where he owned a home.  His brother, Ben Fitchner, died some time ago.

The funeral services over the remains of Mrs. Mattie A. Brady, who died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Kate Hays, Monday morning, were interred in Beech Grove Cemetery. Tuesday afternoon.  Rev. Roy B. Morgan conducted the services.  Mrs. Brady who was 66 years of age, leaves a husband, who is a patient at Anna, two daughters, Mrs. Kate Hays, of this city, and Mrs. Bettie Maranda, of Grand Rapids, Iowa; and one son, Richard B. Brady, of Jonesboro, Ill.  (Mound City)

(Andrew Jackson Hays, 20, married Kate Brady, 17, on 15 Aug 1888, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Friday, 17 May 1918:
ELDORADO CORPORAL AMONG CASUALITES
One Hundred Six Names Listed by War Department Today

WASHINGTON, May 17—Among those on the casualty list today, which continued 106 names were
Corporal Thomas M. Price, Eldorado, Ill., private John Griffin, Mount Pulaski, Ill., Lon E. Simer, Kinmundy, Ill., slightly wounded.

MISS HAWKINS' FUNERAL HELD THIS AFTERNOON

Funeral services for Miss Mary Hawkins, an old resident of Cairo, were held this afternoon at her residence on Twenty-second Street conducted by Rev. John W. Coontz, pastor of the first Methodist Church.  Hymns were sung by members of the Methodist choir, Mrs. F. A. Willis, Mrs. Harry Hood, Messrs. C. M. Roos and W. A. Dougherty.

The remains were taken by automobiles to Villa Ridge where interment was made.  The pallbearers were Messrs. C. C. Carter, C. M. Roos, J. J. Kuykendall, and M. J. Howley.

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Mosely passed away Wednesday at the home of his parents on Second Street.

Saturday, 18 May 1918:
Mrs. Thomas Geveden died at her home Monday night, south of town (Bardwell, Ky.).  Mrs. Geveden was well known to a very large number of people and was one of the old landmarks of a well spent life, having gone through a long life imparting good counsel to those with whom she came in contact.  She was survived by several children.  Her remains were interred in the Arlington Cemetery, the services being conducted by Rev. Burgess, of Blandville.  

A stillborn boy was born to Mr. and Mrs. Lindsey Troester on May 11.  (Pulaski)

 

CRIMINAL CASES TRIED NEXT WEEK

             Criminal cases will be taken up next week.  The Potts murder case and the Hall case for embezzlement are scheduled for Monday.

             Charles Potts struck and knocked down Otho Metcalf, of Grand Chain, in a saloon at Thirty-fourth Street and Commercial.  Metcalf fell on his head on the concrete floor and sustained a fractured skull from which he later died.  The case was continued from last term of court.


Monday, 20 May 1918:
WHITE PLAGUE CLAIMS 12 VICTIMS IN MONTH
Ten of These Were Negros Says Health Officer's Report

A total of twelve deaths from tuberculosis 10 of them negroes, was reported by Health Officers Clarke to the council this morning.  This from 44 deaths from all causes, in which 22 were white people and 22 negroes.  Pneumonia claimed eight five of them colored; apoplexy four and nephritis five, while there were three accidental deaths.  The others were from various diseases.

Of contagious diseases, six cases of whooping cough are reported, one of diphtheria, two of red measles one of scarlet fever, and one of small pox.

CHARLESTON WOMAN DIED AT ST. MARY'S

Mrs. Elizabeth Quinn, aged 71 years, of Charleston, Mo., died Saturday night at 8:30 o'clock at St. Mary's Infirmary after several days’ futile treatment.  Her son, E. E. Quinn, of Cairo, and daughter, Mrs. Mary Simpson, of Charleston, were at her side at her death.

The body was removed to the E. A. Burke undertaking parlors and prepared for burial.

The remains were taken to Charleston on the morning boat Sunday and burial took place at Charleston Sunday afternoon.

MRS. R. L. BONDURANT DIED SUNDAY MORNING

Mrs. R. L. Bondurant, aged 63 years, of Jordan, Ky., died at St. Mary's Infirmary Sunday, May 19, of cancer, after a lingering illness.  Her daughter, Mrs. Grove Brown, and son, P. A. Bondurant, were at her bedside when death came.  She leaves surviving her five sons and one daughter, also four sisters and was a sister-in-law of Dr. A. Bondurant, of Cairo.

The remains were shipped to her home Sunday on the 5:45 train and funeral services were held there this afternoon.  Mrs. John W. Bransford, of Cairo, and Mrs. John Bondurant, of Charleston, Mo., accompanied the funeral party.  Mrs. Bondurant's husband died last September.

OLD CAIRO RESIDENT PASSED AWAY
Mrs. Marie Louise Bouchet Died at 83 Years

Mrs. Marie Louise Bouchet, aged 83 years, died about 7 o'clock Sunday evening at the home of her son, Girard Bouchet, 813 Cedar Street, after a brief illness. Her death was largely due to age.

Marie Louise Bouchet, was the widow of John Girard Bouchet.  She was born at St. Victor De Malcap, France, November 25, 1835, and came to the United States in her youth.  She has been a resident of Cairo since 1856.

Surviving the deceased are three sons, Eugene, Joseph and Girard, eight grandchildren, a sister, Mrs. Virginie Vincent, of Cairo, and a brother, Louie Pierre Veirun, of France.

While the deceased had been ill for the past six months, her death was entirely unexpected.

E. A. Burke has charge.

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Satterthwait left Wednesday for Pennsylvania, where they were called by the death of a relative. (Charleston, Mo.)

Tuesday, 21 May 1918:
JURY IS OBTAINED IN MURDER TRIAL

Six jurors had been accepted by both sides when the circuit court adjourned Monday night in the case of Billie Goin and Henry Leach for the murder of Carey Belew, a negro, January 14.

Examination of the third panel of jurors was begun at the opening of court and at a few minutes before 11 o'clock, the jury was completed.  The men finally accepted are:

Sam Halls, Fred Lawles, W. D. Taylor, George Keller, John T. Burton, H. T. Galbraith, Dennis Miller, J. B. Warner, J. L. Hartley, George Kobler, Harry Hubbard, and George Ryal.

The review of the case in the opening of the case by the attorneys for the State and the defense, was ready, the jury before adjournment, which was taken immediately after at 11:30

CARD OF THANKS

We desire to express our sincere appreciation to those kind friends and neighbors who offered their assistance and words of sympathy during the illness and death of our dear son and brother, Frank Richard Bullard, also for the floral offerings which were so beautiful.
Mrs. H. H. Baker and family

MRS. MARIE L. BOUCHET
Old Cairo Resident Laid to Rest at Beech Grove

Funeral services over the last remains of Mrs. Marie Louise Bouchet, who passed away Sunday at noon were held this afternoon at St. Patrick's Church, Rev. Father Downey officiating.  A great number of friends, especially among the older residents, of Cairo, were present at the impressive ceremony, the deceased being a resident of Cairo for more than half a century and well known and beloved by the many whose friendship or acquaintance she formed during that long citizenship.

Floral offerings, beautiful and numbers accompanied the body to its last resting place.  The solemn procession left the residence, 813 Cedar Street, at 1:30 o'clock for the church, where services were held at 2:00 o'clock.

An interurban special left the corner at Ninth and Washington Avenue, at 2:30 o'clock for Mounds, where interment took place at Beech Grove Cemetery.

The pallbearers were:  P. J. Doud, M. J. Howley, Will Winter, Sr., P. A. Doud, William Schatz, M. J. O'Shea, George Becker, and H. E. Fitts.

NEW MADRID MAN DIED AT ST. MARY'S MONDAY
Passed Away with Family at His Bedside

W. C. Newsome, of New Madrid, Mo., passed away at 10:30 Monday evening at St. Mary's Infirmary at the age of 55 years.  He had been at the hospital for several days.  Some time ago he underwent treatment here but was allowed to go home.

At the bedside were his mother, Mrs. A. P. Newsome, his sister, Mrs. Eddye Phillips, and three children, Lynn B. Newsome, Mrs. Adele Mann, and John W. Newsome, all of New Madrid.  The three children are all married.  A brother also survives the deceased, in addition to those at his bedside.  The brother, W. W. Newsome, resides at Tulsa, Okla.

The body was removed to Karcher Brothers undertaking parlors and prepared for burial.  It was taken south on the seven o'clock Iron Mountain boat this morning for New Madrid, the relatives accompanying the body.  Services will be held Wednesday at the residence in New Madrid, and interment will take place in that city.

Claynan Nelson, who is training at Camp Pike Ark., arrived home Monday to attend the funeral of his uncle, William Steinbeck.  (Bardwell, Ky.)

Word came Sunday that Mrs. Dr. Huff, of Carterville, had committed suicide at her home.  She is the oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Price, of this city (Vienna), and they with her sister, Flossie, and brother, Harry, and wife drove up at once.  It was learned later that she committed suicide by hanging herself with the bed clothes.  She was despondent over the death of her little daughter, which occurred about two months ago,   Besides the above mentioned relatives, she leaves her husband, sister, Amanda of Watertown, and brothers, James, of Oklahoma, Walter, of Cypress, Joe, of Vienna, and Charles B., near Chicago.  

(James M. Price married Susan E. Pearce on 29 Apr 1874, in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Wednesday, 22 May 1918:
HENRY LEACH AND BILLY GOIN FREE BY JURY VERDICT
Verdict of Not Guilty Returned after Jury Deliberated for Three Hours
CHARLES POTTS WENT ON TRIAL FOR MURDER
Jury Being Selected in Case of Man Who Killed Another in Saloon Brawl

Henry Leach and Billie Goin, indicted by the grand jury in February for the alleged murder of Carey Belew, a negro, and whose case went to the jury at 11 o’clock today, were freed by the jury this afternoon.  A verdict of “not guilty” (of either murder or manslaughter) was returned at 2:10 o’clock this afternoon.

With the mother of Billie Goin weeping happily and friends surrounding them, the two men walked from the courthouse this afternoon, entirely freed of any responsibility for the death of the negro.  The mother of the negro was in court and listened to the verdict in silence, turned to her friends and left the building.

Argument by the attorneys was taken up with the opening of court this morning and finished at 10:45, after which Judge Butler gave the instructions.

In the evidence given Tuesday afternoon before the jury, Henry Leach and Billie Goin, both declared they had no intention of driving the negro into the water, that the affair had arisen out of a general fight, in which the negro was stated to have taken full part and that it was purely accidental that the fight led in the direction of the river.

They also declared they left the place of the alleged death before they saw the negro drown, and the defense placed great stress on the fact that the death had never been absolutely established, as the body had never been found.  Both denied shaking the rope to which the negro held or throwing anything at him.

On the other hand, a negro, who watched from the top of the levee slope, declared that the negro sank out of sight in the icy river and did not reappear.  Ice at the time prevented any attempt to recover the body.

The case of Charles Potts is set for trial next in turn and the examination of the jurymen was begun this afternoon in his case.

MRS. RALPH CUSHMAN DIES THIS MORNING
Former Cairo Woman Passes Away after Lingering Illness

Mrs. Ralph W. Cushman died this morning at 1:30 o'clock at her home in Memphis after a lingering illness.  For the past two years she has been at Hendersonville, N.C., for the benefit of her health, returning home February 5th since which time she has been confined to her bed.

Mrs. Cushman was formerly Miss Leota LaMontague, and was born in Charleston, Mo., January 20, 1891, and lived in Cairo for several years, later moving to Memphis, where she was married to Ralph W. Cushman, formerly of Cairo and a son of H. A. Cushman, of this city.

The remains will arrive in Cairo Thursday morning at 1:15 o'clock and will be taken to Burke's undertaking parlors.  The funeral party will go to Charleston, Mo., on the 7 o'clock boat.  The funeral will be held in Charleston Thursday morning at the Baptist church.  The mother, sister, and brothers of deceased, as well as her husband, will accompany the body.  The arrangements are in charge of E. A. Burke.

BLODGETT, MO., WOMAN PASSED AWAY TODAY

Mrs. Carelena Thompson, wife of Alec B. Thompson, of Blodgett, Mo., died at St. Mary's Hospital at 1:30 this morning, at the age of about 38 years.  She had been ill for the greater part of the time during the past 10 to 20 years, and was brought to St. Mary's about two weeks ago, but too late for any assistance.

There being no hope for her recovery, she was to be taken home today, but passed away in the early morning.  Her husband and her mother, Mrs. C. J. Robinson, all that survive her, were at her bedside.

The body was removed to Karcher Bros. undertaking parlors and prepared for burial.  It will be taken to Blodgett, via the morning boat, Thursday, where funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon.

The deceased was a member of the Court of Honor, No. 1190, W.O.W.

SON OF C. A. WEIS IS DROWNED ON PICNIC
Died on High School Outing in Alexandria, La.

Carl Weis, son of C. A. Weis, formerly of Cairo, and formerly connected with the Weis-Peterson Box Company, now the Peterson-Miller Box Company, was drowned on a school outing according to word just received by Mrs. E. A. Burke.

He was about 17 or 18 years of age and was to have graduated from the high school at Alexandria, La., his home, Saturday, May 24.  He is the older of two sons, of C. A. Weis, the second son being 10 years of age.

Thursday, 23 May 1918:
MURDER CASE WENT TO THE JURY TODAY
Charles Potts Tried for Murder of Otho Metcalf

The jury returned a verdict at 3:45 p.m. of not guilty.

The case of Charles Potts, charged with the murder of Otho Metcalf, went to the jury at about three o’clock this afternoon.  Argument by the attorneys was begun shortly after 1:30 this afternoon when court opened after the noon session.

Testimony in the case was begun after the selection of the twelfth juryman this morning.  It was a case of self-defense, the attorneys for Potts contended, alleging that Metcalf, had been shaking his fist at Potts and cursing him, as he approached Potts after an argument at a card table, in Scheppleman's Saloon at Thirty-fourth Street and Commercial Avenue.  Scheppleman testified that he had come from behind the bar and pulled Metcalf back as he stood shaking his hand at Potts and testified that as he turned to the bar again thinking the affair settled Metcalf resumed hikes loud talking, approaching Potts, Potts then struck Metcalf.

The man fell, striking his head on the concrete floor and sustained a fracture at the base of the skull, to the right, according to Dr. Woelfle, the next witness, which wound, according to the doctor's testimony, caused his death.

Eleven jurors were obtained Wednesday evening and the jury was finished this morning.  Those selected are as follows:

J. B. Warner, J. L. Hartley, Dennis Miller, John Sullivan, Festus Barter, Henry Harper, B. F. Wurner, Harry Hubbard, Niles Schuh, Allen Hickcox, Ike LaHue and Joe Walmer.

MOUNT VERNON BOY ON SUNKEN TANKER
Mrs. Charles R. Gordon, Mother, Is Seriously Ill

MOUNT VERNON, Ill., May 23—Elmer Gordon, of this city, was a member of the gun crew of the United States tanker William Rockefeller destroyed May 18.  Gordon was the first Jefferson County man to enter the war last spring, having just completed a term in the navy.  His mother, Mrs. Charles R. Gordon, is seriously sick and the effect of the announcement of the sinking of the ship is being kept from her.

The remains of William Steinbeck, a popular citizen of this place (Bardwell, Ky.), arrived here Sunday morning from Louisville, Ky., where he passed away Saturday afternoon as the result of an operation which he had undergone the first of the week.  Prior to his death, Mr. Steinbeck was a resident of Bardwell for twenty years and was engaged in the blacksmith business.  He is survived by one son, Clarence, age seventeen years, and a little daughter, Clara, age nine years, also a host of friends and relatives who reside in this county.  The funeral services were conducted from the family residence by the Rev. B. T. Huey, of Martin Tenn., after which interment was made in the Bardwell Cemetery with I. O. O. F. ceremonies.

Friday, 24 May 1918:
FORMER CAIRO LADY DIES IN KANSAS CITY

Word has been received by relatives of the death of Mrs. William Dale Moore, in Kansas City, on May 15.  She died at the home of her brother, Robert E. Devore in that city.

Mrs. Moore left Cairo about 28 years ago.  She was a member of an old Cairo family, was born in Cairo and was the daughter of N. A. Devore.  Surviving her here are a sister, Mrs. D. W. Weldy, at Villa ridge, a niece, Mrs. Charles Bethel, and a nephew, Frank Foss, of Cairo, and a niece, Mrs. J. T. McCune, at Mound City.

Mrs. Moore will be remembered by a great many of the older residents.

(William A. Moore married Annie Devore on 19 Nov 1869, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Nicholas A. Devore married Sarah Ann Grover on 27 Dec 1864, in Alexander Co., Ill.  William Minton, 23, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., son of Bird Minton and Julia Graddy, married Anna Weldy, 17, born in Rain Co., Kan., daughter of David Weldy and Julia Devore, on 15 Oct 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

MRS. RALPH CUSHMAN BURIED AT CHARLESTON

The funeral of Mrs. Ralph W. Cushman was held at Charleston, Mo., Thursday and the remains were buried in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery.  Services were held at the First Baptist Church, conducted by the pastor, Rev. Robert L. Lemons.

Besides her husband, Ralph W. Cushman, and her mother, Mrs. LaMontague, and brother, H. A. Cushman, and daughter, Miss Catherine, and Theron Pritchett, attended the funeral from Cairo.

SON OF THOMAS LEWIS DIES IN MEMPHIS

Master N. V. Lewis, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Lewis, died at the home of his parents in Memphis this morning after a brief illness.  N. V. Lewis, of Grand Chain, was in Cairo today en route to Memphis called by the death of his little grandson.

Mr. and Mrs. Brinkmeyer left Thursday night for New Orleans, where they were called by the death of Mrs. Brinkmeyer's sister, Mrs. B. Burns.

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Quinn, who were here (Charleston, Mo.) for the funeral of their mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Quinn, have returned to their home in Olive Branch, Ill.

Ed Welsh and family of Heggie Street (Charleston, Mo.) arrived home Sunday from Lutesville, where they were called by the death of Mr. Welsh's brother.

Saturday, 25 May 1918:
FORMER CAIRO WOMAN DIES

Mrs. William Keefe, formerly Miss Mary Conners, of Cairo, died suddenly at her home in St. Louis, according to word received by her brother-in-law, Thomas J. Keefe, of Cairo, late Friday afternoon.  Mrs. Keefe was well known in Cairo.

MRS. MARY PACE DIES IN MT. VERNON TODAY

Mrs. Mary Pace, mother of Mrs. Albert Lewis, of Cairo, died at her home in Mt. Vernon early this morning after an illness of about six months.  Mrs. Pace was the widow of the late E. C. Pace, of Mt. Vernon.

She had been unconscious for the past week and Mrs. Lewis has been with her since last Sunday.
The funeral services will be held in Mt. Vernon Sunday.

SISTER FARA PASSES AWAY
Cairo Mourns Loss of Saintly Woman Whom Death Claims after Six Weeks' Illness

Sister Fara, beloved head of the sisters at St. Mary's Infirmary, passed away at 10:30 o'clock Friday night after a six weeks' illness during which time she suffered intensely, but bore her pain with a courage and patience that were in keeping with her life of sacrifice and living for others.

Sister Fara was beloved alike by Catholics and Protestants, rich and poor, as everyone who came under her wonderful influence became a friend and admirer.  She was a cultured and intelligent as well as a spiritual and saintly woman, whose mission it was to relieve suffering and who always lived up to her duty.  She lived in Cairo for 29 years, coming here from St. Mary’s Notre Dame, Ind., where she became a member of the Sisters of the Holy Cross 30 years ago.

She was 54 years of age and was born in Ireland, coming to the United States, where she lived in Philadelphia.  Her name was Mary Williamson and she leaves surviving her no immediate relatives.
Cairo mourns the loss of Sister Fara and her beautiful life is a lesson to everyone no matter what his creed.  The remains will lie in state in the community room at the infirmary until 9:30 o'clock Sunday morning when they will be taken to St. Patrick’s Church.  The Knights of Columbus in a body will march in the funeral procession and the funeral high mass will be said by Rev. Father Eschman of DuQuoin.  After the services the mortal remains will be in state in the church until 9:30 at night when they will be taken on the Illinois central to Notre Dame, Ind., where interment will be made.  Rev. Father James J. Downey will accompany the body.

The pallbearers are Drs. W. F. Grinstead, R. E. Barrows, James McManus, A. A. Bondurant, Flint Bondurant, John T. Walshe, J. E. Woelfle, J. J. Rendleman, W. C. Clarke, S. B. Cary, Samuel Dodds, J. H. McNemer, H. A. Moreland, J. W. Dunn, Johnson, J. A. Davis, J. E. Strong, N. W. Cox, E. D. Morrow, William Fields, and R. M. Young.

R. D. Steinbeck, who came to attend the funeral and burial of his brother, W. M. Steinbeck, has returned to his home in Missouri.  (Bardwell, Ky.)

Monday, 27 May 1918:
Mrs. Albert Lewis returned this morning from Mt. Vernon, Ill., where she was called about a week ago by the illness of her mother, Mrs. Mary Pace, who passed away Saturday.

Mrs. H. S. Rowling, of Thebes, came down Sunday to attend the funeral of Sister Fara.  She was the guest of Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Howley, while in Cairo.

The body of Mrs. Ralph W. Cushman arrived here (Charleston, Mo.) Thursday morning from Memphis, Tenn., where she died on Wednesday morning.  The funeral service was held in the Baptist church by Rev. R. L. Lemons, at 2:30 o'clock and interment was in the Odd Fellows Cemetery.

Mayme Valentine Preuitt, daughter the late Capt. Valentine Preuitt and Mrs. Mary J. Preuitt, died at her home on East Commercial Street (Charleston, Mo.) Thursday morning at 3 o'clock.  The funeral was held from St. Henry's Catholic Church on Friday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock by Father Petrie, in the presence of a large crowd of relatives and friends.  Interment was in the Catholic cemetery.  She is survived by one brother, Tom Preuitt and three sisters, Lula and Bess Preuitt and Mrs. Dick Berry, of Willow Springs.  Mayme will be greatly missed by her many friends who loved her dearly for her many lovely traits of character.  

Mrs. Moore, of New Madrid, is here (Charleston, Mo.) having been called by the death of Miss Mayme Preuitt.

HUNDREDS MOURN FOR SISTER FARA
St. Patrick’s Church Filled at Funeral Services Sunday

Her faith in the goodness and mercy of God and her infinite patience were pointed out by Rev. Father J. J. Downey as the chief characteristics of Sister Fara, which made her life here at St. Mary's Infirmary so crowned with success.  Father Downey paid a high tribute to Sister Fara at the service held in St. Patrick’s Church Sunday morning.  The church was filled with people who had known and loved Sister Fara during her 29 years of ministration at the hospital.  The physicians of the city, intimate contact, served as pallbearers.  Members of the local chapter of Knights of Columbus attended in a body and acted as an escort as the remains were carried to the church from the hospital where she had so unselfishly devoted the best part of her life.  Sisters of the Holy Cross, her co-laborers, also occupied seats in the center of the church.

Sunday afternoon and until night, the remains lay in state in the infirmary, and scores of people passed bit the casket to gaze for the last time upon the fractures that they had learned to reverence and admire and love.  Later accompanied by a large number of friends, the body was taken to the Illinois Central station, to be forwarded to Notre Dame for interment.

Harry Smith, who was injured at the Illinois Lumber Company while at work there Tuesday, died at St. Mary’s Hospital in Cairo early Sunday morning from the wounds he sustained.  Blood poison having set in and the fatal results following.  He leaves a wife and two small daughters.  (Mound City)

Tuesday, 28 May 1918:
News of the death of his sister, Mrs. Anna Moore, of Kansas City, Mo., was received by her brother, R. A. Devore, she having passed away at the home of another brother, R. E. Devore.  Deceased also has a sister surviving her, Mrs. D.H. Weldy, of near Mounds.

Wednesday, 29 May 1918:
TELLS HOW YOUNG WEIS WAS DROWNED
Young Man Would Have Graduated from High School This Year

Carl A. Weis, Jr., who lost his life by drowning at Alexandria, La., on May 21, while in bathing, was a member of the graduating class of the high school there, and was attending a school outing when he lost his life.  The Alexandria Town Talk, commenting upon the tragedy, says that “the unfortunate occurrence has cast a gloom over the entire community and particularly upon his young friends who compose the senior class as well as the other pupils and faculty of the school, with whom he was so intimately associated.”

It was a gay party that attended the outing and it was not until they were preparing to leave that they missed Carl.  “It is not known,” says the paper, “whether anyone saw him go down, but when he could not be located, someone called for him, and no response being received, the party became alarmed and called for Prof. Nye.  When Prof. Nye heard his name called, he returned to the other side of the pond and began a search for the missing youth.  Failing to locate him, he jumped into the water, diving down and fortunately recovered the body immediately on the bottom where the water was about ten feet deep.  It was brought to the surface and with the assistance of Mr. John Price and others, was taken ashore where every effort was made to revive him and physicians were immediately summoned, but nothing could be done, as life was evidently extinct before he was taken out of the water.  Carl was an expert swimmer and it is believed he must have been taken with an attack of the heart.”

The young man was a son of Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Weis, was born in Cairo, Nov. 1, 1901.  His father is manager and principal owner of the Alexandria Cooperage and Lumber Company.

Rev. Father James J. Downey is expected to return Thursday from Notre Dame, Ind., where accompanied the remains of Sister M. Fara Sunday.  Father Downey is stopping in Chicago on the way home.

The funeral of Harry Smith, who died Sunday morning at St Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo, was held from the St. Peter's Episcopal Church Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock.  Rev. A. J. D. Keuhn officiated and the interurban cars conveyed the funeral cortege to Beech Grove Cemetery where the body was interred.  Two sisters and a brother-in-law of the deceased, of Democracy, Ohio, were in attendance at the funeral and burial.  (Mound City)

Thursday, 30 May 1918:
Mrs. Linahan, age 80 years, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Anna Carter, has been in failing health, died of stomach trouble Tuesday afternoon. Deceased is survived by her daughter, Mrs. Anna Cader, and a son, Thomas Scanlin, of Ullin.  The funeral was held this morning from St. Mary's Catholic Church.  Interment in Villa Ridge cemetery, Karcher Brothers, of Cairo, are in charge.  (Mound City)

(Thomas Scanlin married Alice Vick on 25 May 1887, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Friday, 31 May 1918:
The funeral over the remains of Mrs. Ann Linehan, who died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Anna Carter, Tuesday morning, was held from St. Mary's Catholic Church Thursday morning at 8:30 o'clock.  Father F. Tecklenberg conducted the services.

The interment taking place in the Catholic cemetery at Villa Ridge (Mound City)

(Her marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge  reads:  Ann Linehan 1838-1918.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. Harry Baker, of Detroit, and her sister-in-law, Miss Florence Baker, of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, arrived Wednesday to attend the funeral of Harry E. Smith.  Their arrival was somewhat belated, as the funeral was held Tuesday afternoon.  The former Mrs. Baker and Mrs. Smith were sisters.

Miss Anna Green, a negress dropped dead in colored annex to H. V. Handley's saloon Thursday afternoon at 3:30.  The body was removed to the undertaking rooms of Montgomery & Stockton, where the inquest was held.  The negress was a well-known character about town (Mound City).

Saturday, 1 Jun 1918:
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to express our most profound appreciation to the general public of Cairo for the many sympathetic and beautiful manifestations of their thoughtfulness and devotion to our beloved Sister Fara during her illness.  We shall ever cherish in sweet remembrance thoughts of those whose profuse floral tributes so fittingly symbolized their abiding respect and affection for every trust reposed in her.  We wish to thank them with ample sincerity and assurance that our hearts are filled with tender thoughts of them.
Sisters of the Holy Cross

Mrs. Ellen Lorden, of Rantoul, and Mrs. Mary Garnier, of Centralia, nieces of the late Mrs. Ann Linehan, were called here on account of the death of their aunt.  (Mound City)

Tuesday, 4 Jun 1918:
FUNERAL NOTICE

Gholson—Died, June 3, 1918, at Jonesboro, Ark., Eugene Milford Gholson, aged 21 years.  Funeral services will be held at the residence of W. L. Perce, 514 Center Street at 9 o'clock a.m., Wednesday, June 5.  Interment private.  Friends of the family are invited to the funeral services.  E. A. Burke is in charge of the arrangements.

EUGENE GHOLSON IS TO BE BURIED HERE

Eugene V. Gholson, aged 21 years, son of Mr. and Mrs. John W. Gholson, formerly of Cairo, lately of Jonesboro, Ark., after an operation for appendicitis, died at that place Monday, according to information received by friends of the family here.

The remains were brought to Cairo for interment today and funeral arrangements will be made shortly.  Services will be held form the residence of Mrs. W. L. Perce, 514 Center Street, Wednesday.

(John W. Gholson married Mary G. Price on 17 Oct 1889, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. Robert Hunt received a message Saturday stating that her father, A. W. Lewis, a former merchant of Pulaski, but now residing at Sesser, Ill., was stricken with paralysis and that his right side and speech was seriously affected.  (Mound City)

Wednesday, 5 Jun 1918:
CHAPMAN'S DEATH IS UNCONFIRMED
Report of Death of Vienna Boy in France Not Verified

A report sent out from Carbondale that Lieut. Ralph Chapman, son of former Congressman P. T. Chapman, of Vienna, had been killed in France, where he is in the aviation service, could not be verified this morning.  The Citizen called up Senator Chapman by telephone, but he was away from home.  Mrs. Chapman, when asked if she had heard from her son and told that it was reported his name was in the casualty list, said that she had not received the news.

Lieut. Chapman is the youngest son of Senator and Mrs. Chapman.  An elder son, Ward Chapman, is also in the artillery service, and a cousin, Dick Chapman, also holds a commission.

Joe Davies, of Cairo, is a cousin of the Chapman family.

(Ples T. Chapman married L. May Copeland on 20 Dec 1882, in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. L. F. Murdaugh, who has been seriously ill at the home of her mother, Mrs. D. Yuch, for the past five weeks, is still in a critical condition.

 

Word was received here (Barlow, Ky.) Monday of the death of Gene Gholson, who formerly lived here, but now of Jonesboro, Ark.  Died of appendicitis.  He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Gholson.

 

Thursday, 6 Jun 1918:
A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Walter Dershinger, of America, but it lived for only a day or two, burial taking place at Beech Grove Cemetery Tuesday.

Friday, 7 Jun 1918:
MRS. CHARLES FEUCHTER CALLED BY MESSAGE
Relative at Evansville to Be Buried Saturday

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Feuchter left today for Evansville, Ind., where Mrs. Feuchter has been called by the death of Miss Emma Roach, a relative.  Funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock.  Miss Roach, the deceased, was principal of one of the Evansville schools.

Mrs. Feuchter will remain after the ceremonies, while Mr. Feuchter will go to St. Louis to attend the T. P. A. convention.


Saturday, 8 Jun 1918:
GYPSY GIRL FELL IN RIVER, DROWNED
Small Child of Traveling Tribe Fell off Bank at Wickliffe Friday Afternoon

A small South American Indian girl, traveling with a party of her race roving through the country in gypsy fashion, was drowned Friday afternoon at Wickliffe.  The child with others of tender age was playing on the river bank, while the party awaited the ferry Three States to make their crossing to Cairo.  The party was traveling in four automobiles.

The children were running up and down at the edge of the water when simultaneously two of them fell into the water.  A frantic effort was made to rescue them, but one went down finally before she could be reached.  The other was saved.

The body was recovered an hour afterward, by fishermen, who used grab hooks.  Dr. Melton, who appeared at the scene attempted to resuscitate the little girl, but the long period in the water killed her.  An inquest was held in Wickliffe, Friday evening and a verdict of death due to accidental drowning was returned.

The child was buried at Wickliffe, today.

Miss Lucy Hutcherson, 17-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Hutcherson, died Tuesday night.  Funeral at the residence Wednesday afternoon, conducted by her pastor, Rev. J. M. Jenkins.  Interment at City Cemetery.  Lucy had recently graduated from Marvin College and no young woman in town had more friends than she.  She was secretary of the Methodist Sunday School and her classmates attended the funeral in a body, as did her graduating class from the college.  (Clinton, Ky.)

Mrs. Cora Burnely, wife of J. R. Burnely, and a daughter of John Horn, died at the home of her parents here (Bardwell, Ky.) Monday night, after a lingering illness of tuberculosis.  She was born and reared at Bardwell and was a lady of highest character and a Christian who always remembered the duties she owed to the community and her fellow man.  She is survived by her husband and one child, father, mother, one sister and one brother, the latter two being Mrs. Ed Marton and Herman Horn.  The funeral services were conducted at the home of her parents, Wednesday afternoon by Rev. Keener Rudolph and interment was in the Bardwell Cemetery immediately afterwards.  

Will Burnely and son, Leonard, of Cairo, attended the burial of Mrs. J. R. Burnely, Wednesday, she being a sister-in-law of Mr. Burnley.

WOMAN KILLED BY LIGHTNING

MOUNT VERNON, Ill., June 8—Mrs. Lottie Hess, of Isa, a village a few miles south of Mount Vernon, was struck by lightning and killed last night.  She had been gathering eggs at the chicken house and returning to the house stopped under a tree to avoid the shower.  Oliver Harris was severely injured by a stroke of lightning also.

THOMAS McFARLAND DIED IN CHICAGO
Passed Away After Delicate Operation; Was Long Resident of Cairo

Thomas McFarland, owner and president of the McFarland Lumber Company, died Friday night at 10 o'clock, at the Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago, following an operation for gallstones.  His wife and daughter, Evelyn, aged 19, were at his bedside as he passed away.  Mr. McFarland has been under treatment for the past two weeks at the hospital.  Before leaving for Chicago, he expressed the belief that if it was found necessary to operate, he would not withstand it.  He was 67 years of age.

Mr. McFarland was one of the leading lumber men of the city and had been a resident of Cairo for the past 12 or 13 years.  He was a member of St. Joseph's Catholic Church.  Well known and much respected, his death will come today as a shock to many who did not realize the gravity of his condition, when he left for Chicago.

While no definite information as to the funeral services has been received here, it is thought that he will be buried at Chicago as his people are located there, the funeral to take place probably Monday.
It is thought Mrs. McFarland and daughter Evelyn will continue to make their home in Cairo.

Mr. McFarland was born in Massachusetts 67 years ago.  His family moved to Chicago while he was yet young and there he made his home until after his marriage.  He was a resident of Chicago during the big fire of 1871.  He was married twice.  A lumber man at 20 years of age, he followed the business through his life, and as long as 18 years ago had lumber interests in Cairo.  His family at that time were living in Chicago.

About 1905 or 1906 Mr. McFarland incorporated his lumber business at Cairo and moved his family here.  He built the present home of the family at 2845 Park Place West.  Since then he has been a continual resident of the city and turned all his attention to his business interests here.  He had no Chicago lumber interests at the time of his death.

His health has been weakened for a long time and lately developed for the worse.

Monday, 10 Jun 1918:
FIVE NEGROES ARE SCALDED BY STEAM
New Man Opens Steam Box at Pioneer Pole and Shaft Co.; Probably Will Not Recover

Five negroes were scalded, one perhaps fatally, and two others seriously, when one, an inexperienced hand, at his first day's work, opened a steam box in the rim plant of the Pioneer Pole and Shaft Company, this morning about nine o'clock.

The new man, Fines Wilson, was scalded from head to foot by the steam which burst from the door and according to the physicians in charge was practically parboiled.  The skin of his face and the greater part of his chest and lower body peeled off.  The chances for life are against him.  His home is in Cairo.
William and Henry Johnson were seriously burned and brought to St. Mary's Infirmary with Wilson.  Bell was burned about the chest and Johnson on both arms.

J. W. Crim, of Mound City and Alec Bush, of Future City, were burned, but not seriously and were taken to their homes.

FATHER OF JESSE BEADLES DIES SUNDAY

Jesse Beadles and family were called to Moscow, Ky., by the death of his father, which occurred there Sunday.

CHARLESTON LADY DIES AT INFIRMARY

Mrs. Marie E. Sterett, of Charleston, Mo., died at St. Mary's Infirmary shortly before noon today, where she was a patient.  The body was taken home on the boat this afternoon, accompanied by her daughter, Mrs. Strickland.  The deceased was 57 years old.

REQUIEM MASS TUESDAY FOR THOMAS McFARLAND

Requiem mass will be said at 7:30 o'clock Tuesday morning at St. Joseph's Church for Mr. Thomas McFarland, whose death occurred in Chicago Saturday and who will be buried here Tuesday.  Rev. Father Gillen, pastor of St. Joseph's Church, will conduct the mass.

Funeral services for the late Thomas McFarland will be held Tuesday at 11:30 a.m. in the chapel in Graceland Cemetery, Chicago.  A number of the Cairo lumberman will go to Chicago tonight to attend the funeral.  The burial will be in the cemetery there.

Tuesday, 11 Jun 1918:
MAN MARRIED 13 TIMES DIES AT 99
"Uncle" John Dempsey Took His Latest Wife When 95

MARION, Ill., June 11—“Uncle” John Dempsey, Williamson County's oldest resident, died at his home four days before his neighbors were preparing to celebrate this 100th anniversary.

In addition to his extreme age he was the most married man in the county, but after he took his thirteenth wife at the age of 95, a conservator was appointed for him.  He purchased his coffin seven years ago.

BROTHER OF CAIRO GIRL IN THE CASUALTY LIST

Harry F. Ray, of McCurtain, Okla., whose name appeared in Monday's casualty list, is a brother of Miss Mabel Ray of the Home Telephone Exchange in Cairo.  Miss Ray has not heard from her mother, who would be the one to receive the official notification of casualty.

The funeral services of Mrs. Clarissa Parrott, better known as Mrs. Morrow, who passed away in her home in Oak Street Saturday, were held at her late home Sunday home evening at sundown by Rev. Mr. Lamkin, of Cairo.  Burial took place in Beech Grove Cemetery.

(James A. Parrott married Clerissa Morrow on 24 Sep 1882, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

The remains of Mrs. Earnest, an aged lady, also passed away at her home in North Oak Street Friday night, were taken to Dongola, where funeral services and interment took place.  She had been an invalid for several years the result of an accident sustained in a run away.  (Mounds)

(Philip Earnest married Hannah S. Barger on 19 Dec 1872, in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker in Mt. Olive Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Phillip J. Earnest Born Jan. 28, 1855 Died Oct. 5, 1938.  Hannah J. Earnest Born Jan. 17, 1858 Died June 7, 1918.—Darrel Dexter)

Wednesday, 12 Jun 1918:
CHARLESTON MAN DIED OF BLOOD POISONING
Body of Aged Samuel Royster Will Be Buried at Indianapolis

Samuel Royster, aged 82 years, died at 8:45 last night at St. Mary’s Infirmary of blood poisoning.  It is said the blood poison resulted from the cutting of a corn.  He was from Charleston, Mo., but his former home was Indianapolis, Ind.

His daughter, Mrs. C. C. Watt, and husband, of Charleston, were at the bedside when he passed away.  The body was prepared for removal to Indianapolis and sent over the Big Four this evening.  Funeral services and interment will take place at that city.

RECEIVED NOTICE OF BROTHER'S DEATH
Word Came Today to Miss Mabel Ray of Telephone Exchange

Miss Mabel Ray, operator at the Home Telephone Company, today received a letter from her mother in McCurtain, Okla., that she had received notification of the death of her son, Harry F. Ray, in France on May 20.  He died of wounds received in action.

Miss Ray has been an operator at the local exchange for the past three years, coming here from DuQuoin, where the family formerly resided.

MRS. H. F. STARKS PASSED AWAY TODAY
Remains to Be Buried at Grand Chain Thursday Afternoon

Mrs. Sarah A. Starks aged 61, passed away at 6:30 o'clock this morning at her home, 315 Ninth Street.  She had been ill for about three months, during two of which she was under the doctor’s care.  Hardening of the arteries was the cause of her death.

The deceased is survived by two daughters, Mrs. R. Dever, and Miss Kathleen Starks, both of whom made their home with her and two sons, H. G. and J. W. Starks, also of Cairo.  All were present at her death bed.  Surviving also are three brothers, Charles H. Beshers, of Columbus, Ky., G. A. Beshers, of Grand Chain, and R. L. Beshers, of El Paso, Ill., and a sister, Mrs. Annie Fansler, of Cairo.

The remains were taken to Grand Chain this afternoon where they will be buried Thursday afternoon.
Mrs. Starks was a native of New Columbia, Ill.

E. A. Burke was in charge of the funeral.

(Her marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Sarah A. Starkes Born June 25, 1857 Died June 12, 1918.—Darrel Dexter)

Jacob Imhoff, of Buchanan, Mich., the father of W. B. Imhoff, of this city (Mound City), died at St. Mary’s Infirmary in Cairo Monday afternoon.  He had recently suffered a stroke of paralysis and having been ill previous to that affliction and he succumbed to the complications that set in.  He was 67 years old.  Deceased is survived by a daughter, Miss Cora Imhoff, of Cairo, and two sons, W. B. Imhoff, of this city, and George Imhoff, of Cairo.  The body was taken to Buchanan, Mich., for burial accompanied by his daughter and son, George.

TWELFTH ENGINEERS OFFICER SHOT AS SPY
Lieut. Roy Parker, of Belleville, Graduate of Illinois

BELLEVILLE, Ill., June 12—Thomas F. Powers, an employee of the St. Clair County Gas and Electric Company, has received a letter telling of the capture of Lieut. Roy Parker, Twelfth Engineers, formerly an employee of the gas company in Belleville, by Germans and of his being shot as a spy.

Lieut. Parker was a graduate of the University of Illinois and his particular task in his company was that of an observer.

The news was in a letter from G. T. Stearns, formerly a gas company employee, now stationed at Fort Riley, Kan.  Both Stearns and Parker formerly lived at Champaign.

Thursday, 13 Jun 1918:
Uncle George Anderson, an aged negro, died Thursday.  (Cache)

Friday, 14 Jun 1918:
The funeral of Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Stirrett, who died at St. Mary's on Monday, was held Tuesday afternoon from the residence.  Rev. R. L. Lemons, pastor of the Baptist Church, held the service, after which the remains were taken to the Odd Fellows Cemetery for burial.  (Charleston, Mo.)

Saturday, 15 Jun 1918:
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to thank those who so kindly helped us in our late bereavement the death of our beloved mother and sister.
George Starks
John Starks
Kathleen Starks
Mrs. R. Dever
Mrs. A. L. Fansler

Monday, 17 Jun 1918:
MRS. MARY CREIGHTON DIES THIS AFTERNOON
Passes Away at Home after Illness of Several Months

Mrs. Mary E. Creighton died at her home, 2706 Commercial Avenue this afternoon at 2 o'clock after an illness of some months following several paralytic strokes.  She was taken with the first last April and was removed to St. Mary’s Infirmary.  Her health improving, she was taken to her home as it was her wish to be surrounded by her family and in her own home.  She was a devoted mother and during her illness her children were with her constantly.

Mrs. Creighton was a devoted member of St. Joseph’s Catholic Church.  She leaves surviving her her husband, Martin, a daughter, Miss Mayme Creighton, and three sons, Joseph, Martin and Mal, all of Cairo.  She also leaves an invalid sister, Miss Ellen Cullinan, and a brother, Mal Cullinan.

The funeral arrangements will be announced later.

(Martin Creighton married Mary Cullinan on 6 Feb 1870, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Her marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Mary E. Creighton 1853-1918 Mother.—Darrel Dexter)

Tuesday, 18 Jun 1918:
FUNERAL NOTICE

Funeral services for Mrs. Mary E. Creighton, who died Monday, June 17, 1918, will be held Wednesday afternoon, June 19.

Funeral cortege will leave the residence, 2706 Commercial Avenue, at 1:30 p.m. or St. Joseph's Church, where services will be conducted by Rev. Fr. Gillen at 2 o'clock.  Special I. C. train will leave Fourteenth Street and Ohio Levee at 2:45 for Villa Ridge, where interment will be made in Calvary Cemetery.

The pallbearers are:  Active—C. A. Pettit, John Sullivan, T. J. Williams, C. A. Profilet, A. W. Lynch, E. J. Walker

Honorary—W. A. McKnight, C. L. Keaton, P. T. Langan, T. J. Keefe, A. P. Ehs, W. P. Greaney, John Hogan, Gus Osterloh, John Barry, D. M. Kelly.

"Aunt" Sallie Reese, an aged and respected citizen of Bardwell died at her home here (Bardwell, Ky.) Sunday after a lingering illness of tuberculosis.

Wednesday, 19 Jun 1918:
Word reached here (Villa Ridge) last week of the death of Mrs. Mary E. Green, wife of the late G. W. Green.  Mrs. Green until last November made this place her home, but at that time left for Pennsylvania where she was with relatives.  Death came as a result from an automobile accident which caused several ribs and an arm to be broken and a fractured skull.

The remains were brought to Elmwood, Illinois, where they were laid to rest Saturday afternoon.

BODY OF MAN FOUND FLOATING IN RIVER
Identification Impossible Body Probably in Water Since Winter

A floater was pulled from the Ohio River Tuesday afternoon by employees at the Barrett fleet and after an examination by the coroner was buried immediately.  The body was badly decomposed, the features of the face having fallen away, and the clothes were in no condition to be used as a means of identification.  He was a large man of between 35 and 50 years of age.

The fact that the man wore an overshoe, leads to the opinion that he met his death during the winter season, when the ice causes such heavy loss of property along the Ohio Valley.

Thursday, 20 Jun 1918:
Card of Thanks

We wish to thank Father James J. Gillen, the choir of St. Joseph’s Church, the good sisters of St. Mary's Infirmary, and all friends whose kind assistance and sympathy during the illness and death of our wife and mother, Mrs. Mary Creighton, was such a comfort to us.  We also wish to thank those who sent floral offerings and the friends who loaned their automobiles for the funeral.
Martin Creighton and Family

WIFE OF MAJ. LEWIS DIED AT VILLA RIDGE

Mrs. Sarah E. Lewis, wife of Maj. S. O. Lewis, died at her home in Villa Ridge Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock after a long period of illness.

Funeral arrangements had not been made last evening.

(Samuel O. Lewis married Sarah E. Walker on 11 May 1870, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Sarah E. Lewis 1847-1918.—Darrel Dexter)

HILL SPRINGS, KY. MURDER

CLINTON, Ky., June 20—Henry Featherstone shot and killed Fulton Bass near Spring Hill Thursday.  Details of the shooting could not be learned but reports say that a difference arose over a watch that Bass had taken from a negro hand of Featherstone’s.

Friday, 21 Jun 1918:
SOLEMN REQUIEM MASS HELD FOR SISTER FARA

Solemn requiem mass was held at St. Patrick’s Church at 8 o'clock this morning for Sister Fara, whose death occurred a few weeks ago.  Rev. C. J. Eschmann, of DuQuoin, officiated, assisted by Father Downey, Father Reight, and Father O'Connell.

LOUIS H. MYERS HAS PASSED AWAY
Old Cairo Resident Died Thursday at Toledo, Ohio

Louis H. Myers, one time sheriff of Alexander County, and chief of police, of Cairo, and for years a citizen here during which he served as a constable and looked after real estate matters, passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. H. G. Wilson, in Toledo, Ohio, Thursday afternoon.  He had been in failing health for a long time and had gone to Toledo where she could give him constant attention.

Mr. Myers was in his 85th year.  He was a resident of Cairo for half a century and was a prominent figure here for years.  Ten years ago his wife died and since that time his home on Tenth Street has been broken up.  For several years he has been in very poor health, and a few years ago he was so low that his life was despaired of.  He rallied however and was able to be up and around again.

Mr. Myers is survived by his adopted daughter, who was Miss Gussie Myers, now the wife of H. G. Wilson, and Mrs. W. H. Williams and Louis Woolriege, niece and nephew.

The remains will be brought to Cairo for interment at Villa Ridge cemetery, under the auspices of Safford Lodge of Odd Fellows, of which he was a member.

(His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Louis H. Myers Born Aug. 20, 1843 Died June 20, 1918.—Darrel Dexter)

ORIENT, ILL., MAN KILLED IN ACTION A VOLUNTEER

BENTON, Ill., June 21—Sergt. Fravell, of Orient, among those killed in action Wednesday, is a son of John Fravell, of Buckner.  When the war first started he volunteered enlisting in the Marine Corps.  He is the first Franklin County man killed in overseas service.

Saturday, 22 Jun 1918:
JOHN MASSEY, NEGRO, P. O. ATTACHE, DEAD

John Massey, the special delivery carrier at the Cairo post office, was found dead sitting in a chair this morning at his home, 218 Twenty-ninth Street.  He had been in poor health for a number of months and had not worked at the post office since before the cold winter weather set in last winter.  He was about his home as usual this morning, however, and was sitting out in front of the house.  Later he went in and sat in a rocking chair, where he was found dead.

In the same block, a negro woman, Georgia Ruby, was found dead Friday.

MYERS PARTY NOT TO COME TO CAIRO
Local Special Will Meet No. 1 with Body at Villa Ridge

Funeral services over the body of Louis H. Myers will be held Sunday afternoon at Villa Ridge cemetery.  The body of the late Mr. Myers will be forwarded from Toledo tonight and will come south on No. 1 from St. Louis tomorrow.  The remains will not be brought to Cairo however, arrangements having been made to stop at Villa Ridge.

A special Illinois Certain will leave the Illinois Central station at 4:30 p.m. Sunday and will proceed to Villa Ridge to meet funeral party from Toledo.

Safford Lodge No. 67 I. O. O. F. will conduct the services at the grave.  Friends of the family are invited.

E. A. Burke has charge of arrangements.

N. R. Taylor, one of the county's best known citizens, died at his home here (Bardwell, Ky.) Sunday at 6:30 p.m. following an attack of nervousness, extending over several weeks.  Mr. Taylor was born in Warren County and came to Carlisle County about twenty-five years ago.  He has always been one of the strong champions of progress in every line of endeavor and a devout advocate of righteous living.  During the early years of his citizenship here, he was engaged in teaching, but in late years, he has been farming, having but recently purchased a tract of land west of town.  Mr. Taylor was a member of the Christian Church and always lived an upright honorable Christian life.  He was also a member of the Masonic Lodge, having been affiliated with the Bardwell lodge for many years.  He is survived by a wife and child by a former marriage and a brother.  Funeral services were conducted at the Christian Church Monday afternoon by Elder Joe Ratcliffe and burial was in the Bardwell Cemetery, being conducted by the Masons.

Monday, 24 Jun 1918:
MRS. A. DANNEKER OF MOUNDS PASSED AWAY
Died at Her Home after Illness to Be Buried Wednesday

Mrs. Albert Danneker, a bride of eight months, formerly Miss Cassie Travers, of Cairo, died at her home in Mounds at 4:30 o'clock this morning after an illness of some length.  She was born in Cairo and went with her parents to Mounds at an early age.  She is the wife of Albert Danneker, a switchman in the Illinois Central yards at that place.

Surviving the deceased are the husband, mother and father, Mr. and Mrs. John Travers, two sisters, Mrs. Ed Raub and Mrs. Edna Scheuling, and a brother, John Travers, all of Mounds.

Service will be held Wednesday morning at St. Raphael's Catholic Church at Mounds, with interment at St. Mary's Cemetery.  The time will be announced later.

Karcher Brothers have charge of the arrangements.

ANNA WOMAN DIED AT ST. MARY'S SATURDAY
Mrs. Cecilia Clements Was Buried at Anna Today

Mrs. Cecilia Clements, of Anna, Ill., wife of Charles A. Clements, who was brought to Cairo Monday, June 17, for treatment and operation for gallstones, died Saturday night at 9:30 o'clock at the infirmary.  Her husband and family were at the bedside.

The body was taken to Karcher Brothers undertaking parlors and prepared for removal to Anna.  It was taken to Anna on the 11:45 Illinois Central train.  Funeral services were held at Anna today.

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR LOUIS H. MYERS

The remains of the late Louis H. Myers were buried in Villa Ridge cemetery Sunday evening, beside the grave of his wife.  The funeral services were held under the auspices of Safford Lodge of Odd Fellows of which he was a member and Frank E. Thurman and W. H. Gibson, officiated.  Pallbearers selected from the order were Hugh Davis, J. W. Corn, J. D. Johnson, J. A. Cox, Walter Priddy and W. G. Gill.
Members of the lodge and other Cairo friends went up from here on a special train and met Illinois Central train No. 1 on its arrival at Villa Ridge at 5:48 p.m.  Accompanying the remains were his daughter and her husband, Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Wilson, of Toledo, Ohio.

It was a coincidence that the horse which was his faithful servant and companion for so many years in Cairo should have drawn his body to its last earthly resting place in the cemetery.  The animal is now owned by J. F. Sawyer, the sexton.

CENTENARIAN WAS MARRIED 13 TIMES

Many Johnson County people knew Uncle John Dempsey, of Creal Springs, who died last week, 100 years old lacking 4 days—the oldest person in Williamson County.  He had been married 13 times and could not remember all of his wives' names.  His last matrimonial venture was when he was 95.  He lived with her three weeks and gave her $500 and a sewing machine to separate.  Uncle John had been in Burnside many times, was a peculiar character.  He tried hard to reach the century make and came near succeeding.

 

INFANT SON OF W. W. PRITCHETT BURIED

William Walter, Jr., aged 16 months, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Pritchett, of 2600 Sycamore Street, died Saturday evening at 4 o'clock of summer complaint.  The remains were taken this morning to Dexter, Mo., where they were buried today.

Mr. Pritchett is bookkeeper for the McKnight-Kenton Grocery Company.

VIENNA WOMAN DIED OF HYDROPHOBIA
Mrs. James Hester, Bitten by a Pet Cat, Died in Great Agony

VIENNA, Ill., June 24—One of the most shocking deaths this community has ever known occurred Sunday when Mrs. James Hester died of hydrophobia.  Eight weeks ago Mrs. Hester was bitten on the hand by a cat.  As the cat had shown no symptoms of rabies no specific treatment was taken to prevent that disease.  Although the hand became very sore and the patient suffered severely, the sore healed and recovery seemed almost complete when about a week ago symptoms of hydrophobia appeared.

For the last week her sufferings were very great.  So great that for five or six days she was kept under the influence of medicine.  She died Sunday at 3 a.m.

Tuesday, 25 Jun 1918:
FUNERAL NOTICE

Danenker—Died, Mrs. Albert Danneker at her home in Mounds Monday, June 24.  The funeral will be held in Mounds Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock at St. Raphael's Catholic Church, Rev. Father Techlenberg to officiate.  The funeral cortege will leave the house, 305 No. Delaware Street, at 8:50 for the church.  Interment will be made at St. Mary's Cemetery.  Friends of the family invited to attend.

(Her marker in St. Mary Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Cassie wife of A. J. Danneker Born Jan. 5, 1898 Died June 24, 1918.—Darrel Dexter)

JERRY MORROW DIES IN ST. LOUIS MONDAY

Jerry Morrow, aged 60 years, died Wednesday evening at 7:30 o'clock in St. Louis, where he has been visiting his daughter, Mrs. L. A. Fox, for some time.  He was formerly a well-known and popular motorman for the Cairo Electric and Traction Company and everyone knew "Jerry" who has been retired for some years.  He leaves surviving him his wife, Mrs. Ellen Morrow, a daughter, Mrs. L. A. Fox, and a son, John Morrow, of Cairo.

The remains will be brought to Cairo arriving tonight and taken to his home 627 Sixteenth Street.  The funeral arrangements will be announced later.  Karcher Brothers are in charge of the arrangements.

(Jeremiah Morrow married Helen Hanrahan on 12 May 1881, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Jeremiah Morrow Born April 1, 1856 Died June 24, 1918 Father.—Darrel Dexter)

IN MEMORY OF THOMAS McFARLAND

We, your committee duly appointed at a special meeting of the Trustees of the Orphan Asylum of Southern Illinois at Cairo held June 18th, A.D. 1918, do place on record our sincere and heartfelt sorrow, for the loss of our co-trustee and secretary, called from us at the height of his usefulness and on the eve of a new era in the life of the asylum, brought about largely by his faithfulness and devotion to the cause of the fatherless, and untiring efforts on behalf of the orphan.

Mr. McFarland, since his connection with this work of charity, has been most generous and active, never failing to give his help actively and financially whenever needed.

We hereby, by a rising vote, express our appreciation of all his good deeds for the Orphan's Home and our respect for him as a good citizen, a Christian gentleman, and devoted husband and father, always at the front in public duty, and faithful to the work entrusted to him.

To his devoted wife and daughter, we extend our tender sympathy and indeed hope they may find consolation in his goodness and his enviable record to those in affliction and distress.

Our secretary is instructed to furnish a copy of these proceedings to the family and the public press.
(Signed)
Miles Frederick Gilbert
John M. Lansden, Committee

Mrs. Albert Danneker, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Travers, passed away early Monday morning at her home on North Delaware Avenue, after an illness of many weeks, which was borne with great patience.  Everything that medical skill and loving hands could do was done but of no avail.  She leaves to mourn her loss, beside her parents, a devoted husband, two sisters, Mrs. Ed Raub, and Mrs. Edna Schming, and one brother, John Travers, beside a host of relatives and friends.  (Mounds)

Obituary

On Wednesday last, June 19, our little community (Villa Ridge) was saddened by the news of the death at 2:30 p.m. of Mrs. Sarah Lewis, wife of Maj. S. O. Lewis, Sr., of this place, at the age of 71 years.  She had been in failing health for the past year, but until the last few months, all had hoped she might still be spared many happy and useful years.

Surrounded by her devoted family—husband—four sons and two daughters, she followed the beckoning hand and went to rest—peacefully—like a babe going to sleep.

Funeral services were held at the Congregational Church, where Rev. Galvin, of Mounds, gave in appropriate words, a most touching and tender tribute to the life and memory of the deceased.

The day was ideal and the church decorated by loving hands, with ferns and potted plants, was filled with sorrowing relatives and friends.

A profusion of exquisite flowers dumbly testified to the esteem to which she was held in her home town, where her gentle presence will be missed and most to by those who knew her best.

Card of Thanks

We extend our thanks and appreciation to our friends who kindly assisted us during the illness and death of our dear wife and mother, also for the many beautiful floral offerings and the kind and sympathetic remarks of the pastor.
S. O. Lewis, Sr., and Children

Wednesday, 26 Jun 1918:
FUNERAL NOTICE

Morrow—Died, Monday, June 24, in St. Louis, Jerry Morrow, aged 60 years.  Funeral services will be held at St. Patrick’s Church Thursday afternoon, June 27, conducted by Rev. Father James J. Downey.  Funeral cortege will leave the residence, 627 Sixteenth Street, at 2 o'clock for the church, where services will be at 2:15.  A special train will leave Fourteenth and Ohio at 2:45 for Villa Ridge where interment will be made.  Friends invited.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Entered into rest, June 27, 1917, Mrs. A. Hoag, age 68, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John A. Miller, Jr., 221 9th Street.  Services will be conducted at the residence by Rev. Father J. J. Downey, Thursday, at 3 p.m., June 27, 1918.  The remains will be taken to Olmstead on the 3:40 p.m.  Big Four train.  Interment will be in Mount Zion Cemetery, Olmstead, Ill.

MRS. ALBERT HOAG
PASSED AWAY HERE
Old Cairo Resident Died at Age of Sixty-Eight Years After Illness

Mrs. Victorine Hoag, aged 68 years, for the past 35 years a resident of Cairo and native of southern Illinois, died at 5:45 Tuesday evening at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John A. Miller, Jr., of Ninth Street.  She had been ill for several months with hardening of the arteries.  She was the wife of Albert Hoag.

The deceased was born at Caledonia, Illinois, and spent her entire life in the part of the state.  She married twice.  Surviving her are the husband, Albert Hoag, two daughters, Mrs. J. A. Miller, Jr., of Cairo, and Mrs. J. J. Fisher, of Little Rock. Ark., one son by her former marriage, W. D. Barnes, of Moline, two sister, Mrs. Mary Moore, of Grand Chain, and Mrs. Annie Carson, of Artex, Ark.

Funeral services will be conducted at the Miller residence 221 Ninth Street, Thursday afternoon, Rev. Father Downey officiating.  Interment will take place at Caledonia, the remains to be removed Olmsted on the Big Four at 3:45.

E. A. Burke has charge of arrangements.

(Thomas C. Hough married Alice Barnes on 18 Jan 1879, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Nelson Bussey, a young man about 23 years old, died Sunday at the home of his mother in town (Clinton, Ky.)  He was survived by his mother and four brothers, B. S., W. H., Earl, and James.  Interment at Oakwood Cemetery.

 

Thursday, 27 Jun 1918: 
NEGRO DROPPED DEAD IN CAIRO LUMBER YARD

J. R. West, a negro, working at the Illinois Lumber Company, dropped dead of heart failure in the lumber yard Wednesday afternoon at 4 o'clock.  He was working with a number of other men at the time and made no complaint of illness before dropping to the earth.  When his fellow workmen reached him, he was unable to speak and died at once.

A coroner’s jury empaneled by Coroner Samuel Dodds returned a verdict of heart failure.  The body was removed to Mound City, where West has resided.  The dead man was apparently in good health and has been for the past two months, for which period he has been working at the lumber yard.
 
OLD CAIRO RESIDENT DIES IN DENVER, COL.

Mrs. Delphine Holderby died Wednesday afternoon at 3:30 o’clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. E. R. Godden, in Denver, Colo.  A message to this effect was received Wednesday night by her daughter, Mrs. W. L. Rutter.

Mrs. Holderby was the wife of A. Holderby and was 68 years of age.  She has been practically an invalid for the past year following a paralytic stroke and a month ago went west with her daughter.  No word was received in Cairo that she was in a critical condition and the news of her death was unexpected.  She was a well-known Cairo resident and had lived here for many years.  She leaves surviving her two daughters, Mrs. J. M. Rutter, of Cairo, Mrs. E. R. Rodden, of Denver, and three sons, Rev. William Holderby, a chaplain in the army at Galveston, Texas, Captain Robert Holderby, of Camp Grant, Rockford, Ill., and Capt. Ben Holderby, stationed at Dallas, Texas.

Her husband, who also survives her, is in Chicago in a sanatorium

Funeral arrangements cannot be announced until later.
 
Mr. Tom Croslin's funeral was preached at the Baptist church Sunday.  Mr. Crosslin was drowned a few weeks ago in Cache.  (Perks)
  
Friday, 28 Jun 1918: 
Southern Illinois Boys Killed During Fight

WASHINGTON, June 28—A marine casualty list issued today contains 50 names, among which are those of Sergt. Thomas P. Arnett, Christopher, Ill., and Private William Moss, Mt. Vernon, Ill., killed in action.

ILLINOIS BOY DIED WOUNDS OVER THERE
William James of Springerton Reported Dead in Today's List

WASHINGTON, June 27—The army casualty list today contained 80 names, among them that of Private William James, Springerton, Ill., died of wounds.

CARD OF THANKS

We desire to extend our thanks to the friends who extended their sympathy and sent beautiful flowers on the death of our son and brother, Jerry Morrow.
Mrs. Ellen Morrow
Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Fox
J. A. Morrow and Family
Joseph A. Morrow
 
NEGRO BOY DROWNED IN OHIO THURSDAY
Body Recovered by Dragging Hone and Half Afterward

Rainy Woody, a 13-year-old negro boy living at Thirty-second Street and Commercial Avenue, was drowned in the Ohio River at the foot of Twenty-sixth Street Thursday afternoon at about 4 o'clock.  The boy was swimming with a number of others when he suddenly began struggling to keep his head above water.  It is thought he may have been seized with the cramps.  The river was dragged at the point where he disappeared and the body recovered at 5:30.  It was taken to the home of his parents.
  
Saturday, 29 Jun 1918:
CHARLESTON VOLUNTEER KILLED IN ACTION JUNE 17
Charleston Boy Joined Marine Corps Year Ago Through Postmaster Here

Private Randall Mattingly, former Charleston High School football star and member of the local track team in 1915-16, was killed in action with the United States Marines in France on June 17, says the Charleston Enterprise-Courier.

Mattingly was about twenty years old and had been in France since early in April.  He enlisted in the Marine Corps through the local postmaster last summer, shortly after the death of his mother, and received his training at Paris Island, S.C.  In his company at the training camp and later in France were Harry Lee, another Charleston football man, Wert Gwaltney, former manager of the Standard Oil station and Otis Josyln, son of Mr. and Mrs. O. W. Josyln.

At the beginning of the war, young Mattingly wanted to enlist for service, but at the request of his mother, who was then in ill health, he abandoned his plans.  His mother died in August, and shortly afterward he applied for enlistment in the marines and was accepted.  After his enlistment, his father, a traveling salesman, removed to Cape Girardeau, and that city was given as Mattingly's home in the casualty list.

Besides his father, young Mattingly is survived by a sister, Mrs. Gray, who lives in Cape Girardeau and two brothers, Jack, who lives at Carbondale, Ill., and Paul, who resides with Mrs. Gray.
 
Card of Thanks

We wish to thank our friends for their kind assistance in our late bereavement, the death of our dear baby.  Their sympathy at all times has been a great comfort to us.
Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Pritchett
 
WILLIAM E. JONES DIED EARLY TODAY
Remains Were Taken to Benton, Ky., for Interment

William E. Jones, aged 66 years, died at St. Mary's Infirmary at 1 o'clock this morning after an illness of seven or eight months.  The remains were removed to the residence of his son, Frederick B. Jones, 1313 Walnut Street.

He leaves five sons, Clyde F. Jones, Fred B. Jones, Roy Jones, Charles E. Jones and Claude H. Jones.  The last named now fighting somewhere in France.

The remains were removed to Benton, Ky., this evening at 5:40 o'clock.  Funeral services will be held at Benton with interment in Palmer Cemetery Sunday, June 30.

Funeral arrangements are in charge of E. A. Burke, undertaker.
  
Monday, 1 Jul 1918:
Card of Thanks

We wish to thank our friends for their kind assistance in our late bereavement, the death of our beloved wife and mother, Mrs. Albert Hoag.  Their help to us during her illness and their sympathy at all times has been a great comfort to us.
Mr. and Mrs. John A. Miller and Family
Albert Hoag
Mrs. Ella Fisher
 
H. C. MULCAHY IS REPORTED VERY LOW

H. C. Mulcahy is reported to be very low at his home near Willard and his recovery is regarded as a matter of grave doubt.
 
EAST ST. LOUIS BOY IS KILLED IN ACTION
Corp. John H. Dorman, Jr., Killed, Lamb, Ill., Boy Wounded

WASHINGTON, July 1—The army casualty list today contained 49 names, among them being Corporal John Henry Dorman, Jr., East St. Louis, Ill., died in action, and Corporal Jesse F. Hubbs, Lamb, Ill., severely wounded.

 
Tuesday, 2 Jul 1918:
H. C. MULCAHY DIED EARLY THIS MORNING

H. C. Mulcahy died at 1:30 o'clock this morning at his home near Willard, following an illness from Bright's disease and other complications.  He had been confined to his bed for about ten days.

He is survived by his widow, who was Miss Minnie Foster and six children.  The deceased was a son of the late James H. Mulcahy and one brother, E. P. Mulcahy of St. Louis, and a sister, Mrs. L. C. Ricks, of Mounds, are all that remain of the family.

The funeral services will be held Thursday, July 4.  The remains will leave his home at 12:30 noon for interment in Bumgard Cemetery at 2 p.m.  E. A. Burke, undertaker, has charge of the funeral arrangements.

(James H. Mulcahy married Nancy A. M. Burress on 13 Jan 1870, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Baumgard Cemetery reads:  Henry C. Mulcahy Born July 16, 1873 Died July 2, 1918.—Darrel Dexter)
 
CENTRALIA SOLDIER WOUNDED SEVERELY
Casualty List Today Contains Eight-one Names

WASHINGTON, July 2—The army casualty list today contained 81 names, among them being Sergt. Benjamin H. Lewis, of Centralia, wounded severely.
  
Wednesday, 3 Jul 1918:
YOUNG CHARLESTON WOMAN DIED TUESDAY
Mrs. L. E. Boyce Passed Away at St. Mary's Infirmary

Mrs. L. E. Boyce, of Charleston, Mo., died at the age of 27 years, at St. Mary's Infirmary, at 8 o'clock Tuesday evening.  She is the wife of L. E. Boyce, of Charleston, and was formerly Miss Roxie Mattingly.

Surviving her are her husband, a daughter, four weeks old, and her father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Mattingly, of Charleston, three brothers and two sisters.

The remains were prepared for burial at Karcher Brothers, undertakers, who drove with the body to Charleston, Mo., this morning on the 7:30 trip of the Pete Langan.  The relatives also accompanied the body in automobiles.

Funeral services will be held at Charleston Thursday afternoon, July 4.  Interment will take place there.
 
NOBEL M. CUNNINGHAM DIES IN CALIFORNIA

Noble M. Cunningham, meteorologist for the U. S. Weather Bureau, died at Red Bluff, Calif., on May 19, according to word received in Cairo through the service.  Mr. Cunningham was in charge of the local weather bureau about ten years ago.
 
Word has been received here (Mound City) of the death in Chicago of Mrs. Cassie Tinker.  Mrs. Tinker was married after leaving Mound City and left a babe three months old.
  
Friday, 5 Jul 1918:
CHARLES MESHEW DIED THURSDAY MORNING
News Agent Had Been in Failing Health for Some Time

Charles Meshew, aged 33 years, died Thursday morning at 2 o'clock at St. Mary’s Infirmary of tuberculosis.  The deceased is well known as a news agent by Cairo people, and had been in that business here for a number of years.  His health failed him gradually.  The body was taken to the E. A. Burke undertaking parlors and prepared for burial.  The remains were removed to Paducah, Ky., this morning, where interment will take place at Oak Grove Cemetery.
 
Mrs. Robert Colier, of Taylorsville, was called here (Wetaug) Tuesday on account of the death of her nephew, little Leland Corzine.
  
Saturday, 6 Jul 1918: 
Mrs. John Horn died at her home here (Bardwell, Ky.) last Saturday morning of pneumonia.  Mrs. Horn had been an invalid for a long time, the principal cause being rheumatism, with which she suffered intensely for a long time.  A few days before her death, she contracted pneumonia, which disease her weakened condition could not stand.  She is survived by her husband and two children, the latter being Mrs. Martin and Herman Horn.  The brother and one sister also survive her.  They are Mrs. Talley Reddick and Gus Frech.  Mrs. Horn was a member of the Christian Church and during her life she lived a model conscientious and devoted Christian life.  She was a fine woman and always ready to do what she could in alleviating the suffering of others.  The funeral services were conducted at the home of Elder Joseph Ratcliffe and the burial was in the Bardwell Cemetery Sunday afternoon.
  
Monday, 8 Jul 1918: 
Mrs. Jennie Latimer returned the first of the week from Rives, Tenn., where she was called by the illness and death of her mother, Mrs. Moffat.   (Charleston, Mo.)


The remains of Mrs. Roxie Mattingly Boyce who died at St. Mary's in Cairo on Tuesday, arrived here (Charleston, Mo.) on Wednesday and were taken to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Herman Mattingly, on Commercial Street.  The funeral was held Thursday afternoon from St. Henry’s Catholic Church by Father Petrie.  Interment was in the Odd Fellows Cemetery.
  
Tuesday, 9 Jul 1918:
Little Ruby Virginia Hight, the fourteen-month-old baby of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hight, died Friday, July 5, after an illness of about two weeks.  Ruby was a bright, intelligent little child and was loved by all who knew her.  (Wetaug)

             (Walter E. Hight, 23, of Wetaug, Ill., farmer, born in Wetaug, Pulaski Co., Ill., son of Alexander Hight and Matilda Williams, married Cora E. Heater, 16, of Mound City, born in Wetaug, Ill., daughter of Martin Heater and Leah E. Hartman, on 22 Apr 1894, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug reads:  Ruby V. Hight Born May 9, 1918 Died July 5, 1919—Darrel Dexter)
  
Wednesday, 10 Jul 1918:

FORMER MOUND CITY BOY KILLED IN ACTION

Curtis Disbenet, son of Edward Disbenet, Has Uncles There

             MOUND CITY, Ill., July 10—Curtis Disbenet, whose name appeared recently in the marine casualty list as killed in action, is a former Mound City boy, and has two uncles now living here.

He, with his parents, resided in Mound City until five or six years ago, when the family removed to Memphis.  His father is Edward Disbenet.  Thomas Disbenet and J. E. Beaver, both of Mound City, are uncles of the dead hero.

(Thomas Disbennett, 20, married Maggie Thurston, 15, on 1 Dec 1900, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

J. W. VICKERS, BARLOW POSTMASTER, IS DEAD

             BARLOW, Ky., July 10—Postmaster J. W. Vickers, of Barlow, died at his home in this city at 3:50 p.m. July 7, Sunday after an illness.  The deceased was a resident of Barlow for the past 30 years and was 69 years of age at his death.  He held the office of postmaster here for the past 16 years.

A wife, daughter, Mrs. Ida Edwards, and granddaughter, Mary Edwards, survive the deceased.

  

Thursday, 11 Jul 1918:

MATTHEW T. WALSH DIES THIS RMONGIN

Former Cairo Man Passes Away Suddenly at Home in East St. Louis

             Matthew T. Walsh died suddenly at his home in East St. Louis this morning at 10:30 o'clock after a paralytic stroke.  He formerly lived in Cairo, where he was a number of years ago agent for the Iron Mountain Railway.  He was at the time of his death connected with the Wabash Railroad with headquarters in St. Louis.  He was well known in Cairo.

He was a brother of the late Pierce P. Walsh and Frank T. Walsh, of Cairo, and Martin Walsh, who resides in Tennessee, and a father of James C. Walsh, of Chicago, and Mrs. Leon Gilbert, formerly Miss Jessie Walsh, of Oklahoma.  Mrs. Niles Schuh, of Cairo, is a granddaughter.

The funeral arrangements have not been definitely announced but it is though probable that the remains will be brought to Villa Ridge for interment.

 

Friday, 12 Jul 1918:

MATTHEW WALSH TO BE BURIED AT VILLA RIDGE

             The remains of Matthew T. Walsh, who died at his home in East St. Louis Thursday morning, will be brought to Villa Ridge for interment at Calvary Cemetery arriving Saturday afternoon at 1 o'clock.

             Funeral services were held at East St. Louis this afternoon.

 

EVANSVILLE MAN DIES PRAYING FOR U. S. VICTORY

             EVANSVILLE, Ill., July 12—With a prayer on his lips for victory for the Americans in the present war, Conrad C. Reichert, 80 years old, veteran of the Civil War and former businessman died here Thursday.

  

Saturday, 13 Jul 1918:

I. C. PASSENGER CHIEF DIED OF HEART DISEASE

Samuel G. Hatch Passenger Traffic Manager Dead

             Dispatches were received from Chicago yesterday by railroad officials here announcing the sudden death of Samuel G. Hatch, passenger traffic manager of the Illinois Central Railroad.  He was stricken with heart disease while conversing with General Passenger Agent H. J. Phelps in the office of that official at Chicago headquarters.  For some time past Hatch had made his headquarters at Atlanta as a member of the Southern Lines Passenger Committee. For many years he resided in St. Louis during his early railroad career and was connected with the Cotton Belt Railroad passenger departments. He served the Illinois Central as passenger traffic chief for over twenty years.

  

Tuesday, 16 Jul 1918:

FORMER CREAL GIRL'S CHILD STRUCK BY AUTO

Son of Mr. and Mrs. Horace Bateman Severely Injured at Alton

             The little son of Mr. and Mrs. Horace Bateman was run over by an automobile truck while playing the street near his home in Alton Saturday.  He was severely injured and fears are entertained that fatality may result.

             Mrs. Bateman was a former Creal girl and daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Logan Randolph.

 

FORMER MOUND CITY WOMAN DIES MONDAY

Mrs. Fred Edmonds Passes Away at Home in Denver, Colo.

             Mrs. Fred Edmonds passed away at her home in Denver, Colo., at 9:25 o'clock Monday morning after a lingering illness of asthma. Mrs. Edmonds was 43 years of age and was formerly Miss Agnes Williams, of Mound City, where she was born and raised. She was a graduate from the Mound City high school and was a cultivated musician.

             She was married in Paducah, Ky., where her father, Capt. Michael Williams, resides.  She is survived by her father, her husband and two children, Margaret and Herbert.  She also leaves three sisters, Mrs. E. J. Stuart, 625 Thirty-fourth Street, Mrs. Joseph A. Lutz, of Mound City, Mrs. J. J. Rohan, of St. Louis, and two brothers, Edward Williams, of O'Leary, Ohio, and Sergt. Joseph E. Williams, who is with the U. S. truck service at Fort Armistead, Baltimore, Md.

             Mrs. Stuart and Mrs. Lutz left this morning for Paducah to be with their father. The funeral arrangements have not been announced.

             (Michael Williams married Mary Ella Fitzgerald on 25 Jan 1874, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Joseph Anthony Lutz, 30, butcher, born in Mound City, son of Anton Lutz and Kresanzia Moser, married Lena Francis Williams, 22, born in Mound City, daughter of Michael Williams and Mary E. Fitzgerald, on 5 Jun 1901, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  James J. Rohan, 29, manufacturer, born in St. Louis, Mo., son of John Rohan and Christina Lortz, married Margaret B. Williams 21, born in Mound City, daughter of Michael Williams and Mary E. Fitzgerald, on 7 Jun 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

ILLINOIS MARINES KILLED IN ACTION

Corporal Also Wounded, According to Army List

             WASHINGTON, July 16—The army casualty list today showed a total of 100 names, including Corporal Herbert H. Miller, Raymond, Ill., severely wounded.

             The Marine Corps casualty list today contained 887 names, including John A. Maxfield, Palmara, Ill., and Henry E. Fisher, O’Fallon, Ill, both killed in action.

  

Wednesday, 17 Jul 1918:

Word has been received of the death of Mrs. Fred Edmonds of Denver, Colo.   Mrs. Edmonds will be remembered as Miss Agnes Williams, being a daughter of Mr. Williams, of Paducah.  She was born and reared in Mound City and was a sister of Mrs. Joseph Lutz and Mrs. Edward Stewart, of Cairo.  (Mound City)

   

Thursday, 18 Jul 1918:

CYPRESS BOY IN CASUALTY LIST

             In the marine casualty list published yesterday was the name of Realis C. Kiestler, of Cypress, Ill., killed in action.

 

Friday, 19 Jul 1918:

OLD RESIDENT OF MOUND CITY DIES

Miss Mary O'Hara Passes Away Late Thursday Afternoon

             Miss Nona O'Hara died at her home in Mound City Thursday evening at 6:30 o'clock, following an illness of several months.  She was born in Mound City in 1865 and has always lived there.  She was the daughter of the late Mrs. Mary O’Hara and leaves a sister, Mrs. Hal Reed, and two brothers, Ed O'Hara, of Mound City, and William O’Hara who is now in Morgan City, Ala.  William O'Hara has recently returned from France, where he was sent after signing up for ship building service.

             Miss O’Hara was a member of St. Mary's Catholic Church from where the funeral will be held.  The arrangements are not announced at this time, as it is not known when her brother may arrive from Alabama.

 

DEATH CLAIMS OLD RESIDENT OF CAIRO

John Sullivan Passed Away Early This Morning

             John Sullivan, one of the oldest residents of Cairo, passed away at 5 o'clock this morning, at his home, No. 234 Twelfth Street, after an illness of about two weeks.  Pneumonia developed and death finally came as a relief to end his suffering.

             Mr. Sullivan was 78 years of age and had been a resident of Cairo since the early fifties.  He came to Cairo directly upon his arrival in this country from Ireland and has remained here ever since.  He was a hardworking man in his early years and accumulated some means which he invested in Cairo property.  For the past thirty years he has devoted his time to looking after these real estate interests.  He was always a firm believer in Cairo's future.

             Mr. Sullivan is survived by his widow and five children, Mrs. T. G. Cowley, of East St. Louis, who was called here by his serious illness, Mrs. T. L. Karcher, of Cairo, Daniel Sullivan, of Denver, Colo., William and Miss Katherine Sullivan, of Cairo.

             Funeral services will probably be held Sunday at St. Patrick’s Church of which he was a member and the body will be taken to Calvary Cemetery Villa Ridge for interment.

             (John Sullivan married Nancy Hair on 20 Oct 1862, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Thomas Cowley married Mary Sullivan on 3 Oct 1888, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  John Sullivan Born June 21, 1844 Died July 19, 1918 Father.—Darrel Dexter)

  

Saturday, 20 Jul 1918: 

J. S. CHAPMAN DIES EARLY THIS MORNING

             J. S. Chapman, aged 53 years, died at St. Mary's Infirmary this morning at 1:30 o'clock.  Mr. Chapman was well known in Cairo where he has many friends.  The remains were taken to Burke's undertaking parlors from where they will be shipped Sunday on the Illinois Central to Vandalia.  The funeral will be held in Vandalia at the home of Mrs. Barney Brannon, sister of the deceased.  Interment will be made at South Hill cemetery.

 

CORP. N. D. HUMPRHEY SEVERELY WOUNDED

             Corporal Naylor B. Humphrey, of Wickliffe, has been severely wounded in action, according to a message received by his father this morning.  He is with the Thirtieth Infantry, Company D.  Before joining the army, Corporal Humphrey was correspondent for The Citizen.

 

COBDEN BOY HAS BEEN SEVERELY WOUNDED

             Washington, July 20—The army casualty list today showed a total of 120 names, including Fred W. Elftman, of Maywood, Ill., missing in action, and Claude W. Horn, of Cobden, Ill., wounded severely.

             (He survived his wounds and a marker in Cobden Cemetery reads:  Claud W. Horn Born Feb. 22, 1897 Died July 24, 1924 Illinois Cpl. Sup Co 9 Infantry World War I PH—Darrel Dexter)

 

FUNERAL NOTICE

             Sullivan—Died:  John Sullivan, Friday morning, June 19, at his home, 234 Twelfth Street.  The funeral cortege will leave the residence at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon for St. Patrick's Church, where services will be held, conducted by Rev. Father James J. Downey, at 2:15 o'clock. A special Illinois Central train will leave Fourteenth and Ohio streets at 2:45 for Villa Ridge, where interment will be made at Calvary Cemetery.

             The pallbearers will be Messrs. Mark Kain, John Hogan, Mike Kilmartin, Dave Meehan, Mike Hart, Dave Barry, John Barry, P. T. Langan, Dick Jones, Mike O'Shea, Mikle O'Donnell and Andrew Whitcamp.

  

Monday, 22 Jul 1918: 

CARD OF THANKS

             We wish to extend our thanks to the friends and neighbors who were so kind to us during the illness and death of our beloved mother, Margaret Atherton, of Karnak, Ill.

The children:

Alice Walker

Sarah Hennington

Victoria Schlafer

Henry Chaney

             (M. P. Walker married Mrs. Margaret Atherton on 17 Jul 1889, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

  

Tuesday, 23 Jul 1918:

ILLINOIS MAN SHOT AND KILLED DURING QUARREL

             BENTON, Ill, July 12—Following a quarrel at Ziegler, Albert Druary shot Christie Bush, aged 33, in the back of the head, killing him instantly.  Druary was brought to Benton and placed in jail.

 

LIEUT. CHARLES L. TWISS AMONG CASUALTIES

             Lieut. Charles Lee Twiss, of Shelbyville, Ill., was among the severely wounded in Monday's casualty list.  Lieut. Twiss was a Cairo linotype operator when he joined his company C, of Shelbyville, in the Fourth regiment. He had worked for a morning paper here, and when Cloyce Dixon, operator of The Citizen left, Mr. Twiss came to take his place on this paper.  He was well liked by all of his associates, who will hope to hear of his recovery from his wounds.

 

GIRL DROWNS LEAPING FROM SKIFF

             EVANSVILLE, Ind., July 23—Miss Myrtle Furlow, 17 years old, was drowned in the Ohio River near here and a companion, Miss Addie Bruher, narrowly escaped when they attempted to jump from a skiff to a barge.

 

OLNEY, ILL., BOY SEVERELY INJURED

             WASHINGTON, July 23—The casualty list today contained 105 names.  Among the severely wounded was John I. Herman, of Olney, Ill.

 

FRED RIDDLE DIES AT HOME IN MOUNDS

             Fred Riddle, son of Mr. and Mrs. Newton Riddle, of 316 Ninth Street, died about 7 o'clock last evening at his home in Mounds.  The end came suddenly after about five weeks’ illness.  Mr. Riddle has resided in Mounds for the past eight years, where he had a large circle of friends.

             Mr. Riddle is survived by his wife, Mrs. Grace Riddle, his father, and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Newton Riddle, of this city, and three sisters, Miss Anna Riddle, of St. Louis, Miss Mayme Riddle, of Cairo, and Mrs. Nona Hill, of Cairo.  He was 36 years of age and was born in Dexter, Mo.  The funeral will be held at Mounds tomorrow morning at 10:00 after which the remains will be removed to Anna, the home of his wife's parents, for burial.

             (His marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Fred Riddle 1882-1918 Grace Riddle his wife 1885-1958.—Darrel Dexter)

 

GEORGE B. BAKER'S SON WAS DROWNED IN THE OHIO RIVER

Lad Lost His Life Tuesday Evening While in Swimming on the Kentucky Beach

WAS MEMBER OF BOY SCOUT CAMPING PARTY

Companion, and Rev. Tomshany, Scoutmaster, Barely Escaped in Effort to Save Him

             The Presbyterian Boy Scouts outing came to a sudden and tragic termination yesterday afternoon between four and five o'clock in the morning by the drowning of Rue Edward Baker, 13-year old son of attorney and Mrs. George B. Baker, prominent resident of this city.

             Young Baker with several other scouts were swimming in the Ohio River on the Kentucky beach just opposite the Cairo Point only a hundred yards from their camp site, under the care of Rev. A. T. Tomshany, pastor of the church, and scoutmaster of the troop.  The beach that had been carefully selected for their swimming has been abandoned for a strip of beach several hundred feet down the river, when a sunken barge had been discovered with rusty spikes and sharp bits of rusty metal and had caused the boys to fear cutting their feet.  Bounds had been set where the boys could swim in safety.  It was just outside these bounds that young Baker lost his life.  It is thought that the spot where Baker drowned was a sand pit where the Halliday Sand Company had dredged a number of barge loads of sand last year, since the natural slope of the entire beach and the practically currentless river would not permit a step off or such a depth.

             When Baker was discovered to be in distress, one of his companions, Harold Hartley, went to his assistance as well as did Rev. Tomshany, the latter, however, being handicapped because of his distance from the scene and the fact that heavy over shoes and clothes hampered his endeavors to rescue the drowning boy, Rev. Tomshany and young Hartley themselves barely escaped drowning in their efforts to save Baker.

             The theory that cramps caused the boy to drown was incorrect since the body was in a natural position, slightly bent as if swimming when brought up.

             M. C. Anderson, a fisherman of East Cairo, recovered the body with a trotline, after it has been laying an hour in ten feet of water at the bottom of the river.

             Young Baker was just thirteen years of age and the only child.

             Mr. Baker and the fathers of several of the boys in the party went in launches to the scene of the drowning where Dr. Clarke worked vainly in an attempt to resuscitate the body—a thing impossible since the body had been in the water long before the arrival of the physician.

             The mother is prostrated with grief while the strain upon the father and upon Rev. Tomshany has been very great.

             The body of the lad was brought over to Cairo at 8 o'clock last evening and prepared for burial at Burke's undertaking establishment and this morning at 6:30 o'clock it was taken to Golconda, their former home, on the Big Four train, for burial.

             The accident happened within twenty-four hours of the time that the boys had expected to break camp and return to Cairo after their ten days' outing.  Rev. Mr. Tomshany had cautioned the boys each day that they must obey the camp rules and yesterday morning impressed upon them the necessity of obeying the rules.  One of these was that they should not go into the water before 4 o'clock in the afternoon and another was that they must keep within the bounds set.  The hole where Baker was drowned was outside these bounds and was unknown to Mr. Tomshany until he got into it in trying to rescue the lad.

             The body was taken to Golconda, Ill., early this morning, accompanied by the lad's parents, Mr. and Mrs. George B. Baker and Mr. and Mrs. B. D. Crum.  The funeral will be held tomorrow at 1 o'clock.

             (George Brown Baker married Della May Williamson on 2 Nov 1898, in Pope Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Edward Fitzpatrick died at Hamilton, Ohio.  Mrs. Fitzpatrick was the wife of Edward Fitzpatrick, former resident of Mound City.

 

LIEUT. TWISS WAS WOUNDED 14 TIMES

             Lieut. Charles L. Twiss reported wounded in Monday's casualty list, will be seven or eight weeks in the hospital, according to word received by his father in Shelbyville.  He received fourteen wounds.  A report was current in Cairo yesterday that Lieut. Twiss had succumbed of his wounds.

 

Thursday, 25 Jul 1918: 

Mr. Fred Riddle passed away at his home on Oak Street (Mound City) Tuesday night at 7 o'clock.  Funeral services and burial took place in Anna Thursday afternoon.

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We desire to express our most grateful thanks to the Brotherhood and the many friends of John Sherman Chapman—to the nurses who so tenderly cared for him in his last illness and the friends who helped arrange for bringing him home.

             We are very proud of the high esteem and of the true friendships he formed while a citizen of your city.

Signed:

Mrs. M. E. Chapman

Miss Celia G. Chapman, of 6155 Galbleton Place, St. Louis, Mo.

Miss Gertrude Chapman, with the American Red Cross, Paris, France

Mrs. Barney Brannon, Vandalia, Ill., mother and sisters of the deceased

             (Barney Brannon married Adeline Chapman on 10 Jul 1898, in Fayette Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

  

Friday, 26 Jul 1918:

LARGE ATTENDANCE AT BAKER FUNERAL

             Funeral services over the remains of Rue Edward Baker were held from the home of his grandfather, Mr. Williamson, in Golconda, Thursday afternoon.  There was a very large attendance, as the Bakers have a great many friends and relatives there, and there were loads of flowers.

             Mr. and Mrs. Baker will return to Cairo tonight at 8 o'clock coming by way of Paducah.

 

Harrisburg Man Passed Away at St. Mary's Today

             Peter Albinger, a resident of Harrisburg, who has been a patient at St. Mary's Infirmary for the past four or five days, passed away this morning about 6 o'clock.  His body was prepared for burial by Karcher Brothers and will be sent to his home in Harrisburg over the Big Four this afternoon.

 

OLMSTED SOLDIER SEVERELY WOUNDED

Elmer Goins, Wounded Through Accident, Casualty Report

             WASHINGTON, July 26—The army casualty list today contained a total of 98 names, including Elmer Goins, of Olmsted, severely wounded in an accident.

             (He survived his wounds and his marker in Ohio Chapel Cemetery at Grand Chain reads:  Elmer Goins 1894-1953 Cook Co G 132 Inf. World War I.—Darrel Dexter)

  

Saturday, 27 Jul 1918:

MRS. CORA HILL DIES IN PADUCAH

Mrs. Cora Hill died at her home in Paducah, Ky., Friday after a year's illness.  The remains will be brought to Cairo arriving here tonight at 8 o'clock over the Illinois Central.  They will be taken to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse E. Hogan, 417 Cross Street and later taken to Thebes where the funeral services will be held Sunday.  Interment will be made in the family cemetery at Thebes.

Mrs. Hill leaves surviving her, her husband, T. J. Hill, and daughter, Miss Ethel A. Hill, of Paducah and a daughter, Mrs. J. E. Hogan, of Cairo.

(Thomas J. Hill married Cora J. Brown on 23 Mar 1888, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Boy from Mound City Draft Board Severely Wounded in Accident

Elmer Goins, an Olmsted boy, was mentioned in yesterday's casualty list, as sent by Gen. Pershing, as severely wounded in an accident.  Goins was inducted into the National Army from the Mound City local board and was sent to Camp Taylor.  This is believed to be the first mention in the casualty lists of anyone from this vicinity in the National Army.

Mr. and Mrs. Newton Riddle and daughters, Mrs. Nona Hill and Miss Mayme Riddle, have returned from Mound City, where they were called by the illness and death of the former's son, Fred Riddle.

LIEUT. CHAPMAN IN THE CASUALTY LIST

Washington, July 27—A total of 168 named, 64 of whom were killed in action, were reported today.  Among them is the name of Lieut. Daniel W. Chapman, severely wounded.

LIEUT. CHAPMAN IS SEVERELY WOUNDED
Son of Vienna Banker Falls in Battle on July 11

VIENNA, Ill., July 27—A telegram was received by Mr. and Mrs. P. T. Chapman that their son, Lieut. D. Chapman, Co. B, 104 Inf., 26th Division, A. E. F. had been severely wounded July 11.  Lieut. Chapman left for France in January and has been in active service almost ever since.

This is the second casualty among Johnson County boys.  Will Howell, another Vienna boy, was slightly wounded a short time ago.

James A. Crawford, who disappeared from Thebes June 22, has not yet been heard from.  He was sick at the time of leaving.  His relatives have been notified in the west, but they have not heard from him.  His family at Thebes think he is sick somewhere or has met with foul play.  He purchased a ticket to Illmo, Mo., on the above date and no further trace can be found of him.  His wife went to Tamms last week and got his clothes and carpenter tools.  (Thebes)

Monday, 29 Jul 1918:
F. H. THURMAN IS CALLED TO DEATH
End Came Suddenly Sunday Afternoon—Burial at Wickliffe Tuesday

F. H. Thurman died at his home, No. 524 Eleventh Street, at 3:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon.  Death came suddenly, Mr. Thurman having been up and around within fifteen minutes of his demise.  He had been in failing health for some time due to the infirmities of age, but was able to visit his daughter in Wickliffe only the week before.

Mr. Thurman was 82 years of age on June 8th last.  Born in Lincoln County, Ky., he took up the printing trade when his father removed to Louisville, starting first as a paper carrier and then learning the trade.  In 1858 he went to Hickman to publish the Hickman Observer.  Later, he published the Ballard Yeoman at Wickliffe.  For the past 26 years he has lived in Cairo with his son.  Part of this time he was connected with The Citizen, both in the mechanical and editorial departments.

For a number of years Mr. Thurman has retired from active work, spending his time quietly at his home on Eleventh Street or with his children in Ballard County.

He is survived by his son, Frank E. Thurman, of Cairo, a daughter, Mrs. D. R. Enlow, and a son, Horace M. Thurman, both of Wickliffe.  A granddaughter, Miss Pearl Enlow, of Wickliffe, and a grandson, Ira E. Enlow, of Cairo, also survive.

Mr. Thurman was a member of Safford Lodge of Odd Fellows and of the Parthenia Rebekah Lodge.  He was also a member of the Cairo Typographical Union.  He was a good man and a useful citizen.

Funeral services were held at the family residence this noon, at 12:30 o'clock conducted by Rev. C. Robert Dunlap, and under escort of fellow members of the I. O. O. F. and Rebekah lodges, the remains were taken to Wickliffe on the 2 o'clock ferry this afternoon.

Tuesday afternoon funeral services will be held at the home of his daughter in Wickliffe, and the remains will be laid at rest in the Wickliffe Cemetery, beside the graves of his wife, who passed away eight years ago, and of his son, Richard Thurman.

William Lampe, of Elco, Convicted Murderer, Applies for Pardon

An application for a pardon or commutation of sentence has been made to the State Pardon Board by William Lampe, convicted of murder in 1914.  It was proven at the trial that he had murdered Christian L. Burk, at his home near Elco, in front of his (Burk's) wife.  It was also shown that the murder was premeditated.  This case in court at the time of the famous Harvey Fields murder trial and an interesting parallel was drawn at the time between the decisions of the juries.  The 21-year sentence has over 15 years yet to run.

The application will be acted upon at the next meeting of the board in October.

Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Sitter have returned from Mounds, where they were called by the death of Fred Riddle.  (Villa Ridge)

Tuesday, 30 Jul 1918:
CORONER'S JURY CONVICTS NEGRO
Orders Sheriff to Apprehend "Doc" Thomas for Murder at Roth's Crossing

Joseph Hayes, a negro, was clubbed to death Sunday morning about 7 o'clock by a negro known as Doc Thomas.  The murder occurred at Roth's Crossing on the Thebes branch of the Iron Mountain.

The cause of the trouble is not known, but evidence introduced at the coroner's jury yesterday evening proved conclusively that the crime was committed without cause and was not justified.  The jury therefore recommended that the sheriff apprehend Thomas and hold him for the law to take its course.
Up until noon today, Thomas had not been captured.

MRS. HENRY TIDEMAN DIED VERY SUDDENLY
Wife of Electric Manufacturing Company Head Suddenly Stricken

A wire to James H. Galligan, cashier of the Alexander County National Bank, today stated that Mrs. Henry Tideman had died suddenly.  Mr. Tideman was in Chicago at the time en route to Cairo, and returned to Menominee, Mich., at once.  The wire which was from the company failed to five the details of her death.

John Struckmeyer, of Mounds, Dies at Home Yesterday Afternoon

John Struckmeyer, proprietor of the Royal Bar at Mounds, died at his home in that city Monday evening at 5 o'clock, after an illness of several months.  Mr. Struckmeyer was born January 13, 1881, and at the time of his death was 37 years of age.

The deceased is survived by his wife, Mrs. Minnie Struckmeyer, his three-year-old daughter, Sarah, a brother, Criss, living in New Mexico, and a sister, Mary, residing in East St. Louis.

Funeral services will be held at the home Thursday at 1:00 p.m. after which the remains will be taken to Beech Grove for interment.  It will be a motor funeral, conducted by Karcher Brothers.

Mrs. D. R. Enlow received word Sunday of the death of her father, F. H. Thurman, of Cairo.  Mr. Thurman was about eighty-two years of age and was formerly a citizen of this city (Wickliffe, Ky.), being at the head of almost the first newspaper published here.  The body was brought here from Cairo on the two o'clock boat.  Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon; interment took place at the Wickliffe Cemetery.  He was well loved and highly respected by everyone and will be greatly missed by all.

Wednesday, 31 Jul 1918:
THURMAN FUNERAL IS HELD IN WICKLIFFE

The funeral of F. H. Thurman, veteran newspaperman, held yesterday in Wickliffe, Ky., was very largely attended.  It was said to be the most impressive funeral held in that city for some time, there being friends of the deceased present from all over that section of the country, as well as from Cairo.

Services were conducted by the Odd Fellows in charge of the Hesperian Lodge No. 62.  Odd Fellows and Rebekahs, of Cairo were present, as were representatives of the Cairo Typographical Union.

Thursday, 1 Aug 1918:
William Palmer, who died at his home on the National Road Tuesday evening, was buried this afternoon.  Deceased was 51 years of age, having been ill for several weeks, during which time he suffered three paralytic strokes.  He had been to the home of his sister in Champaign some two weeks ago, in order to recuperate, but on Friday last he suffered a paralytic stroke and became unconscious.  He was brought to his home in this city Sunday.  A widow, three sons, and a daughter, survive him.  One son, Corporal Berham Palmer, of the 120th Infantry is now in France, Leland and Harry being at home, as also Miss Ada May, the only daughter.  Mr. Palmer conducted a small farm and dairy near this city (Mound City) and was well and favorably known by nearly everyone.

(This may be the same person as William Painter mentioned in the 2 Aug 1918, issue.—Darrel Dexter)

Friday, 2 Aug 1918:
M. E. Lazarus and sister of Natchez, Miss., were called here (Mound City) on account of the death of their brother-in-law, William Painter, whose funeral and burial was held Thursday afternoon.

(This may be the same person as William Palmer mentioned in the 1 Aug 1918, issue.—Darrel Dexter)

The funeral of William Painter was held from the Methodist church.  Rev. J. W. Coontz, of Cairo, conducted the services, interment taking place in Beech Grove Cemetery.

Rev. Carlock conducted funeral services at the Baptist church (Thebes) Sunday afternoon of Mrs. Cora (Brown) Hill, formerly of Thebes, but had moved to Paducah, Ky.  The funeral services were well attended by her former friends and neighbors, besides many relatives.

Saturday, 3 Aug 1918:
Negro Killed as Men Leave for Training

Shortly before the men were to report for the second roll call at 11:30 this morning, Lewis Simpson, No. 280, from Tamms, was shot and killed by Thomas Ibory, another negro from Tamms.  The murder took place in front of the office of the local board in the center of a crowd of about a thousand drafted men and their friends and relatives.

It was a miracle that no one else was injured, as three shots were fired.  The negro ran out Fifth Street towards the Mississippi levee, closely pursued by some of the registrants.  He ran through a yard to Fourth Street and was last seen going over the Mississippi levee through Solomon's Junk Yard.  He stopped as he went over the levee to reload his gun.  An automobile load of policemen set out over the levee in pursuit.  Sergt. McKinney and Patrolman Beard were still searching for him at 1 o'clock.
Unable to Call Roll

So great was the unrest among the negroes that it was impossible to call the roll again and the morning count had to be used.

Various stories as to the cause of the trouble were told, but the most plausible one is that it was caused over the sweetheart of the dead man.

When the roll was called this morning, of the 297 men ordered to appear, all were present, but 18, and two more put in their appearance later.

At 6:30 this morning, the negroes of the call, which exhausts Class 1 assembled at the offices of the local board and there received the instructions.  John L. Jhoens was made captain of the outfit with five lieutenants.

They then marched to the court house, where C. S. Britton presided at a meeting for them.  He made a strong patriotic address, and the introduced Dr. Samuel Dodds, who told the men of their moral responsibilities as soldiers.  Mr. Baker was unable to be present, so Prof. Singleton, principal of the Sumner High school, was asked to lead the men in a few songs.  He then made a short address to the men, urging them to remember the part that their ancestors had played in American history and for them to do their part in making the world free.  His closing remark, "And I don't want to see all you men come back privates," brought a mighty volume of applause from the new soldiers.  After the speaking, the men were allowed to disperse until 11:30 when they will assemble again for entrainment.

MRS. HATTIE HAWLEY DIES IN MOUND CITY
Well Known Young Woman Passes Away Early This Morning

Miss Hattie Hawley died at her home in Mound City at 6 o'clock this morning.  The cause of her death was attributed to a nervous breakdown due to overwork.  She was employed in the office of the Electric Light and Water Company, where she has been for a number of years.  Miss Hawley was thirty-eight years of age and the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Hawley.

She was a member of the Methodist Church and the Rebekah Lodge and was a popular, well known young woman having many friends in Cairo.  She is survived by her mother and a sister, Mrs. C. E. Richie, of Mound City.  The funeral arrangements will be announced later.

(Robert H. Hawley married Mary A. Boren on 6 Sep 1876, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Monday, 5 Aug 1918:
FORMER RESIDENT DIES IN ST. LOUIS

John W. O'Connell, who lived in this city many years ago, died yesterday morning at his home in St. Louis about 10 o'clock.  He is a brother of Mrs. Mary Fitzgerald, of 415 Walnut Street.

Mr. O'Connell came here shortly after the Civil War and was a successful sign and house painter.  He moved to St. Louis in the early 70s and engaged in the same business.  He was very successful there and soon became very wealthy.

He was 76 years of age at the time of his death, caused by hardening of the arteries.

(Daniel Fitzgerald married Mary O’Connell on 2 Sep 1867, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

OLIVE BRANCH BOY WOUNDED IN ACTION

According to a letter received by Charles Dalton, of Olive Branch, his son, Frank Dalton is in a hospital in France, severely wounded.  Dalton had a leg shot off and his left hand wounded.  Dalton is in the draft and went to Camp Taylor from here.

The funeral over the body of Hattie B. Hawley, who died Saturday morning, was held this afternoon from the family residence on Fourth Street, Rev. Roy B. Morgan, of the Congregational Church, conducting the services.  Interment taking place in Beech Grove Cemetery.

Tuesday, 6 Aug 1918:
HARRY HINE DIES AFTER RESCUE OF DROWNING YOUTH
Swimming Party Brought to Tragic End by Loss of Young Man's Life
DECEASED WAS CLERK OF COMPANY D, I. N. G.
Survived by Father and Mother, Sister and Two Brothers, One in France

A merry swimming party was brought to a tragic end last evening shortly after 8 o'clock when Harry Hine, a member of the party came to his death.  The party composed of O. W. Brey, his wife and son, Milton, Miss Ethel Dawson, Mrs. Etta Jones, Mrs. William B. Brey, and small daughter, and the deceased, Harry Hine.

According to Mr. O. W. Brey, the party went out the Tenth Street road to the Mississippi River and there planned to spend the evening concluding with a big picnic supper.  He and young Hine had waded around in the water before they had allowed anyone else to enter the river.  They had found the water not to be over waist deep. About two hours after their arrival, Milton Brey called to his father for help.  He had on a pair of water wings, but these, in some manner, had become tangled and were useless.  The father could tell at a glance that the boy was in deep water and was drowning.  He rushed to his aid, but soon became exhausted, although he is a very good swimmer.

Seeing the predicament, the other two were in, young Hine swam to them and Brey, seeing that he was merely hindering the other two and about to drown himself, in some manner reached the shore, where he lay exhausted some time.  By this time the strong Mississippi current was pulling Milton and Harry far down stream.  Harry finally succeeded in adjusting young Brey's wings, but the strain was too great on Hine, who had suffered from heart trouble and asthma.  They soon reached a bar but it was Brey that was doing his utmost to save Hine now.

Meanwhile the party had gone for help and returned with Ralph Koonce and George Blough, who succeeded in pulling the boys ashore. It is not believed that Hine was drowned because he was never underwater as Brey succeeded in holding him up all the time after he became exhausted.  The pulmoter at Fire Station No. 1 had been sent for, but whoever had been entrusted with this important mission failed to reach there, according to the firemen.

The coroner’s jury rendered a verdict this morning that he "came to his death thru exhaustion from his efforts to rescue a drowning person."

The deceased is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Hine, of 3307 Highland Avenue, a sister, Miss Louis Hine, a student in the Cairo high school, and two brothers, Roland, with the Marines in the front line trenches, and Maurice, a sophomore in the high school.

Funeral services will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock at the family residence, 3307 Highland Avenue, conducted by Rev. Curwin Henley, pastor of the Tigert Memorial Church.  Interment will be made at Beech Grove.  Burke is in charge of the funeral.

The flag on the Armory was flying at half-mast today out of respect for the deceased, who was clerk of Co. D, Ninth Inf., I. N. G.
 
ALEX MILLER AMONG KILLED IN ACTION
Brother of Mrs. Ed Rubenacker Reported Among Casualties

Alex Miller, brother of Mrs. Edward Rubenacker, of 3201 Elm Street, is reported killed in action in France, according to a message received by his sister Monday.  The young man is well known in Cairo.
 
MRS. MARGARET VICK PASSED AWAY AT ELCO
Aged Resident of County Died at Home Saturday

Mrs. Margaret Vick, aged 73 years, died Saturday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John White, at Elco.

Death came after a period of failing health for the past three years.

Mrs. Vick was the widow of George Vick, formerly of Mill Creek, who died 18 years ago.  Surviving her are eight children, Mrs. Mattie Dillow and Clyde Vick, of Mill Creek, Mrs. Edna Dillow, Will and Henry Vick, of Delta, Mrs. Ida Whitaker, of Miller City, Sidney Vick, of Marion, Ill., and Mrs. John White, of Elco.

Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the Baptist church of which she was a member, conducted by the Rev. Will Lockard and burial was in Vick Cemetery at Mill Creek.

(George W. McCrite married Margaret McCrite on 2 Mar 1862, in Alexander Co., Ill.  James Adam Dillow married Martha Alice Vick on 24 Apr 1895, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Robert Otto Dillow married Edna Irene Vick on 9 Oct 1898, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Her marker in Vick Cemetery near Mill Creek reads:  Margareta Vick Born Dec. 9, 1844 Died Aug. 4, 1918.  Our mother has gone to a mansion of rest, To a glorious land by the Deity blest.—Darrel Dexter)

 
FUNERAL NOTICE

Hine—Died:  August 7—Harry E. Hine, aged 21.  Funeral services will be conducted at home of parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Hine, 3307 Highland Avenue, at 2:00 p.m. Wednesday, August 7, by Rev. Corwin Henley, pastor of the Southern Methodist Church.  Special interurban train will leave Thirty-fourth and Highland at 2:30 for interment at Beech Grove Cemetery.  Friends of the family are invited.
 
Mrs. B. I. Britton returned Sunday from Greenville, Miss., where she had been called by the death of a relative.  (Mounds)
  
Wednesday, 7 Aug 1918:
CAIRO
MARINE IS WOUNDED IN FRANCE

According to a letter received by his mother, Mrs. Susie Allen, of 509 Center Street, Sgt. Claude Allen, U. S. M. C., has been wounded in France.  The letter was written June 30, while he was in a hospital, where he states he had been for three weeks.  He does not state the extent of his injuries, but says he will be "up and at 'em" in a short while.  His relatives had not seen his name in the casualty list nor had they received any notification from the War Department.  Young Allen was a sergeant in Co. 78 Sixth Regiment U. S. M. C.
 
871 Names in Today's Army and Marine List of American Casualties

Washington, Aug. 7—In the Marine casualty list today is the name of Eric Compton, of Carbondale, severely wounded.
 
FUNERAL OF HENRY HINE HELD TODAY
Firing Squad from Company D Gives Last Salute to Departed Member

Funeral services for Harry Hine, who died Monday evening after his successful effort to save Milton Brey from drowning, were held at the residence, 3307 Highland Avenue at 2 o'clock this afternoon.

Company D, of which the deceased was a member, met at the Armory at 1 o'clock and marched to the home.  After the services, conducted by Rev. Curwin Henley, of the Tigert Memorial Church, the funeral party boarded a special interurban train at Thirty-fourth and Highland for Beech Grove where interment was made.

At the grave, he was given the burial of a soldier by Company D.  The firing squad fired a parting salute to the dying strain of "taps."  Pallbearers were chosen from his friends in the company.
  
Thursday, 8 Aug 1918:
Man Up for Murder Several Months Ago Charged with Robbery

Charles Potts, the man from Wickliffe, Ky., who was charged with the murder of Otto Metcalf in a saloon January 26, was arrested yesterday by Sergt. McKinney and Officer Beard on a charge of robbery preferred by H. W. Deweese of Wickliffe.  He was bound over to Sheriff Ashby and returned without extradition papers.
 
CHARLES MAHAFFEE WOUNDED AND GASSED
Writes from Hospital however that He Is Getting Along O.K.

Charles Mahafee, another Cairo boy, has been wounded in action in France.  He was gassed and hit by shrapnel on July 19, according to a letter written to his sister Mrs. Peter Brackey, but as the letter was written the following day from the field hospital, and he said that he was getting along O.K. and expected to get back to the front. It is believed that his injuries are not severe.
 
BOY INJURED IN AUTO ACCIDENT DIES HERE

Jesse R. Farley, a 17-year-old youth from Morehouse, Mo., died last evening at St. Mary's Infirmary where he had been brought for treatment by his mother.

The boy had been injured several weeks ago in an automobile accident, but his life could not be saved.

Karcher Brothers prepared the body for burial and will ship the remains to Sikeston, Mo.
 
The body of Mrs. Elizabeth Ortner, who died in Los Angeles, Cal., on July 29th, was brought here (Charleston, Mo.) and taken to the home of her son, Max Ortner, where the funeral service was held Tuesday afternoon at 4 o'clock.  Rev. L. R. Jenkins, pastor of the Methodist church, officiated.  Interment was in the Odd Fellows Cemetery.  Mrs. Ortner was 80 years and 4 months old.

 

R. H. Hawley, time keeper at the Polk Preserving Company, who has been off duty owing to the illness and death of his daughter, Hattie, will resume his daily avocation Friday at the plant.  (Mound City)
  
Friday, 9 Aug 1918: 

R. Hutcheson received a letter from his son, Lieut. Roderick Hutcheson, who is a member of the Rainbow Division in France. He recently suffered an injury to his right hand, caused by a hand grenade, which he threw back at the Huns and has been at a base hospital for three weeks.  He also states that one night a number of Hun airships were discovered over their quarters and the French ordered all lights out with the exception of the section where the German prisoners were stationed.  The air men, mistaking the lighted place as an operating quarters, let down their death-dealing fire and killed some 29 Germans. Roderick says this may be hard to believe, but as he was on the scene and vouches for the truth of the statement.  (Mound City)

 

C. A. Rudolph left Tuesday for Lovelace where he was called on account of the death of his sister.  (Arlington, Ky.)

 

COLORED SOLDIER DIES IN HAWAII

Mrs. Sara Hart, a colored woman living at 908 Walnut Street, received words today that her nephew, Claud A. Robinson, a private in Co. K, 25th Infantry died at Schofield Barracks, Hawaiian Territory on July 17.  The remains are now at San Francisco and will be forwarded by the government if the relatives desire.  The dead soldier is a grand nephew of Henry Taylor, a well-known colored man.

  

Saturday, 10 Aug 1918:

MRS. JERRY MORSE KILLED BY TRAIN
Husband Seriously Injured When Automobile Is Struck

Mrs. Jerry A. Morse was killed and her husband seriously injured Friday evening just this side of East Prairie, Mo., when the automobile in which they were driving was struck by a Cotton Belt inbound train.  The car was thrown into a ditch and Mrs. Morse was pinned to the ground by the running board of the car, which crushed her ribs.

They were but a short distance from their home when the accident occurred.
 
GOLCONDA, ILL., PASTOR DROPS DEAD IN HOME

Golconda, Ill., Aug. 10—The Rev. I. M. Blanchard, a prominent Baptist minister, dropped dead at his home near Golconda, Friday.

 
Mrs. Ella Cobb and Mrs. M. Lazarus, of Natchez, Miss., who were called here (Mound City) by the death of W. C. Painter, have returned to their homes.  They were accompanied by Mrs. A. R. Lazarus, who has made her home with Mrs. W. C. Painter, the past year.
  
Tuesday, 13 Aug 1918: 
MRS. MARY KREHER DIES THIS MORNING
Former Cairo Woman Passes Away at St. Mary's Infirmary

Mrs. Mary Cashman Kreher passed away this morning at 8:30 o'clock at St. Mary's Infirmary after a lingering illness.  She was brought to Cairo from her home in DuQuoin following the death of her husband, which occurred but two months ago, this makes her demise doubly deplorable, as she leaves surviving three young sons, Edward, the oldest, aged 14, Albert, aged 11, and Earl, aged 9.  She also leaves an aunt, Mrs. Timothy O'Conner, of Cobden.

Mrs. Kreher was born in Cairo February 14, 1873 and was married to Andrew Kreher of DuQuoin, in Cairo, October 31, 1901.  Rev. Father Dispenbroch officiating.

The remains were taken to DuQuoin this afternoon where the funeral will occur Wednesday at the Sacred Heart Church conducted by Rev. Father Eschman.  Mrs. T. J. Keefe and Mrs. Katherine Rubenacher of Cairo will accompany the funeral party.

 

CAIRO BOY WAS NAMED IN ORDERS

Lieut. Paul M. Clendenen Carried to Front on Stretcher to Direct Fighting

Second Lieutenant Paul M. Clendenen, in command of a company of colored troops on the battle line in France, has been named as one of a number of Americans officers for bravery in action.

Lieut. Clendenen is the son of Superintendent Taylor C. Clendenen, head of the Cairo public schools.

Junius B. Wood, correspondent of the Chicago Daily News, gives the account in a dispatch telling of the bravery of the negro troops, the old Eighth Illinois and a regiment of New York colored volunteers over whom Lieut. Clendenen is one of the offices.

Mentioning the various deeds for which the men are mentioned in French and American orders, the correspondent says:

“An epidemic of Spanish influenza gripped the regiment.  At the time, Capt. James Dugald White, Capt. F. W. Cobb, Lieut. R. M. Roland and Second Lieutenant P. M. Clendenen were carried to the front on stretchers and continued to direct their men during the critical hours of the fighting.
  
Wednesday, 14 Aug 1918:
TWO LITTLE BOYS RUN DOWN BY TRAIN

Two small boys, living at Tatumville, near Tamms, were run over by a Mobile & Ohio train and killed some time last night, as they were stealing a ride.  The names of the boys could not be learned today.

From information gained by The Citizen, the boys had run off to Jonesboro and were returning when they were run over by a train.  As conductor on the freight train No. 62 north, claimed he saw the boys in the north end of the Tamms yards, which would indicate that they were starting out a second time.  At any rate, their bodies were found at Mill Creek and were taken to Jonesboro.  Mill Creek is in Union County.
One of the boys is reported to have been about 8 years of age and the other somewhat older.

(The 15 Aug 1918, issue recorded their names as Reese Tatum and Frank Schilling.—Darrel Dexter)
 
VIENNA BOY WAS NOT KILLED—WAS WOUNDED

A telephone message from Vienna today to The Citizen, states that Charles L. Ford reported killed in France was only wounded.  His father, William Ford, a school teacher, received a cable from him on August 7, stating that he was wounded and was getting along nicely.
  
Thursday, 15 Aug 1918:
YOUNG MAN UNKNOWN AT MOUND CITY

Robert A. Richardson, of Mound City, Ill., is named as severely wounded in the casualty list published in The Citizen today.

Members of the Pulaski County draft board do not know him.  They have a Joe Richards and a Henry Leon Richards, but not Robert A. Richardson.
 
YOUNG THEBES MAN DIED LAST EVENING
Amos M. Chism Passed Away at Home of Mother in Olive Branch

Amos Milton Chism, aged 27, of Thebes, died at the home of his mother, Mrs. Minnie Chism, at Olive Branch, Wednesday evening, at 6:20 o'clock, where he was visiting while undergoing medical attention.  He had been ill for several months.

The deceased had been in the employ of the Southern Illinois Bridge Company and of the Chicago and Eastern Illinois road at Thebes.

The deceased is survived by a widow, who was Miss Mabel Brown and little son, Harold Eugene, and by a sister, Miss Florence Chism, and three brothers, Howard, Henry, and Leslie.

Funeral services were held this afternoon at 3 o'clock at the M. E. church in Thebes, of which he was a member, conducted by the Rev. Mr. Browning, of Olive Branch, and burial was in the Thebes Cemetery.

(William E. Chism married Minnie W. Edwards on 28 Jan 1887, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Thebes Cemetery reads:  Amos M. Chism 1891-1919 Eva M. Hewitt Chism 1892-1969.—Darrel Dexter)
 
YOUNG BOYS KILLED BY TRAIN TUESDAY
Accident Occurred Near Mill Creek Where Inquest Was Held

Reese Tatum, aged 15, and Frank Schilling, aged 11, were killed early Tuesday morning by a Mobile and Ohio train about two and a half miles north of Mill Creek. The indications at the coroner’s inquest were that the boys had hopped the train to return home from Jonesboro.

The coroner’s inquest was held at Mill Creek.  The Tatum boy's home was at Tatumville, a small village near Tamms, and the Schilling boy lived at Hazlewood, near Elco.

The funeral services were held Wednesday and interment made at Hazlewood Cemetery.

It is reported that the boys had taken some money from their folks and ran away because they were afraid to stay at home.

(Markers in Hazlewood Cemetery at Elco read:  W. Leeroy Son of W. C. & H. C. Tatum Born Dec. 1, 1903 Died Aug. 13, 1918.  He came to raise our hearts to heaven.  He goes to call us there.  The golden gates were open wide.  A gentle voice said come, and Angels from the other side welcomed Our loved one home.  Frank Schilling 1907-1918.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. H. B. Cartner is very low and not expected to survive many days.  (Thebes)

(Henry B. Cartner married Mary C. Boswell on 7 Apr 1872, in Union Co., Ill.  A marker in Hulen Cemetery reads:  H. B. Cartner 1846-  Mary C. Cartner His Wife 1848-1918.  Father & Mother.  Abide in Me.—Darrel Dexter)
 
An infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Bagby of Center, died last week and was buried at Concord Cemetery. (Curry)

(A marker in Concord Cemetery near Olmsted reads:  Bernard Bagby Born July 30, 1913 Died Aug. 3, 1918.  At rest.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Friday, 16 Aug 1918:
DEATH CLAIMS MRS. CAROLINE McCLURE
Old Resident of County Passed Away in St. Louis Thursday

Mrs. Caroline V. McClure, once a resident of Cairo, and for years a prominent resident of the north end of Alexander County, died in St. Louis Thursday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Throgmorton.  She was 85 years of age.  The remains will be brought to McClure for burial Sunday.

Mrs. McClure was born in Virginia on July 29, 1833.  With her parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Overbey, she came to Cairo when eight years of age, attending school here until she was 16.  Her father was in the mercantile business here.  On February 24, 1853, she married Thomas J. McClure, who had then acquired quite a large farm at McClure.  To them six children were born, four of whom survive, Mrs. Virginia Taylor, wife of Oscar Taylor, of McClure, Mrs. Caroline Throgmorton, wife of Dr. Charles Throgmorton, of St. Louis; T. J. McClure, of McClure, and Claude McClure.

Mrs. McClure was left a widow in 1882, when her husband died on August 23 of that year.  Since that time for many years she managed her farming interests at McClure, with the assistance of her son, J. T. McClure.

Mrs. McClure built a fine home at McClure, which is one of the landmarks of that section.

             (Thomas J. McClure married Caroline Overbey on 24 Feb 1853, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Their marker in Lindsey Cemetery near McClure reads:  In Memory of Thomas J. McClure Born Nov. 8, 1823 Died Aug. 23, 1882.  Caroline McClure Born July 29, 1833 Died Aug. 27, 1918.  Settled on farm in 1865 on present townsite of McClure, Illinois, Alexander County.  Interested in farming, milling & promotion of welfare of community, friends & relatives.  Members of Cumberland Presbyterian Church.  A Memorial to our Father & Mother Thomas J. and Caroline O. McClure.  Erected by the McClure Family Nov. 25, 1948.—Darrel Dexter)

 

WORD RECEIVED THAT PAUL COCHRAN IS DEAD

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Cochran, at 322 Twenty-ninth Street, have received a letter stating that their son, Paul Cochran, who was wounded July 25, was dead.  The letter did not state when he died or under what circumstances.
 
TWO KILLED, FIVE HURT IN ILLINOIS MINE EXPLOSION

HARRISBURG, Ill., Aug. 16—Owing to the prolonged dry period in this vicinity, coal miners are hauling water from Carmi, Benton, and Mount Carmel.  One big mine has shut down.

At El Dorado, two men were killed and five injured by an explosion in the No. 10 mine of the O'Gara Company.
 
French daily press reports the information that Robert A. Richardson, of this city (Mound City) was severely wounded in France.  The young man did not enlist from here.  It is presumed that he went from Arkansas.  He formerly resided here and his mother was Laura Harland, formerly of this city.
  
Saturday, 17 Aug 1918:
Brother of Cairo Man Seriously Injured in France
Youngest Brother of E. A. Berry of This City Wounded June 8th

E. A. Berry, of the Webster Hotel, received a message from the War Department today giving the information that his youngest brother, Private Frank Berry, had been seriously wounded in action on June 8.  This is all the information contained in the message, the extent of his injuries and the engagement in which he was injured were not given.

Private Berry went over with General Pershing in June 1917 and has been in the regular army for four years.  He resided in Johnston City, Illinois.

WIFE OF FORMER SINGER MAN DIES

It was learned in Cairo last evening that Mrs. W. R. Smith, wife of the former manager of the Singer Sewing Machine Co. here, had died in Carbondale following an operation.  The funeral was held at Carbondale at 2:30 this afternoon.

Mr. and Mrs. Smith resided in Cairo until about two months ago.

FUNERAL NOTICE

All members of Knights and Ladies of Security are requested to assemble at the Safford Hall, Sunday, Aug. 18, 11:30 a.m. proceeding to the home of our late brother, Isaac Zook, where services will be held.  The following have been selected as pallbearers:  George Gilmore, Horace Hughes, P. J. Taylor, G. M. Taylor, Virgil Riley, and William P. Joiner.
Albert Cathell
Secy. K & L. of Security.

LITTLE GIRL SHOT BY SMALL BROTHER
Minnie Lewis, of 3110 Sycamore Street, Accidentally Killed This Afternoon

Minnie Lewis, the young daughter of John Lewis, of 3110 Sycamore, was accidentally shot and killed this afternoon about 1:45 by her younger brother, Leonard.  He was playing with a shotgun when the accident occurred.  The body was taken to Karcher Brothers to be prepared for burial.

It was learned that the children were playing with a loaded shotgun, and were trying to put it under the bed, when it was discharged, the load entering the little girl's neck.  She was dead when her mother, who was in the next room rushed in when she heard the shot.

The girl was 13 years of age and her brother, who did the shooting, is 9 or 10.  Their father, John Lewis, was killed on a shanty boat some years ago and since then their mother has remarried to Jake Pratt.

Dr. Dodds, coroner, summoned a jury this afternoon to inquire into the accident.

MRS. W. R. SMITH DIES IN CARBONDALE

Mrs. W. R. Smith, formerly of Cairo, died at her home in Carbondale, Friday following a surgical operation.  Mrs. Smith was the wife of W. R. Smith, formerly manager of the Singer Sewing Machine Company’s downtown office in Cairo, leaving here about two months ago.

The funeral services were held in Carbondale this afternoon.

ISAAC ZOOK DIES AFTER ILLNESS OF TWO MONTHS

Following an illness of about two months, Mr. Isaac Zook, of 400 Washington Avenue, died yesterday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at his home.

The deceased is survived by his son, Robert Short, of Kansas City, Mo., a sister, Mrs. Robert Hogan, and a brother, Charles, both of Dawson Springs, Kentucky.

E. A. Burke prepared the remains for shipment to Bardwell, Ky., where they will be sent Sunday afternoon and interment made.

The following will act as pall bearers:  Horace Hughes, P. J. Taylor, G. M. Hogan, Virgil Riley, and William P. Joiner.

(Isaac Zook married Minnie Short on 12 May 1897, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

George W. Boswell, one of the oldest and most highly respected citizens of the county died at the home of his son-in-law, Boy Watson, in Bardwell last Saturday afternoon at 5:30 o'clock.  Mr. Boswell was stricken with paralysis few weeks ago and his condition was serious from the start.  Notwithstanding everything was done for him that human genius could employ, he gradually grew worse until the end came.  He was born in Shelby County, Ky., in 1844, but moved to this county with his parents when he was six or eight years of age and had always been a citizen of this county since he first came.  He was a good citizen and had the utmost respect of everyone.  He was married to Miss Martha Ellen Thomas, a member of one of Milburn's well known families who has been dead for thirteen years.  He is survived by nine children.  Mr. Boswell was a member of the Baptist church and his funeral and burial occurred at Milburn Sunday afternoon, the funeral services being conducted by Rev. W. H. Williams of Clinton.

John Boswell, a well-known citizen of the Milburn district, died at his residence there Sunday night of cancer of the stomach, with which he had suffered for a long time.  Mr. Boswell was a good citizen and was interested in all movements tending to uplift his fellowman.  He was a member of the Baptist Church, being a communicant of that organization of worshippers for almost his entire life.  His remains were interred in the Milburn Cemetery Monday afternoon, the funeral services being conducted by the Rev. W. H. Williams, of Clinton.  Mr. Boswell was a brother of George W. Boswell, who died at Bardwell on Saturday afternoon preceding his death on Sunday.

Monday, 19 Aug 1918:
LEWIS GIRL BURIED AT BEECH GROVE

The coroner’s jury in the case of Minnie Lewis, the little girl who was shot Saturday afternoon by her brother, Leonard Lewis, ruled that she came to her death through the accidental discharge of a shotgun.
The boy's story was not very well connected, but the jury could not make him change it.  There is no doubt about the shooting being to some extent, an accident, but the jury seemed to think that something should be done for the boy, instead of to him.  He appears to be a very bright little fellow and with the proper environment, he might have a bright future.

Funeral services were held this afternoon at the home, 3111 Sycamore, conducted by the Rev. Jesse Paris, pastor of the Church of God.  The body was taken to Beech Grove at 2:30 where interment was made.

LARGE ATTENDANCE AT McCLURE FUNERAL

Funeral services were held Sunday at McClure over the remains of Mrs. Caroline McClure, and the remains were buried on top of the hill, beside the grave of her husband, T. J. McClure.

The funeral was largely attended.  Dr. and Mrs. Thorgmorton and daughter, and Claud McClure and wife and two daughters, accompanied the remains from St. Louis.

HERBERT R. GATES KILLED IN CUBA
With Friend Is Victim of Automobile Accident
Both Die Instantly

Word was received in Cairo Saturday evening of the sudden death of Herbert R. Gates, at his home in Buenaventura, Cuba, Saturday, August 10.  Mr. Gates, who is a brother-in-law of Mrs. J. L. Batterson, 821 Twenty-fifth Street, was on his way home from an automobile ride with a friend, Dr. Grome, when the accident occurred and both were instantly killed.  No particulars were given in the brief note telling of the tragedy and no informational to Mrs. Gates movements except that she intended leaving in a few days for St. Louis where her mother resides.

The news comes as a great shock to the relatives and friends of the family in Cairo.  Mr. Gates and his family visited in Cairo last winter, the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Batterson and family.

Thursday, 22 Aug 1918:
Mose L. Miller, of Elco, who underwent a surgical operation at St. Mary's Infirmary, a few days ago is in a critical condition.

BARDWELL GIRL DIES AT HOSPITAL
Alter Hutson, the 17-year-old daughter of W. M. Hutson, of Bardwell, Ky., died yesterday at St. Mary's Infirmary about noon.  She had been ill only a few days.  E. A. Burk prepared the body for shipment to Bardwell on an early morning train.

(The 27 Aug 1918, issue records her name as Alta Hutson.—Darrel Dexter)

Friday, 23 Aug 1918:
ELCO RESIDENT DIED HERE TODAY
Mozel Miller Passed Away at St. Mary's Infirmary

Mozel Miller, aged 51 years, a prominent farmer of Elco, died at St. Mary’s Infirmary at 2:30 o'clock this afternoon, following an operation Monday for gallstones.

Mr. Miller had been in poor health for some time and Sunday came down to the infirmary when the operation was decided upon.

The deceased is survived by his widow and five children.  He also leaves three brothers, Joseph, John and George Miller, also of Elco.  He lives on a farm about a mile and a half from Elco.  The remains will be taken to Elco Saturday and the funeral will probably be held Sunday, from the Baptist church, of which he was a member.

Most of the members of his family were present at his bedside when death came.  They are stopping here at the home of Nelson I. Croft on Twenty-third street.


The remains of Ike Zook, of Cairo, were brought here (Bardwell, Ky.) Sunday and interred in the Bardwell Cemetery Monday morning.  Mr. Zook was a brother-in-law of R. L. Chandler, of this city.

Saturday, 24 Aug 1918:
ANDREW ROARK DIES ST. MARY'S INFIRMARY

Andrew Roark, aged 50, died at St. Mary's hospital yesterday.  The body was removed to Burke's undertaking establishment and prepared for burial, which took place yesterday at Beech Grove Cemetery.  He is survived by a sister Mrs. Montram, of Carbondale, who was notified of his death.

MRS. ANNE HALL DIES AT HOME IN ANNA
Passes Away Friday Afternoon—Funeral Services Sunday

Word was received this morning of the death of Mrs. Anne Hall, which occurred at her home in Anna, Ill., Friday afternoon, after a several weeks' illness.  Mrs. Hall was the mother of Mrs. Charles Hickcox, of St. Louis, formerly of Cairo, and of Mrs. Kate Hartline and Mrs. Aurora Poole, of Anna, both teachers in the Cairo schools.  She also leaves surviving her three other daughters:  Miss Emma Hall, Mrs. Hicks, of Sikeston, Mo., and Mrs. Cox, of St. Louis.  Mrs. Hall is well known in Cairo where she has often visited.

The funeral services will be held in Anna Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock and interment made in the Anna cemetery.

(Frank H. Hall married Flora A. Elkins on 22 Nov 1866, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Her marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Ann Elkins Hall 1847-1918—Darrel Dexter)

Monday, 26 Aug 1918:
MRS. GRACE FLOURNOY DIES SUNDAY MORNING
Passes Away at St. Mary’s Infirmary Following Operation

Mrs. Grace Edmonds Flournoy, aged 28 years, wife Clarence S. Flournoy, died at St. Mary’s Infirmary at 3 o’clock Sunday morning following an operation Friday morning in an attempt to save her life.  She has been ill for nearly two months and a greater part of the time was at the home of her sister, Mrs. Andrew Serbian, on the Mound City Road.  She was taken to the hospital Thursday afternoon.

Mrs. Flournoy was an unusually beautiful and accomplished young woman.  Possessed of an unusually fine contralto voice, she was an earnest ___ student and was ambitious to accomplish something with her talent.  She was a valued member of the Fortnightly Musical Club and the contralto soloist at the Presbyterian Church of which she was a member.

Funeral services were held Sunday night at 8 o’clock at the residence, 425 Twenty-sixth Street conducted by Rev. J. A. Brunberg of Malden, Mo.

Among the floral tributes there was a sheaf of roses from the Fortnightly Musical Club.  The remains were taken to Mason, Tenn., and interment was made there today.

Mrs. Flournoy leaves surviving her her husband, two little daughters, Grace and Margie, he mother, Mrs. Gravett, of Mound City, and two sisters, Mrs. Andrew Serbian of Cairo, and Mrs. Frank Henry, of Chicago.

(Andrew Serbian, 22, of Cairo, married Bertha Mikkin, 21, of Cache, on 3 Sep 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

FUNERAL TODAY FOR LITTLE McCLARY BABE

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Robert McClary, born last Wednesday, died Sunday afternoon.  It was their first born.

Funeral services were held at ten o’clock this morning at the family residence, No. 411 Twenty-seventh Street and the remains were taken to Beech Grove Cemetery for interment.

Rev. J. A. Brunberg, of Malden, Mo., who preached at the Presbyterian church Sunday morning in the absence of the pastor, conducted the services.

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR MOSES L. MILLER

Funeral services were held Sunday at Elco over the remains of Moses L. Miller, who died at St. Mary's Infirmary Friday.  A number of Cairo people attended, including Senator Sidney B. Miller, William Brown, Harrison Brown, Nelson I. Croft, and family and Mrs. J. S. McRaven, of Marion.

FUNERAL NOTICE

We desire to extend our thanks and appreciation to our friends for their kindness during the illness and at the death of our husband and father, Moses L. Miller.  We are thankful to Mr. and Mrs. Nelson I. Croft for their kindness and also extend our thanks to the members of the Methodist choir for the kindness they showed us.
Mrs. Moses L. Miller and family

BODY OF COLORED SOLDIER ARRIVES
Claude A. Robinson, Who Died on July 17, in Hawaii, to Be Buried Tuesday

The body of Claude A. Robinson, colored private in Co. K, Twenty-fifth Infantry, who died at Schofield Barracks, Hawaiian Territory on July 17, arrived in Cairo today and will be buried in the National Cemetery at Mound City Tuesday with military honors.  A special interurban car will leave at 1:30 tomorrow afternoon to take the family and friends to the cemetery.  The young man was a son of Mrs. Saydie Hart of 908 Walnut Street.  He had been in the service for about two years.

(Claud A. Robinson, private in the U. S. Army, died 17 Jul 1918, and was buried in Section F, grave 4682A, at Mound City National Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)

Tuesday, 27 Aug 1918:
GRAY B. HONEY DIES AT THEBES
Old Resident of County Passed Away Last Evening

Gray B. Honey, an old resident of Alexander County, died Monday morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. J. C. Garner, near Thebes.

He was born in Fayette County, Tennessee, December 3, 1847, and came to Thebes with his parents when a small boy and has resided in Alexander County since that time.

The deceased leaves a wife and five children, Walter S. Honey, of Thebes, Mrs. Cecile Garner, Mrs. James Benefield, of Fayville, Mrs. L. E. Holbin, of East St. Louis, and Mrs. William E. Ayers, Marion, Ill.

Interment in Mt. Zion Cemetery.

(William E. Ayers married Ione Honey on 23 Dec 1900, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. Jane Shreves, of Karnak attended the funeral of her nephew, Leo Stankey.  (Perks)

N. J. Livesay suffered a paralytic stroke at noon Monday, his entire right side being affected.  He is 78 years of age and has been feeble all summer.

The body of Private Claud A. Robinson, of Company K, 25th Infantry, was brought here for burial, being consigned to Mrs. Saydie Hart.  The remains having been shipped form Scofield Barracks, Honolulu, Hawaii.  The deceased was a colored soldier.

Mrs. Parker Moore left Thursday morning for Dyersburg, Tenn., in answer to a message announcing the death of her sister who resided there.  The deceased had been a sufferer from a stroke of paralysis, which attacked her about a year ago and from which she never fully recovered.  (Bardwell, Ky.)

Miss Alta Hutson, daughter of W. M. Hutson, south of town, died at a hospital in Cairo Wednesday morning from the effects of an operation that was performed on her eye Monday.  Her remains were brought to Bardwell Thursday and interred in the Bardwell Cemetery.

(The 22 Aug 1918, issue reported her name as Alter Hutson.—Darrel Dexter)

Wednesday, 28 Aug 1918:
HARRISBURG BOY IS REPORTED WOUNDED

Anthony Shimaltis, of Harrisburg, was in the list of wounded, degree undetermined, made public yesterday by the war department.

The list also contains the names of 96 reported missing in action.

CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank our kind friends for their assistance, beautiful floral offerings and automobiles furnished at the funeral of our infant son.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert McClary
411 Twenty-seventh St.

ASA M. YATES DIED EARLY THIS MORNING

Asa M. Yates, aged 59 years, died at his home on the Central Bend Road in Dogtooth Bend at 7 o'clock this morning after a long illness.  He was one of the prominent farmers of his neighborhood.
Funeral services will be held at his residence Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock and burial will be at the Bumgard Cemetery.

The deceased is survived by a widow and several children.  He was a brother of Spirus H. Yates.
E. A. Burke has charge of the funeral.

(Asa M. Yates married Ada Foster on 1 Aug 1893, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Baumgard Cemetery reads:  Asa M. Yates Born Nov. 12, 1860 Died Aug. 28, 1918.  Addie E. Yates Born Feb. 17, 1872 Died March 1, 1933.—Darrel Dexter)

The remains of Mrs. Claude Armstrong, who died in St. Louis Friday night, were brought here and interred in the Beech Grove Cemetery Sunday afternoon.  Mrs. Armstrong had been ill for several months.  She leaves to mourn her loss her husband and three children.  (Mounds)

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Ira Higgins passed away Saturday, after several days' sickness with malarial fever.  (Villa Ridge)

Thursday, 29 Aug 1918:
TRIBUTE TO LATE MOSES L. MILLER
Elco Lost Valued Citizen in His Untimely Death

Death came into the home and called from a loyal wife and five children, their devoted father and husband, Moses L. Miller, of Elco, on Friday, Aug. 23rd, at 2:30 o'clock p.m.

The village and entire surrounding country mourns the loss of a very estimable and highly respected citizen noted for his charity and activity in religious life.

The deceased was born near Elco, March 27, 1868.  Early in life he married Miss Melissa Smithy.  To this union were born seven children, of whom five are living.  Mr. Miller was a man noted for his kindness toward all who knew him, ministering to the wants of others and any differences that might exist thru kindness which he practiced as an instrument of discipline.

The deceased fought the battles of life bravely.  Having been ill for some time until recently he was advised by a number of prominent physicians that an operation was necessary to prolong his life.

The operation was undergone on Monday, August 19th, at St. Mary’s Infirmary, in Cairo, but proved of no avail.

The Almighty in His infinite goodness and wisdom saw fit to call from our midst this manly man to reap the harvest to reward beyond and may he share abundantly in the glories that the Prince of Peace has so willingly promised to bestow on all like characters.

The body was removed to the home of his daughter, Mrs. Bufford, in Elco, and on Sunday morning at 11 o'clock the funeral was preached at the Baptist church, of which the deceased was a faithful and active member for a number of years.

The remains were taken to the Sims Cemetery north of town and laid to rest, mid falling rain to the mother earth.

We, the people, beg to extend our heartfelt sympathies to the immediate family in this their sad bereavement.

(His marker in St. John’s Cemetery near Mill Creek reads:  Mosel Miller Born March 27, 1868 Died Aug. 23, 1918.  Melissa Miller his wife Born Oct. 5, 1870 Died Nov. 1, 1961.—Darrel Dexter)

FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—At the residence in Lake Milligan neighborhood, Asa M. Yates, Wednesday morning, August 28, at 9:30 o'clock, aged 58 years.  The funeral services will be held at Lake Milligan Baptist Church near Miller City at 11 o'clock Friday morning; sermon by Rev. T. W. Tate, the pastor of the church.  The funeral party will leave the residence at 9:30 o'clock.  Interment in Bumgard Cemetery.

YATES FUNERAL FRIDAY MORNING

Funeral services for Asa M. Yates will be held Friday morning at Lake Milligan Baptist Church, near Miller City, at 11:00 o'clock conducted by Rev. T. Tate, pastor.  Notice of the funeral appears elsewhere today.

Friday, 30 Aug 1918:
BRAKEMAN FOUND DECAPITATED

POPLAR BLUFF, Mo., Aug. 30—Brakeman C. A. Yow, working between Illmo and Paragould on the Missouri Pacific, was found Wednesday under an iron bridge, six miles south of Perkins with his head and one arm cut off.  The discovery was made by the crew of a train.

Saturday, 31 Aug 1918:
Mrs. Alice Thomas, wife of Richard F. Thomas, of this county, died very suddenly of heart trouble at the home of her daughter, Mrs. William Campbell, of Lovelaceville, on Monday morning of this week.  She is survived by her husband and several children, besides a large number of other relatives.  The burial was in the Thomas graveyard Tuesday.  (Bardwell, Ky.)

News was received from the War Department last Friday announcing the death in France of Lonnie Yancy.  He was a son of J. B. Yancy, and lived near Arlington.  The young man was a member of the draft and left Carlisle County in the late part of last February for Camp Taylor and is the first Carlisle County man that has been killed in the war with Germany.  (Bardwell, Ky.)

Monday 2 Sep 1918:

FUNERAL OF MRS. BAIN TO BE HELD TUESDAY

Funeral services of Mrs. Sarah Bain, of 618 Thirty-sixth, who died Saturday evening, will be held tomorrow morning at the family residence.  The funeral cortege will leave the residence at 10:20 over a special interurban train for Shiloh Cemetery, Mounds.  There will be services at the grave.

COOPER FUNERAL HELD YESTERDAY

Funeral services of Walter Cooper, aged 37 years, who died at St. Mary's Infirmary Saturday, were held at Karcher Brothers’ undertaking parlors yesterday.  The remains were sent to his home in LaCenter, Ky., where the burial will take place at 4 o’clock this afternoon.  His brother, S. H. Cooper, was at his bedside at the time of his death.

Nelson J. Liveray, aged 78 years, seven months and 29 days, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. A. F. Koontz, Saturday, Aug. 31, at 6:30 o'clock.  He suffered a third paralytic stroke Monday noon and became unconscious, remaining in this condition until he passed away.  He had been quite feeble all summer, more so since May when he suffered a second stroke.  Deceased leaves a widow, Mrs. Sarah E. Liveray, to whom he had been married in 1861.  He also leaves a son, Charles Liveray, and two daughters, Mrs. A. F. Koontz and Mrs. J. E. Kellar, six grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.  Two of his grandsons are now with the colors in France.  Also, two brothers, Louis J. Liveray, of Willow Hill, Ill., and James, who resides in Colorado.  He was a native of Illinois, having been born in Nashville, this state, and was a veteran of the Civil War, having served in the 13th Illinois Cavalry.  Funeral was held this afternoon from the Grace M. E. Church, Rev. J. B. Johnson, assisted by Rev. Roy B. Morgan, officiating.  Burial in Beech Grove Cemetery.  (Mound City)

(The 27 Aug 1918, issue gives his name as N. J. Livesay and the 4 Sep 1918, issues records it as Nebron J. Livesay.  Nelson J. Livesay, 24, of Ashley, Ill., born in Washington Co., Ill., 5’5”, dark hair, blue eyes, light complexion, enlisted as a corporal in Co. G, 13th Illinois Cavalry on 21 Dec 1863, and was mustered out at Pine Bluff, Ark., 25 Aug 1865.  Albert Koontz married Annie Livesay on 22 Jun 1893, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Edward J. Keller, 22, barber, born in Mound City, Ill., son of Chris Keller and Lizzie Revington, married Adelia Livesay, 21, born in Villa Ridge, Ill., daughter of Nelson Livesay and Sarah Hankins, on 31 Jan 1894, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Wednesday, 4 Sep 1918:
Louis Livesay who was called here to attend the funeral of his brother, Nebron Livesay, returned to his home in Willow Hill this morning.  (Mound City)

Thursday, 5 Sep 1918:
OLD RESIDENT OF MOUND CITY DIES

Mrs. Margaret Hurst, aged 71, died at her home in Mound City at 9 o’clock this morning, after an extended illness of heart trouble.

She had been a widow for several years and leaves two sons, William H. Hurst, of Vincennes, Ind., and Robert Hurst, of Mound City; and three daughters, Mrs. Christina Nelms, Mrs. H. V. Handley and Mrs. Harry Price, all of Mound City.

She was a native of Pulaski County and was born near Olmsted.  She was well known to a large circle of Pulaski County people.

Funeral arrangements had not been announced today.

Friday, 6 Sep 1918:
Female Infant Found Dead Along Beech Ridge Road Yesterday

A female infant, apparently very young, was found dead among the weeds along the Beech Ridge Road yesterday afternoon about 1:30 by Road Commissioner Andrew Serbian.  It appeared to have been thrown there from a passing automobile and was probably dead already.

Coroner Dodds was called and an inquest was held, but nothing could be learned about the matter.  The coroner ordered the body buried and this was done yesterday afternoon.

MOUND CITY BOY SEVERELY WOUNDED

William L. Mattingley, of Mound City, is mentioned in today's casualty list among the severely wounded.

The name of Almus Loloss, of Marion, is also among the wounded.

Both men are privates.

Saturday, 7 Sep 1918:
The funeral over the remains of Mrs. M. J. Hurst was held from the Pilgrim Congregational Church this morning at 10 o’clock.  Rev. Roy B. Morgan conducted the services, burial taking place in Beech Grove Cemetery.  (Mound City)

Monday, 9 Sep 1918:
BODY RECOVERED OF ST. LOUIS VICTIM

The body of Mrs. Robertson, who drowned when the St. Louis sank last week, was found at Chester and her husband and brother passed through Cairo Sunday from Chester, where they identified the body and took it back to Moscow, Ky., for burial.

COMMERCE LADY DIES

Mrs. Mary E. Sanders, aged 50, the wife of Henry Sanders, of Commerce, Mo., died at St. Mary’s Infirmary about midnight, Saturday.  She had been ill about four years and had been taken to the infirmary Thursday.  The body was taken to Karcher Brothers, who prepared it for burial.  The funeral will be held at Commerce today.

Tuesday, 10 Sep 1918:
OLD CAIRO CITIZEN DIES AT ST. MARY'S
Louis Zanone Passes Away This Afternoon after Long Illness

Louis Zanone, Sr., died this afternoon at 3 o'clock at St. Mary’s Infirmary where he was brought Monday from a sanitarium at Anna, Ill.  He has been ailing for the past several years following a paralytic stroke.

Mr. Zanone was 63 years old and was born in Italy.  When he came to the United States he located first at Mounds and in 1869 moved to Cairo, where he has been in business since.  He leaves surviving him his wife, a daughter, Mrs. Arthur Thompson, of Memphis, and two sons, Enrico and Louis, Jr., the latter in France with the U. S. Army and Enrico in training camp in Ohio.

The funeral arrangements had not been decided this evening.

ROBERT FELLNAGLE IN HOSPITAL IN FRANCE

Robert Fellnagel, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Fellnagel, 2117 Holbrook, is in a hospital in France suffering from severe mustard gas burns.  His face was blistered and his eyes injured as well as a number of burns on his body.  When he wrote on August 19, he was just able to sit up.  The men had worn their gas masks all night and in the morning took them off.  The day was cloudy and the gas was supposedly near the ground.  When the sun came out in the afternoon, the gas rose and many of the men suffered from the affects.

Wednesday 11 Sep 1918:
CAIRO LADY DIES IN PADUCAH TODAY

Mrs. Ella Primper, formerly of Cairo, died at 12 o'clock today at the home of her sister, Mrs. Hugh Miller, at Paducah, where she had been making her home for the past two months.  Blood poisoning starting from an infection in her foot is said to have been the cause.

Mrs. Primer, who is an aunt of John Scheel and of Miss Gertrude Eschman, of Cairo, is survived by two sisters in Paducah, the other being Mrs. Lillie Bethel.  She was a widow.

Funeral services will be held at 4 o’clock tomorrow afternoon with burial at Paducah.

NEW MADRID LADY DIES AT ST. MARY'S HOSPITAL

Mrs. Linda May Bates, of New Madrid, Mo., aged 30, died last evening about 5:10 o'clock at St. Mary’s Infirmary of puerperal peritonitis.  She had been here since Sunday.

She is survived by a young babe, her husband, W. Claude Bates, and her mother.  They were all at her bedside when she succumbed.

Karcher Brothers prepared the body for shipment to New Madrid, this morning on the 7 o'clock train.  The funeral will be held Thursday and she will be buried near her home.

OLD CAIRO CITIZEN DIES AT ST. MARY'S
Louis Zanone Passes Away Tuesday Afternoon after Long Illness

Louis Zanone, Sr., died Tuesday afternoon at 3 o'clock at St. Mary’s Infirmary where he was brought Monday from a sanitarium at Anna, Ill.  He has been ailing for the past several years following a paralytic stroke.

Mr. Zanone was 63 years old and was born in Italy.  When he came to the United States he located first at Mounds and in 1869 moved to Cairo, where he has been in business since.  He leaves surviving him his wife, a daughter, Mrs. Arthur Thompson, of Memphis, and two sons, Enrico and Louis, Jr., the latter in France with the U. S. Army and Enrico in training camp in Ohio.

The funeral arrangements had not been decided this evening.

Jay Willingham, age 68 years, a prominent citizen of this place (Bardwell, Ky.) passed away at his home here Saturday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock after a lingering illness.  Mr. Willingham had been a resident of Bardwell for the past twenty years and was popular with all who knew him.  He was at one time sheriff of Carlisle County, a member of the I. O. O. F lodge and a deacon in the Baptist church.  Besides his widow, Mrs. Jennie Willingham, he leaves one son, Shirley Willingham, of Dyersburg, Tenn., and a daughter, Mrs. E. H. Gardner, of this place. He also leaves two brothers R. O. Willingham, Sr., of Bardwell, and Richard Willingham, of California, and one sister, Mrs. Brit Glenn, of Arlington.  Funeral services were held from the Baptist church at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon by Rev. W. H. Gardner, of Martin, Tenn., after which burial was made in the Bardwell Cemetery with Odd Fellow ceremonies.

Thursday, 12 Sep 1918:
FUNERAL NOTICE

Zanone—Died Tuesday, Sept. 10, Louis Zanone.

Funeral services will be held Saturday morning at 8:15 o'clock with requiem high mass at St. Joseph's Church.

Remains will be taken by special Illinois Central train from Fourteenth and Ohio streets at 9:30 o'clock for Villa Ridge cemetery, where interment will be made in Calvary Cemetery. Rev. James Gillen will officiate.

Friends of the family are invited.

(His marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Louis Zanone 1858-1918.—Darrel Dexter)

CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank the many friends and neighbors for their kindness and sympathy during the illness and death of our darling mother, and also for the many beautiful flowers.
Mrs. H. V. Handley
William Hurst
Mrs. Christina Nellins
Mrs. Harry Price
Robert Hurst
Mrs. Hattie Hurst and family

(Harry Vantrees Handley, 30, manufacturer, born in Grand Tower, Ill., son of Manuel Handley and Margaret C. Pulley, married Sarah Duncan Hurst, 28, of Pulaski, born in Villa Ridge, Ill., daughter of Michael Hurst and Margaret Jane Hurst, on 16 Sep 1900.—Darrel Dexter)

Friday, 13 Sep 1918:
MRS. LOUISE GIBBONS DIED EARLY TODAY

Mrs. Louisa J. Gibbons, aged 54 years, died at 2 o'clock this morning at her home, No. 710 Thirty-seventh Street, after an illness of about three years.  She suffered from a complication of diseases.

The deceased was a widow and spent her whole life in Cairo.  She leaves two sons, Harry Gibbons, of Salem, Ill., and J. W., of Camp Dix, N. J., and one daughter, Miss Nondus Gibbons.  There are also two grandchildren and three brothers Charles Talbott, of Chicago, and Lindza and Fred Talbott, of Cairo.

Funeral arrangements are awaiting the arrival of relatives and interment will be at DuQuoin.

Mrs. Gibbons was a member of the Christian Church. Mrs. Falconer has charge of the funeral.

(John A. Gibbons married Louisa J. Talbott on 11 Jun 1884, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

AGED LADY PASSED AWAY EARLY TODAY

Mrs. Eliza Farmer, aged 71 years, died this morning at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Guy Schell, 227 Twenty-seventh street, where she had been making her home.  She had been sick for several months of cirrhosis of the liver.

The remains were taken to Fulton, Ky., today for burial beside her husband.  Funeral services were held at the residence at 10 o’clock this morning, conducted by Rev. Mr. Turner, pastor of Calvary Baptist Church and the body was taken to Fulton on the 1:45 Illinois Central train E. A. Burke had charge of the burial.

Saturday, 14 Sep 1918:
FUNERAL SERVICES HELD THIS MORNING

The funeral of Louis Zenone, whose death occurred at St. Mary's Infirmary late Tuesday afternoon, was held this morning at 8:15 o'clock at St. Joseph's Church, Rev. Father James J. Gillen officiating.  There were many beautiful flowers sent by friends of the deceased and his family.

The funeral party went by special train to Villa Ridge where interment was made at Calvary Cemetery.  Karcher Brothers were in charge of the funeral.

PROMINENT CACHE FARMER DIES HERE

George Hornberger, a prominent farmer from Cache, died early this morning at the home of Mrs. H. A. Etz, 225 Nineteenth Street.  The deceased was about 59 years of age and had been sick for about a month.  His wife died about three months ago.  He is survived by eight children, all living in the vicinity of Cache.

The funeral arrangements will be announced later.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Hornberger—Died, Saturday, Sept. 14, George Hornberger, aged 59 years, at St. Mary’s Infirmary.
Remains will lie in state at E. A. Burke's undertaking parlors until Sunday, Sept. 16, at 1:45 p.m., where services will be held by Rev. Fr. Gillen, of St. Joseph's Church.

Interment in Bumgard Cemetery near Willard at 3 p.m.

Friends of the family are invited.


CIRCUS CONCESSION MAN FALLS DEAD HERE

A man, who has been following the circus for the last three days, dropped dead this morning at Sixteenth and Commercial.  He fell on the sidewalk and then had several hemorrhages, dying quickly.  The police took him to Burk's undertaking parlors.  He was a one-legged man and had a small concession with the show.  The man's name could not be learned.

Monday, 16 Sep 1918:
PARDON NOTICE

John Clark, sentenced to a life sentence on a charge of murder at the fall term of the Alexander County Circuit Court A. D. 1901, will apply for Pardon or Commutation of sentence or parole at the October meeting of the Board of Pardons to be held at Springfield, Illinois, on the 8th day of October A. D. 1918.

Tuesday, 17 Sep 1918:
Mrs. Wheeler received a telegram Friday stating that her son, Louis Farris, had been killed in action in France.  This is the first death recorded of the large number of I. C. employees from here (Mounds), who have answered the call of their country.

Wednesday, 18 Sep 1918:

Portageville Man Struck by Train Dies at Infirmary

             W. R. Adams, of Portageville, Mo., injured in an accident at Lilbourn, Mo., at eight o’clock Tuesday morning, when the car in which he was riding was struck by a Cotton Belt train, died at St. Mary’s Infirmary at 1:30 o’clock, this morning.  Death was due to concussion of the brain.

             Mr. Adams was in a car with three others when it was hit by the train.  He was brought over to Cairo last evening but his injuries were so serious that nothing could be done to save his life.

             The deceased was a carpenter and had been a deputy sheriff at Portageville and was well known in that community.  He leaves a wife and four children.  A son, Alfred Adams, was with him when he was brought here and was at his bedside at his death.  He was a member of the W. O. W. lodge.

             The body was prepared for burial by Karcher Brothers and taken to Portageville at 2 o’clock this afternoon and funeral services will be held tomorrow.

 

Uncle of Cairo Woman Thought to Have Met with Foul Play; Dead

             The following story in the Paducah Evening Sun will be of interest to Cairo people and probably the man is known here.  The Sun says:

             The family of James Jones (alias Drake) who drank carbolic acid Sunday morning back of Johnson’s saloon on South Tenth Street, believe that he met with foul play.  His sisters in a statement to the Sun, this morning, declared that they believe someone gave Jones the poison in some whiskey and that he would never have killed himself.

             The police are still working on the case.  Detective Franklin and others are investigating.

             Jones, who was better known as Drake, among his friends, was born in Nashville, Tenn., August 31, 1884.  He was night watchman on the wharf boat at the time of his death and had followed the river trade for years.

             Relatives of Jones said today that he had brooded over death of his mother also.  His mother’s bones were recently interred and reburied in another place.  He became melancholy after viewing them.

             The funeral was held at 4 o’clock this afternoon from the residence.  The deceased held a membership in the Tenth Street Church.  The following relatives survive:  three sisters as follows:  Jennie Lynn of Paducah, Florence Durrett, of Cairo; Bell Drake, of Cairo; a niece, Lillian Norris, of Cairo; a nephew, Clarence O. Lynn, of Paducah; a cousin, Violet Steely, of Paducah; an aunt, Belle Carver, and brother-in-law, George Lynn, of Paducah.

 

Friday, 20 Sep 1918:
MRS. JOHN MAJOR DIES AT SANDOVAL

Mrs. John Major, aged 72 years, died at the home of her daughter in Sandoval, Ill., Thursday.  She was the widow of the late John Major, and formerly resided in Cairo.  Her sister, Mrs. Annie Kobler, of Cairo, died about a year ago.  She leaves surviving her daughter, Mrs. Josie Swayne, of DuQuoin, and a brother, William Douthhitt, of Monroe, La.

The funeral services will be held in Mounds, Saturday afternoon, at 2:30 o'clock, the funeral party arriving there at noon, interment will be made at Beech Grove Cemetery.  Friends of the family are invited to attend.

(John Major married Mary Dauphet on 16 Jun 1869, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Saturday, 21 Sep 1918:
AGED BLACKSMITH DIES AT WORK THIS MORNING

H. P. Cates, of 413 Eighth Street, an aged blacksmith, dropped dead this morning at the Hastings Elevator, where he was working on their addition.  The coroner's inquest was held at 1:30 this afternoon.  E. A. Burke has charge of the body.

The deceased is survived by his wife and daughter Jennie, of Cairo and sons, Bruce, of Gary, Ind., Charlie, of Colorado Springs, Colo., and Chris, of Milbourn, Ky.

No arrangements for the funeral have been made.

Joe Glynn Dies at Great Lakes

A message received this afternoon states that Joe Glynn, son of John P. Glynn, of Cairo, died this morning at 9 o'clock of pneumonia at the Great Lakes Training Station, following an attack of Spanish influenza, which is epidemic at the naval station at this time.

His father received word Thursday that his son was dangerously ill and went up Thursday night.  He has only been ill a few days and had been at the Great Lakes for about three months.  The news of his death came as a great shock to Cairo, where he was well known and popular.  His death is the first on the casualty list for Cairo.

Monte Zimmerman, of Marion, is in Cairo, called by the death of his mother, Mrs. J. O. Zimmerman.

MRS. J. O. ZIMMERMAN DIES THIS MORNING

Mrs. J. O. Zimmerman passed away at St. Mary's Infirmary at 12:40 this morning, following a surgical operation Thursday.  Mrs. Zimmerman had been in poor health for the past year and recently returned from Colorado where she spent the summer and where she had been quite ill.  She has not been able to be out since returning to her home here.

She was a member of the Cairo Baptist Church and was a well-known resident of Cairo, where she has lived for the past seventeen years.  She was born in Tennessee.  Mrs. Zimmerman had many friends in Cairo and was loved by them for her sunny and social disposition and her death comes as a great shock to all.  She leaves surviving her, her husband, a daughter, Mrs. Frederick K. Wheeler, of Cairo, a son, Monto O. Zimmerman, of Stonington, Ill., a sister, Mrs. A. B. Patton, of Pine Bluff, Ark., and a niece, Mrs. J. C. Witt, of Cairo.

The funeral services will be held Sunday morning at 9:30 o'clock at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. F. K. Wheeler, 818 Charles Street, conducted by Rev. L. D. Lamkin.  The funeral party will leave at 11:15 for Makanda, Ill., where interment will take place at the family private cemetery.

The pallbearers chosen are Messrs. J. W. Howe, H. N. Henckell, Raymond Abell, John T. Brown, Claude Winter, Lee J. May, Herbert C. Steinel, and Leslie Roche.

(Her marker in Zimmerman Cemetery near Makanda reads:  Sophronia Zimmerman 1860-1918.  She is buried beside Jacob O. Zimmerman 1855-1922.—Darrel Dexter)

Marguerite, the fifteen-month-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Thompson, of Lower Thebes was buried in Thebes Cemetery Sunday.  The parents and relatives have the sympathy of friends in their bereavement.

Monday, 23 Sep 1918:
REMAINS OF FIRST SAILOR HERO HERE
Body Lies in State at Knights of Columbus Club Rooms; Flags at Half-Mast

Arriving on No. 5 from Chicago, the remains of Joseph J. Glynn, Cairo's first sailor to die in the service of his county, was met by the Knights of Columbus and Elks lodges in a body.  He was carried in a flag-draped hearse to Karcher Brothers undertaking parlors, followed by the lodge members.

Last evening, the remains were taken from Karcher's Brothers to the Knights of Columbus club rooms, where the body will lie in state until Tuesday morning under guard of two Elks, two Knights and two members of Company D.  The body will be removed to St. Patrick’s Church for requiem high mass.  It will be returned to the club where the funeral services will be held conducted by Father James J. Downey.

With full military escort, the body will be borne to 14th Street at 2 p.m. tomorrow, where the funeral train will be in waiting to proceed to Villa Ridge, where interment will take place.

That a Cairo patriot has fallen is seen on every hand.  Many of his old friends are not here, for they too are in the service.  But he is being mourned everywhere.  The city flag at the Halliday Park and the flag on Fire Station No. 1 were flying at half-mast this morning, paying a silent tribute to one who gave his all that it should never go down.

(His marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  John Joseph Glynn Born Aug. 30, 1894 Died Sept. 21, 1918 U. S. Navy.—Darrel Dexter)

MRS. CORDELIA ABELL PASSED AWAY TODAY
Old Resident of Cairo Dies Early This Morning

Mrs. Cordelia E. Abell, of 810 Walnut Street, passed away at 2:30 o'clock this morning, following an illness of about two weeks of malarial fever.  She was in her 86th year and owing to her advanced age her death was not unexpected.

The deceased was the widow of the late Joseph Abell and had been a resident of Cairo for nearly 55 years.  She was a native of Cincinnati.

Surviving are five sons, A. G. Abell, of Kansas City, and Joseph C., Tate, Edward and Samuel, all of Cairo.

Funeral services will be held from the home of C. T. Abell, 425 Tenth Street, but arrangements are awaiting the arrival of E. G. Abell.

Mrs. Abell has one brother surviving in Cincinnati.  Her eldest brother died only a few months ago.

FORMER CAIRO LADY DIES IN ST. LOUIS

Mrs. Rose Fritzier, formerly of Cairo, died at her home in St. Louis, Saturday night, about 11 o'clock.  She was a sister of William Steagala and an aunt of Mrs. E. J. Nambrick and Mrs. Frank Connell, of this city.  The remains will arrive from St. Louis Tuesday afternoon at one o'clock and interment will be made at Villa Ridge.

CLARENCE NICHOLS DIES AT HOME HERE

Pioneer River Captain Succumbs after Illness of Several Months; 47 Years Old

Capt. Clarence Nichols, a pioneer Cairo river man died this morning at 3:00 p.m. at the home of his parents, Capt. and Mrs. Charles Nichols on Cross Street.  Capt. Nichols had been ill for some months and had been under treatment at Rochester, Minn.  He was removed from St. Mary’s Infirmary several days ago.  He was 47 years of age.

The deceased is survived by his parents, a brother, Capt. Harry, and two sisters, Mrs. R. P. Flack, of this city, and Mrs. D. M. Scott, of Winnipeg, Manitoba.  Mrs. Scott returned to her home about a week ago thinking that her brother was out of danger.

Funeral arrangements have not been completed, because of the inability to locate his father, who is on a steamer some place between Portsmouth and Cincinnati, but it is expected that he will be reached sometime today.

The body will be taken from Burke’s undertaking parlors to the Elks Club rooms, where it will lie in state until funeral arrangements are completed.

Capt. Nichols was born in Covington, Ky., on July 3, 1871, and had been a resident of Cairo for 26 years, twenty of which he had been employed by the River Coal Company and the Barrett line.  He was regarded as one of the best pilots running out of Cairo.  The last boat that he took out was the James Moren on June 5.

The remains will be buried at Beech Grove Cemetery.

Capt. Nichols was a member of the Elks Lodge and of the K. M. K. C.

First Johnson County Boy Meets Death in France

VIENNA, Ill., Sept. 23—A letter was received Saturday morning by Rev. H. C. Tritt, pastor of the Methodist Church of this place, giving particulars of the death of his son on the battlefield of France.  No official message has been received.  The letter was the first news the family had of their great bereavement. Lieut. Herchel C. Tritt was 22 years of age.  He was a graduate of the Carterville high school and an attendant of McKendree College.  He enlisted in the regular army in January 1917, served first in the coast artillery at Fort Totten, transferred to Foreign Service August 18, 1918, and was given a commission as second lieutenant.  He was transferred from Bat. A to Bat. B and met death only a few hours after being transferred, August 31.

Lieut. Tritt, the letter stated, had been sent with another officer and several men to an observation post and was struck by a shell.  He never regained consciousness and died soon afterward.  This is the first death reported of a Johnson County boy and the sorrowing friends have the sympathy of the community.

Monte Zimmerman returned to Marion today, called here by the death of his mother, Mrs. J. O. Zimmerman.

Learn That Three Cairo Boys at Great Lakes are Ill Owing to Same Malady

Information was received by long distant telephone last night from Postmaster B. McManus, Jr., that three Cairo boys were ill at the Great Lakes, suffering from the same malady, probably Spanish influenza.  He called Guy Eichenburger at the Blue Front Restaurant, but he was already on his way to Chicago.  He told Clyde Jones, the night manager, that Phil Eichenburger was very ill, though not dangerously.  He also stated that his own son, Allen, and Dick Roberts were affected.

Ray L. Hosmer returned this morning from Chicago.  He reports that Dick Roberts' condition is about the same, as is also that of Allan McManus and Phil Eichenberger, though the latter two boys seem to be taking a turn for the better.  They are suffering from Spanish influenza.  Their friends in Cairo are hoping for the speedy recovery.

George Hornberger, one of our (Roth Crossing) prominent farmers, died in Cairo Friday morning, and was laid to rest in Bumgard Cemetery Sunday afternoon.  Mr. Hornberger was preceded to the Great Beyond by his wife, only four months ago.  To know them was to love them; their neighbors and friends will miss them and wish to extend their sympathy to their beloved children in this their dark hour.

(George Hornberger married Eva ____ on 18 May 1895, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Their markers in Baumgard Cemetery read:  George Hornberger 1859-1918 Father.  Eva Hornberger 1879-1918 Mother.—Darrel Dexter)

Tuesday, 24 Sep 1918:

MILITARY FUNERAL FOR JOSEPH GLYNN
Hundred Pay Homage to First Cairo Seaman to Die in His Country’s Service

The funeral services of Joseph Glynn, Cairo's first sailor hero, were held this morning at St. Joseph's Church and were very largely attended. The body was removed after the services to the Knights of Columbus club rooms, where it was left in state until 1:30 p.m., at which time the funeral party left for the Illinois Central special train at Fourteenth and the levee. Interment was made at Villa Ridge.

Led by Company D, one of the largest funeral parties in Cairo accompanied the remains of the deceased sailor. The Elks and Knights of Columbus attended in a body. At the cemetery he was buried with full military honors—his casket was draped with the American flag, and a firing squad delivered the last salute to the dying strains of "Taps."

The active pallbearers were eight members of Company D and the honorary pallbearers were:

From the Elks:  Louis Block, Charles Walker, And. M. Davis, Henry Goettel, H. N. Henckell, Lee J. May, Tenny Goldsmith, Edward Hill.

From the Knights of Columbus:  Thomas Howely, George Fischer, M. J. O'Shea, E. J. Walder, John Crehan, F. J. Fitzgerald, R. Y. DuQuesnay, M. S. Egan

J. H. Hendricks, of Valley Recluse, who is a patient at St. Mary's is in a very serious condition.  He was accompanied to Cairo by Dr. Hargan, of Mound City, and was to have been operated upon today, but his condition is such that he cannot undergo the operation.

PHIL EICHENBERGER HAS LEFT HOSPITAL

A letter from Phil Eichenberger states that he was expected to leave the hospital the day the letter was written, Sunday. A wire from Guy P. Eichenberger, his father, stated that Phil had left the hospital but that he had not located him when it was sent, as he had been sent to another company.

Mr. and Mrs. Littel and Mrs. Will Lydon, of Paducah, came to Cairo today to attend the funeral of Joe Glynn, which occurred this afternoon.  Other out-of-town friends who are here to attend the funeral are Mrs. James Noonan, of St. Louis, John J. Byers, of Nashville, Tenn., Walter Hackett, of Chicago, Russell Tuttle, of Anna.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—Nichols, September 23, 1918, aged 47 years. Funeral services will be conducted at Elks Lodge B. P. O. #, 651 Wednesday, September 25th, at 2 o'clock p.m. by Rev. C. Robert Dunlap, pastor Lutheran church.

Special interurban cars leave 9th and Washington Ave., at 2:30 p.m. Interment Beech Grove Cemetery. Pallbearers, H. R. Aisthorpe, W. H. Wood, W. F. Crossley, C. C. Terrell, Gus Osterloh, M. S. Egan, James Casey.

Friends of family invited.

Wednesday, 25 Sep 1918:
Deserter Kills Self Rather Than Give Up

Dave Mayes, a deserter from Camp Dodge, Iowa, shot and killed himself at 11:45 this morning when an attempt was made to arrest him.

He was on Dick Wood's farm in the Drainage District and swore that he would not be taken alive. Sgt. McKinney and Detective Casey went to the farm and surrounded the house.

Mayes came to the door when he saw the officers and looked out. He then passed from the view and a few minutes later a shot was heard. Dashing into the house, the man was found dead.

(His name is recorded as David Mayze in the 26 Sep 1918, issue.—Darrel Dexter)

Girl Injured by Automobile Sinking Rapidly

A distressing accident occurred yesterday evening at 6 o’clock between Cross and Center streets in front of Steger's bakery, when Lorraine Richardson, the 12-year-old daughter of H. S. Richardson, 25th and Walnut streets, was run over by an automobile driven by D. L. Marx. Mr. Marx, who was driving his son's car, saw the little girl mount her wheel when he was about fifteen feet away and he had intended to make a stop. She got in his path, Mr. Marx says, and he dodged, but she apparently tried to avoid the car by diverting her course in the same direction and the wheels of the car passed over her abdomen, inflicting what may prove to be fatal injuries.  She was at once taken to St. Mary’s Infirmary where Drs. Clark, Woelfle, and Walsh worked valiantly to save her life, though there is little hope this afternoon that she can survive.

Lorraine is a great favorite among her school mates and is an unusually bright and lovable little girl and has the sympathy of the entire city in her terrible suffering.

Her father, Mr. H. S. Richardson, is a superintendent for the Metropolitan Insurance Company.

Louis S. Phares, son of Mrs. Elsie Wheeler, was born at Grand Chain, Ill., Jan. 6, 1900, and killed in action while serving his country in France, July 21, 1918, age 18 years, 7 months, and 15 days.

He attended school in Decatur, Ill., and came from there to Mounds, when he was employed by the I. C. R. R. as yard clerk. He resigned his position on the 15th of May, 1917, and enlisted in the Field Artillery of St. Louis, on the 18th day of May, 1917. Was in Camp at Ft. Bliss, Texas, until July 23, when he sailed for France.

The first letter his mother received after his arrival in France was Sept. 1, 1917. He stated that he was in good health and always wrote encouraging letters. The last letter she received was dated June 2, 1918, just nine months since the first one was received. He continued to encourage his mother, telling her not to worry, as he did not feel that he was in danger. On Friday, Feb. 12, his mother received the sad message that he had given his young life for his country. He joined the Y. M. C. A. January 9, 1916.

(L. S. Phares married Elsa Stevers on 23 Dec 1889, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Leonard Clifford, Well Known High School Foot Ball Player, Wounded

According to word received by Mrs. Rose L. Clifford, of 414 Union Street, from Major General Barnett, her son, Corporal Leonard A. Clifford, U.S. Marine Corps, was severely wounded in action on July 19. Clifford enlisted last fall and as a very popular young man. He was a member of the C. H. S. football team during the season of 1916 and was one of the best tackles since the days of "Grandpa Curry", who by the way was injured some time ago with the British army. Gen. Barnett's communication received by Mrs. Clifford last night at 8 o'clock follows:

Regret to inform you cablegram from abroad states that Corporal Leonard Adolph Clifford, Marine Corps, was seriously wounded in action on July 19. No further particulars available. Official cablegram cannot be sent asking about his condition, but you will be notified should any details be received."

Leonard Clifford left Cairo on January 9, last, and landed in France on May 5. It is presumed that the young man is improved, otherwise his family would have even notified previous to this had death occurred.

Word from Phil Eichenberger states that though he is much better, the camp is still under quarantine, but the boys all have the very best medical attention obtainable.

Thursday, 26 Sep 1918:

AGED RESIDENT OF MOUND CITY DIES
Peter Coldwater Passes Away at 9 O'clock this Morning

Peter Coldwater, aged 84, died at Mound City at 9 o'clock this morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. J. T. Betts.

The deceased was a veteran of the Civil War. He is survived by two grandchildren in addition to his daughter, Mrs. Allie Easterday and Arthur Betts, who is now in France.

Funeral services will be held Friday afternoon at 3 o'clock at the family residence in Mound City.

VICTIM OF AUTO ACCIDENT DIES
Little Lorraine Richardson Succumbs to Injuries at 9 O'clock Last Night

Little Miss Lorraine Richardson, the twelve -year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Richardson, of 2502 Walnut Street, died at St. Mary's Infirmary last night, from injuries received when she was run over by an automobile driven by D. L. Marx. The wheels of the car passed over the middle of her body and despite the efforts of three physicians, she sank rapidly and no hope was held for her recovery. The body was removed to Burke's undertaking parlors.

Lorraine was a student of the Cairo public school, being in the sixth grade.

Funeral services will be held at the family residence Friday, conducted by Rev. J. S. Clements, pastor of the First Christian Church at 2 o'clock. A special interurban train will leave Twenty-fifth Street and Walnut streets at 2:30, where interment will be made.

There will be out-of-town friends and relatives from Paducah, Bardwell, Wickliffe, Columbus, and others from more distant points who will arrive to attend the funeral.

NEGRO IS HELD IN CONNECTION WITH SUICIDE

Mose Diggs, a one-arm negro, is being held in connection with the suicide of David Mayze, a deserter from the United States Army. Mayze left here for Camp Dodge some months ago and deserted.
It is charged that Diggs succeeded in hiding his army uniform and secured a suit of citizen's clothes for him. A charge of disorderly conduct was placed against him and he was fined $10.00 and cost. It is expected that by the time his sentence expires, the government will be on the job to investigate the more serious charge.

The coroner’s jury meeting in the Drainage District, yesterday, reported that Mayze came to his death by his own hand.

(His name is recorded as David Mayes in the 25 Sep 1918, issue.—Darrel Dexter)

FUNERAL NOTICE

Richardson—Entered into rest, September 25, 1918, Anna Lorrane Richardson, age 12 years.
Funeral services will be conducted at residence, 2502 Walnut Street, Friday, Sept. 27, by Rev. J. S. Clements, pastor of Christian Church, 2 p.m. Special interurban cars leave 25th and Walnut at 2:30 p.m. Interment at Beech Grove Cemetery. Friends of the family invited.

Friday, 27 Sep 1918:
DIED IN PADUCAH THIS MORNING

Mr. Ed Lehrer died in Paducah this morning. Mr. Lehrer was a well-known tobacco salesman and had many friends in Cairo. The funeral will be held in Paducah, Sunday and friends from Cairo will attend.

CORONER'S JURY RETURNS VERDICT OF NOT GUILTY

A coroner’s jury which met in Burke's undertaking parlors yesterday afternoon, returned a verdict in the death of little Lorraine Richardson, that "she came to her death by internal injuries caused by an automobile passing over her body and that the accident was purely accidental and unavoidable. The automobile being driven by David L. Marx."

The jury impaneled by Coroner John T. Brown was as follows:

M. S. Carter, foreman; H. T. Moore, Herbert Steinel, R. H. Spann, Niles F. Schuh, and Lee J. May.

CORP. FRED WHITE WOUNDED IN ACTION

Corp. Fred White, son of Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Crider, of 469 Thirty-fifth Street, was wounded in action on July 7, according to official notice received by his mother, Thursday.

The young man is in the U. S. Marines. Two other Cairo boys, Fox and Clifford, are in the marines with him, word also coming that the latter was seriously wounded.


Saturday, 28 Sep 1918:
MINE EXPLOSION KILLS 25 MINERS
Superintendent and General Manager Included in Casualties at Mine Near Murphysboro.

MURPHYSBORO, ILL., 2:00 p.m. (Special)—Four foreigners, who had becomes isolated from the rest of the men, have been rescued. They knew nothing of what happened to the other 20 men. The fire is still raging.

MURPHYSBORO, ILL., Sept. 28—Twenty-five men were believed to have been killed at 5 o'clock this morning in an explosion in a mine of the Franklin Coal & Coke Company at Royalton, Ill. The dead include the superintendent and the general manager.

The mine had caught fire and Superintendent Rastick and Manager Helms with 21 others went down into the mine to fight the blaze.

The explosion occurred soon after and up to 10 o'clock rescuers had not found them and all hope had been abandoned.

DR. CARY'S NEPHEW DIES OF INFLUENZA

James Herring, nephew of Dr. S. B. Cary, and well known in Cairo, died at the Great Lakes naval station at 2:30 Friday afternoon, of influenza.

The remains will be sent to Union City, Tenn., his former home, where the funeral will be held probably Monday.

The young man formerly attended the Cairo high school.

SPANISH INFLUENZA REPORTED AT ELCO

"There are not enough well people in Elco to take care of the sick ones," said Scott Jordan, in from Mill Creek today.

There are a hundred cases of Spanish influenza there and Thursday there was a consultation of physicians which included Dr. Robinson and Dr. Mathis, of Ullin, Dr. Heilig, of Mill Creek, and Dr. Penniman, of Tamms.

The matter has been reported to the State Board of Health and they are endeavoring to send a physician to Elco to take charge of the situation.

It is said that when one member of a family is taken down that the disease goes right through the family.

So far, no deaths have been reported.

WELL KNOWN CAIROITE DIES IN INFIRMARY

John M. Powers, known to his intimate friends as "Mooney Jack," died at St. Mary's Infirmary yesterday afternoon about 1 o'clock. He had been suffering from a liver trouble for about a year, but his case did not become serious until a few weeks ago.

Mr. Powers was a native born Cairoite and was 43 years of age. He had been employed at the Falconer undertaking parlors for years and his body was removed there. He is survived by his mother, who resides at 1804 Poplar Street, an aunt, Mrs. Charles P. Arter, and a cousin, Miss Mary Powers.
Funeral arrangements have not yet been completed.

FUNERAL OF MISS LORRAINE RICHARDSON YESTERDAY

The funeral of Lorraine Richardson, who met with a tragic death last Tuesday evening, was held at the family residence, 25th and Walnut Street, yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock. There were many sorrowing friends present among whom were the members of Lorraine's class the pupils of seventh grade of the Lincoln school, who attended in a body. The floral offerings were of unusual beauty and abundance. The funeral party went by interurban to Beech Grove, where interment took place and the pallbearers were composed of employees of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, of which Mr. Richardson is an agent. They were as follows—E. J. Stuart, A. E. Hodges, H. B. McCoy, W. T. Parker, C. O. Waite, and F. F. Simmons. The entire office force and all employees of this District were in attendance. The services were unusually sad and impressive and were conducted by Rev. Mr. J. S. Clements of the Christian Church.

Card of Thanks

We desire to express our appreciation to the friends and neighbors for their many kindnesses, their presence and help during the brief illness and death of our little daughter, Lorraine and for the many beautiful floral offerings.
Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Richardson

CARD OF THANKS

Words would be inadequate to express our deep appreciation to our friends for the many acts of kindness shown us in the death of our beloved one, John Joseph Glynn. The beautiful floral offerings and expressions of sympathy helped us wonderfully to bear the burden in our irreparable loss.

Especially do we wish to thank Rev. Father James Downey, Knight of Columbus, the Elks, Company D, the choir of St. Patrick’s Church and Miss Martha Clark.

That no similar affliction will strike in any of your homes, is the fervent prayer of
Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Glynn
Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Kierce
Mrs. Agnes Wheeler
Mrs. T. H. D. Griffitts

(Charles W. Wheeler, 57, of Cairo, farmer and merchant, born in Stratford, Fairfield Co., Conn., son of Levi Wheeler and Elvira Booth, married Agnes C. Glynn, 26, of Cairo, born in Cairo, daughter of Michael Glynn and Bridget Fox, 18 Oct 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  John H. Kriess married Maggie E. Glynn on 5 Sep 1892, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Blon Harlan, who is stationed at Camp Taylor, was called home Thursday to the bedside of his father, who is very low. (Barlow, Ky.)


Monday, 30 Sep 1918:
PAUL GREENWELL DYING OF SPANISH INFLUENZA

Word has been received in Cairo by his sister-in-law, Mrs. Alphonsus Greenwell, that Paul Greenwell is dying from Spanish influenza at an eastern embarkation camp. Mr. Greenwell is already on his way east. Paul was a Caruthersville boy and was employed at St. Mary's Infirmary where he drove the ambulance.

FUNERAL OF AGED RESIDENT TODAY

John Hurst, aged 79, one of the oldest residents of Cairo, died at St. Mary's Infirmary at 7 o'clock Sunday morning. He was a member of Alexander Lodge I. O. O. F. and that organization had charge of the funeral, which was held at 1:30 o'clock this afternoon from the family residence on Ninth Street. The end came after a stroke of paralysis last Friday. The funeral party was taken to the Villa Ridge cemetery in automobiles.

Mr. Hurst is survived by five children, _ora, Lena, Della, and Albert, of Cairo, and John, of East St. Louis.

(John Hurst married Ellen Larry on 20 Dec 1864, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  John Hurst Born March 19, 1839 Died Sept. 29, 1918 Father.  Beside this marker is one which reads:  Ellen O’Leary Hurst Born April 25, 1844 Died April 20, 1910.—Darrel Dexter)

PROMINENT RESIDENT OF McCLURE IS DEAD

James Woodward, an old resident of McClure, died Saturday morning of Bright's disease and was buried there in the afternoon in the Linsey Cemetery.

JOHN GALVIN DIES AFTER ILLNESS EIGHT MONTHS

John T. Galvin died at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Galvin, 229 Nineteenth Street, yesterday morning at 4 o'clock after an illness of eight months. He was a little over 27 years of age.
He is survived by his parents, his wife, Mrs. Ellen Galvin, two children, Thomas, aged 6, and Mary Margaret, aged 3, two brothers, Frank J., of Cairo, and Michael W. of Newport News, Va., and a sister, Miss Rose Elizabeth, of this city.

Karcher Brothers have charge of the funeral, but the arrangements will not be completed until the arrival of the brother from Newport News.

FUNERAL OF JOHN POWERS YESTERDAY

Funeral services of John M. Powers were held yesterday. The church service was held at mass in the morning at St. Patrick's Church and at 1:00 o'clock another service was held at Falconer’s undertaking parlors at which the deceased worked for years.

Ten automobiles accompanied the body to the grave at Villa Ridge, where a short and simple service was held.

The pallbearers were: W. P. Ryan, J. P. Raggio, T. F. French, Tom Ward, Benjamin Malinski, and Charles McNulty.

CAIRO BOY WOUNDED AT CHATEAU THIERRY

Scott W. Harlan, of Cairo, with the United States Marines, was wounded twice in action in the engagement at Chateau Theirry, according to a letter just received his is now in a base hospital. He was one of the first to go over and has now been in France for sixteen months.

CARD OF THANKS

We desire to express grateful appreciation to the many friends of our believed and brother, Clarence L. Nichols, who was ever untiring during his late illness and death.
Capt. and Mrs. Charles Nichols
Harry G. Nichols
Mrs. R. P. Slack
Mrs. D. M. Scott

Friends and relatives who were in Cairo to attend the funeral of Lorraine Richardson, who died last week, were Mrs. Anna Black and granddaughters, Hattie Evans, Mrs. Anna Maybry, Mrs. Frank Puckett, Mrs. Kilgore, all of Bardwell, Ky., Mrs. Dick Boyd, of Columbus, and Mrs. T. E. Snyder, of Paducah.

Richard Ehs, son of A. P. Ehs, of Twentieth Street, who has been ill with Spanish influenza in a hospital in London, England, has entirely recovered, according to word received by his parents.

Mr. and Mrs. John Hurst, of East St. Louis, came to Cairo today to attend the funeral of John Hurst, whose death occurred Sunday morning.

Mrs. Hattie Murphy, of Mound City, attended the funeral of John Hurst, which has held today.

Mr. and Mrs. Ishmael Billings, Miss Louise Schlamer, and Emil Alexson, have returned from Paducah, where they attended the funeral of their uncle, E. M. Lehrer, whose death occurred last week in that city. Mrs. Emma Schlamer, of Cache, who also attend the funeral will return in a few days.

MOUNDS BOY IN CASUALTY LIST

Homer Beegle, a Mounds boy, is mentioned in today's casualty list, as severely wounded. His nearest relative is L. A. Beegle.

Tuesday, 1 Oct 1918:

TO HONOR MEMORY OF PAUL COCHRAN

Mayor Wood has requested that at the next regular meeting of the Council, Commissioner Howley will present resolution expressing the sentiments and feelings of the people of this city for the first Cairo hero to fall in the service of his country, Paul Cochran, who was wounded and died in France.  It is thought that later on a suitable monument will be erected in one of the city's parks to commemorate the deaths of all of the young men from Cairo who have died for their country.

AGED RESIDENT DIES OF TUBERCULOSIS

After an illness of some weeks, Bales Bains, aged 54, died last evening at 8:30 p.m. at St. Mary's Infirmary.  He had been suffering from tuberculosis.  He made his home at 327 Twenty-eighth Street with his nephew, A. E. Heatcock.  Besides his nephew, he is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Mary Heathcock, of Perks, Ill., and Mrs. Alice Beams, of West Frankfort, Ill. and a brother, Napoleon Bains of McClure. Ill.

The funeral cortege left E. A. Burke's undertaking parlors this afternoon at 2 o'clock on the regular interurban train for Beech Grove.  Services were held at the cemetery conducted by Rev. L. A. Lankston of the Pentecost Church.

(This may be the same person as Balus E. Rains, who married Georgia Ashford on 23 Mar 1885, in Hardin Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. C. C. Mayfield, of Centralia, Ill., came to Cairo to attend the funeral of John Galvin, which occurred today.

CARD OF THANKS

We desire to extend our heartfelt thanks to the friends for their expressions of sympathy and acts of kindness on the death of our father, John Hurst.
The Family

Wednesday, 2 Oct 1918:
FUNERAL SERVICES TUESDAY

Funeral services for the late John T. Galvin were held Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at the St. Patrick’s Church, conducted by Rev. Father J. J. Downey.  Interment was made at Villa Ridge Cemetery.

MOREHOUSE, MO., BOY DIES AT INFIRMARY

William M. Mathis, aged 21, a prosperous young farmer, of Morehouse, Mo., died yesterday morning at 9:30 o'clock of peritonitis, at St. Mary’s Infirmary.  He is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Mathis, and four sisters and a brother.  His parents were here at the time of his death.  The remains were removed to Burke's undertaking parlors and were sent to Morehouse at 1 o'clock this morning, the parents accompanying the body.

Card of Thanks

We desire to express our thanks to the many friends for their kindness during the illness and death of the late John Thomas Galvin, to those who sent beautiful floral offerings and for the use of the automobiles, especially do we wish to thank Father James Downey and the choir.
Mr. John T. Galvin and children
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Galvin and family

Marvis, the 3-year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Boren, was severely burned about his head, breast and arm, Monday afternoon.  The child was so badly burned that it was unable to relate how it happened.  But it seems that while Mrs. Boren, the mother, had gone to a nearby neighbor to secure some eggs, the little one went into the yard and the clothes became ignited from a bonfire and before help arrived was badly burned, especially on her arm.  The grandfather, John Berch, who sleeps during the day, was the first to come to the rescue.  (Mound City)

Mrs. Nellie Winstead Roe, who is now in Texas, with her party, was granted a pension the first of September of $40 per month for herself and son, Karl, whose father is now a soldier in France.

Many years ago, we helped an old soldier, Alby Dent, 2 or 3 years to get a pension of $12.00 per month for a disease contracted in the army.  There is quite a difference now and 25 years ago in getting pensions.  About that time ago we assisted a well-known veteran of the Civil War for about two years in getting an increase of from 6 to $12 increase for months for diseases contracted while in service.  He was unable to do any kind of work.  In the meantime a great many affidavits and much evidence was submitted.  He became ill and was confined to his bed a long time.  The day he died, he received notice from the government that his new pension had been cancelled that it bad been found by an investigation his pension was not needed or desired.  Quite a number of pensions were dropped at that time.  We have written this year one letter for one woman whose husband enlisted less than a year ago and she is already getting $40 per month.  Uncle Sam is going to look after the soldiers this time.  (Wetaug)

(The reference is to William A. Dent, who served in Co. C, 26th Illinois Infantry.  He enlisted on 1 Sep 1861, as a private, was 20, born in Rowan Co., N.C., and re-enlisted as a veteran volunteer.  He was mustered out as a corporal on 20 Jul 1865, at Louisville, Ky.  He filed for a pension on 21 Aug 1890.  His marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug reads:  W. A. Dent Died May 13, 1895 Age about 52 Years.  In my father’s house are many mansions.  His toils are past; his work is done.  He fought the fight, the victory won.—Darrel Dexter)

Thursday, 3 Oct 1918:
RETURN DESERTER TO CAMP DODGE

Jesse Pearson, the negro who deserted from Camp Dodge, with David Mayze, who shot himself, was returned to Camp Dodge this morning by First Class Private Henry Schroeder, Co. B, 19th Train Headquarters and Military Police.

Friday, 4 Oct 1918:
BLOCK SIGNAL MAN STRUCK BY TRAIN

BARDWELL, KY., Oct. 4—Hayden Geeter, of this place, a block signal man, employed by the I. C. R. R., was seriously injured Thursday, when struck by a fast freight train at Winiford, Ky.  Mr. Geeter had left his epeeder on the rack for a few minutes while talking with some men in the tower at Winiford, and seeing an approaching train rushed to save his car and was struck on the head, breaking his neck.  Dr. W. L. Mosby, the I. C. physician, rushed to the scene doing all he could to save his life.  He was brought home on the first passenger train after the accident, living only a few minutes after he arrived here, never regaining consciousness.  Mr. Geeter leaves besides a wife and four children, several brothers and sisters to mourn his death.

Charles T. Bethel, who was called to Miami, Fla., the latter part of last week by the death of a relative, expects to arrive home Sunday night.

Capt. "Billy" Williams, who has been residing at St. Mary’s Infirmary for several months, is in a serious condition.  He has been confined to his bed for the past two weeks.

Little Evelyn Huff Cooper, aged five months, died Tuesday evening at the home of her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Tandy Huff, near this city (Charleston, Mo.)  The funeral was held on Wednesday afternoon at the Baptist church, conducted by Rev. R. L. Lemmons.  The little baby's father who died Friday at the Great Lakes Training Station was buried here on Monday afternoon from the same church.

CYPRESS BOY WOUNDED WITH MARINES IN FRANCE

Realis Carroll Kiestler, of Cypress, Ill., is mentioned in today's Marine casualty list as wounded in action.  His nearest relatives is Donn Eady.

 

Little Marvis Boren, who was so severely burned Monday afternoon, passed away at 4 o'clock Wednesday afternoon.  Medical aid having been attentive and the aid of loving friends and neighbors did all that it was possible to do.  The family have the sympathy of the whole community.

Mrs. Kate Hughes, who has been quite ill for the past few weeks, died Wednesday afternoon, about four o'clock.  Mrs. Hughes was born July the 3d, 1837.  She is survived by three sons, J. H. Hughes, J. I. Hughes, and Harrison Hughes; and one daughter, Mrs. Ruanna Sullivan, all of this city (Wickliffe, Ky.) except Harrison, whose home is in Oklahoma, also a large number of other relatives and friends, who will greatly mourn her loss.  Funeral services took place at two o'clock at the Cane Creek Cemetery.

A grown son of James Nelms died at his home in Granite City and was brought here (Pulaski) and buried at Rose Hill on Tuesday of this week.


Saturday, 5 Oct 1918:
CAIRO BOY SERIOUSLY ILL AT CAMP MILLS, N.Y.

Clarence H. Hawkins is seriously ill of pneumonia at Camp Mills, N.Y., according to word received yesterday by his sister-in-law, Mrs. James Hawkins.  Young Hawkins was formerly in the employ of the Mobile & Ohio.

Capt. Williams Old Resident of Cairo Dies Today

Capt. William M. Williams, old resident of Cairo, and former claim agent for the Mobile & Ohio railroad died at St. Mary's Infirmary at 2:15 o'clock this afternoon.

Capt. Williams had been in failing health for a long time.  He roomed with Mrs. Cassiday on Sixth Street, until his condition required more constant nursing than she could give him, and he was removed to St. Mary's Infirmary, where he has been since last January.

Capt. Williams saw service in the Mexican and Civil wars, the latter on the Confederate side.  His wife and daughter, Miss Mary, passed away some years ago and since then he has lived here among his old friends.

Up to the end he resigned his official position as claim agent for the Mobile & Ohio, but he has not been able to perform the duties for several years.

His only living relative is a niece, Mrs. Fanny Hanna, of Charleston, W. Va.

Funeral services will be held Sunday afternoon, leaving Burke's undertaking parlors, at 2:30 on a special train for Beech Grove Cemetery.  The funeral will be in charge of Cairo Lodge 237 A. F. and A. M. of which Captain Williams was a member.  Friends are invited to attend.

CHARLESTON MAN DIES

James Pirtle, of Charleston, Mo., died yesterday afternoon at 3 o'clock at St. Mary’s Infirmary.  He had been ill of typhoid fever for only a short time.  Relatives have been informed of his death.

Mrs. John Grimes left this morning for Chicago, called by the death of her little grandson and the serious illness of her daughter, Mrs. H. R. Wasmer.

ATTENTION A. F. and A. M.

All members of Cairo lodge No. 237, are requested to meet at Burke's undertaking parlors at 2:15 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 6, for the purse of attending the funeral of our late brother, W. M. Williams.  Special interurban car leaves at 2:30 sharp.  Interment at Beech Grove.
S. G. Richardson, master

Monday, 7 Oct 1918:
JAMES HESTON DIES AT LITTLE ROCK

James Heston formerly of Cairo when he was in the employ of the Cotton Belt railroad, died at his home in Little Rock, Ark., this morning, after an illness of a few weeks.

He is survived by his wife, who was Miss Emma Susanka, of Cairo, his father and mother, one sister and five brothers.

He removed from Cairo to Little Rock about 12 years ago and held a responsible position with the Cotton Belt at the time of his death.  He was also largely interested in real estate there.

The remains will be brought to Lewiston, Ill., for burial.

Mrs. J. J. Lane was called to Little Rock, by his illness and has been there for several weeks.

 

YOUNG MAN DIES AT HOME OF HIS COUSIN

J. E. O'Boren, aged 31, died yesterday after a long illness at the home of his cousin, Mrs. D. E. Dunn, 419 Thirty-fourth Street.  After being prepared for burial, by E. A. Burke, the body was shipped to Memphis this morning, accompanied by E. T. Stewart.  The body was taken to the home of his sister, Mrs. Edward Pleesinger. Interment will be made in Elmwood Cemetery.

WICKLIFFE RESIDENT DIES

J. W. Long, of Wickliffe, Ky., died at St. Mary's Infirmary of dropsy at 9:05 o'clock last night at the age of 77.  He had been suffering for a long time.  He is survived by a daughter, Mrs. J. W. Flannigan, of Mound City, who was with him at the time of his death, and a son, Frank Long, of Bragg City.  Karcher Brothers prepared the remains for shipment to Wickliffe, and the funeral arrangements will be announced upon the arrival of his son.

RESOLUTIONS ON DEATH OF F. H. THURMAN
By the Officers and Members of Cairo Typographical Union No. 461

Whereas, God in his wisdom has seen fit to remove from this sphere of life and usefulness on His earth, July 28, 1918, at a ripe old age, our friend and fellow craftsman, F. H. Thurman, and

Whereas, we are deeply sensible that in his death we have lost a true friend and a conscientious advisor, and a staunch and true union man, and

Whereas, Cairo Typographical Union No. 461 realizes keenly the great loss his family and friends have sustained, its heartfelt sympathies are extended to them. Mr. Thurman has been a member of this union since its organization and for a number of years was its honored recording secretary. He was a man what justly commanded and enjoyed the confidence, respect and friendship of all who knew him. His strong personal character and faithfulness in the performance of his duties were such as made friends for him wherever he was known. Our friend and brother has left us, but his memory will ever live and be cherished by those who knew him best; therefore be it

Resolved, that in the death of F. H. Thurman, we have lost a member who was very dear to us and whose death we deeply deplore and be it further

Resolved, that this resolution be spread upon the minutes of the Union and that a copy be sent his bereaved family of the deceased.

 

MOUND CITY BOY DIES AT JEFFERSON BARRACKS

Floyd Derr, of Mound City, died at Jefferson Barracks last night, where he was in training for army service.

He is the first Mound City boy to give his life for his country.

Derr entrained two weeks ago. A few days ago he was given the anti-typhoid serum and it was too much for his system and made him ill. When his company left, he could not go with them, on account of his condition and death came last night.

He leaves a father, William Derr, a sister and several uncles and aunts.

(William Derr married Emma Lawler on 9 Jun 1890, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Charles T. Bethel will return tonight from Miami, Fla. where he was called by the death of a relative. He expected to reach Cairo Sunday night, but was delayed by a wreck.


LITTLE GIRL DIES SUNDAY

Little Emaline Schell, aged four years, died Sunday at the home of her parents, 227 Twenty-seventh Street. The remains were taken this afternoon to Fulton, Ky., for burial.


Last Rites Held Over Remains of Capt. Williams

Funeral services for Capt. W. M. Williams were held Sunday afternoon from the Burke's undertaking parlors and the remains were taken to Beech Grove Cemetery for interment in the family lot beside the graves of his wife and daughter. The Masonic lodge officiated and the funeral was attended by a large number of old friends.

Capt. Williams was born near Pittsburg on May 4, 1831, and came to Cairo in 1855 and entered the employment of Williams & Company, who erected the first brick building on Ohio Street, still standing and owned by R. Smyth & Co. In 1859 the deceased went to Arizona as superintendent for the St. Louis Mining Company and it was while in that capacity that he escaped from a band of marauding Mexicans, who killed all of the employees of the company in a raid and destroyed the plant. Capt. Williams being absent from the plant when the raid was made.

Capt. Williams served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War until the surrender of Gen. Lee. Returning to Cairo in 1870, he ran a distillery here for a time, but later disposed of it and entered the employ of the Mobile & Ohio Railroad in 1880, which he held until his death.

In 1863, he married Miss Rachel Williams at Covington, Ky., and one daughter, Miss Mary, was the result of this union. Both passed away a number of years ago.

Capt. Williams’ only living relative was Mrs. Fanny Hanna, of Charleston, W. Va.

Capt. Williams was a good citizen, a man who made warm friendship, and who was faithful in the service of his employers and his fellow man.


Tuesday, 8 Oct 1918:
MILITARY FUNERAL WEDNESDAY MORNING

The body of Floyd Derr, who died at Jefferson Barracks Sunday night, arrived in Mound City, today and was taken to the home of his aunt, Miss Carrie Lawler. The body was accompanied by a military guard of two men and was met at the station by a large crowd of friends.

Private Derr was 21 years of age and registered on August 21. He volunteered for service and left for Jefferson Barracks September 23.

High requiem mass will be said at St. Mary’s Catholic church Wednesday morning at 8:30 o'clock conducted by Rev. Father Techlenberg. The body will be taken to the church at 2:00 o'clock p.m., where military services will be held with Company D, of Cairo in charge. Interment will be made at the Catholic cemetery at Mounds.

(His marker in St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery at Mounds reads:  William Floyd Derr 1897-1918.—Darrel Dexter)


Plan Memorial to Lieut. Clendenen Sunday Afternoon

News of the death of Lieut. Paul M. Clendenen, son of Mr. and Mr. Taylor C. Clendenen, of Cairo, came as a severe blow Monday afternoon.

A dispatch from the War Department in Washington announced that he had been killed in action on September 12.

It is believed that his death must have occurred on the first day of the attack on the St. Mihiel sector, as that assault was begun on the morning of September 12.

From the last letter received from Lieut. Clendenen, written on Sept. 1, he stated that he was at a point just west of the Argonne Forest and that he was just leaving for a training camp 115 kilometers east, which would bring it to the region of the St. Mihiel sector.

Lieut. Clendenen was born in Cairo on March 9, 1887, and was therefore just 31 years of age.  He graduated from Cairo High School in the Class of 1904 and from the University of Illinois Class of 1909 and later was employed by Armour & Co., in the Cairo branch and later travelled for the publishing house of Silver, Burdette & Company.

He entered the second Officers’ Training Camp at Ft. Sheridan and received a commission as second lieutenant and was sent to France, being placed in charge of a company of colored volunteer troops from New York.  They made a good record for themselves and came into notice for the spirit they showed.  Some weeks ago Lieut. Clendenen received honorable mention because during an engagement he was carried to the front line to direct his men during a German attack.  At the time he was suffering from an attack of influenza.  It was at that time that he was slightly gassed and later he went to Paris to recover his health.  He was just getting back into service when he fell on September 12.

A memorial is being planned for Lieut. Clendenen next Sunday afternoon at the First M. E. Church, jointly by the church, the Knights Templar, and the Elks Lodge, with all of which he was actively connected.


WINIFRED WARDER ARRIVES IN FRANCE
Goes with Mobile Gas Unit under Auspices of National Woman's Suffrage Ass'n.

Miss Winifred Fairfax Warder has arrived in France, according to a message received Monday evening by her parents, Hon. and Mrs. Walter Warder.  Miss Warder sailed from an eastern port on September 25.

Her arrival on the scene of the war was the culmination of two years of preparation and effort to give her services to her country and, though disappointed a number of times, she has at last achieved her ambition and will soon be on the fighting line in France.

The service in which Miss Warder is enlisted is with the Woman’s Overseas Hospital and she goes with the most active unit that of Mobile and Gas to work close to the fighting line for men overcome with gas.  This movement is financed by the National Woman’s Suffrage Association.

When a group of American women organized the woman’s overseas hospitals, they offered themselves to the Red Cross, only to be informed that they could be accepted to serve with the civilian population only.

They offered themselves to the war department to find that the surgeon general accepted only those hospitals turned over to the government by the Red Cross, which there upon became military hospitals staffed by officers of the medical corps.  They offered themselves to the French government, thru the French high commission and were accepted.  With the French doctors and nurses they have been able to care for American soldiers brought in with the French wounded as they are not permitted to care for them in American hospitals.

Miss Warder received her commission to go with this important unit thru her persevering efforts and experience in various sorts of war work and organization.  She attended the national service school at Chevy Chase two years ago and has continually engaged in war work since that time in an endeavor to be on the fighting line.  She was instrumental in the organization of the Navy League in Alexander County and was also county chairman of the Woman’s Committee, Council of National Defense until she resigned to take up war work in Washington, D.C.  She became known to the National Woman’s Suffrage Association thru her reputation in this work and when her application taken to France with Gas unit was sent in it was immediately accepted.

Going with this unit are sixteen women, including surgeons, aides and assistants. Their mission is first aid to gassed soldiers on the fighting line

Miss Warder came home a few weeks ago expecting to spend a two week leave of absence with her parent, but was ordered to report in New York shortly after her arrival.  Her mother accompanied her east and remained with her until the day she sailed, returning about ten days ago.

Miss Warder has the best wishes of her many Cairo friends for her welfare and all are glad that she has at last accomplished that for which she has so long and faithfully striven.

MEMORIAL TO FIRST TO GIVE HIS LIFE

The council Monday adopted the following, prepared by Commissioner Howley and Judge Dewey, as an appropriate tribute to Paul Cochran, the first Cairo boy to lose his life in the war.

“Whereas, God has removed from the scene of life’s battle to the realm of eternal peace, Paul Cochran, of Cairo, Illinois, a private soldier of Company E, 47th Infantry of the American Expeditionary Forces in France, who after a short career in civil life and a brief service in the army, was killed in action somewhere in France.  He was the son of Lee and Betty Cochran, of this city and enlisted as a volunteer soldier in the United States Army shortly after America entered the war.  He was wounded while in action on a French battlefield on July 25, 1918, and died in a hospital back of the front line, somewhere in France on August 7, 1918.  Just a young man, he had been a student, workman and solder.  The latter years of his life, except during the army service, were spent in Cairo, where he was a trusted employee of the Singer Manufacturing company.  As a soldier he was faithful in his duty and loyal to his country and when in July last, the Teutonic hosts were making their last great drive towards Paris, he went to his death fighting valiantly for the defense of America and her allies and for the cause of freedom and democracy throughout the world; and

“Whereas, the people of Cairo desire to pay a tribute to the memory of the first soldier from the City of Cairo and the County of Alexander to give his life for his country in the present war, therefore,

“Be it Resolved, That we, the Mayor and Commissioners of the City of Cairo, Illinois, in council assembled, and as representatives of the entire citizenship of the city, do hereby express our sincere regret that our fellow citizen, Paul Cochran, lost his life for his country and for the freedom of mankind, and that he made this great conflict, which we believe marks the turning point of the war.

HOUSTON LADY DIES AT HOME OF FATHER

Mrs. Evelyn King, aged 32 years, died at the home of her father, G. P. Torance, No. 330 Ninth Street, at 4 o'clock Monday afternoon. She was on a visit here form Houston, Texas, where she resides. Her husband, J. A. King, summoned by her illness, arrived this morning. Her daughter, Mildred, aged 7 years, is very low at her grandfather's.

The remains were removed to Burke's undertaking establishment and were taken to Trenton, Tenn., her old home, for burial today.

Her husband is superintendent of construction of the firm of Horton & Horton, at Houston.


FORMER CAIRO MAN DIES IN ATLANTA

Dan Cowley, of the U. S. N., died this morning at 1 o'clock at Atlanta, Ga., from the effects of Spanish influenza. He formerly lived in Cairo and as a nephew of Mrs. T. L. Karcher, of 905 Walnut Street, and also of the Sullivan family, 224 Twelfth Street.  He was unmarried and leaves surviving him his mother, Mrs. T. G. Cowley, of East St. Louis, three sisters, Mrs. Pearl Cowley, of Illano, Texas, Misses Maude and Nina Mabel Cowely, of East St. Louis, and two brothers, Tom and William Cowley, of East St. Louis, all formerly of Cairo.

The remains will be brought to Cairo and taken to Karcher Brothers undertaking parlors until the funeral, the time of which is not announced. Interment will be made at Villa Ridge.

(Thomas Cowley married Mary Sullivan on 3 Oct 1888, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Dan Cowley Born Aug. 28, 1889 Died Oct. 8, 1918 Son.—Darrel Dexter)


FUNERAL SERVICES TODAY

Funeral services for Jannet Wynn, the six-month-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. Wynn, of 307 Third Street, were held this afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, conducted by Rev. C. Robert Dunlap. The baby passed away at the home of her parents Sunday. Interment was made at Beech Grove.  E. A. Burke was in charge of the services.


The news of the death of Lelon W. Moyers, of Cunningham, has been received by his relatives. Several months ago Mr. Moyers was wounded while engaged in a battle but he recovered after remaining in a hospital two months and again went to the front to assist in waging the war. Again his body was pierced by a bullet of the enemy and he was sent back to the hospital where he died. (Bardwell, Ky.)


SOLDIER DIES OF EPIDEMIC

Clarence Hawkins, a private in the infantry in training at Camp Mills, N.Y., died this morning of pneumonia following an attack of Spanish influenza. He formerly was employed in Cairo as car inspector of the Illinois Central Railroad.

The remains will be taken to his home in Boaz, Ill., where interment will be made.


THEBES BOY RUN OVER BY A TRAIN

Glenn McDonald, aged about 18 years, of Thebes, was severely injured between 12 and 1 o'clock this morning, when he fell between the cars on a train between Thebes and Illmo and his right leg was crushed.

He was brought down to St. Mary’s Infirmary this morning to have the injured member amputated.

His mother and sister accompanied him.

McDonald was employed in the acid house of Fayville.

His limb was amputated and he was very weak this afternoon from loss of blood.

 

Wednesday, 9 Oct 1918:

COLORED SOLDIER DIES AT CAMP DODGE

             Pvt. Jesse Johnson, better known as Jesse Lewis, of 3900 Commercial Ave., who left for Camp Dodge, Ia., with the last contingent of colored drafted men, died there on October 8, and his body will be brought back to Cairo for burial.

FORMER RECRUIT OFFICER DIES OF PNEUMONIA

Corporal Arthur Lieberman, formerly in charge of the recruiting office here, died at Jefferson Barracks, Monday evening at 7:40 o'clock.  His death was caused by pneumonia.

Corp. Lieberman first came to Cairo some years ago as a private under Sgt. Kresky and then when the war broke out and Kresky was made an officer of the line, Lieberman was promoted to corporal and placed in charge of the office here.  A few months ago, when all of the recruiting offices were closed, he was assigned to active duty at Jefferson Barracks.  His wife is staying at the Melba Hotel.

The body arrived from St. Louis this morning and was taken to Burke's undertaking parlors where it will lie in state until the funeral.

According to present arrangements, the funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 o'clock and interment will be made at the National Cemetery.  Company D will escort the body and he will be buried with full military honors.

He is survived by his wife and mother, brother and sister, in Chicago, who have not yet been heard from.

Corporal Liebermann was of great assistance to the public library in taking care of the books that were sent from here for the boys in camp.  After the books were secured, he took charge of them and rendered every assistance in their transportation.

He had tried to enter an officers' training camp for a commission, but his lack of a high school education served as a bar and prevented him from getting into the active service in France.

(Arthur Lieberman died 7 Oct 1918 and was buried in Mound City National Cemetery in Section F grave 4964H.—Darrel Dexter)


ATTENTION KNIGHTS

Gate City Lodge No. 24 will meet tonight at Castle Hall at eight o'clock to arrange for the funeral of our deceased brother, Ollie Crump.
C. A. Bowlar, C. C.
W. A. Plummer, K. R. S.

The body of recruit William F. Derr, who died in the hospital at Jefferson Barracks, was brought home via the Big Four route Tuesday noon.  Immediately conveyed to the home of his father and sister, William Derr and Miss Doris Derr.  The funeral will be held Wednesday morning, Rev. Fr. Tecklenberg being in charge.  Burial in St. Mary's Cemetery near Mounds.  (Mound City)

Card of Thanks

We desire to publicly thank the friends and neighbors who so dearly administered to us during the suffering and death of our daughter, Marvis and ask God's blessings to all of you.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Boren.

Thursday, 10 Oct 1918:
RALPH S. VICK DIES THIS MORNING
Ullin Man Succumbs to Epidemic after Five Days Illness

Corporal Ralph S. Vick died this morning at 3 o'clock at Camp Custer, Battle Creek, Mich., where he has been suffering from influenza and later pneumonia since Friday.  He was, until going to camp, cashier of the State Bank at Ullin, Ill., where his father, George B. Vick, resides.  He also leaves a sister, Mrs. Otto Serbian, of Cairo, a married sister in Centralia, one in Washington, and a brother and sister in Ullen.

He was with the Headquarters Detachment, 40th Infantry.

No announcement of the arrival of the body or funeral arrangements was made in the message received at noon today by Mrs. Serbian announcing her brother's death. She went to Ullin this afternoon to be with her father.

(George C. Vick married Sarah C. Newcome on 26 Mar 1882, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  Corp. Ralph F. Vick 1892-1918.—Darrel Dexter)

FORMER CAIRO WOMAN DIES OF PNEUMONIA

Mrs. J. W. Mills, formerly of Cairo, died this morning at Nashville, of pneumonia, following an attack of influenza.  She was only ill four days.  Mrs. Mills left Cairo where she resided at 428 Tenth Street to join her husband in Nashville about two months ago.  He, while in Cairo, was employed at P. T. Langan's and left Cairo several months ago to work at the government explosive plant.

Mrs. Mills leaves surviving her husband.  They had no children.

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR DAN COWLEY FRIDAY

The body of Dan Cowley, whose death occurred in the officers' training camp at Atlanta, Ga., Tuesday arrived in Cairo on Wednesday afternoon and was met at the station by members of Company D.  The remains were taken to the home of his grandmother, Mrs. Sullivan, 234 Twelfth Street, in a flag draped hearse and escorted by members of Company D.

Funeral services will be held private according to a decision of the Health Officer, and will be at Calvary Cemetery, Villa Ridge.

Lieut. Paul M. Clendenen Buried with Military Honors at Gizancourt, in France

Mr. and Mrs. Taylor C. Clendenen received a letter Wednesday form the captain of the company to which their son, Lieut. Paul M. Clendenen belonged, stating that he was killed instantly by a high explosive shell.  The letter which was written September 12, the day of his death occurred, stated that he was buried with military honors at Gizancourt.

"A pretty little French village, our own men and a brother officer escorting him as a soldier of honor should be."


FORMER CAIRO MAN DIES AT NASHVILLE

The body of Claude Young, who died at Nashville, Tenn., Tuesday evening, arrived in Cairo Wednesday evening on Number 6, and were reshipped from here to Dawson Springs, Ky., this morning, leaving at 5 o'clock.  His death was caused by pneumonia.

He was formerly a painter of Cairo and left here to work on a large painting contract at the government plant at Nashville.

FRED WHITE IN CASUALTY LIST

Sgt. White, of 409 Thirty-fifth Street, is officially reported wounded in action in today's Marine Corps casualty list.  Information to this effect was received some time ago.

Friday, 11 Oct 1918:
INFANT SON DIES THURSDAY MORNING

Woodrow Wilson, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Hall, died at their home, 426 Thirtieth Street, Thursday morning, was buried this morning at Beech Grove Cemetery.  The funeral was private.  E. A. Burke was in charge of the arrangements.


THEBES BOY SEVERELY WOUNDED

The name of William I. Simkins, of Thebes, Ill., appeared in Thursday’s casualty list as severely wounded.

Mr. Long, who passed away Sunday afternoon at St. Mary's Infirmary, will be missed by his many friends in Cache.  He was a grandfather of Mrs. N. E. Parrott, of this place (Cache).  She and also the daughter, Mrs. Flannigan, of Mounds, have the sympathy of their many friends.

Mr. Dulin's son’s corpse, of Chillicothe, Ohio, was sent home to Cypress Tuesday, he being an influenza victim at camp there.  (Perks)

SOLDIER'S FUNERAL HELD THIS AFTERNOON

Funeral services for Dan Cowley, the soldier whose death occurred Tuesday at the officers' training camp at Atlanta, Ga., were held this afternoon at 2 o'clock at the home of his grandmother, Mrs. Catherine Sullivan, 234 Twelfth Street,  Rev. Father J. I. Downey officiated and there were many beautiful floral offerings.

Members of Company D acted as pallbearers and a firing squad from the company fired a salute over the grave.  Interment was made at Villa Ridge cemetery the funeral party going up on a special Illinois Central train.

The pallbearers were Sergeant Schuch, Privates Braughton, Goodman, Sullivan, Karcher, Kuykendall, Orrick, and Sandler.  The firing squad was Corporal Weldon, Privates Koonce, Dunlap, Ibacch, Clutts, Hessian, C. Stout, and M. Stout.

(Thomas Cowley married Mary Sullivan on 3 Oct 1888, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Saturday, 12 Oct 1918:
FUNERAL OF MRS. MAYO HELD IN GEORGIA

The funeral services of Mrs. J. W. Mayo, whose death occurred at Nashville, Tenn., Tuesday morning, occurred at Columbus, Ga., Wednesday.  Mrs. Mayo formerly resided in Cairo at 428 Tenth Street and left this city about two months ago to join her husband who was employed at the government explosives works there.  Mrs. Mayo had many friends in Cairo who were grieved to hear of her untimely death.

FUNERAL OF CORPORAL RALPH VICK SUNDAY

Funeral services for Corporal Ralph Vick, whose death occurred at Camp Custer, Battle Creek, Mich., Thursday, will be held at Ullin Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock.  Cairo friends who may wish to attend will have to go up at 4:30 in the morning.

HARRY F. CARLTON DIES THIS MORNING

Harry F. Carlton died this morning at 8:45 o'clock at his home, 219 Sixth Street, after a two weeks' illness of grip.  He was 43 years of age and leaves surviving him his wife and two sons, aged 13 and 10 years.  He was manager of the Gold Coin Butterine Company.

The funeral arrangements have not been completed as yet.  Mrs. L. E. Falconer is in charge.

BROTHER OF CAIRO WOMAN DIES

Cecil R. Reynolds died at Fort Riley, Kan., Friday, according to word received by his sister, Mrs. James Stuart, 3114 Poplar Street.  The message did not state the cause of his death, but it is supposed that he succumbed to an attack of influenza.

The body will be brought to Cairo for burial.  E. A. Burke will have charge of the arrangements.

FORMER CAIRO MAN DIES AT NASHVILLE

Arthur McFadden died Wednesday morning at Nashville, Tenn., where he was employed at the government powder plant from pneumonia.  He was injured in an automobile accident several weeks ago and contracted pneumonia during his illness.

He was 24 years of age and formerly resided in Cairo at 713 Thirty-Fifth Street.  His brother, Leonard McFadden, lives in Cairo.  The funeral services were held Thursday and interment made at McGuire Cemetery, which is about twenty miles from Mayfield, Ky.  Another brother, Clarence McFadden, who is also employed at Nashville, accompanied the remains to Mayfield.

Mr. and Mrs. Guild lost a little daughter, aged about 3 years, Thursday night with pneumonia following an attack of influenza.  The parents are both reported to be in a serious condition with the same disease.  (Mounds)

CAIRO COMMANDERY No. 13 K. T.

Memorial service at First M. E. Church, Sunday, October 13th, in honor of Knight Paul M. Clendenen indefinitely postponed.
R. L. Hosmer, Commander
C. S. Bourque, Recorder

Officers Write Appreciation of Lieut. Clendenen

The following letters were written to Mr. and Mrs. T. C. Clendenen on September 12, the day their son, Lieut. Paul M. Clendenen was killed in France.  They are from the captain of his company and from the first lieutenant of his battalion:

Entire Battalion Sends Sympathy

12 Sept. ‘18

Dear Mr. and Mrs. Clendenen:

Today our Battalion lost the officer and gentleman who was its very joy of life, your son, Paul.  He was instantly killed by a shell in one of the trenches and his orderly wounded.  You will hear officially of course later.  I have just left him.  He will be at a town called Gizacourt, a pretty little French village and our own men and a brother officer are escorting him as a soldier of honor should be.

There is nothing I can say to you both but I felt you would rather hear something from one of his friends.  Paul was nominated for a first lieutenancy for his good service.  His company commander, Capt. White, and Battalion commander, Capt. Bobb both counted on him and were always able to depend on him and were always able to depend on him in any emergency.

He used to show me your pictures and one of a girl he seemed very fond of always spoke lovingly of you and his home.  During the battle of 11 July, he acted as Company G Commander and handled the company alone while really unfit for duty, on his nerve.  Recently he was in splendid sprits and health and the life of our men.

We are naturally broken up, but have to “carry on” and it is another debt we have to make the enemy pay and believe me they will pay and dearly.

Our entire battalion is with me in our expression of tribute to your boy and sympathy to you.

Sincerely,

Edward C. Siedle

First Lieut. 2 Battalion

369 Infantry, A. E. F.

What the Captain Wrote

September 12, 1918

Mr. T. C. Clendenen,

811 Twenty-sixth St., Cairo, Ill.

Dear Sir:

Although I realize thoroughly that nothing I can say can make the burden any easier for you and your family, I feel that I must write you how deeply Paul’s comrades sympathize with you all in your bereavement and how much we loved and admired him

For six months we have been in the same company and have known each other as brothers.  During that time Paul was always ready for the hardest work or the most dangerous mission and was always cheerful after the greatest hardships and under the most discouraging conditions.  On July 15, when the Germans attacked, Paul was suffering with fever, but he left his bed to lead his platoon.  Two days later when I was gassed, Paul took command of the company and handled it very efficiently, under difficult conditions.  For these two acts, he was recommended by the battalion commander for citation and the Distinguished Service Cross.  Knowing his modesty, I am sure these things have been minimized in his letters home, but you must know that no one could have done more for the country for which Paul finally gave his life, than he.

As to his death this morning, I shall only add that he was mercifully killed instantaneously by a nigh explosive shell and could not have suffered.

The remaining officer of the company, Lieutenant Rowland who has always been with Paul almost constantly for the last six months, joins me in expressing the sincerest sympathy to you and your family.

Most respectfully yours,

J. Dugald White

Capt. J. D. White

Co. E 369 Infantry

American E. F. France

Leonard Campbell died at his home in the lower part of the city on Thursday after only a few days illness, pneumonia having proven fatal after a siege of the influenza that is in our midst.  Leonard until recently was employed at the Polk Preserving Co., and having reached his majority was entered in the next draft and for which he was preparing.  (Mound City)

The Pulaski County exemption board has received the announcement of the death from the county:  Ralph Vick, of Ullin, died at Camp Custer, near Battle Creek, and Sherman Bell, of Pulaski, who died in France.
             (
Sherman Bell was a corporal in Co. A, Division Battalion 2, 161 D.B. in World War I, according to the 1956 Veterans Commission’s Honor Roll of Veterans, State of Illinois.  His marker in Henderson Cemetery at Pulaski reads:  Sherman Bell 2 Apr 1892-6 Oct 1918.—Darrel Dexter)


Monday, 14 Oct 1918:
Mrs. Hall Whiteaker died at Danville at the home of a sister and the body will be brought to Olmsted today for burial.  This was the message received Sunday night by friends of the deceased.

(Another article in the same issue states she died at Paducah, Ky.—Darrel Dexter)

James Hale died Saturday afternoon after a lingering illness of tuberculosis.  The funeral was held Sunday with burial at Beech Grove Cemetery Sunday afternoon.  (Mound City)

MRS. HALL WHITEAKER DIES IN PADUCAH, KY.

Mrs. Hall Whiteaker died Sunday at the home of her sister in Paducah, Ky., after a brief illness. Her husband, Dr. Hall Whiteaker, is with the army medical corps and has been in France for four or five months. His wife has been with relatives in Danville, Ill., and went to Paducah to visit her sister, when she was taken ill.

The remains will be taken to her home at Mounds Tuesday and the funeral will be held there at 2 o'clock Tuesday afternoon conducted by Rev. Mr. Dunn, pastor of the Methodist church.

Dr. Whiteaker is one of the well-known physicians of Southern Illinois.  Mrs. Whiteaker was formerly Miss Tina Webb, of Paducah.

(Hall Whiteaker married Mary J. B. Cook on 15 Aug 1873, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Hall Whiteaker married Tina Webb on 29 Sep 1891, in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

MRS. J. L. BRIDGES DIED THIS MORNING

Mrs. Dora Anne Bridges, wife of J. L. Bridges, died this morning at 10:30 o'clock at her home, 415 Washington, after a few days' illness of influenza.  She was 55 years of age.

The remains were taken to Burke's undertaking parlors and will be sent to Vienna, Ill., Tuesday, morning for burial.

(J. L. Bridges married Dora Harwick on 4 Apr 1886, in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Hans Miller Is Killed in Action on Sept. 20th

Mr. and Mrs. F. O. Miller, of 2501 Park Avenue, this morning received a message announcing the death of their son, Hans, who was killed in action in France on Friday, September 20.  He was in the field artillery, was about 21 years of age and enlisted for service in the United States army over a year ago, in Chicago.  Before leaving Cairo he was employed at Patier's Store.

Mr. and Mrs. Miller have two sons in France, Oscar and Bernard, both of whom enlisted for service.  The death of this young man makes the fourth Cairo boy whose death has come thru the war.  The first, Paul Cochran, who died from wounds, Joe Glynn, whose death was due to pneumonia at the Great Lakes, Lieut. Paul M. Clendenen, who was killed in action on September 12, and Hans Miller, whose death occurred September 20.

Tuesday, 15 Oct 1918:
MOUND CITY BOY IN CASUALTY LIST

The name of William L. Mattingly, of Mound City, appeared in the casualty list of those who died from wounds, published in the morning papers today.  Mention of his death has been made before.

Winifred Warder Dies in France of Pneumonia

Miss Winifred Warder, daughter of Senator and Mrs. Walter Warder, died in Bordeaux, France, of pneumonia, on October 8, in the American hospital there, according to a message received this morning.  The message, which was from Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt, reads:

"We are grieved to report the receipt of the following cable:  Winifred Warder died October 8 in the American hospital at Bordeaux, of pneumonia, contracted on the voyage.  Interment Thursday at the American cemetery, at Bordeaux."

On October 7, the family received this message. "Winifred Warder arrived in France safe and well."  This message was from Miss Farrar, secretary of the National Woman's Suffrage Association.

Miss Warder gave her life for her country just as surely as if she had reached the goal of her ambition, the fighting line where she soon would have been had not death claimed her.  From the first America's entrance into the war it was Miss Warder's ambition to go to France and her efforts to do this never ceased.  She was listed to go with the Red Cross a year ago and was disappointed.  She entered a nurses' training school and finding that this would take two years at least of preparation she tried other sources to get to the front.

Finally, one a month or so ago she was accepted by the National Woman's Suffrage Association to go in the Mobile Gas unit, one of the most hazardous of services for women and which would have taken her directly to the front on the fighting line.  That she did not see actual service is the principle regret of her sorrowing parents who consented to her going only because it was her heart’s desire and because she said she could not rest until she had done all that she could for her country.

Winifred Fairfax Warder was 34 years of age in May and was a graduate of Cairo High School.  She also graduated from Monticello University and was a graduate of the Hamilton School at Washington, D.C. and the Sherratt Art School in New York City.  She studied art in the east several years and her efforts in this line were given principally to exquisite china painting.  At the beginning of the war, two years ago, Miss Warder entered the Chevy Chase National service school and later returned to Cairo, where she was active in organizing the local Red Cross chapter, the Woman's Committee Council of National Defense the Navy League, and other patriotic movements.

The fact that her parents were satisfied that she had arrived at her destination safe and well made the shock of the message received this morning more severe to her family and friends in Cairo.

(Walter Warder married Dora Bain on 24 May 1876, in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Soldier's Widow Attempted to End Her Life Today

Mrs. Nora Lieberman, wife of Corp. Lieberman, whose death occurred at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., last week, attempted to end her life early this afternoon by taking carbolic acid, at the Hacker Flats on Fifth Street.

She was in an unconscious condition with her life hanging in the balance and Dr. Barrows, who was called and attended her gave her small hope of her survival.

A letter from Mrs. Hacker said that she could not live without her husband and gave directions for her burial, while another was addressed to her mother, Mrs. C. Jenkins, in Malden, Mo.

Property Held in Trust for 10 Years by L. Zanone Will

By the terms of the will of the late Louis Zanone, admitted to probate today, the household furniture, $10,000 in money and a life interest in the house stead on Twentieth Street, is left to his widow, Mrs. Cora Zanone.

All of his property in Italy is left to his sister, Eugenia Massa.

The rest of his property is placed in certain trust funds to be held for ten years for the benefit of his daughter, Clotilda Thompson, and his sons, Louis Zanone, Jr., and Enrico Zanone.

James H. Galligan and Augustus Botto are made executors of the will, which was witnessed by Andrew H. Whitcamp, William H. Jones and Sophia C. Serbian.

Miss Warder Receives Recognition in Chicago Tribune This Morning

The following from today's Chicago Tribune will be of peculiar interest this evening as the news of Miss Warder's death only reached here this morning.

"Miss Winifred Warder, one of the district representatives of the Illinois Equal Suffrage Association and well known in war work, has arrived in France, where she has gone in the service of the woman’s overseas hospital, the special war work of the National American Women’s Suffrage Association.  Miss Warder is attached to the mobile gas unit of the movable hospital, which will operate in connection with the medical corps of the French army just back of the front line and will connect with a gas hospital further back.  This is said to be the first experiment of a portable gas hospital service.”

Mrs. Catherine Wickert was taken to St. Mary's Infirmary this morning and is in a critical condition with an attack of influenza.  Her son, George Wichert, who is in Caruthersville, Mo., was sent for and will arrive this evening.

Mrs. Frances P. Jackson, of Vienna, will arrive this evening to be with her sister, Mrs. Walter Warder, who received the sad news of the death of her daughter, Miss Winifred, this morning.

(Samuel Jackson married Frances P. Bain on 23 Sep 1860, in Jackson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

INFANT DIES THIS AFTERNOON

Junior, the six-week-old son of Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Wright, of 227 Thirty-third Street, died this afternoon at 2:00 at their home.  The little fellow has been ailing throughout his brief life and his death was not unexpected.

The remains will be taken to Wickliffe, Ky., Wednesday morning for burial.

Mr. Alexander left Saturday for Illmo, Mo., in response to a message stating that his son, Richard's, infant son had succumbed to an attack of influenza and that Richard and his wife were seriously ill with the same malady.  (Mounds)


The remains of Noah C. Milner, a prominent citizen of this place (Bardwell, Ky.), who died in N