Obituaries and Death Notices

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen

2 Jan 1912 - 28 Dec 1912

Cairo, Alexander County, Illinois


Transcribed and annotated by Darrel Dexter

darreldexter@hotmail.com
 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 2 Jan 1912:

John White, an aged negro employed by Dr. Cary for about twelve years, died Monday.  It is thought his death was the result of a wound he received several days ago by being kicked by a horse.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 3 Jan 1912:

DEATH CLAIMED E. J. AYRES TUESDAY

Former Resident of Villa Ridge Passed Away in California

             News came today of the death of Mr. E. J. Ayers, formerly a prominent fruit grower of Villa Ridge.  He passed away at Artesia, Cal., where he and Mrs. Ayres were living with their daughter.

             Mr. Ayres leaves besides his widow, a son and two daughters, Dr. Phillip Ayres and Mrs. Ruth Phillips and Mrs. Jenning Mannington.

             Since Mr. Ayres left southern Illinois for California, he has been in extremely poor health.

             (Henry N. Mannington, 27, of Stewart, Iowa, banker, born in Genesco, Ill., son of John Mannington and Mary Nourse, married Jennie Y. Ayers, daughter of Elias Ayers and Ardelia Wheelock, on 6 Sep 1894, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Grace D. Barnard was taken to St. Mary's Infirmary Tuesday afternoon, where she underwent a surgical operation this morning.  She appeared to stand the operation well, but her recovery is doubtful.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 4 Jan 1912:

SOL FARNBAKER STRICK BY DEATH

Passed Away Wednesday Night after Long Illness

             The sudden death of Solomon Farnbaker, who died at 10:30 o'clock last night at his home at 422 Seventh Street, was a great shock to his relatives and friends.  He died while sitting in a chair, conversing with his physician, and appeared to be in good health.

             The deceased has been ill since October 26, with complication of heart and lung trouble.  For sixty-four days and nights he has been unable to lie in bed and was compelled to sit up in a chair.  The last ten days he improved and was able to be out.

             The deceased was 61 years of age and was born August 31, 1850, at Natchez, Miss.  He received his education in the clothing business in New York, Paducah, and Evansville.  He came to Cairo from Evansville in 1873 and engaged in the clothing business in connection with his father.  In 1887, he engaged in the newspaper business and published the Cairo People.  Recently he engaged in the wholesale mail order business and for the last eighteen months prior to his illness was traveling salesman for the Cairo Brewing Company.

             The surviving members are a wife, three brothers, John, of California; Joseph, of Memphis; and Maurice J., of 420 Seventh Street, of this city.

             The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon.  Services will be held at the house by Rev. James Downey of St. Patrick's Church, and a special train will leave the foot of Fourteenth Street for Villa Ridge cemetery.

 

Mrs. W. A. Spann Dead

             Word was received here (Vienna) Wednesday of last week that Mrs. W. A. Spann had died at her home in Marion.  Her former name was Mrs. Mollie Goodall, and she had been married to Mr. Spann some two months or more.  Mrs. L. J. Smith and Mrs. R. E. Gillespie, daughters of Mr. Spann, left here Monday afternoon for Marion, in response to the information that their stepmother was very low.

             (Levi J. Smith married Lula Spann on 29 Apr 1895, in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

OMISSIONS MADE IN CITIZEN'S REVEW OF THE YEAR 1911

             In the necrology of the year, published in The Citizen, the name of Mrs. Anna M. Parks, who died in St. Louis, on Feb. 15, was unintentionally omitted.  Mrs. Parks was one of the old residents of Cairo.

 

FUNERAL NOTICE

             FARNBAKER—Died, Wednesday evening, Jan. 3, Solomon Farnbaker.

             Funeral services will be held at the family residence, No. 422 Seventh Street, Friday, at 1:45 o'clock, conducted by Rev. James Downey.  Remains will be taken by special Illinois Central train leaving Second Street at 2:45 p.m. for Villa Ridge cemetery, where interment will be made in Calvary Cemetery.

Friends of the family are invited.

 

Mr. and Mrs. S. O. Bowles left this week for Madisonville, Ky., where they attended the funeral of the latter's mother.  (Mound City)

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 5 Jan 1912:

FARNBAKER FUNERAL WAS HELD TODAY

             The funeral of Solomon Farnbaker was held this afternoon.  Services were held at 1:30 o'clock at the residence at 422 Seventh Street, conducted by Rev. James Downey.  A special train left the Illinois Central station at 3 o'clock for Villa Ridge cemetery, where interment was made.  The pallbearers were:  Guy Eichenberg, N. Sandler, M. J. Howley, James Barrow, F. Teichman, and John Sanders.

 

Seymore Hutchison left Thursday for Des Moines, Iowa, after attending the funeral of his mother, Mrs. B. Hutchison.  (Mound City)

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 6 Jan 1912:

GRAND JURY PROBES WICKLIFFE HOMICIDE

Frank Turner in Jail for Murder of John Clay

             The Ballard County grand jury today began investigation of the shooting Friday afternoon of John Clay, aged 24, by Frank Turner, which resulted in the death of the young man.  Turner is in jail awaiting the action of the grand jury.

             The homicide, which was prompted by jealousy, occurred on the street.  Turner called Clay from his home and shot him as they were walking along the street.  As Clay started to run, Turner followed him firing.  In all it is said five bullets were lodged in Clay’s body.

             It is stated that Mrs. Turner appealed to Clay for money to buy a pair of shoes.  This angered Turner and he planned the murder of ClayClay is a laborer, but Turner does little to make a living for his family.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 8 Jan 1912:

FUNERAL NOTICE

             Smith—Died Sunday, January 7, 1912, Mrs. Mary E. Smith, aged 73 years.

             Funeral services will be held Wednesday morning at St. Joseph's Church, at 8:30 o'clock.  Remains will be taken to Villa Ridge cemetery for interment.  Funeral train will leave foot of Fourteenth Street at 9:45 a.m.  Friends of the family are invited to attend.

 

FUNERAL NOTICE

             Brackey—Died this morning, of pneumonia, the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Brackey.

             Funeral services will be held at the family residence No. 727 Thirty-fifth Street, Tuesday afternoon at 1 o'clock, conducted by Rev. James Gillen.  Remains will be taken to Beech Grove Cemetery for interment by special interurban car, leaving Thirty-fourth and Highland.  Friends of the family are invited.

 

INFANT SON OF ED BRACKEY FOUND DEAD THIS MORNING

             Edward Brackey, the four-month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Brackey, of No. 727 Thirty-seventh Street, was found dead in bed at 6 o'clock this morning.  Coroner McManus was notified and held the inquest at the residence.  The verdict of the jury was that the child had come to its death from natural causes.  The remains were taken in charge by Mrs. M. E. Feith, and the funeral will probably be held tomorrow.  The body will probably be taken to Beech Grove on an Interurban car.

 

MRS. IDA PRUITT PASSED AWAY TODAY

             Mrs. Ida Pruitt died this morning at her home No. 324 ½ Thirty-Second Street.  The remains were taken in charge by E. A. Burke.  Services will be held tomorrow at noon at the residence conducted by Rev. L. G. Graham.  Special interurban car will leave at 1:30 o'clock for Beech Grove Cemetery.

 

OLD RESIDENT DIED SUNDAY

Mrs. Mary Smith, Aged 63 Years, Passed Away after Brief Illness

             Mrs. Mary Smith, aged 63 years, died at 10:20 o'clock last night at the home of her daughter, Mrs. F. O. Johnson, No. 2702 Sycamore Street.  She was an old resident of Cairo and resided here nearly all of her life.  Death was caused by a complication of diseases of which she had been suffering the past week.

             The deceased was born in Ireland and came to this country and direct to Cairo when she was 10 years of age.  She is the widow of John Smith and before her marriage, she was Miss Mary Hughes.  John Smith was a prominent merchant of Cairo and an old resident.  The deceased was a member of St. Joseph's Church and the Catholic Knights.  For some time she has been making her home with her daughter, Mrs. Johnson.

             Surviving members are two children, Mrs. F. O. Johnson, of this city, and son, Martin, of St. Louis, a sister, Mrs. E. C. Smith, of East Prairie, Mo.   The out-of-town relatives have already survived.  Mrs. James Sullivan, a sister-in-law of East St. Louis is expected to arrive today.

             The funeral arrangements have not been completed.

             (John Smith married Mary Hughes on 3 Feb 1870, in Alexander Co., Ill.  James C. Sullivan married Hannah Smith on 11 Sep 1883, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN

             Notice is hereby given that I, Sadie Hardin, who was tried and convicted in the Circuit Court of Alexander County on May 23rd A.D. 1906 for the alleged murder of Albert Brown, will at the January session A.D. 1912 of the Board of Pardons of the State of Illinois make application to the Board to be pardoned and liberated from the Illinois State penitentiary at Joliet, Illinois.

Sadie Hardin

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 10 Jan 1912:

FUNERAL OF MRS. SMITH HELD THIS MORNING

             The funeral of Mrs. Mary Smith, who died Sunday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. F. O. Johnson, of No. 2702 Sycamore Street, was held today.  Services were held at St. Joseph's Church and mass at 8:30 o'clock this morning and a special train on the Illinois Central departed from the foot of Fourteenth Street for Villa Ridge, where interment was made.  The pallbearers were:  Louis Zanon, Tom Galvin, David Barry, S. Chapman, Arthur Magner, Frank Thomas, A. F. DeBaun, P. T. Langan, P. J. Purcell, Patrick Mahoney, James Galligan, and W. P. Greaney.

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We desire to extend our sincere thanks to our friends and neighbors for their kindness at the death of our baby, Edward T. Brackey.

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Brackey

 

The infant baby of Mr. and Mrs. Will Britt died on last Sunday afternoon after a long illness.  (Pulaski)

 

A. M. Crawford, an old man of about ¾ Cherokee Indian, and who lived alone and was quite feeble, was found dead in his home here (Pulaski) early Monday morning.  He had evidently frozen to death, as he was found lying on the floor very thinly clad.  Esq. J. B. Kennedy empaneled a jury and held an inquest which rendered a verdict of dead from cold and exposure.

 

NEGRO CAUGHT IN MACHINERY AND SERIOUSLY INJURED

             Henry Lewis, colored, an employee of the Roberts Cotton Oil Mill, was seriously injured last night by being caught in the machinery while working on the night shift.  He is confined at St. Mary's Infirmary and is in a very critical condition.

             Lewis was caught in a pulley of the rapid moving machinery and was carried around several times before he could be rescued.  He was rushed to the office of Drs. Gorden and McNeimer and given immediate attention.  Both legs and his right arm were broken.  His left leg was badly lacerated and the arm was broken at the shoulder.  He also has a number of bruises about the body.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 11 Jan 1912:

Charles Miller has been called to Iowa to answer questions relating to a will that he was remembered in by his father.  We are informed that the property left him is very valuable.  (Tamms)

 

Cyrus (Bud) Miller was called to Mill Creek Saturday to the bedside of his father, Paul Miller, who is very sick.  Mr. Paul Miller is one of Union County's prominent farmers.  (Tamms)

 

Died, January 8, Guy Cruse, aged about 19.  He had suffered from scarlet fever for about 6 weeks and fought hard for life until Monday morning, when it became too much for him, when he had to give up.  The sympathy of all is with the parents and brother, which survive him.  (Mill Creek)

 

The baby of Scott Warren, living in the country east of town (Thebes), is dead.

 

The Italian farmer in the hills, who lost two children by diphtheria a short time ago, lost another child the first of the week and one more is very low.  (McClure)

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 12 Jan 1912:

OBITUARY

             Ida, the beloved wife of Alonzo Pruitt, departed this life Jan. 8th after a long illness of tuberculosis.  She was 34 years of age.  She lived a sweet, patient Christian life, although she was a great sufferer, yet she never murmured on account of her affliction.  She leaves besides her husband, one sister, Mrs. Roger Barbee, four aunts and a host of friends to mourn her death.  Her funeral was preached by Rev. L. G. Graham, pastor of the Calvary Baptist Church, of which she was a member, and the body was laid to rest in Beech Grove Cemetery.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 13 Jan 1912:

SECTION FOREMAN FROZEN TO DEATH

Henry Hacke, Aged 35 Years, Succumbs to Cold Weather near Olive Branch

REMAINS FOUND BY FRIENDS LAST NIGHT

On Railroad Track between Olive Branch and Fayville—Deceased Unmarried—Has Sister in Iowa.

             The first fatality, as a result of the cold weather, reported in this section, is that of Henry Hacke, section foreman for the C. & E. I. Railroad.

             Mr. Hacke left Olive Branch Thursday morning for Fayville, where he was going to clean out some switches.  He was on his way back to Olive Branch, when he succumbed to the cold and his remains were picked up by friends Friday evening about 6 o'clock.

             The deceased is said to be unmarried and made his headquarters at Olive Branch.  He has a sister residing at Muscatine, Iowa, and another in New York.  The sister at Muscatine has been notified of her brother's death, but the exact location of the other sister had not yet been learned.  The deceased was about 35 years of age.

             Coroner McManus left this morning for Olive Branch to hold an inquest over the remains.

 

Judge J. B. Collins was called to Belknap by the death of his sister, Mrs. Fannie Adams.

 

Henry Lewis, the negro who was injured Tuesday night at the Roberts Cotton Seed Oil Mill, died this morning at St. Mary's Infirmary.  The remains were taken in charge of E. A. BurkeLewis was suffering from two broken legs, a broken arm and badly lacerated limbs.  He was working on the night shift and was caught in a pulley.  He was pulled around a number of times before the machinery could be stopped.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 15 Jan 1912:

OLD RESIDENT OF CAIRO PASSED AWAY SUNDAY

             John A. Nickles, one of the oldest residents of Cairo, aged 84 years, died Sunday morning at 3:35 o'clock at his home, No. 2814 Commercial.  Death was caused by a paralytic stroke, of which the deceased had been suffering for some time.

             The deceased was born in Clinnenburg, Germany, October 1, 1827.  He came to this country in 1848 and in 1877 came to Cairo.  Immediately after his arrival here, he opened a shoe shop on Ohio Street above Eighth and has been in the shoe repairing business ever since.  From Ohio Levee he moved his shop to No. 1109 Washington Avenue and later to a store next to his residence at No. 2814 Commercial Avenue.

             The surviving members are a wife and three sons, John, Joseph, and Theodore, the latter of Paducah, Ky.

             Funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon at the residence, conducted by Rev. M. H. Loar of the First Methodist Church.  Interment will be held at Villa Ridge cemetery.

             The deceased was a member of Cairo Lodge No. 237 A. F. & A.M., who will have charge of the funeral.

 

FUNERAL NOTICE

             Nickels—Died Sunday morning, January 14, John A. Nickles, aged 84 years.

             Funeral service will be held at the family residence, 2814 Commercial Avenue, Tuesday, January 16, at 1:30 p.m.  Remains will be taken by special train leaving Fourteenth Street at 2:45 o'clock for Villa Ridge cemetery.  Friends of the family invited.

 

MASONIC NOTICE

             All members of Cairo Lodge No. 237 A. F. & A.M. and all visiting brothers are requested to meet at the Masonic Hall at 1 p.m. Tuesday, January 16th, 1912, for the purpose of attending the funeral of our late brother, John A. Nickles.

C. S. Bourque, Worthy Master

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 16 Jan 1912:

COTTON BELT OFFICIAL KILLED

Guy L. Stewart, Industrial Agent, Burned to Death in His Car

ACCIDENT OCCURRED NEAR THEBES BRIDGE

Cotton Belt and C. & E. I. Trains Collided and Crashed into Iron Mountain Freight

             Kelso, Mo., Jan. 16.—Guy L. Stewart, of St. Louis, agricultural and industrial agent for the Cotton Belt, was burned to death today in a wreck near here.  The Cotton Belt passenger train and a Chicago & Eastern Illinois passenger collided and both of them crushed into an Iron Mountain freight train in the railroad yards.  Stewart was in his private car which took fire.  It was telescoped and rescuers were unable to reach him.  One Pullman car was also telescoped, but the passengers escaped injury.  Three trainmen were injured.  The C & E. I. train was running late when the collision occurred.

 

REPORT THAT MAN DROWNED BELIEVED TO BE HOAX

             The report that a man was drowned in the Mississippi River, while walking over on the ice, alarmed the relatives of Albert Norris, operator for the Cotton Belt at Bird's Point.  He could not be located at the Point, but it was learned later that he went over on the transfer, which was late.  It is believed the story was a hoax.

 

Friends of Rev. and Mrs. A. S. Buchanan, of Indianapolis, formerly of Cairo, will be sorry to hear of the serious illness of their son, Milo, who has been suffering for the last ten days with an attack of typhoid fever.  His condition is considered critical.

 

PATRICK CARMODAY PASSED AWAY TODAY AT INFIRMARY

             Patrick Carmoday, aged 36 years, passed away early this morning at St. Mary's Infirmary, of pneumonia.  The deceased is survived by a brother, Thomas Carmody, two aunts, Mrs. Ellen Levitt, and Mrs. Mary Driscoll, and two uncles, Peter Doud and Patrick Carmody.

             The funeral services will be held tomorrow morning at St. Patrick's Church and interment made at Villa Ridge cemetery.

             The deceased was formerly employed at the Andrew Lohr Bottling Company.

             (Michael Driscoll married Mary Doud on 22 Sep 1887, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Martin Carmody married Bridget Doud on 31 Jan 1869, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FUNERAL NOTICE

             Carmoday—Died, Monday, January 16th, 1912, aged 36 years.  Funeral services will be held Wednesday morning at 8:30 o'clock at St. Patrick’s Church.  Cortege will leave the residence of Mrs. Ellen Levitt, No. 410 Cross Street, at 8 o'clock.  Interment will be made at Villa Ridge.  Friends of the family are invited to attend.

 

Died, in Anna, on last Monday night, Mrs. M. M. Veach, at the age of 72 years.  She leaves only one child, Mrs. Eugene Leonard, at whose home she died.  The remains were brought to Vienna on the 10 o'clock train Thursday morning for interment, accompanied by relatives and friends.  The funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at the home of Miss Emma Rebman, who is a niece of the deceased, conducted by Eld. I. A. J. Parker, followed by interment in the Masonic Cemetery.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 17 Jan 1912:

FORMER CAIRO BOY AT DEATH'S DOOR

             The condition of Milo Buchanan, son of Rev. and Mrs. A. S. Buchanan, of Indianapolis, formerly of Cairo, is more serious today.  M. Easterday received a message this morning from Rev. Buchanan.  The message stated that Milo was very low with an attack of typhoid.  He has been ill since before Christmas.  Two nurses are attending him.  The patient is delirious and has a temperature of 104 and pulse 108.

 

The funeral of John Nickles, who died early Sunday morning at his residence at 2814 Commercial Avenue, was held Tuesday afternoon.  Services were held at the residence by Rev. M. H. Loar and a special train left Fourteenth Street for Villa Ridge cemetery where interment was made.

 

Patrick Carmoday, who died early Tuesday morning at St. Mary's Infirmary, was buried this morning.  Services were held at St. Patrick’s Church at 8:30 o'clock conducted by Rev. James Downey.  A special train left Fourteenth Street for Villa Ridge cemetery, where interment was made.

 

Mrs. Harmon, of Des Moines, Ia., who has been visiting at the home of B. Hutchison and family since the death of her sister, returned to her home Tuesday.  (Mound City)

 

Little Hallie Upchurch, son of Mrs. John Upchurch, of this place (Olmsted), died Sunday afternoon at his home at 4:25, the cause of death being pneumonia in both lungs.  Hallie was a bright little fellow of three years and loved by all who knew him.  Mr. and Mrs. Upchurch have the heartfelt sympathy of the community in their sad bereavement.

 

Died, at his home in Ullin, Jan. 11, 1912, Charles H. Kruse, son of G. B. Kruse, of this place (Olmsted).  Death was caused from catarrh of the stomach, which had given him considerable trouble for about two years.  He was brought to Olmsted Friday afternoon, where the funeral was preached Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock by Brother J. L. Martin, at the home of John Johnson.  Burial at Masonic Cemetery.  Besides his many friends, he leaves a wife and three children, an aged father and sisters to mourn his death.  An abundance of beautiful carnations with lilies and hyacinths were presented by C. G. Willard, of Mound City.

             The pallbearers were Hiram Calvin, J. W. Cook, George Lilly, Charles Kratz, Dan McDaniels, and Rudolph Dick.

             (His marker in the Masonic Cemetery at Olmsted reads:  Charles H. Kruse Died Jan. 11, 1912 Aged 31 Years.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. and Mrs. Farnbrough from the south were here Saturday to attend the funeral of Charles Kruse, brother of Mrs. Farnbrough.  If it had not been for the timely assistance of Lige and Fred Goines, Friday night of last week, Uncle George Kruse, who is quite aged and dead, would have probably perished in the snow and blizzard that was raging at the time.  Mr. Kruse had fallen the second time in the snow, but the boys happened along in time to get him up and into a neighbor's where he was revived.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 18 Jan 1912:

CAIRO MAN KILLS SELF AT SIKESTON

George Cleige Took Dose of Carbolic Acid Wednesday with Fatal Effect

TRIED TO SLAY WIFE WITH A KNIFE

Deceased Member of Knights Pythias Lodge of This City—Worked at Singer

             Sikeston, Mo., Jan. 18—George Cleige, of Cairo, Ill., killed himself here last night by taking carbolic acid.  In the early part of the evening, he went to the home of his wife from whom he was separated and tried to slay her with a knife. Later, he took his own life.  He was dead when found this morning.  Cleige is said to have been a member of the K. of P. Lodge at Cairo.

             The deceased is a cousin of Henry Etz, engineer at the Halliday Mill and of Mrs. Rosena Elias.  He was about 40 years of age and was formerly employed at the Singer.  Deceased went to Sikeston only a few days ago with the intention of bringing his wife back to Cairo, but it is said she refused to accompany him, which resulted in his rash act.

             (The 19 Jan 1912, issue reported his name was George Kruge.  Harry Elias married Rosina Ward on 15 May 1900, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 19 Jan 1912:

FUNERAL OF CAIRO MAN WAS HELD AT SIKESTON TODAY

             The funeral of George Kruge, who ended his life at Sikeston, Mo., Wednesday night by taking carbolic acid, was held this afternoon and the remains interred at Sikeston.

             Cairo Lodge No. 173 Knights of Pythias of which the deceased was a member, made arrangements with the Sikeston Lodge to take charge of the remains.  Fred Dauksch, chancellor commander of the local lodge, made arrangements last evening and several of the members from Cairo went to Sikeston today to attend the funeral.

             The name of the deceased was not George Cleige, as has been stated.  The name was misspelled in the dispatch received from Sikeston.  The deceased and his wife formerly resided at No. 215 Thirty-fourth Street in this city.  He had been married about a year and until recently was employed by the Singer Manufacturing Company.

 

NEGRO CONFESSES TO ULLIN MURDER

Otis Meals, Arrested at New Orleans, Confesses to Shooting of Marshal Chastine on August 19th

             Otis Meals, a negro arrested at New Orleans, has confessed to the killing of Marshal Robert Chastine of Ullin on August 19th.  Sheriff Wehrenberg, of Mound City, received a message today from the Chief of Police at New Orleans, starting that the negro had been captured there and that he had confessed to the crime.  An officer has been sent after him and he will be brought here in a few days as he does not demand a requisition.

             The father and brother of Meals were arrested after the shooting and were sentenced to the penitentiary.  They were implicated, but Otis was the one who did the shooting.  He has been tracked by an officer for some time and was finally located at New Orleans.

             Immediately after his arrest, he confessed to the killing and was willing to return.

 

THREE KILLED IN WRECK

North and South Bound Frisco Freight Trains Crash Together near Wittenberg, Mo.

             Cape Girardeau, Mo., Jan. 19.—Three trainmen were killed and one injured fatally in a head-on collision between two freight trains on the Cape Girardeau division of the Frisco Railroad near Wittenberg.

             The dead are:  Engineer Charles Baird, Fireman W. Clark, and Brakeman G. Sutton, all of the northbound train.

             Brakeman H. Hilthouse of the southbound train probably will die.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 20 Jan 1912:

OLD RESIDENT OF CAIRO PASSED AWAY FRIDAY

             Mrs. Catherine Cooper, an old Cairoite, died Friday afternoon at 4:40 o'clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Fred Strautz, of No. 2003 Washington.  Death was caused by old age.  The deceased has been ill for the past six months, but only last week did her condition become serious.

             She was born at Buffalo, N.Y., and came to Cairo with her parents, while she was very young.  She has resided here all of her life and is very well known among the old Cairoites.  The deceased was a member of St. Joseph’s Church and the Catholic Knights of America.  She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Fred Strautz, of Cairo, and Mrs. John Hook, of East St. Louis.  Charles Strautz, of Cairo, and Mrs. John Hook, of East St. Louis, Charles Strautz, of St. Louis, a nephew, arrived last night to attend the funeral.

             (Frederick W. Strautz married Katie Cooper on 16 Nov 1882, in Alexander Co., Ill.  John Hook married Susan L. Cooper on 14 Aug 1888, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Her marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Catherine Cooper Died Jan 19, 1912.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FUNERAL NOTICE

             Cooper—Died Friday afternoon, January 19, Mrs. Catherine Cooper.

             Funeral will leave the residence, 2003 Washington, at 1:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon for St. Joseph's Church where services will be conducted by Rev. James Gillen.  Cortege will leave Fourteenth Street on a special train for Villa Ridge cemetery where interment will be made.

             Friends of the family are invited to attend.

 

Died, at his home about 3 ½ miles south of Vienna, on Tuesday morning, Asa C. Atherton, at the age of 79 years.  Death was caused from senility and a breaking down of the system.  Mr. Atherton was a good man and well respected by his neighbors and friends.  His daughter, Mrs. E. E. Mathis, lived with him and kept house for him—his last wife having died some years ago.  The remains were shipped to Hodges Park in Alexander County for burial Tuesday evening, accompanied by his daughter, Mrs. Mathis, his son-in-law Charles A. Parker, and perhaps others.

 

Dr. F. A. Snell, a well-known physician of Columbus, Ky., died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. A. M. Wilson, in Columbus Monday afternoon of meningitis.  He had been in ill health since last fall when he had a stroke of apoplexy.

             The deceased is survived by two daughters, Mrs. A. M. Wilson and Miss Laverne Snell.

 

Wesley Webb, an aged citizen of Oscar, Ballard County, Ky., died last Sunday afternoon of the infirmities of old age.  He was a former resident of Carlisle County.

 

Mrs. Noonon, wife of Jailer Noonan, of Hickman, Ky., died Tuesday morning at her home in Hickman, from injuries received a few days ago from a fall on the ice.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 22 Jan 1912:

NEGRO BOY WAS FATALLY BURNED

Died Sunday from Injuries Sustained in Fire Late Saturday Night

FIRE WAGON COLLIDES WITH TELEPHONE POLE

In Running to Fire This Morning—Firemen Kept Busy During Past Few Days

             Fred Robinson, the negro boy who was burned Saturday night in the fire at Thirty-first and Commercial Avenue, died Sunday morning, and an inquest was held this afternoon by Coroner McManus.

             The fire is said to have started from an overturned lamp.  The boy was asleep when the fire started and he was seriously burned when his father rescued him.  The fire occurred about 9 o'clock.

             Companies No. 2 and 3 answered to the alarm.  No. 3 had a line of hose damaged by a street car, the motorman running over the hose before he saw it in time to stop his car.

 

ANOTHER OLD CAIROITE GONE

J. S. Metcalf Passed Away at Tampa, Fla.

             J. S. Metcalf, an old resident of Cairo, passed away at his home in Tampa, Fla., last week.  A Tampa newspaper just received gives the following notice of his death.

             Following a period of ten days illness, James H. Metcalf, for the past thirty years a resident of Hillsboro County, succumbed yesterday to a stroke of apoplexy, at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. W. W. Nowotny, 702 East Frances Avenue.

             The deceased born in Calloway County, Kentucky, March 4, 1826, but while still a youth moved with his parents to Southern Illinois.  At the age of twenty years he enlisted in the United States Army and served during the entire period of the Mexican War following which he returned to Cairo Ill., where he engaged in the mercantile business and continued to make his home there until he moved to Florida in 1881.

             Upon his arrival in this state, Mr. Metcalf located nine miles north of Tampa and set to work to raise an orange grove, no small undertaking for a man who had already passed the half century make in his life’s span.  Here he continued to reside, doing his share of the work on the farm, until about six years ago, when he moved with the family of Mr. and Mrs. Nowotny to their present residence in this city.

             Of splendid stature and powerful physique, as may be gathered from this sketch of his life, Mr. Metcalf was essentially a man in every sense of the word.  Always considerate of the feelings of others, he spent his declining years passing a kindly word to all he met, trying to make the sun shine a little brighter and smooth out the troubles of everyone who came his way.

             (William W. Nowotny married E. Monte Metcalf on 29 Sep 1886, in Alexander Co., Ill.  James H. Metcalf was a private in Company B, 2nd Illinois Infantry during the Mexican War.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 23 Jan 1912:

Sheriff Wehrenberg is expected home tonight from New Orleans with the prisoner Otis Meals who was recently arrested in that city on the charge of murdering the marshal at Ullin some time ago.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 24 Jan 1912:

A Former Resident of Mound City Dies in Chicago

             Word was received this morning of the death of H. M. Perks, formerly of Mounds, who was run over by a street car in Chicago about a week ago.  From the time of the accident, there were only faint hopes of his recovery and he has remained in a comatose condition until the end came early this morning.  He was a brother of L. C. Perks, of Mound City.

 

DOUBLE KILLING AT MARION LAST NIGHT

             Marion, Ill., Jan. 24.—Authorities today are making a searching investigation of the double killing at Carterville near here last night.  When the wife of Sam Pulliner refused to leave a dance and go home with him, Pulliner procured a shotgun and killed her.  Within a few minutes a general battle was in progress outside the house and this morning Pulliner was found dead.

 

C. H. Kruse died at his home in Ullin Jan. 11, from acute indigestion and heart failure, from which he was a sufferer for about three months.  Besides his many friends he leaves a wife and three children, an aged father and sister.

 

Mrs. Catherine Guild died at her home four miles northwest of Ullin Jan. 17.  She was born in Cary County, Ireland, in 1852 and was married to James Guild in 1870, coming to Alexander County about 30 years ago.  From that time until her death she resided in the community of Beech Grove. She was a good neighbor, loving wife, and mother.  She was the mother of ten children, seven of whom are left to mourn her loss.  Those living are Maude Short, Millie, Nellie, Mary, John, Dan, and Will.  Millie, living in Wyoming, could not be present.  John is in Wisconsin.  Miss Nellie teaches school at Mounds.  The remains were laid to rest at Mt. Pisgah Cemetery. Jan. 20.  Rev. Bumpas, pastor of the M. E. Church, conducted the funeral.

             (Ed Short married Maude Guild on 8 Sep 1895, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Her marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug reads:  Catharine Guild 1852-1912.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Card of Thanks

             Please allow us as members of her family to extend our sincere and heartfelt thanks for the help and kindness shown us by our friends and neighbors in the sad hours of the death of our wife and mother.

James Guild and Children

 

Mrs. Mary A. Burris, administrator of the estate of her son, Arthur B. Burris, deceased, who sued the Murphysboro Telephone Company for damages for the death of A. Bert Burris, who was electrocuted on a pole while he was working as a lineman for the company in that city, has been settled and plaintiff took a non-suit.  The sum agreed upon was $1,250, which includes plaintiff's attorney's fees.

 

Thomas B. Powell, who has been confined to his home with a severe spell of lagrippe, and who has for some years been suffering from an attack of paralysis took a change for the worse Monday morning and it was thought for a while that he could not recover.  He is now suffering from heart failure.  (Vienna)

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 25 Jan 1912:

The remains of little Walter Moyer were brought here (Grand Chain) last Saturday to the home of his grandfather, Mr. Aliff.  Funeral services were held at the home Sunday after which the body was laid to rest in the Grand Chain Cemetery.  Little Walter was six years old and lived in Poplar Bluff, Mo.  He died Jan. 19, of pneumonia.

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We desire to extend our very deep gratitude to the friends and neighbors who were so attentive during the illness and at the death of our son and brother, Charles Michamp.

E. F. Michamp and family

 

Grandma Martha Elwood has been affected with a goiter for more than fifty years.  It has assumed enormous proportions and the doctors can do nothing to relieve her.  She suffers intensely with no hope of relief, but death from the pain.

 

The funeral of the late Mrs. Del. Gaines was held Wednesday afternoon in the Baptist church, services being conducted by Rev. Ferrill and interment at Beech Grove Cemetery.  (Mound City)

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 26 Jan 1912:

OBITUARY

Asa C. Atherton

             Asa C. Atherton was born in what is now Pulaski County, Nov. 21, 1832.  He was the second of six children and the son of Aaron and Elizabeth Atherton, both natives of Kentucky, who immigrated to this state in 1816 and settled where the subject of this sketch was born.  His father was a soldier in the Mexican War and was killed in the Battle of Buena Vista, Feb. 27, 1847, thereby limiting the opportunities for an education for this son, as he resumed the responsibilities of the home and conducted the farm for his mother until he was eighteen years old.  Entered the mercantile business in what was known as Valley Forge, Pulaski County, and acted as postmaster six years, at which is now Villa Ridge, before the Illinois Central Railroad was built.  Then he returned to the home farm where he lived about twenty years, farming and sawmilling.  He also put in a flour mill, which he ran in connection with the saw mill about one year, when it was destroyed by fire, losing the mill and its contents as he had no insurance in 1879.  Soon after Hodges Park was started, he put up a saw mill and store at that place in which he remained engaged as long as he stayed in Alexander County and some six or seven years after coming to Johnson County.  After closing out the milling business he settled down on his farm three miles south of Vienna and spent his declining years peacefully and apparently perfectly contented, enjoying the reward for his score years of usefulness.

             He married Elizabeth Kelly Dec. 16, 1856, and to this union nine children were born:  John H., Ellen Mathis, Edward J., Hannah C., Grace T. Parker, George C., Anna A., Fanny M. and Violet E.  His daughter, Ellen E. Mathis, has lived with him since the death of his last wife and has been untiring in her devotion to his every need.

             His second marriage was to Emily A. Brown, June 29, 1883.  In 1891 he married to Mary E. Norton, Nov. 15, and was again married Dec. 17, 1899, to Mary J. Parker, formerly a well-known resident of Vienna, who died May 16, 1904.

             He united with the Shiloh Baptist Church near Villa Ridge Aug. 12, 1852.  He was very faithful to his church and was a tireless Bible reader.  He enjoyed good health up to within a few days before his death, when he contracted a cold which he was unable to throw off on account of his old age.  He passed away Jan. 16, 1912.

             He was a good father, a generous friend and will be greatly missed by those who knew him best.

             Funeral services were held at Shiloh Baptist Church, a mile and a half west of Villa Ridge and near his old home, Jan. 17th, conducted by Rev. W. A. Ridge, of Dongola, a personal friend and once pastor of Shiloh Church.  The services were very touching as he recalled many incidents of the past, showing the generosity and interest taken by the deceased in the up building and maintenance of Shiloh Church.

             (Asa Coleman Atherton, 50, miller, from Hodges Park, Ill., born in Pulaski Co., Ill., son of Aaron Atherton and Elizabeth Atherton, married Mrs. Emily Alvina Brown, 43, born in St. Louis, Mo., daughter of Samuel Music and Elizabeth Walker, on 27 Jun 1883, in Union Co., Ill.  Asa C. Atherton married Mrs. Mary E. Morton on 15 Nov 1891, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Asa Atherton married Mary J. Parker on 17 Dec 1899, in Johnson Co., Ill.  James P. Mathis married Ellen E. Atherton on 6 Jul 1878, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Charles A. Parker married Grace T. Atherton on 19 May 1889, in Alexander Co., Ill.   His marker in Shiloh Cemetery near Villa Ridge reads:  Asa C. Atherton Born Nov. 21, 1832 Died Jan. 16, 1912 Baptized Aug. 12, 1852.  Mary E. wife of A. C. Atherton Born Dec. 23, 1842 Died Feb. 28, 1899 Aged 56 Ys., 2 Ms., & 5 D.  Violette A. daughter of A. C. & Elizabeth Atherton Died Oct. 4, 1880 Aged 8 Ys., 6 Ms., & 14 Ds—Darrel Dexter)

 

Card of Thanks

             To the friends and neighbors who so kindly assisted us during the sickness and death of our father, we express our sincere thanks.

John H. Atherton

Ellen E. Mathis

Edward J. Atherton

Charles A. Parker

 

"POOR" RECLUSE DIES RICH

Mrs. Rosa Tyler, of Near Centralia, Ill., Leaves $20,000 Property

             Centralia, Ill., January 26.—Although she lived alone for years in a little one-room log cabin in a clump of woods near the Bowman Schoolhouse, several miles from Centralia, and was thought exceedingly poor, Mrs. Rosa Tyler, aged 75, died Wednesday, worth $20,000.

             It was discovered after her death that she owned property and had wealth, and two nieces, who lived in Kansas City, Mo., were not aware of the fact.  In the bedding was found considerable money and certificates of deposit worth $10,000.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Brown, of Olive Branch, and Miss Keeler, of Cairo, all attended the funeral here (Mound City) of the late Harry Perks.

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We wish to thank our many friends who so kindly attended us during the illness and death of our little daughter, niece, and granddaughter.  We pray heaven's choicest blessings on each and every one.

Respectfully,

Mr. and Mrs. Sol. Hicks

Miss Georgia Bugg

John Bugg

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 27 Jan 1912:

The funeral of the late Harry M. Perks was held today at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Higgins at 1 o'clock conducted by Rev. Joseph Buie.  Interment at Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge.

             (His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Harry M. Perks Born Feb. 22, 1869 in Petersburg Died Jan. 23, 1912, in Chicago.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 29 Jan 1912:

Mrs. J. B. Collins, left this morning for Murray, Ky., called by the death of her sister-in-law, Mrs. A. B. Spencer, who died Sunday afternoon.

 

OLDEST RESIDENT OF CAIRO DIES

Bernard Smith, Aged 79 Years, Passed Away at Home of Daughter

             J. Bernard Smith, an old resident of this city, passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. George Fischer, at No. 529 Center Street at 7:50 o'clock this morning.  The deceased took sick with an attack of pneumonia Saturday and this, with infirmities of old age, hastened death.  He was 79 years of age.

The deceased was born in County Connaugh, Ireland, and came to America when a lad of twelve years and to Cairo during the Civil War.  For over fifteen years, he was employed as section foreman for the Illinois Central Railroad.  His wife died seventeen years ago this month.

             He is survived by a sister, Mrs. Margaret Kennedy, of No. 2036 Pine Street, besides three sons and four daughters, as follows:  Jerry Smith, of Cairo, John Smith, of Slayton, Texas, James Smith, of Omaha, and Mesdames George Fischer, of Cairo and G. E. Baldwin, of Boston, and Misses Mary Smith, of Boston and Miss Anna Moren, of Chicago.

             He is also survived by relatives in St. Louis and four grandsons in this city.

             The funeral services will be held Wednesday morning at St. Joseph's Church.  Mrs. M. E. Feith the funeral director having charge.

 

NEGRO OFFICER KILLS BAD MAN

Napoleon Lipe, Young Negro Desperado, Shot by Officer Gus Johnson

CREATED DISTURBANCE IN UPTOWN SALOON

And Ran Occupants Out with Winchester Rifle—Later Made Gun Play at Police

             Napoleon Lipe, a young negro desperado, aged about 25 years, was fatally shot by Officer Gus Johnson, about midnight Saturday and died from his wounds Sunday evening at 6:30 o’clock at St. Mary’s Infirmary.

             Lipe was a son of former Officer Green Lipe, colored.  The young negro is said to have been intoxicated and went into the saloon at Thirty-second and Commercial and engaged in a quarrel with another negro.  Later he left the saloon and, going to the home of his father, not far distant, he seized a Winchester rifle and went back to the saloon, where he made the negroes step lively.  The bartender managed to get Lipe out of the saloon and called the police.

             Officers Johnson and Griffin, colored, responded to the call.  They encountered Lipe and another negro at the corner of Twenty-seventh and Commercial.  Seeing the officers, Lipe is said to have made a gun play, trying to shoot the officers, who dodged behind a telephone pole.  The negro Patterson, who was with Lipe, managed to get the rifle away from him, whereupon Lipe started on a run up Commercial with the police in pursuit.  Lipe made a motion towards his back pocket as if to pull a gun and Johnson was too quick for him and shot at him.  He was then arrested and taken to police headquarters. It was not known that the shot had taken effect until sometime later.  He was then taken to the infirmary, where he died Sunday evening about 6:30 o'clock.

             Officer Johnson has always been a fearless officer and killed a "bad negro" named Frank Conners several years ago for which he was exonerated.

             Johnson was placed under arrest after Lipe's death and is being held pending the result of the coroner’s jury this afternoon.

             Lipe had had trouble with a number of officers in the past, including former Officer Jim Casey and Special Officer Ed Moore.

             The coroner’s inquest was held this afternoon in the council chamber.

             The jury was composed of Samuel Green, Charles DeBaun, James Barrow, Gus Osterloh, Joe Berbling, and Ed Halliday.

 

Mrs. Elmer Clymore, who has been in bad health for several months and finally her mind became effected so much that it was deemed best to take her to the hospital for treatment.  Accordingly she was adjudged insane before Judge Hight on last Monday morning and her husband and Ike L. Morgan took her to the Southern Hospital at Anna.  This is a sad affair indeed.  The little son, Bradley, only child, has gone to stay at his grandfather's, Dan Clymore, in the country, and Elmer still remains here (Vienna) as clerk in Boyd’s store.  Another sad thing is that Mrs. Clymore's mother, Mrs. Bradley Farmer, is slowly dying with cancer.  They are all good people. 

(Elmer Clymore married Daisy M. Farmer on 6 Aug 1899, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Daniel H. Clymore married Louella Albriton on 13 Jan 1878, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Bradley Farmer married Nancy C. Moor on 7 Apr 1871, in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 30 Jan 1912:

CAPT. WILLIAM McCLATCHEY DIES

Veteran Riverman's Last Trip Was with Taft Flotilla

             Cape Girardeau, Mo., Jan. 30.—Capt. William McClatchey, 67 years old, died here Monday.  He had followed river life fifty-four years.  He lived in St. Louis thirty years, being captain of the old Anchor line, and had charge of some of the best boats between St. Louis and New Orleans.  He was in charge of the City of Cairo, which was in the St. Louis harbor during the cyclone and for two days was mourned as dead.

             His last trip on the river was on the steamer Cape Girardeau, during the Taft flotilla to New Orleans in October 1908.  For two years he made his home in Cape Girardeau with his son, Sam F. McClatchey.

 

VETERAN OF MEXICAN WAR PASSES AWAY

             Edward Smith, aged 91 years, died Monday afternoon about 4:30 o'clock of old age at St. Mary's Infirmary, where he had lived the last eighteen years.  He came to Cairo at that time and having no place to go he was taken in as a charity patient and worked around the infirmary until, his eyesight failing him, he became totally blind.  He had been practically helpless the past fifteen years and had to be led around the place.

             The old gentleman was a reticent frame of mind and would talk little of his affairs.  It is not known whether or not he has any surviving relatives.  He was born in New York and spent a time in Canada.  He was a veteran of the Mexican War and often told of several battles in which he participated.

             The funeral will be held Wednesday morning at St. Patrick's Church, services being conducted by Rev. J. Downey and interment will be at Villa Ridge in Calvary Cemetery.

 

CORONER'S JURY EXONERATED JOHNSON

             Officer Gus Johnson was exonerated by the coroner's jury Monday evening for killing Napoleon Lipe, the young negro whom the officer shot Saturday night.  About fifteen witnesses were examined and their testimony was to the effect that Johnson was justified in the shooting.

 

Claude Winter went to Clinton, Ky., today to attend the funeral of Mr. Bussey, which occurred there today.  Mr. Bussey was with the late Claude Winter, Sr., at the time of his fatal accident over a year ago.

 

Harry Becker went to Clinton, Ky., today to attend the funeral of Mr. Bussey.

 

DOUBLE TRAGEDY OCCURRED AT GALATIA

Husband Kills Wife and Then Ends His Own Life

             The little town of Galatia, in Saline County was highly wrought up on Saturday about noon by a double tragedy, which was enacted there in the local telephone central office.  James Goodman, slipping up behind his wife while she was answering calls at the switchboard, fired a bullet through her brain.  He then turned the weapon on himself and blew out his own brains.  His body fell across that of his victim.

Family troubles combined with ill health is said to have been the cause of the tragedy.  The couple were not living together.  They separated recently and on Sunday last when together to talk over their differences had a violent quarrel.  This is believed to have been directly responsible for the act. 

             Goodman had been in ill health for some time, being a victim of tuberculosis and this was caused him to be very unhappy.

             The murdered woman was formerly Miss Etta Rieter. She had been married twice, the first time to Joe Pemberton from whom she was separated.  She leaves one child by Pemberton.  She later married Goodman and at the time of the double deed, was separated from him.  Since being separated from him she had been working as central girl at the village telephone office.  She is said to have come from a good family.—Marion Post

             (Joseph T. Pemberton married Etta Ritter on 4 Oct 1899, in Saline Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

James R. Thornton, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Thornton, died at their home Jan. 23, age 21 years.  The deceased has been a sufferer of curvature of the spine since a child.  He was bedfast three weeks.  He leaves a father, mother, one brother and two sisters, besides a host of friends and relatives.  The funeral was held at the house and the remains were laid to rest near Anna.  (Ullin)

 

CARD OF THANKS

             We wish to thank our many friends in Ullin and Pulaski for their helping hand and sympathy shown us in the sad hours of the sickness and death of our son and brother, James.

Yours with thanks,

C. W. Thornton and family

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 31 Jan 1912:

FUNERAL OF OLD RESIDENT HELD THIS MORNING

             The funeral of J. Bernard Smith, who died Monday morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. George Fischer, on Center Street, was held this morning at St. Joseph’s Church, Rev. James Gillen officiating. The cortege left the foot of Fourteenth Street on a special I. C. train for Villa Ridge, the burial being held at Calvary Cemetery.

             The following were the pallbearers:  Thomas Galvin, Peter Doud, Thomas Fuller, David Barry, Thomas Keefe, James Barrow, Daniel Kelly, Sr., M. J. Howley, P. T. Langan, H. Walbaum, Patrick Egan.

 

Funeral of Edward Smith

             The funeral of Edward Smith, who had been a patient at St. Mary's Infirmary for nineteen years and who died at that institution Monday afternoon, was held Tuesday morning at St. Patrick’s Church, the burial being at Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge.  Rev. J. J. Downey was the officiating priest.

 

James E. Cunningham, in response to word that his mother was seriously ill at her home in Detroit, Mich., left for that place last Saturday afternoon.  Mr. Cunningham on Monday sent a telegram to his wife that his mother was dead and she and son, Charley, left for Danville, Ill., Monday afternoon to attend the funeral.  The mother was rather old and had been living with her daughter in Detroit, Mich., for some time.  (Vienna)

 


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 2 Feb 1912:
WELL KNOWN RIVER MAN DIES AT MEMPHIS

Joseph Depress, a well-known river engineer, died at the Marine Hospital in Memphis last Wednesday of spinal meningitis.  He was employed on the transfer boat Charles Merriam that was recently sent to Memphis from Belmont, Mo., in the service of the Iron Mountain.  He leaves a wife and four children.
 
Died, at his home in Ullin, Jan. 23, James Thornton, oldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Neal Thornton.  His illness was of short duration, being an attack of pneumonia following partial paralysis of the lower limbs.  James was a young man of sterling quality.  He was ambitious to accomplish something in life and took great interest in his studies at school, he was a favorite among his classmates, was ever cheerful and happy and an inspiration to all with whom he was associated.  His classmates acted as pallbearers and during his illness were solicitous. The family have the deepest sympathy of their friends and neighbors in this their sad affliction.
 
James W. Newton was in Jonesboro for several days this week called by the illness of his father, who is very low.  (McClure)
 
Mrs. H. B. Cartner, of Thebes, received a telegram today announcing the death of his aunt, Elizabeth Casper, aged about 85 years.

(Henry B. Cartner married Ailsy S. Davault on 11 Apr 1867, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 3 Feb 1912:
OLD CITIZEN OF MOUND CITY DEAD

William P. Rouse, of Mound City, died Friday at his home after a lingering illness of dropsy.  Deceased was 50 years of age.  He leaves two sisters, Mrs. Kate Scott, of Decatur, and Mrs. Eva Bowling, of Mound City, besides two brothers, James Rouse, of Memphis, and Thomas Rouse, of Brazil, Ind.

The funeral services will be held Sunday at 1:30 o'clock at the house, the Rev. Mr. Anderson of the Episcopal Church officiating.  Interment will be made at Beech Grove Cemetery.

(William P. Rouse married Josie Cragitt on 29 Nov 1884, in Jackson Co., Ill.  Jesse L. Bowling married Eva M. Rouse on 23 Apr 1873, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
OFFERS $50 REWARD

A reward of $50 will be paid for the recovery of the body of Henry Decker, who is supposed to have been drowned Saturday night off wharf boat at Cairo.  He was 6 ft. 1 inch in height, wore brown corduroy trousers, dark brown woolen shirt and blue jumper, had on heavy shoes which appeared black because of grease.
Mrs. Sidney Decker
2504 Sycamore Street

(Henry Decker, 24, married Sidney Butler, 24, married on 8 Aug 1875, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 5 Feb 1912:
FORMER CAIROITE DIES AT CENTRALIA

H. T. Gerould, formerly connected with the gas works here, died at his home in Centralia last Thursday.  The Centralia Democrat says of his death:

H. T. Gerould, one of Centralia’s most highly respected citizens, passed away at his home on North Poplar Street, Thursday night at 10:30 o'clock.

Mr. Gerould was born in Gilson N.H., May 14, 1837, and spent his youth in the east.  He came west at the age of thirty years and soon attained his success as manager of various gas companies.  He spent 10 years in Cairo, seven years in Mendota and about fifteen years in Centralia in that capacity.

Mr. Gerould retired from active business five years ago.  Three years ago he suffered a paralytic stroke from which he recovered only to succumb to chronic heart trouble.  He leaves a widow, Mary S. Gerould, and two sons, Dr. T. F. Gerould, of this city, and L. Ernest Gerould, of St. Louis.

Mr. Gerould was a member of the St. John's Episcopal Church.
 
NEGRO BARBER DROPPED DEAD

Sam Anderson, a negro barber, dropped dead on the corner of Twenty-sixth Street and Commercial, Sunday night about 7 o'clock.  His death is attributed to heart trouble.  He leaves his mother and two brothers.  The funeral will be held tomorrow, William Hughes, the undertaker, having charge.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 6 Feb 1912:
MAN AND HORSE FREEZE TO DEATH NEAR BARDWELL

Paducah, Ky., Feb. 6—Sterling Lovelace, 25 years old, a young farmer of Cunningham, in Carlisle County, and his horse were found frozen to death early Sunday morning.  They were found near the farm of Tom Carroll, who resides between Cunningham and Bardwell.  When found, Lovelace was under his buggy and his head was frozen to the ground.

While the deaths of Lovelace and his horse were due to the excessive cold weather, a runaway was indirectly the cause.  Lovelace was in Bardwell Saturday on business and started to return to his home Saturday night.  It is believed that the horse ran away and ran into a tree.  The horse was badly injured and was unable to move.  Lovelace was in the buggy alone and it is believed that he was stunned from the buggy and never regained consciousness.

When found, he was under his buggy.  The lines were looped around his neck, while both hands were clutched tightly to the lines.  It is believed by friends that he placed the reins over his head and was dozing while driving home.  Mr. Carroll heard a noise early Saturday night and went to his front porch.  He heard no more noise and retired.  Early Sunday morning he discovered the overturned buggy, the horse and dead master on the road near his house.

Mr. Lovelace was a well-known young farmer of Carlisle County.  His father also survives.  Two sisters, Mrs. Florence Bennett, of Graves County, and Mrs. A. C. Lynn, of Carlisle County, and three brothers, Lute Lovelace, Will Lovelace, and Virgil Lovelace, all of Carlisle County, survive.

The funeral and burial took place Monday at Zoar Baptist Church.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 7 Feb 1912:
STEPHEN BIRD PASSES AWAY
Old Resident Died at St. Mary's Infirmary This Morning
SPENT MOST OF HIS TIME AT BIRD'S POINT
Where He Owned a Sawmill and Farm—Was One of the Early Settlers There

Stephen Bird, an old resident of Cairo and Bird's Point, Mo., died at St. Mary's Infirmary this morning after a brief illness due to the infirmities of old age.  The deceased was 75 years old.  He was brought over from Bird's Point last Monday and placed in the hospital.

Mr. Bird was born in Louisiana in 1837.  He came to Bird’s Point with his parents when he was a boy and has practically resided there ever since.  His father conducted a sawmill at Bird's Point and during the war it was removed to where Bird's Mill is now and the deceased had charge of it ever since the death of his father.  His uncle, William Bird, was one of the early settlers at Bird's Point and who afterwards settled in Cairo.

Although the deceased kept his residence in Cairo, he spent most of his time in Missouri, where his sawmill interests and farm are located.

He was educated by private tutors, as was the common practice with families of means at that time.  He did not enlist in the war, although the soldiers were encamped at Bird's Point.  He belonged to no lodge or church.

The deceased is survived by his wife and two sons, Abraham, of Bird's Mill, and City Attorney Hunter Bird, of this city.  He also has a brother, Andrew Bird, residing at Tampa, Fla., besides two sisters, Mrs. Clara Edwards, of Union City, Tenn., and Mrs. Nannie Hunter, of Marion, Ky.

The relatives have been notified of his death and are expected to arrive and attend the funeral.

The funeral will be held at the family residence at Twenty-fifth and Sycamore streets tomorrow at 12:30 p.m.  The remains will be interred in the family burying grounds at Bird's Point, Mo.
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—Stephen A. Bird, age 75 years.  Funeral services will be held at the family residence on Twenty-fifth and Sycamore streets, Thursday, February 8th at 12:30 o'clock, conducted by Father James Gillen, pastor of St. Joseph's Church.  The remains will leave the residence at 1:00 p.m. for the Iron Mountain wharf boat at Eighth and Ohio streets.  Interment will be held in the family burying grounds at Birds Mill, Mo.  Friends of the family are invited to attend.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 8 Feb 1912:
FUNERAL OF STEPHEN A. BIRD HELD TODAY

The funeral of the late Stephen A. Bird, who died Wednesday morning at St. Mary's Infirmary, took place this afternoon from the family residence on Twenty-fifth Street.

Interment was held at Birds Point in the family burying ground and the remains were taken over on the Cotton Belt at 2 o'clock.

The following were the pallbearers:  Active—Alex Wilson, Ross C. Bates, M. J. O'Shea, Q. E. Beckwith, and Fred Lihd.  Honorary—William White, John C. Gholson, Joseph Wenger, John M. Lansden, Al Lewis, M. H. Howley, Reed Green, M. F. Gilbert, E. A. Smith W. F. Grinstead, and H. S. Antrim.
 
UNTIMELY DEATH OF BRIGHT YOUNG MAN
Frank Blotkin Passed Away in Chicago at Age of 21.

Frank Blotkin, son of Mrs. Theresa Blotkin, of No. 826 Twenty-third Street, died Wednesday at Chicago after a two-week illness of typhoid fever.  Mrs. Blotkin had been at her son's bedside the past two weeks having been called to Chicago on account of his serious condition.

The deceased had lived in Cairo nearly all his life, receiving his education in the Cairo public schools.  He was an exceptionally bright young man and graduated from Cairo High School in 1908, being regarded as one of the most apt students ever finishing at that institution.  His zeal and energy led him to enter the University of Chicago upon his own resources, his ambition being to fit himself for the U. S. Consular Service.  To accomplish this, he received his B. S. degree and at the time of his death was striving for the Master of Arts title.  He received several scholarships which none other but a bright person could achieve.

He was just entering upon the zenith of his career, and it seems one of the peculiar ironies of fate that he should be stricken down at this time.  The burden of his untimely end will rest heavily upon his mother, to whom he was deeply devoted and who went through many sacrifices that her son might have the educational advantages he deserved.  He also leaves a sister, Miss Minnie, and a brother, Abe, who is assistant manager of the Kress Store in this city.
 
Miss Nellie Kibbels, of East Cape Girardeau, who died in the hospital at Cape Girardeau while under an operation, was buried here (McClure) in the Lindsey Cemetery Saturday.  She is the oldest daughter of James Cotner.

(The 9 Feb 1912, issue reported her name as Mrs. Nellie Tippet.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 9 Feb 1912:
FUNERAL OF FRANK BLOTKIN SUNDAY AFTERNOON

The remains of Frank Blotkin, who died Wednesday in Chicago, were brought to Cairo this morning, accompanied by his mother, who was at his bedside at the time of his death.

The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at the family residence on Twenty-third Street conducted by Rabbi Meyer Lovitch, of Paducah.
 
MRS. JOHN CAIN PASSES AWAY
Old Resident of Cairo Died Early This Morning at Age of 68.

Mrs. Honora Cain, wife of John Cain, an old and respected resident of Cairo, died at 2:40 o'clock this morning at her home, No. 421 Fourteenth Street.  The deceased suffered a paralytic stroke three days ago and this coupled with the old age of the sufferer prevented her recovery.  This was the third stroke of its kind that Mrs. Cain experienced in as many years.

The deceased was born in County Cork, Ireland, in 1844, and was at the time of her death 68 years of age.  Her maiden name was Honora O'Neil and she came to this country with her parents when quite a young girl.  During the Civil War in 1862, she came to Cairo and resided here ever since.  She was married to Mr. Cain in this city in 1865.

Although of a quiet and unassuming nature, she had a wide circle of acquaintances.  She leaves besides her husband, four daughters, Mrs. Frank Jaeckle, of East St. Louis, Mrs. Kate Shea, and Misses Mayme and Ida Cain, of this city, and one son, Alex Cain, of Murphysboro, and five grandchildren.

Mr. Cain is the venerable watchman at the First Bank and Trust Company.  He has been ill for some time and the sudden death of his wife and subsequent shock makes his recovery doubtful.

The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon from St. Patrick’s Church, of which the deceased was a member.  Interment will be at Villa Ridge in Calvary Cemetery.

(John Cain married Hanora O’Neal on 16 Dec 1863, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Frank Jaeckle married Margaret E. Cain on 30 Jun 1891, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Francis F. Shea married Catherine Cain on 13 Nov 1889, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Her marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Hanora Cain 1847-1912.—Darrel Dexter)
 
A strikebreaker was found dead in Claude Bailey's saloon last Wednesday evening.  The coroner came over from Mound City on the 7 o'clock car.  We are informed that the verdict was "heart failure and alcoholism," and that he had been working under an assumed named.  (Mounds)
 
Mrs. Nellie Tippet, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Cotner, died at St. Francis Hospital in Cape Girardeau, Friday, February 2nd, at 10:20 a.m.  The deceased was 23 years of age.  She leaves a husband and two children, father, mother, four sisters and one brother.  Interment at Lindsay Cemetery near McClure.  (East Cape Girardeau)

(James Cotner married Mary Hinson on 14 Jul 1884, in Alexander Co., Ill.  The 8 Feb 1912, issue reported her name as Nellie Kibbels.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 10 Feb 1912:
SIX-YEAR-OLD BURNED TO DEATH

Glascow, Ky., Feb. 10—Mary Troxel, 6-year-old daughter of John Troxel, was burned to death here this morning, her clothing catching fire while she was playing in the yard.
 
J. E. JENKINS DIED THIS MORNING
Passed Away at Home of His Parents from Effects of Pneumonia

J. Edward Jenkins, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Jenkins, died at the home of his parents this morning at 1:15 o'clock of pneumonia.  He had only been ill a week and death ended much suffering.

The deceased had been in the Pullman service about twelve years and it was on his regular run from New Orleans to Chicago last Monday that he took sick.  His wife was accompanying him at the time and, on account of Mr. Jenkins' illness, they stopped here Monday to spend a few days with the parents of the deceased.

Mr. Jenkins was born March 17, 1861, at Fort Dodge, Iowa, and came to Cairo with his parents when quite a young man.  He was 51 years of age.  Besides his wife, he is survived by his parents and one brother, W. A. Jenkins, of Chicago, and one sister, Mrs. Mary Slone, of Huron, South Dakota.

W. A. Jenkins and Mrs. Slone will arrive for the funeral which will probably occur Monday.
 
The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Adams, living on C. W. Wheeler's farm west of town (Mounds), died yesterday morning and the funeral is fixed for today at Dongola.
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

Blotkin—Died Wednesday in Chicago, Frank Blotkin.

Funeral services will be held at the family residence, No. 826 Twenty-third Street, Sunday afternoon at 1:03 p.m.  Remains will be taken by special train leaving Fourteenth Street at 2:45 for Villa Ridge cemetery.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 12 Apr 1912:
OLD CAIROITE DIED IN MEMPHIS

J. H. Morehead received a long distance message this morning advising him that his brother, William Morehead, had passed away in Memphis at 7:30 this morning.  The deceased, who left Cairo twenty years ago, will be remembered by residents of that date.  He was two years the senior of his brother.  Mr. Morehead and his sister, Mrs. Phil Irby and Mrs. Arthur Thistlewood, leave for Memphis tonight to attend the funeral.

The deceased left a widow and one son.
 
DYNAMITE EXPLODED IN MAN'S POCKET

J. M. Stille, editor of the Charleston Republican, who was in town today, says that last Thursday, George Willard, foreman of the B. F. Marshall Investment Co., of Blodgett, Mo., was fatally injured in the explosion of a dynamite cap and died from loss of blood in two hours.   He had some caps in his pocket and in moving a wagon the caps exploded, tearing out the right side of his body and shattering his leg.  He leaves a widow and four children.
 
REMAINS OF FRANK BLOTKIN BURIED SUNDAY

Funeral services over the remains of Frank Blotkin, who died Wednesday in Chicago, were held Sunday at the family residence on Twenty-third Street, being conducted by Rabbi Meyer Lovitch, of Paducah.  The funeral was largely attended and the floral pieces were very profuse.  The class of 1908 of Cairo High School, of which the deceased was a member, attended in a body.

The following served as pallbearers:

S. J. Michaelson, N. Sandler, M. Goodman, D. Rosenberg, J. Sullivan, S. Gruskin, Lee J. May, and N. Goldsmith.

 

FUNERAL OF MRS. CAIN HELD SUNDAY

             The funeral of Mrs. Hanora Cain, wife of John Cain, who died Friday, was held Sunday, services being conducted at St. Patrick’s Church by Rev. J. J. Downey.  Interment was made at Villa Ridge in Calvary Cemetery.  Many friends of the deceased attended and the floral tributes were numerous.

 

Jenkins Funeral Tuesday—The funeral of J. Edward Jenkins, who died Saturday, will be held tomorrow morning.  Mrs. Clyde Slone, a sister of the deceased, and William Jenkins, a brother, have arrived to attend the funeral.

 

UNKNOWN MAN DROWNED TODAY

Fell Off Georgia Lee at Wharf This Forenoon—Inquest Held

             An unknown white man was drowned off the steamer Georgia Lee this morning about 10:30 at the Halliday-Phillips wharf boat.  He went on the boat in an intoxicated condition and inquired of one of the roustabouts the fare to Dorona, Mo., which is a landing opposite Hickman, Ky.  In coming off the boat, he stumbled across the gang plank and fell into the river.

             He fell on his face and floated about 30 feet, in between the Lee boat and the wharf boat. The body did not sink and was picked up by one of the rousters with a grappling hook.  He was taken aboard the boat and his body rolled on a barrel in the hopes of resuscitation, but the man was already dead.

             Coroner McManus was called and he summoned a jury composed of Capt. Elmer Emery, Capt. George Clark, Jesse Fitch, Sam Wessinger, John Foley and John Wichert.  They found that the man met death by accidental drowning.  Coroner McManus explained that the reason the body did not sink was because falling as the man did on his face his lungs filled rapidly with water and stopped the action of his heart.  The cold water may also have had something to do with it as the man was very drunk.

             The man has been seen around the wharf boat for several days and it is presumed that he either lived at Dorena or was going there to work.  He was about 60 years of age.  Nothing to identify him in the way of papers or letters were found upon his person and no one seemed to know who he was.

 

FORMER CAIRO BOY DIES IN THE WEST

             Frank Thornton, aged 25 years, a former resident of Cairo, died in California last week after an illness of several months' duration.  Deceased was well known here.  The remains were shipped to Jackson, Tenn., for interment.  He was survived by his father and two sisters, Mrs. Mattie Belle Clark and Mrs. J. E. Melton.  The latter was Miss Lutie Thornton, who was only recently married.  She resides at Chattanooga.

 

FUNERAL NOTICE

             Died—J. Edward Jenkins, aged 51 years.  Funeral services will be held at home of his parents, No. 2502 Sycamore Street, Tuesday morning at 8:30 o'clock, conducted by Rev. A. M. Eeles, pastor of the Presbyterian Church. The Knights of Pythias will have charge of the services at the grave.  Funeral train will leave Fourteenth Street at 9:45 o'clock for Villa Ridge cemetery.  Friends of the family are invited to attend.

             (A marker in Cairo City Cemetery near Villa Ridge reads:  J. Edgar Jenkins Born March 27, 1861 Died Feb. 10, 1912. Charles E. Jenkins Born Aug. 28, 1863 Died March 11, 1888.  John S. Jenkins Born Sept. 22, 1836 Died Jan. 26, 1924.  Sarah J. Jenkins Born May 22, 1840 Died Jan. 6, 1926.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 13 Feb 1912:

INVESTIGATING KILLING OF LIPE

             It is said that the grand jury will investigate the killing of Napoleon Lipe, a young negro, by Officer Gus Johnson, of the Cairo police force, on Saturday night, January 27th.  Relatives and friends of Lipe contend that the killing was not justifiable despite the fact that the colored officer was exonerated by the coroner’s jury.

             The contention is that Lipe was not armed when he was shot by Johnson and was running from the officer at the time.

             Witnesses have been called to testify before the grand jury and an attempt will be made to secure an indictment against Johnson from the grand jury now in session.

 

IDENTITY OF DROWNED MAN MADE KNOWN

             The identity of the unknown white man, who was drowned off the steamer Georgia Lee Monday morning, was made known this noon when advices were received by Mrs. L. C. Falconer, the undertaker, from relatives at Madisonville, Ky.  The telegram received did not state who the dead man's relatives were in that city, but that the expenses incurred in preparing the remains for burial would be taken care of by the bank there.

             The man's name was J. Dunkerson, this information being furnished by Edward Maley, who saw the man several days before the accident and who was in conversation with the deceased at his restaurant on Ohio Street.  The man told Maley his name and that he had relatives in Madisonville, Ky.

             The remains will be sent to Madisonville this evening via the I. C.

 

COLLEGE PAPER PAYS TRIBUTE TO LATE FRANK BLOTKIN

             The following tribute to the memory of the late Frank Blotkin appeared in the "Maroon," a college paper published by the University of Chicago.

             Frank E. Blotkin, who was graduated from the university at the last convocation, died Wednesday night at St. Luke's Hospital.  Blotkin’s death came four hours after an operation made necessary by typhoid fever, contracted six weeks ago.  While at the university, Blotkin specialized in the study of economics.  He lived at 5628 Jackson Avenue.

             "Mr. Blotkin was a promising student in the political economy department and we expected a great deal of his work," said Assistant Professor J. A. Field.  "He was working with great success toward his master’s degree, despite hardships against which he has had to struggle while in the university.  We will feel his loss deeply."

 

The remains of Lon Randle (col.) were shipped here (Wetaug) from Chicago Friday and buried in Pea Ridge Cemetery, Saturday.

 

The remains of Mrs. Elizabeth Hahl, who died at Mill Creek Feb. 8th, were brought here (Wetaug) to Mt. Pisgah on Friday for interment.  Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Weigel of the Congregational church.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 14 Feb 1912:

GRAND JURY HELD POLICE OFFICER

Gus Johnson, Who Killed Napoleon Lipe, Held for Manslaughter

CHARLES M’CANN HELD FOR MURDER

Jury Discharged This Morning after Making Final Report for Term

             Police Officer Gus Johnson, colored, was held by the grand jury on a charge of manslaughter, for the killing of Napoleon Lipe, on the night of January 27th, the details of which were published in The Citizen at the time.

             As exclusively stated in The Citizen, relatives and friends of the young negro Lipe were much incensed over the fact that the coroner’s jury exonerated Johnson from all blame.  They took the matter before the grand jury and after examining witnesses, an indictment was returned against the police officer as above stated.

             Gus Johnson has been released on $2,000 bail.  His bondsmen are B. McManus, Jr., E. Bucher, and Mike Egan.

             Charles S. McCann was held on a charge of murder for the killing of B. H. Hollingshead on the evening of January 24th.

             Other indictments were returned as follows:

Albert Johnson, alias "Sonny,” murder.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 15 Feb 1912:

The eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Lewis died Saturday night of scarlet fever, it is reported.  (Olive Branch)

 

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Glen Lewis died last Thursday night and was buried Friday.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 16 Feb 1912:

FATAL FALL DOWN AN ELEVATOR SHAFT

Edward Howard, Cashier of Jackson, Mo., Bank Met Sudden Death

ACCIDENT OCCURRED IN ST. LOUIS

Fell from 7th Floor to Basement in National Bank of Commerce Building

             St. Louis, Feb. 16.—Edward Howard, 42, cashier of the Cape County Savings Bank of Jackson, Mo., was instantly killed here when he fell from the seventh floor to the basement of the National Bank of Commerce building today.  Howard attempted to leave the elevator while it was in motion and fell down the shaft.

 

JESSE SPIES, JR., DIED THIS MORNING

             Jesse W. Spies, Jr., eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Spies, died at 3 o’clock this morning of paresis.

Deceased was 34 years of age and is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Spies, of No. 316 Twenty-seventh Street, besides three sisters, Mrs. F. R. Place, of Caledonia, N. Y., Mrs. J. L. Wray, of Denver, Colo., and Miss Blanche Spies, of this city.  Two brothers, George and Albert, also survive him.

The deceased had been associated with his father in the lumber business at Sikeston, Mo., until four months ago, when he was stricken with illness.  He was a native of this city.

             He was a member of St. Joseph’s Parish and the funeral services will be announced later.  Interment will be made at Villa Ridge.

             (Jesse W. Spies married Mollie Mugge on 13 Jan 1875, in Gallatin Co., Ill.  A marker in Calvary Cemetery at Olive Branch reads:  Jessie W. Spies Jr. 1878-1912.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FORMER CAIROITE COMMITS SUICIDE

             Louis Wilmot, a former Cairoite, committed suicide in St. Louis Wednesday morning.  Domestic trouble, followed by his wife’s refusal to live with him, caused the man to commit the rash deed.  He leaves, besides his wife, two children and two brothers, John “Peg” Wilmot, of Obar, N.M.  Wilmot resided in Cairo about ten years ago and was employed by Henry Hasenjaeger.

 

OLD SOLDIER DIED THURSDAY

             Rufus Hutchinson, a white man and an old soldier, who has been living in a shack near the Farmer’s Hand Wagon Company, opposite the bridge, died Thursday morning and was buried at the expense of the county.  His wife survives him.

 

Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Evans and children, who were called to Cairo recently by the death of Mrs. Evans’ uncle, the late J. E. Jenkins, returned to their home in Waynesville, Ill., today.

 

Mrs. Furlow, an old lady 80 years of age, living with her son, E. J. Furlow, on Dr. A. E. McKenzie’s farm west of town (Vienna), died of old age Sunday and was buried in the Fraternal Cemetery north of town on Monday afternoon.

 

Benjamin F. Cagle, 80 years of age, living with his son, J. H. Cagle, on a farm five miles northwest of Goreville, committed suicide by drowning or strangulation in spring on the farm last Saturday.  It is said that there was only some two or three feet of water in the spring and was a small one.  He had been missing about thirty minutes when a small boy found him with his head and shoulder submerged in the icy waters.  Coroner Hood was called to the scene and held an inquest over the body.  The jury, of course, returned a verdict of suicide by drowning.  Mr. Cagle for some time had been in feeble health and it is thought his mind had become deranged.  He had on several occasions threatened to take his life.  He leaves several grown children to mourn his departure.

 

Mrs. Emeline Acorn, aged 84 years, accidentally fell Monday morning, receiving injuries making her recovery doubtful.  She lives with her brother, Pence, near Fayville.  (Thebes)

 

Cletus, the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Lewis, died Thursday morning at 9 o’clock after a few days’ illness.  Little Cletus was nearly two months old and the only child.  The mother also has been very low with pneumonia.  (Thebes)

 

On Sunday morning, Feb. 11, Little Oma, the three-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Lewis, passed away.  Death caused by scarlet fever.  Little Oma was laid to rest in the Twente Cemetery Monday at 11 o’clock.  The parents have the sympathy of their many friends in their sad bereavement.  (Thebes)

             (Her marker in Twente Crossing Cemetery reads:  Oma Mattie Lewis Born Oct. 3, 1909 Died Feb. 11, 1912.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 17 Feb 1912:

FUNERAL NOTICE

             Spies—Died, Friday, Feb. 16, Jesse W. Spies, Jr.

             Funeral will be held Sunday afternoon, Feb. 18.  Cortege will leave family residence No. 316 Twenty- seventh Street, at 1:30 p.m. for St. Joseph’s Church, where services will be held.  Remains will be taken by special train from Fourteenth Street at 2:45 o’clock to Villa Ridge cemetery, where interment will be made.

             Friends of the family are invited.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 19 Feb 1912:

RESIDENT OF VILLA RIDGE DIED SUNDAY

             Mrs. Elizabeth Sherrick, widow of the late E. M. Sherrick, died Sunday night at Villa Ridge, after a brief illness of apoplexy.  Deceased was 78 years old and had resided near Villa Ridge for nearly fifty years.

             She was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and her maiden name was Elizabeth Metzger.  She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Martin McBride, of Villa Ridge, and Mrs. Mary Helman, of Fort Worth Texas.  Two sons also survive her, W. H. Sherrick, of Pine Bluff, Ark., and Andrew Sherrick, of Villa Ridge.

             The funeral will be held tomorrow.

             (M. J. McBride married Lizzie A. Sherrick on 16 Jan 1884, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. G. M. PALMER DIED SUNDAY AT ST. LOUIS

             Mrs. G. M. Palmer died very suddenly Sunday at the home of her sister, Miss Eliza Beardsley, at St. Louis, Mo.  The deceased went to St. Louis last Thursday morning on a visit and was taken suddenly ill Sunday morning and died a few hours later.

             The deceased was the wife of G. M. Palmer, of Eleventh Street, and mother of W. B. Huette, Sr.  She was 69 years old.

             The funeral will be held at St. Louis tomorrow afternoon.  Relatives of deceased in this city will leave for that city tonight to attend.

             She is survived by her husband, one son, W. B. Huette, and one daughter, Miss Rosalie Huette, of St. Louis, besides two sisters, Mrs. Amy Coleman and Miss Beardsley, of St. Louis and one brother, Robert Beardsley.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 20 Feb 1912:

MURDERER SAFE IN PADUCAH JAIL

White Man Who Murdered Milburn, Ky., Farmer Was Threatened

THREE JAILS IN THREE DAYS

Killed Man Who Accidentally Jostled Him and Apologized

             Paducah, Ky., Feb. 20—Confined in the county prison under extra guard, where he was hurriedly delivered Monday evening from Wickliffe, is Will Richardson, 30 years old, an alleged “bad man” and gunfighter of Carlisle County, who is accused of the alleged cowardly murder of John B. Violet, 45 years old, a prosperous planter of Milburn, Carlisle County.  Violet was shot and instantly killed by Richardson late Saturday evening at Milburn and the Paducah jail is the third prison in which the alleged murderer has been an inmate since that time to keep him safe from the hands of a mob.

             According to reports that reached Sheriff Jim Burnely and Deputy Sheriff Wright, who made a record run to Paducah Monday evening, planters of Carlisle County have sworn to avenge the death of their friend and neighbor.

             According to the officers’ version of the killing, Will Richardson went to Milburn Saturday afternoon with the avowed purpose of “getting him a man,” as the alleged slayer is said to have expressed it.

Violet, who is credited with having been a peaceful and inoffensive farmer, in leaving a store entrance is said to have accidently brushed against Richardson.  The latter, according to reports, cursed and upbraided Violet in a rough manner.  Violet is said to have turned and humbly apologized, ending with the words “excuse me.”

             “By God, I’ll excuse you,” Richardson is said to have growled and making a quick draw of his pistol, fired at Violet.  In his rage his aim was bad and he came near hitting a woman who was across the street.  Once more Richardson worked the trigger.  The flame flashed against Violet’s breast, as his body was almost in reaching distance.  He toppled to the ground a corpse.

             Before Richardson could shoot again, Violet’s son, a youth of 20 years, had grappled with Richardson and held him until other men came to his aid.  Richardson was turned over to Deputy Sheriff Wright who hurried him to the Bardwell jail.  Before dawn Sunday, the prisoner was transferred to the Wickliffe jail.  Even then the officers were uneasy that he was not out of reach of the rumored mob, and Richardson was brought to Paducah by order of Judge Sanderson, who convened court at Bardwell Monday morning in the absence of Judge Bugg.

 

CARD OF THANKS

             This token of heartfelt gratitude to the many kind and helpful friends for their sympathy and kindness during the illness and sad bereavement of their eldest son and brother is extended by Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Spies, sisters and brothers.  May the Good Father in heaven, give you strength to bear up when like affliction comes upon you.

Parents, sisters and brothers.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 21 Feb 1912:

OFFICER BRADLEY NOW ON TRIAL

Police Officer under Indictment for Murder Facing Trial

JURY COMPLETED THIS AFTERNOON

All But One from Cairo and Eleven of the Twelve Are White Men

             The trial of former police officer Ben Bradley for murder opened in circuit court this morning, and when the noon adjournment was taken, eight jurors had been secured.

             The remaining four jurors were secured shortly after court convened this afternoon.  Three of the number are from Cairo, and all are white men.

             The men chosen for duty follow:

Isaac Cohn, Cairo

E. W. Jones, Cairo

Charles Wunderlich, Cairo

James M. Ice, Willard

J. H. Woodward, Cairo

Ralph Minton, Cairo

P. J. Howischer, Cairo

Rivers White, Future City

J. Harvel, Delta

F. C. Holloway, Cairo

Joseph Bucher, Cairo

H. C. Mulcahy, Cairo

             White is the only negro on the jury.

             State’s Attorney Wilson made the opening statement for the People and M. J. O’Shea for the defendant.

 

Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Burke have returned from St. Louis, where they attended the funeral of the late Mrs. G. M. Palmer.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 22 Feb 1912:

McCANN PLEADS GUILTY

             C. S. McCann pleaded guilty to manslaughter this afternoon and was sentenced to the penitentiary for an indeterminate sentence.

 

BEN BRADLEY IS ACQUITTED

Arguments Completed Before Dinner and Case Went to the Jury

DEFENDANT TELLS OF THE CRIME

Claiming that He Mistook Negro He Killed for a Chicken Thief

             Bradley was acquitted at 3:30 this afternoon, when the jury returned a verdict of “not guilty” after having been out for three hours.

             Albert Johnson, alias “Sonny” pleaded guilty to manslaughter this afternoon and was sentenced to fourteen years in the penitentiary at hard labor.  Johnson killed another negro on the steamer John A. Wood last November.

             The fate of Ben Bradley, negro and former police officer, rests in the hands of the jury.  The attorneys completed their arguments at noon today, at which time the case went to the jury.

             The evidence in the trial of Ben Bradley, former police officer, was presented to the jury Wednesday afternoon, but the closing arguments of the attorney were not made until this morning, after which the instructions were given to the jury.

             Seven witnesses were examined by the prosecution and four for the defense, among the latter being Bradley himself, who took the stand in his own behalf.

             Ben Bradley then took the stand.  He testified that he was awakened on the night of Sept. 8, 1911, as he thought, about 10 o’clock, and heard someone enter the gate to his yard.  He had been missing many chickens from his hen house and thinking this probably was the thief, went out to apprehend him.  When he came out, the man started to run and Bradley followed, catching up with him just outside the gate.  A scuffle ensued, the man holding to him with a tight grip, kicking him and biting his hands.  He managed to free his right hand in which he held his pistol and struck the man over the head with the gun.  This seemed to have no effect on the aggressor and in attempting to strike a second time the man grabbed the gun and in the struggle it went off and the man fell to the ground a corpse.  Bradley testified that the man was unknown to him, that he had never seen him before, and that it was after the shooting that he first learned the identity of the deceased.  That he didn’t seem to have his senses was his declaration to the jury and he didn’t remember the questioning by Chief Egan shortly after the killing.

 

PIONEER CITIZEN HAS PASSED AWAY

F. D. Rexford, One of Early Settlers of Illinois, Died Tuesday Night

             F. D. Rexford, a former Cairoite, died Tuesday night at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Laura Hartman, at Centralia, Ill., at the age of 83 years.  The deceased had been in poor health for over a year.

Until a few months ago Mr. Rexford and his wife made their home in Cairo with their daughter, the late Mrs. W. R. Halliday.

             About thirty-five years ago, they resided in Cairo and Mr. Rexford during that time was proprietor of the Planters House and also of the old St. Charles Hotel and was one of the best known hotel men in this part of the state.

             Leaving Cairo, he went to Centralia, where, up to the last few years, he was proprietor of the Illinois Central Depot Hotel in that city.  He had not been actively engaged in business for over a year.

             Mr. Rexford was one of the earliest settlers of Chicago, going there at the time when the only building was the old Fort Dearborn.  Because of the swampy conditions of that place, he settled at a place called Blue Island, a few miles north of the Fort Dearborn site, and probably knew more about the early history of Chicago than any man living up to this death and having a remarkable memory, he could picture the sights and happenings at that time, with much interest to his hearers.  He was also one of the pioneers that crossed the prairies in 1849, when the gold rush to California occurred and told of many stirring events in the encounter with the Indians.

             He is survived by his daughter, Mrs. Hartman, and one son, Norman Rexford, of Chicago.  Funeral services were held in Chicago today and interment made in the Blue Island Cemetery.

             (William R. Halliday married Frances A. Rexford on 21 Sep 1882, in Marion Co., Ill.  Edwin Hartman married Mrs. Laura R. Rexford Pink on 22 Nov 1894, in Marion Co., Ill.  Charles Pink married Laura Rexford on 22 Feb 1876, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 23 Feb 1912:

ONE ACQUITTED; TWO PLEAD GUILTY

Three Murder Cases Disposed of in Short Order Thursday

CASE OF GUS JOHNSON IS CONTINUED

Outcome of McCann Case a Surprise—Petit Jury Discharged for the Term

Criminal business was completed in circuit court Thursday when Judge Butler discharged the petit jury, thanking them for their prompt and efficient service.  Today the court listened to several appeal cases and disposed of other minor cases.

Three murder cases were disposed of in the court Thursday afternoon all within a half hour.  All morning and part of the afternoon was given over to the trial of Ben Bradley, charged with killing another negro named Henry Smith.  The case went to the jury at 1:30 o’clock and after being out about two hours, a verdict exonerating the defendant was returned.

Shortly after this came the plea of guilty on the part of Albert Johnson alias “Sonny” Johnson, for manslaughter and he was sentenced to the Chester penitentiary for an indefinite term from one to fourteen years.  In less than fifteen minutes after this Charles McCann, indicted for murder of Bennie Hollinshead, pleaded guilty and was given a like sentence.

McCann shot and killed a river man by the name of Hollinshead in the saloon conducted by Myers Bros. Sixth and Commercial Avenue on the evening of January 27th, the particulars of which are doubtless still fresh in the minds of the people.

According to the eye witness the crime was a cold blooded affair.  It is alleged the police were forewarned that McCann was out looking for Hollinshead, but they failed to arrest McCann until after he had fulfilled his mission by killing the man who eloped with his wife a number of years ago.

McCann’s action came as a complete surprise, as it was generally believed that he would fight the case.  McCann is said to have been without sufficient funds to engage competent attorneys to defend him.

Gus Johnson Case Continued

             The case of police officer Gus Johnson, indicted for the killing of Napoleon Lipe by the grand jury, was continued until the next term of the circuit court which convened in May

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 24 Feb 1912:

DEATH SENTENCE FOR RICHARDSON

Will Be Electrocuted at Eddyville on April 19th

                  A long distance message from Bardwell this afternoon stated that Richardson was sentenced to death in the electric chair.  His pleas of guilty failed to save his life.

 

All Quiet at Bardwell

Bardwell, Ky., Feb. 24.—Willis Richardson, slayer of John Violet, the Milburn farmer, today threw himself upon the mercy of the court in the hopes that it would save his life.  The court sentenced him to the electric chair.

Richardson’s electrocution will occur at Eddyville on April 19th.  He will be taken to Eddyville tonight.

All was quiet in Bardwell today.  The militia was on duty to prevent any outbreak.

 

Will Scherrick of Pine Bluff, Ark., was here (Villa Ridge) Tuesday, attending the funeral of his mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Scherrick.

             (Her marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Elizabeth Scheirich 1834-1912.—Darrel Dexter)

 

John Cheniae came in today from Los Angeles Calif., where he has been since last fall.  He was called home by the serious illness of his sister, Inez.  (Villa Ridge)

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 26 Feb 1912:

PROMINENT CITIZEN OF BALLARD COUNTY DIED SUNDAY

John Cocke, one of the most prominent citizens of Ballard County, Ky., died Sunday morning at 1 o’clock at the home of his brother-in-law, John R. Harkless, at Wickliffe, of apoplexy.  He was taken suddenly ill while attending to some matters at the courthouse Friday afternoon and grew worse until death ended his suffering Sunday morning.

He was interested in the banking business at Wickliffe and also had extensive farming interest in Ballard County.  He was well known in Cairo, making frequent business trips here.  The members of his family, who are also well known here, are his wife, two daughters, Misses Gussie and Fannie, and two sons, John and Richard.

The funeral was held this afternoon conducted from the Harkless residence, interment being made in the Wickliffe Cemetery.  E. A. Burke of this city had charge of the funeral.

 

FORMER CAIRO LADY DIED SATURDAY

Mrs. H. W. Popejoy, formerly Miss Kate Atcher, of Cairo, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Atcher, died at her home in Chicago Saturday after an illness of three months. The funeral will be held Wednesday at Lexington, Ill.  She leaves a husband and two little boys.

Mrs. Popejoy was here at the time of her father’s death last November, but was in very poor health at the time.

(Herbert Popejoy married Catherine Atcher on 12 Oct 1904, in St. Clair Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

STORY OF TRIAL AT BARDWELL

In Which Willard Richardson, Desperado, Was Sentenced to Death

CONFESSED TO TWO OTHER MURDERS

To a Fellow Prisoner and Bragged about His Deeds—Weakened at Trial

The following account of the trial of Willard Richardson, who was sentenced to be electrocuted on April 19th, by a jury in the circuit court of Bardwell, Ky., Saturday (as stated in The Citizen Saturday evening) is taken from the Paducah News-Democrat of Sunday.

In the presence of about two hundred spectators who crowded the dingy court room until almost every passage was blocked, Willard Richardson, indicted for murdering John Violett, a prosperous farmer of near Milburn, took the stand in his own defense and threw himself on the mercy of the jury, which had been empaneled after a venire of one hundred and fifty men had almost been exhausted.  Less than two hours later, the jury marched up the aisle before Special Judge Sandridge and passed to the clerk their verdict, which sends the slayer to death in the electric chair.

The Trial

At 10:15 o’clock, after one hour and a quarter of hard labor, a jury finally was chosen from the venire of 150 men.  But two witnesses took the stand for the prosecution.  Each told how Richardson ran against Violett, cursed the dead man and then emptied the contents of a revolver into his body.  Throughout all testimony, the crowd sat quietly.

At 10:30 o’clock, with head bowed, and almost too weak to reach the witness stand, Richardson told his story of the murder.  Contrary to the general opinion, Richardson did not put up a plea of insanity.  Instead, he acknowledged the crime in anything but a steady voice.  “I was drunk,” he said “and didn’t know what I was doing.  I didn’t know what I was doing and wouldn’t have shot Violett.  I was not at myself.”

In defense of Richardson, Attorney Shelbourne made a powerful appeal for the murderer on the plea that he was drunk and did not realize the enormity of the crime he committed.  Following this, Commonwealth’s Attorney Robert L. Smith, of Clinton, in a slow but impressive argument, told the jury the prosecution’s side of the case.  He said the crime was one of the worst committed in Carlisle and that the death sentence must be imposed on such a character as that which Richardson had proven himself to be.

After the Trial

Following the pronouncing of the sentence, Richardson asked that he be allowed to speak with Judge Sandridge.  With tears in his eyes, the judge listened to the man’s story at the conclusion of which he thanked the court.  After a handshake he left the courtroom.

When he arrived at the jail for the second time he played several games of cards.

Shortly after news of Richardson’s conviction had been received at the county jail, County Jailer Henry Houser and Deputy Jailer Charles B. Whittemore were called to the door which opens in the iron cage, wherein white male prisoners are kept.  After ascertaining that Richardson had confessed to the murder of John Violett and that he had been sentenced to the electric chair, Jerry Moran, an aged man in jail for an alleged petty theft, told the jailers of the murderer’s confession, in which he (Richardson) had killed Violett because of an old grudge he had held against Violett for several years.

“I killed two men down in Texas ten years ago.” Richardson is said to have remarked “and if I could have got something to kill a nigger with, I’d got away from Bardwell.  The nigger was guarding me by himself.”

The murderer also told Moran why he had killed Violett.  “It’s like this,” Richardson said.  “Some time ago Violett and me had some trouble about a trade about a sow and some pigs.  I made up my minds I was going to get him.  Saturday afternoon I was full of whiskey and drunk.  When I saw Violett coming down the street, I thought I just might as well kill him then as any other time, and I pulled my gun and fired.

“I don’t care about dying for it.  I got my man and I’m satisfied.  The ___ ___ ___ ought to have died long time ago.”

Following this, Richardson, according to Moran, asked him to write his mother, who is blind, and tell her “that I died game.  Tell her not to worry about me.  Tell her I was in the big ring to the last.”

Richardson also confessed he was a dope fiend and that he used morphine excessively.  He claims to escape conviction for one of his Texas murders by an insanity plea and the second by establishing an alibi.  Another man, innocent, is serving a term for the second crime.  A full confession from Richardson probably will be forwarded to Governor Colquitt, of Texas.

 

FORMER VIENNA CITIZEN DEAD

William C. Simpson, formerly of Vienna, Ill., but late of Evanston, Ill., died Saturday afternoon at Asheville, N.C., of pneumonia.  He went to Asheville in January following a nervous breakdown and was steadily recuperating when he took down with a severe cold and died suddenly.

Mr. Simpson married a niece of Mrs. Walter Warder, of this city, and was well known here.  He was a son of the late F. M. Simpson and was one of the best known citizens of Johnson County, where he spent most of his life.  He was mayor of Vienna for several years and was also a member of the board of education.  He was prominent in pharmaceutical affairs of the state and was at one time resident of the state board of pharmacy.  He was one of the chief promoters of the Johnson County fairs and was quite an amateur turfman.

He has been located in Evanston for about 18 months where he conducted the Northwestern Pharmacy, having removed there from Vienna.

He leaves a wife and four children, three girls, Janet, Frances, Florence, and one son, William, all of them being under age.  He also leaves his mother, Mrs. Margaret Simpson, of Vienna, and Marion Simpson, a brother, who is an instructor at the University of Illinois at Champaign.

Mr. Simpson was a member of the Cairo Commandery No. 13 Knights Templar, who will probably have charge of the funeral, which will be announced on the arrival of the body.

The remains will pass through Cairo in the morning and funeral will be held at Vienna tomorrow afternoon, in charge of the Masonic lodge of Vienna.  Cairo Commandery No. 13, K. T. will act as an escort of honor.  Friends will go to Vienna on the morning train to attend the funeral.

(Francis M. Simpson married Maggie A. Copeland on 24 Oct 1871, in Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mrs. Elizabeth Tinsely died at her home here (Unity) Monday night and was buried at the Richwood Cemetery.  Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Flick of Olive Branch.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 27 Feb 1912:

SIMPSON FUNERAL HELD WEDNESDAY

Failure of Relatives to Arrive Caused Postponement

Owing to the failure of Mrs. Fannie Jackson and daughter to arrive from Gulfport, Miss., in time to catch the Big Four train this morning, which would take them to Vienna, the funeral of William C. Simpson was postponed until Wednesday.  Mrs. Jackson and daughters arrived at noon today from Gulfport.  Here to meet them were Mrs. William C. Simpson, widow of the deceased, Mrs. A. Jackson and son, A. C. Jackson, of Fort Worth, Texas, and John B. Jackson, of Anna.  The entire party went to Vienna this afternoon.

Others who joined the party here were Mrs. E. J. Kneip, Miss Laura Nichols, James N. Nichols, of Naperville, Ill., and F. M. Simpson, of Champaign.

Funeral services will be under the auspices of the blue lodge of Vienna.  Cairo Commandery K. T. had intended to form an escort, but the change in the arrangements for the funeral made this impossible, as the Templars could not attend tomorrow.  Friends of the dead man will go to Vienna tomorrow to attend the obsequies.

 

YOUNG NEGRO WAS KILLED AT MOUNDS

Monroe Harris Accidentally Shot by James Bailey

In a scuffle between two negroes at Mounds this morning, Monroe Harris, 19, of Trenton, Miss., was shot in the temple and killed by James Bailey, brother of Claud Bailey, in front of whose restaurant the homicide occurred.

Harris had been in Bailey’s restaurant making trouble.  He had used bad language and flourished a gun and was said to be intoxicated.  They put him out of the place and when outside, James Bailey struck at Harris with his gun.  In some way, according to rather conflicting evidence before the coroner’s jury, the gun was discharged and the ball entered Harris’ temple.

Deputy Coroner Cicero Thompson empaneled a jury, and after examining seven witnesses they returned a verdict exonerating Bailey.

 

DEATH RELIEVES LONG SUFFERING OF MRS. WILSON

Mrs. Nina O. Wilson, wife of George Wilson, custodian at the courthouse, died at St. Mary’s Infirmary this morning about 1:30 o’clock, after a lingering illness, having been confined at the hospital the past eight months.

The deceased was born June 10, 1855, at Innes, Miss., and moved to Cobden, Ill., with her parents in 1865, thence to Cairo in 1870.  She was married to Mr. Wilson in 1875.  She leaves besides her husband, two sisters, Mrs. W. P. Green, of Cobden and Mrs. Harvey Woolridge, of this city.

Mrs. Wilson was a devout Christian woman and for the past twenty-five years was a member of the Presbyterian church of this city.  She was also a member of the tribe of Ben Hur.

Funeral services are announced elsewhere in these columns.

(George Wilson married Nina O. Burton on 25 Aug 1875, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

FUNERAL NOTICE

Entered into rest—at St. Mary’s Infirmary, Mrs. Nina O. Wilson, beloved wife of George Wilson.  Funeral cortege will leave family residence 513 Center Street at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, February 28th.  Services will be conducted by Rev. A. M. Eells, at Presbyterian church at 2:00 p.m.  Special funeral train will leave Fourteenth Street at 2:45 p.m.

Interment at Villa Ridge.  Friends of family invited.  No flowers.

 

VETERAN RIVER MAN DIED MONDAY

Capt. Ed Gray, a well-known river man of Graysboro, Mo., and father of Ed Gray, chief engineer of the transfer Marquand, died Monday at his home.  Mr. Gray was at the bedside of his father when the end came, and Mrs. Gray left this morning.

For many years Captain Gray ran on boats on the Mississippi, Ohio and Tennessee rivers and until recent years he was employed on the transfer boat between Thebes and Graysboro.  He was 80 years old.

 

Mrs. A. L. Sanderson and daughter have returned from Ashley, Ill., where they attended the funeral of Mrs. Sanderson’s mother, Mrs. Murray.

 

Miss Inez Cheniar died at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Cheniar here (Villa Ridge) Sunday afternoon.  The funeral services will be held at the Shiloh Baptist Church Wednesday at eleven o’clock.

 

Rev. Thomas D. Latimer, D. D., died at his home in Charleston, Mo., at one o’clock Sunday afternoon, February 25, aged 67 years.

Funeral services Monday morning conducted by the Masonic Lodge, interment at Reeves, Tenn.

Dr. Latimer had been pastor of the Presbyterian Church for two years in August 1911, at which time ill health caused him to resign.  He had held several important pastorates in Tennessee and was one of the leading preachers of Southeast Missouri.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 28 Feb 1912:

MRS. WILSON’S FUNERAL HELD THIS AFTERNOON

The funeral of Mrs. Nina O. Wilson, wife of George Wilson, who died at St. Mary’s Infirmary Tuesday morning, was held this afternoon, the cortege leaving the family residence on Center Street at 1:30 for the Presbyterian church, where services were conducted by the pastor, Rev. A. M. Eels.  The interment was made at the Villa Ridge cemetery.

The pallbearers were:  G. W. Buchanan, S. B. Ward, F. M. Harrell, John Dewey, Rollo Spann, Joseph LeMay, William White and M. Easterday.

 

Word was received here (Mound City) Tuesday from Chicago of the death of the six-month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Vail Hendricks Fall.  Mrs. Fall was formerly Miss Mona Connell of this city.  Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Connell and Mrs. Irving Connell, all of Mounds, left Tuesday afternoon for Chicago to attend the funeral.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 29 Feb 1912:

FORMER CAIROITE KILLED BY FREIGHT TRAIN MONDAY

William Gibney, a former resident of Cairo, and a freight conductor on the southern division of the Mobile & Ohio, was killed last Monday near Humboldt, Tenn. The man was caught under the wheels of one of the freight cars and both his lower limbs were cut off.  He died before the train reached Jackson, where he was being taken for medical attention.

 

Ex-Mayor W. C. Simpson, formerly of Vienna, but late of Evanston, Ill., died Saturday at Ashville, N.C., of pneumonia.  Mr. Simpson’s body arrived at the old home (Vienna) Tuesday morning, accompanied by relatives and friends.  It was carried to the home of his mother-in-law, Fannie Jackson, on West Main Street and lay in state until Wednesday afternoon, at 2:00 o’clock.  Funeral services were held at the residence, conducted under the auspices of the Masonic Lodge and Knights Templar, followed by interment in the Fraternal Cemetery north of town, where he was laid to rest by the side of his first wife, who had departed this life some eight years ago.  He was married first to Miss Cora Jackson, and to this woman four children were born, one boy and three girls, who still survive him, and one half-brother, Marion Simpson, now of Champaign, Ill.  Mr. Simpson was married again last summer to Mrs. Nicholas, of Evanston, Ill.  While Mr. Simpson was mayor of Vienna, he fathered the work of putting in our concrete walks, which still stand as a monument to his memory, for many years to come.  He was several times alderman and mayor and president of the school board and was prominent in pharmaceutical affairs of the state and was at one time secretary and also president of the State Board of Pharmacy.  Most of his life was spent in Vienna, where he was one of the most prominent and useful citizens.  A large crowd of sorrowing relatives and friends followed his remains to its last resting apple.  Truly a good and useful man has gone from our mist.  Peace to his ashes.

(W. C. Simpson married Cora Jackson on 3 Oct 1889, in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Attorney George B. Gillespie was down from Springfield, Ill., Wednesday, attending the funeral of his old friend, W. C. Simpson, and meeting old home friends.

 

Mrs. Ada Taylor, daughter of Mrs. Rilda Smith, living in the south side of town (Vienna), died Wednesday afternoon at 4:00 o’clock.  It is thought she died from poisoning, but as yet it is not known whether it was taken with suicide intent or accidental.  She leaves a little baby eleven months old, a mother and four brothers to mourn her death.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 1 Mar 1912:

AGED LADY DIES AT NOON TODAY

Mrs. Ella Hogan died at 12:45 today at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John Barry, of 2803 Sycamore, after an illness of four months.  Death was due to infirmities of old age.  She is survived by three daughters, Mrs. John Barry, Mrs. Kate Moore, of this city, Mrs. James Kavanaugh, of Chicago; one son, T. J. Hogan, of New Orleans.

(John Barry married Mary Hogan on 5 Jun 1878, in Alexander Co., Ill.  James M. Moore married Catherine Hogan on 19 Jan 1888, in Alexander Co., Ill.  James Kavanaugh married Maggie Hogan on 8 Jun 1893, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Obituary

Inez Cheniae was born April 24, 1896.  Died February 15, 1912, aged 15 years, 10 months and 1 day.  Some few weeks ago she was stricken with blood poisoning, which resulted in her death.  All through her suffering she was patient, kind, and loving; constantly talking of her school work and eager to again be at her desk in the school room.  Inez was just blooming into beautiful womanhood, which makes the parting from her loved ones very sad indeed.  The entire community feels deeply with the family and relatives the loss of their dear one, and we trust that by her death, which seems so untimely, she has brought us all in closer touch with God, who does all things well.  The parents have lost a loving daughter, the school a faithful obedient pupil, the classmates a very dear friend and the community a pure young lady.  The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Ferrell, of Mound City, at the Shiloh Baptist Church Wednesday, February 28.  Interment in Shiloh cemetery.  The offerings of the class were beautiful and showed the high esteem in which they held their departed friends.

Mr. and Mrs. Cheniae wish to extend their thanks to their many friends who so kindly assisted them during the illness and death of their daughter.

 

Andrew Scherrick, who was called here a few days ago by the death of his mother, departed for Brinkley, Ark., the latter part of the week to resume his work.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 2 March 1912:

ANOTHER MURDER IN WILLIAMSON COUNTY

Marion, Ill., Mar. 2—Frank Morris, was shot and killed and Robert Sanders probably fatally cut during a fight in an alleged blind tiger at White Ash last night.  John and Clyde Spiller, aged 20 and 18 years, were arrested.  Officers who investigated say that Morris and Sanders were fighting when the Spiller boys came to Morris’ aid.  A bullet intended for Sanders killed Morris.

 

FUNERAL NOTICE

Hogan—Died, Friday, March 1st, Mrs. Ellen Hogan

Funeral services will be held Sunday, March 3rd, at 1:30 p.m. at St. Joseph’s Church.  Remains will be taken by special train from Fourteenth Street at 2:45 p.m. for Villa Ridge cemetery.

Friends of the family are invited.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 4 Mar 1912:

RICHARDSON APPARENTLY LIED IN CONFESSION

Sheriff James Burnley, of Carlisle County, is in receipt of a communication from Ed Smith, of Augustine, Tex., in which the Texan inquires as to the confession made by Willard Richardson recently sentenced to death for the murder of John Violet at Milburn, says the Paducah News-Democrat. Smith intimates that he is familiar with every crime which has been committed at St. Augustine, for years, but that he knows nothing of such a murder as Richardson described.

The condemned man in his confession at the county jail here, said he killed two men, one of which was a negro. However, officials now are doubting if Richardson really is guilty of the murders he claims.
The cases, however, will be closely investigated and if another man, as Richardson says, is serving for a murder he committed, the innocent man will be given his freedom.

FUNERAL OF MRS. HOGAN HELD SUNDAY AFTERNOON

The funeral of the late Mrs. Ella Hogan was held Sunday afternoon at St. Joseph's Church, Rev. Father James Gillen, being the officiating priest. The pall bearers were as follows: Arthur Magner, Patrick Greaney, Will Carroll, Thomas Caraher, P. T. Langan, David Barry, Martin Donahue, and Patrick Egan.

Mrs. Warren Cozby, of 820 Twenty-second Street, left this morning for Jackson, Mo., called by the sudden death of her sister, Mrs. Frank Slack.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 5 Mar 1912:
FORMER RESIDENT OF SANDUSKY DEAD
A. B. Howland Passed Away in Bay City, Mich.

A.B. Howland, formerly a resident of Sandusky, passed away in Bay City, Mich., February 18th, according to a letter received by Sandusky friends from his widow.

Mr. Howland and wife left Sandusky in September last for Bay City to visit their daughter, expecting possibly to return when Mr. Howland got well, as he had been in bad health for some time, but he failed to regain his health and passed away on the 18th.

Mr. Howland had been a resident of Sandusky and vicinity for many years. He was one of the old citizens and his demise will be a matter of general sorrow in that community. He was 67 years of age and was an old soldier and his funeral was conducted by the Grand Army men.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 6 Mar 1912:
SNEAD'S FATHER KILLED TODAY

Georgetown, Tex., Mar. 6—Rev. J. T. Snead, father of A. J. Snead, who was recently tried for the murder of Capt. Boyce, was shot and killed here today by R. O. Hilliard.  He then turned the revolver on himself and committed suicide. Hilliard was a tenant on one of the Snead farms.  He left a note declaring he killed Snead because of trouble he had had with him. It is declared the killing has no connection with the feud.

PULASKI MAN DEAD AT POPLAR BLUFF

A telegram to friends in Cairo today brought the information that David Sheets, son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Sheets, of Pulaski, was dead at Poplar Bluff, Mo., and that the remains would be brought through Cairo tomorrow morning. No details are given.

(Samuel Sheets married Mrs. Elizabeth Thurtell on 4 Feb 1879, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 7 Mar 1912:
FORMER CAIROITE DIES IN MICHIGAN

Memorial cards announcing the death of Mrs. Charles Bishop, of Coppersville, Mich. which occurred Sunday, Feb. 25, at that place, have even received by friends in this city. The family lived here continuously for 18 years until a year ago, when they moved to Michigan. Mr. Bishop was employed as lumberman by the Vehicle Supply Company. The family resided at Thirty-fifth and Washington. Mrs. Bishop is survived by her husband and a son fourteen years of age.

SINGER FACTORY TO SHUT DOWN FRIDAY
Out of Respect for Dead Vice-President, E. H. Bennett

As a mark of respect to the late vice-president of the Singer Manufacturing Company, E. H. Bennett, who died in Berlin, Germany, on Feb. 21, all of the plants of the company will shut down Friday afternoon during the funeral, which will occur at Bayoone, N. J. The Cairo plant will resume again Saturday morning.

John Sheets received a message from St. Louis late Monday evening, stating that his brother, Dave, was dead. We have no particulars as to the cause of his death at this writing. (Pulaski)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 8 Mar 1912:
HERRIN BANK PRESIDENT DIES

Herrin, Ill., Mar. 8—Thomas S. Lotlar, aged 72, president of the State Savings Bank, died Thursday of paralysis. He was of a pioneer family in this county and was a veteran of the Civil War.

(This may refer to Thomas Stotlar, of Herrin, who enlisted as a private in Co. G, 9th Illinois Infantry, at the age of 21.  He lived in Williamson Co., Ill., was a native of Highland Co., Ohio, 5’9”, brown hair, black eyes, light complexion, single and a farmer.  Thomas Stotlar married Louisa Cox on 14 Jul 1869, in Williamson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

WIDOW OF DR. WALDO DIED IN WASHINGTON

Mrs. Mary B. Waldo, widow of the late Dr. Roswell Waldo, stationed in Cairo during the yellow fever epidemic of 1878, when he was in charge of the U.S. Marine Hospital passed away in Washington, D.C., on February 24th.

Dr. Waldo remained at his post during the yellow fever and lost his life in that struggle against the scourge. His action was remembered by the people here and they erected a monument to his memory in the national cemetery at Mound City.

Upon his death, Mrs. Waldo removed to Washington, where she has resided since. She held a position in one of the departments for many years.

Mrs. Charles Wehrenberg and Mrs. W. S. Sanderson left Thursday for Fulton, Ky., to attend the funeral of Mrs. Newhouse. The deceased was the mother-in-law of Mrs. Eva Newhouse. (Mound City)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 9 Mar 1912:
Mrs. Mary Dudley died at St. Louis Friday afternoon at 12:45. The remains will arrive at Mounds Sunday at 1 o'clock and services will be held at Beechwood Cemetery. Mrs. Dudley was the mother of Mrs. Emma A. Austin, of St. Louis, and the grandmother of Mrs. Carl Miller, of this city.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 11 Mar 1912:
Mrs. Earl Buchanan, formerly Miss Ruth Crouch, died at the home of her father, Bolin Crouch, in Ballard County, on Thursday of last week. The lady was a niece of Dr. H. T. Crouch, of this city (Bardwell, Ky.)

 

Mrs. Ruth Crouch Buchanan, daughter of Bourland Crouch, died last week at her father’s home. After funeral services at the residence, her remains were laid to rest in O'Donnelly grave yard. (La Center, Ky.)

A tramp was killed by a Mobile & Ohio freight train near Wickliffe Sunday. The only thing that would lead to his identity was the word "Bennett" tattooed on his arm.

FORMER RESIDENT OF CAIRO ACCIDENTALLY KILLED AT BARDWELL

John Shepherd, a former resident of this city, was accidentally killed at Bardwell, Ky., Saturday, when he dropped a revolver that he was handling, the same being discharged and the bullet entering his heart.

Shepherd was a farmer and resided near Bardwell. He is survived by his wife and three children.
The funeral services were held today, conducted by Rev. L. G. Graham, pastor of the Calvary Baptist Church of Cairo.

At his home near Arlington, Tuesday night, John E. Cummins passed to his eternal reward. Uncle John was one of the pioneers of this section of the country.  He was a member of the M. E. Church and a man in whom everybody had the greatest confidence.  He leaves a family consisting of a wife and several children.  (Bardwell, Ky.)

After a long and successful life, Mrs. Eleanor Stone died at Milburn, Saturday. Mrs. Stone was born in Fayette County, four miles from Lexington, in 1820 and at the time of her death she was 91 years old. She was married in Fayette County to George W. Stone and in 1857 the family moved to this county.  Her husband died 30 years ago. She is survived by six children, to wit: G. O. Stone, of Bardwell, Mrs. Tom Greene, of Cairo; Mrs. W. H. Green, of Oklahoma City, Okla.; Thomas D., Sam D., and Mrs. W. Y. Johnson, of Milburn. The funeral services were held in the Christian Church at Milburn Sunday and the interment was in the Milburn Cemetery.—Carlisle County News.

R. Y. Jerrell, about 65 years old, died at his home near Kevil, last week, after a long illness of complications. He is survived by three sons, Lee, Jeff, and R. M. Jerrell, and several daughters. Mr. Jerrell lived many years near Kevil and was a popular and well-respected farmer.—Advance.

Mrs. Lillie Martinie, wife of Robert Martinie, died Tuesday at 7 o'clock after a lingering illness of tuberculosis. She was twenty-two years of age and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Will Jennings. She was married to Robert Martinie last April. Mrs. Martinie was a member of the Baptist church.

The funeral services were conducted at Mississippi Church Wednesday morning, with burial in the Mississippi Cemetery.—Courier (Arlington, Ky.)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 12 Mar 1912:
REWARD ASKED FROM GOVERNOR FOR MURDERERS

County Judge Alban W. Barkley has telegraphed Governor McCreary urging him to offer a reward of $500 for the arrest and conviction of the two men who held up and killed Ollie F. Dugger last Thursday night, says the Paducah Sun. Nothing has been received from the governor in regard to whether he will offer a reward on behalf of the state. R. A. Karr, of Herrin, Ill., brother-in-law of Dugger, has offered a reward of $100 for the capture of each man. It is probable that the city may add to the reward and the two lodges may also contribute to a reward.

The body of Dugger was taken to Unionville, Ill., Saturday where the funeral and burial took place at 3 o'clock. The Rev. G. D. Wyatt, pastor of the Tenth Street Christian Church, and a large delegation of Eagles and Woodmen of the World accompanied the body besides member of the family.

(O. F. Dugger married Lucy Karr on 3 Dec 1899, in Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

DEATH OF OLD RESIDENT

Mrs. Margaret Mooney, an old resident of Cairo, died at St. Mary's Infirmary Monday evening at 7:15 o'clock, where she had been confined for about two weeks with a severe attack of grip. This, together with old age, brought about her demise. Mrs. Mooney who was 85 years of age, was born in Ireland and came to this country when quite a young girl. She had lived in Cairo for the past eighteen years, coming here from Ullin, Ill. She leaves three grandchildren, Leonard, Michael, and Edwin Shanahan, all of this city.

The funeral will be held at St. Joseph’s Church, of which the deceased was a member, Wednesday morning, conducted by Rev. Father James Gillen.

(John Shanahan married Mary Mooney on 6 Oct 1885, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

G. E. ANGLEN DIED THIS MORNING
Father-in-law of George T. Carnes Passed Away at the Age of 85 Years

G. E. Anglen, aged 85 years, passed away at 2:15 o'clock this morning at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. George Carnes, No. 700 Commercial Avenue, after an illness of but a week's duration. Death was due to the infirmities of old age.

The deceased has been making his home with Mr. and Mrs. Carnes for the past eight years. He was Mrs. Carnes' stepfather. He is also survived by a daughter residing in Chicago and a son in Walnut Ridge, Ark.  He was a native of North Carolina.

No funeral services will be held here, but the remains will be taken to Ashley, Ill., Wednesday morning at 5 o'clock, the former home of the deceased for interment.

(This may be the same person as George E. Anglin, who married Priscilla L. Short on 24 Sep 1854, in Jefferson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. W. G. Jackson, of Ft. Worth, Texas, who was called here on account of the death of her stepbrother, W. C. Simpson, has returned home. Her mother, Mrs. Maggie Simpson accompanied her home for a visit. (Vienna)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 13 Mar 1912:
DEATH CLAIMS J. B. COLLINS
Well Known Resident of Cairo Passed Away This Morning

J. B. Collins died at his home, No. 228 Twenty-seventh Street, at 4:30 o'clock this morning, after an illness of nine days with brain fever.

The deceased is survived by his wife, two sons and a daughter. His sons are Harry K. Collins, of Milwaukee, and Frank, of this city. His daughter is Mrs. C. J. Henley, of Dongola, Ill.

The deceased was well known in Cairo and southern Illinois. He served as police magistrate and justice of the peace and has been active in politics.

The deceased was born at Metropolis, Ill., in 1853 and was 54 years of age.  He was a member of the Congregational church at Mound City, where he formerly resided.

He was a Republican in politics and served as a deputy sheriff under Sheriff Roche.

The funeral services will be held tomorrow at the family residence on Twenty-seventh Street. The remains will be taken to Beech Grove Cemetery for interment via an interurban car.

TWO CHARLESTON CITIZENS DEAD
F. M. Stotts and D. D. Mitchell Passed Away Sunday Morning

Charleston Courier:—Word was received here Sunday morning that F. M. Stotts, who has been spending the winter in Mineral Wells, Texas, had died suddenly at that place Sunday morning. The remains will be brought here for burial.

Mr. Stotts had been prominent in Charleston business, social and political circles, and his death comes as a shock to the community.  He was in business for a number of years in this city and held the important office of county collector for some years. A few years ago he retired to his farm near town and has been a farmer for the past several years.

Sunday night another death message came to Charleston, announcing to relatives the death, at Haskell, Okla., of D. D. Mitchell, another old and respected citizen. Mr. Mitchell came to this city several years ago and founded the Mitchell hotel, now conducted by his son and daughter. He had been in poor health, but was advised not to attempt an operation at this time, and the shock of the operation was too much for his physical strength, it is supposed, causing his death.

JOHN KELLY HAS PASSED AWAY

John Kelly, an old time Cairoite and a former employee of the Cairo Trust Property Company, died last week at his home in Cape Girardeau, Mo.  He was well advanced in years and this was the main cause of his death. He had worked in the Drainage District for the Trust Property Company for over twenty-five years and lived in North Cairo with his wife and an adopted son who survive him. They moved to Cape Girardeau several months ago. The old man was quite a character and was well known.

FUNERAL OF MRS. MOONEY HELD TODAY

The funeral of Mrs. Margaret Mooney, who died Monday evening at St. Mary's Infirmary, was held this morning, from St. Joseph's Church, Father Gillen officiating. Interment was made at Calvary Cemetery in Villa Ridge. The pallbearers were Joseph More, Stephen O'Laughlin, W. E. Walker, B. McManus, Roy Hill, David Barry, and Gus Swoboda.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—Collins, J. B., Wednesday, March 13th, 1912. Aged 54 years. Funeral services will be held tomorrow afternoon at the family residence on Twenty-seventh street, conducted by Rev. Mr. Garrett, pastor of the Cairo Baptist Church. The remains will leave Twenty-seventh and Commercial at 2:30 o'clock for Beech Grove Cemetery via an interurban car. Friends of the family are invited to attend.

DETECTIVE ENGAGED ON PADUCAH CASE
Pinkerton Man Claims to Know All Three Men and Their Records
TOTAL REWARD HAS REACHED $1,200
For the Arrest and Conviction of Ollie Dugger's Murderers

Paducah, Ky., March 13.—Dawn is breaking in the Ollie F. Dugger murder.

H. W. Mosher, assistant superintendent of Pinkerton's National Detective Agency, of St. Louis, who has taken personal charge of the solution of the crime, gave out a statement as follows:

"We know Dugger's murderers and also the man at Riverside Hospital who calls himself Fred Ross. It is only to be a question of time when we get them. The two men are professional yeggs and the larger one owes 40 years in Nebraska and time in Missouri. I am expecting photographs from St. Louis today."

A reward of $700 is out for the murders and Detective Mosher says he knows of $500 each for both men who are badly wanted elsewhere. County Judge Alben W. Barkley received a letter from Governor McCreary, of Kentucky, today, offering a reward of $500 for the men. Since R. A. Karr, father-in-law of Dugger, has offered a reward of $100 for each man, this makes a total of $1,200 reward out for the men and possibly more.

Detective Mosher has conferred with eye-witnesses to the murder and those who knew the men. He also visited the man at Riverside Hospital yesterday and today, and after his investigation he announced that the murderers are known. Fingerprints of Ross, whose real name is said to be Andrew Brown, were taken Monday and sent to the St. Louis agency. Photographs of the men and other information are expected at any time and if Detective Mosher has not made a mistake, all that remains is to locate the murderers. Detective Mosher is of the opinion that the men crossed the river following the murder and says they will steer clear of cities and the larger towns where they are known.

"These men are not highwaymen," he said, "but yeggman and went to rob Dugger's safe" added Mosher. Brown, who is said to have been a member of a gang, became sick and Detective Mosher believes the partners, who killed Dugger, were restless and would not wait. Brown is said to have been used as a lookout for them. Mosher says the men had no idea of killing Dugger, as that was not in their line. When Dugger reached for his gun, it meant death for one or the other and one of the pair shot Dugger down.

NEGROES QUARREL IN CRAP GAME AND THIRD PARTY IS SHOT

Eli Bobo, a negro formerly employed as porter at The Halliday Hotel, was shot last night in a barbershop conducted by John Durrah on lower Commercial Avenue.

According to Bobo, who was seen this morning at St. Mary's Infirmary, by a Citizen reporter, he was engaged with other negroes in shooting craps in the rear of the barbershop. Two of the negroes became engaged in a quarrel over a nickel and one pulled a gun and shot at the other, missing him and wounding Bobo.

The negro who did the shooting is said to be Cal Nichols, who made his escape and up to this time, the police have failed to arrest him.
Stuck Knife in Man Who "Cleaned Up"

In a crap game only a few nights ago, in this locality, two negroes engaged in a quarrel over some "phony" dice which one had used in getting rich quick. When the loser "got wise" he jerked out a big knife and proceeded to stick it into his antagonist, after which he made his escape.

The blade was broken off in the negro's nose and was extracted several days later.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 14 Mar 1912:
NEGRO SHOT IN CRAP GAME DIES

Eli Bobo, the negro who was shot in a crap game in the rear of the barbershop at 411 Commercial Avenue, Tuesday night, died this morning from his injuries. The coroner’s inquest will be held tomorrow morning. His assailant is still at large.

Bobo was seen by a Citizen reporter yesterday at St. Mary's Infirmary and told the story of the quarrel over a nickel which led to the shooting, the particulars of which were published in last evening's issue.

FUNERAL OF LATE J. B. COLLINS THIS AFTERNOON

The funeral of the late J. B. Collins was held this afternoon from the family residence on Twenty-seventh Street. The remains were taken to Beech Grove Cemetery via an interurban car. The services were conducted by Rev. Mr. Garrett, pastor of the Cairo Baptist Church.

MURDERERS ARE RECOGNIZED IN PINKERTON PHOTOS

Paducah, Ky., Mar. 14.—The fact that the murderers of Ollie F. Dugger are known was substantiated by a witness, who positively recognized photographs received from St. Louis by Detective H. S. Mosher, of the Pinkerton National Detective Agency.

Photograph No. 7213 was recognized as the man who fired the fatal shot and photo No. 7212 was identified as that of his pal, who held up the saloon. There is said to be some doubt about the identification of photo No. 7255, which the witness says is an exact likeness of Andrew Brown, who has been under treatment at Riverside Hospital. Photo No. 7211 is that of a pal of the three and the witness says he saw him in Paducah at the time he saw the murderers.

The identification of the men is now said to be complete. Dr. Frank Boyd, of the police and fire commissioners, expressed the opinion this afternoon that the murderers would be captured within four months at the longest.

Frank Gillion of this place (Olive Branch) died last Monday night and was buried Tuesday. Frank was a young man, 24 years old, and was the only living child of his parents, who are old and were dependent on him.

Mr. and Mrs. George T. Carnes returned Wednesday night from Ashley, Ill., where they attended the funeral of Mrs. Carnes' father, the late G. E. Anglen, whose death occurred in Cairo Tuesday morning.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 15 Mar 1912:
BOY KILLED, WOMAN HURT IN WRECK
On Illinois Central at Clinton, Kentucky, Last Evening
COAL TRAIN CRASHED INTO LOCAL FREIGHT
Engineer Ran Past Block Signal Demolishing the Caboose

A 21-year-old boy was killed, a woman passenger had her leg broken and a number of other passengers were severely shaken up last evening when a heavy coal train on the Illinois Central crashed into the local freight at Clinton, Ky.

The dead and injured were in the caboose which was literally demolished.

The caboose had stopped at Clinton to unload some ties. Calling in the flagman, the train had gotten under way when the coal train ran into it. It is claimed that the heavy rain prevented the engineer on the coal train from seeing the block signal.

The coal train was drawn by one of the company’s big engines and four men were in the cab. Engineer Herman was at the throttle and with him was a man who he was teaching the run.

The dead boy's name was John Benedict. The woman injured was a negro.

Mrs. J. W. Rule was called to Greenfield, Ind., recently by death of her aged father, who was nearing 80 years of age at the time of his decease.

PROMINENT EAST CAIRO CITIZEN DEAD

Virgil Lawson, a prominent farmer of East Cairo, died at his home this morning at 10 o'clock after a few days illness. The deceased is well known here, coming to this city often to buy from Cairo merchants. E. A. Burke has charge of the funeral which will be held Saturday.

CORONER'S INQUEST IN BOBO CASE HELD THIS MORNING

The coroner’s jury summoned this morning to inquire into the shooting at the barbershop of John Durrah, No. 411 Commercial Avenue, last Tuesday night found through the evidence of the witnesses examined, that the negro Eli Bobo, who died Thursday morning from the wounds he received in the gun play, was an innocent bystander and recommended that the negro who did the shooting, Cal Nickerson, be apprehended and held to await the action of the grand jury.

From the testimony presented by the various witnesses, a crap game was going on in the back of the barbershop, between 7:30 and 8 o'clock. Three negroes, Nickerson, Jones and an unknown negro, were shooting the dice, when a dispute came up between the first two men over a nickel. Nickerson grabbed the money off the table, reaching to his back pocket for his gun, whereupon Jones, seeing this move, drew his weapon and pointing it at the former pulled the trigger, but the gun did not go off. Nickerson ran out the door and turning around, fired several times. The negro Bobo was trying to get out the back door at this time and received a shot in the back, which later caused his death. The other shot took effect in the right hand of a negro named Jackson, a barber in the place, who was standing near Bobo. The negro Jones returned the fire from his revolver after Nickerson had stopped shooting, but his shots went wild.

The jury was composed of Roy Clark, Clemens Blom, Guy Morse, William Miller, Wayne Ross, and Dixie Fox, the last three named being colored.

Some fifteen witnesses were examined and after giving their evidence they were each taken before Magistrate Whitcamp and fined $15.00 and cost for gambling. Only one was able to pay this fine and the rest were given jail sentences.

Will Wilson, living three miles east of here (Villa Ridge), died Wednesday night. He was afflicted with heart trouble and had been confined to his bed for some time.

Kenneth, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Jones, died Sunday morning aged 24 days. A short funeral service, conducted by Rev. G.N. Bradley, was held at the residence Monday at 2 p.m., after which the little body was laid to rest in Villa Ridge cemetery. (Villa Ridge)

Card of Thanks

We wish to thank the dear friends who so kindly assisted us during the illness and death of our dear baby. Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Jones.

POLICE BELIEVE FUGITIVE DROWNED

The police are still searching for the unknown man who shot and seriously injured a riverman, John Beauchamp, in Webster's Saloon Tuesday night. Chief Egan believes that the man was drowned in the chase after the shooting. The police officers followed the man on through the cottonwoods to the Big Four incline, where it is presumed he waded into the Ohio River there, thinking it to be one of the small ponds near there and because of his intoxicated condition was drowned. Sergeant Cowell and Officer Harry Jones claim to have heard cries for help, as though from a drowning person. A search was made of the barges and cradles in the vicinity of the incline, but the man was not found. Either he was drowned or he is being harbored as a fugitive from justice by some of the fishermen who live near the incline and Cairo Point is the opinion of the police.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 16 Mar 1912:
FIRST WHITE VICTIM FOR ELECTRIC CHAIR IN KENTUCKY

Frankfort, Ky., Mar. 16.—Unless an action of executive intervenes, the electric chair in the state prison at Eddyville will receive its first white victim next week. The man who is awaiting execution is Cal Miracle, the Breathitt County murderer. On August 26 last Miracle shot and killed Mathew Jones at his home near Pineville. The screams of the wife and children of the victim attracted Mrs. Delsie Gibson, a neighbor, to the scene. On her way she met Miracle, who shot and killed her. The double murderer fled to the mountains and for several months all efforts to capture him were without avail. Several months later he was found in Birmingham, Ala., where he was arrested and returned to Pineville for trial.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 19 Mar 1912:
MRS. TALBOT DIED MONDAY

Mrs. J. C. Talbot died Monday afternoon at 1 o'clock at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Louise Gibbons, No. 300 Twenty-eighth Street. She was the widow of the late John Talbot, who died several years ago and had resided in Cairo for about 50 years. The cause of Mrs. Talbot's death was pneumonia, which she contracted several weeks ago during the cold weather.

The deceased is survived by three sons, Lindsay and Fred Talbot, of this city, and Charles Talbot, of St. Louis, and one daughter, Mrs. Gibbons, of this city. The burial will take place in DuQuoin Wednesday.

(John A. Gibbons married Louisa J. Talbott on 11 Jun 1884, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

AGED WHITE MAN COMMITS MURDER
Philip W. Harlan, of Nebraska, Fatally Stabbed S. F. George, a Syrian
TROUBLE OCURRED AT GREEN TREE HOTEL
Old Man Claims He Feared Being Robbed and Acted in Self Defense

Phillip W. Harlan, aged 75 years, occupies a cell in the city jail charged with murder.

The crime to which the old man must answer, is that of stabbing S. F. George, a Syrian, who died from his injuries at 1:30 o'clock this morning.

Harlan, who claims Bearley, Neb., as his home, is said to have arrived in Cairo Monday from McClure, Ill., where he had been visiting. He went to the Green Tree House, conducted by George at 418 Commercial Avenue, and secured a room for the night.

Believing that George, from whom he had rented the room, was trying to enter his apartments to kill and rob him, Harlan attacked the Syrian with a knife, stabbing him in the throat and severing the jugular vein.

The trouble occurred about 9:30 o'clock, the Syrian dying from his injuries about four hours later at St. Mary’s Infirmary.

Mrs. George, wife of the dead man, says that Harlan came to the place about 7 o'clock in the evening and registered for a room. He went upstairs and about two hours later she and her husband, who were sitting in front of the place with two young white men, heard noises and loud cries. Her husband went up to the old man's room and entered to ascertain the trouble, while the two other men stood just outside the door. When George entered, according to his wife, the old man stabbed him. Mrs. George and the two young men entered the room and found the two men scuffling. George finally weakened and fell away from his assailant and the two young men then wrested the knife from Harlan.

After taking the weapon from Harlan, the two young men, with Mrs. George's assistance, carried her husband downstairs and later he was taken to the hospital.

When the police arrived, they found the old man in his room and they had some trouble in entering as he has pushed his bed against the door.

When seen at police headquarters this morning, the old man bore evidence of having been in a fight, as his head and face are badly bruised and in some places cut. He said he thought he was to be the victim of robbery, worse when George entered.

George, with his family, conducted the hotel and also a grocery and fruit store in the building. He has always been regarded as a quiet respectful citizen and has been in Cairo for about five years.
Coroner’s Inquest

The coroner’s inquest was held this afternoon and the following were summoned to serve on the jury: Arthur Mattingly, H. S. Antrim, James Johnson, Newton Riddle, J. W. Whitlock, and D. H. Mulcahy.

Witnesses were examined and a verdict is expected late this afternoon.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 20 Mar 1912:
JURY EXONERATES AGED WHITE MAN
For the Killing of S. F. George, a Syrian, Monday Night
THAT OLD MAN ACTED IN SELF DEFENSE
Is the Opinion of Those Who Heard Testimony before Coroner's Jury

After deliberating for one hour, the coroner’s jury returned a verdict exonerating Philip W. Harlan, the aged white man, for the killing of S. F. George, a Syrian.

The verdict was reached shortly after 6 o'clock Tuesday evening. The jury was composed of Arthur Mattingly, H. S. Antrim, Newton Riddle, J. H. Mulcahy, James Johnson, and J. W. Whitlock, all businessmen.
Harlan's Story of the Killing

The verdict was not a surprise to the community, as the actions of the old man, at his advanced age, led many to suspect that he must have acted in self-defense.

In testifying relative to the killing, the old gentleman told a straight forward story. He said that he went to the place to get a room and that he retired shortly after.  Before going to sleep, he pushed his bed partly against the door to keep anyone from entering, as the landlord had not given him a key to lock the door. He was awakened later, by someone entering the room and thinking that they were coming in to rob and kill him, he drew his pocket knife and struck at the person nearest him. He claimed that he was forced to draw his knife, because one of the persons who entered had struck him in the face. He did not know that his knife had any effect and did not know the man was dead until told of the fact at the headquarters the next morning. He stated that he was 75 years of age and that he had never been in any trouble before and that he deeply regretted the entire affair. He gave his home as Furnas County, Nebraska. He gave his reason for being in Cairo, stating that he had been visiting his sister, Mrs. J. Cox, at Diswood, and his nephew, James Hill, at McClure, and not having been in Cairo since 1860, he decided to come down and look over the city. As an evidence of the scuffle that ensued when the parties entered his room in the hotel, the aged man bears several scars and wounds on his face.

The case was really a pitiful one, and the age of the man and his evident worry and grief over the affair were the strong points in favor of his exoneration.

When asked concerning the noise that witnesses said he made before the Syrian entered his room, Harlan said as he often talked and walked in his sleep; that might be explanation.  He said that he had about $21 on his person and that about an hour before going to the hotel, he had drank and small portion of sherry wine, that being his favorite beverage. He denied being intoxicated and said that he had his right mind.
Testimony of Dead Man's Wife

Mrs. George, wife of the dead man, testified that she heard loud cries in the room upstairs and that her husband went up to investigate. She heard her husband knock on the door and ask what was the matter and also heard him enter the room. She went upstairs when she heard the scuffle and heard her husband exclaim, "He's killed me." Clarence Lynn and William Taylor corroborated Mrs. George's testimony, they being in the house at the time. They testified that they heard the old man making noise in the room and when they entered they found the men scuffling. Separating them, they took the knife away from Harlan and after assisting George downstairs, called the police.

Several other witnesses said they heard the old man calling out of the window for help after George had entered the room.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 21 Mar 1912:

SUDDEN DEATH OF J. A. BEEBER
President of Cairo Water Company Passed Away Today at Williamsport, Pa.

T. W. Gannon, superintendent of the Cairo Water Company, received a message this morning announcing the death of J. A. Beeber, president of the company, which occurred at his home in Williamsport, Pa., very suddenly this morning. No particulars were given in the message.

The killing of S. F. George by Mr. Harlan, a resident and uncle of Mr. James Hill, of McClure, was a surprise to many here. Mr. Harlan spent the winter of 1910 with his nephew here, also two months of this winter, and left here for a visit to Cairo on business. Mr. Hill was looking for him back on the evening train. He was a quiet man and the killing of Mr. George is to be deplored. Mr. Hill and wife left for Cairo Wednesday morning to see about getting the aged uncle out on bail. (McClure)

J. F. Roberts remains in a critical condition at his home on upper Washington Avenue, although there were slightly encouraging symptoms this morning.

Jacob Fellenstein died Sunday and was buried Monday. Funeral services were held by Tom Gaunt. A large concourse of relatives and friends attended the services. He leaves a widow, two sons, two daughters and a host of friends to mourn his departure. Peace to his memory. (Grand Chain)

(A marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Jacob Fallenstein 1860-1912.—Darrel Dexter)

 


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 22 Mar 1912:
J. F. ROBERTS CALLED BY DEATH
Passed Away at Home in This City Shortly Before Noon

J. F. Roberts, a prominent citizen and businessman of this city, died at the family residence, No. 2404 Washington Avenue, this morning at 11:20 o'clock, Bright's disease being the cause of death. The deceased was taken seriously ill on December 24th, and since that time his life has frequently been despaired of.

Mr. Roberts and his family have resided in Cairo for the past six years. The deceased was vice president of the Denison-Gholson Dry Goods Company and one of its largest stockholders. He has been the traveling representative of the company in southern Illinois up to the time of his death, although he had not been out on the road in that capacity for several months. His thorough business ability and pleasing personality won him many friends, and he ranked among the highest of the company’s salesmen.
Before coming to this city, Mr. Roberts was in the retail dry goods business at Makanda, Ill.

He was born Jan. 9, 1869, on a farm near Marion, Ill., and was at his death 43 years of age. He came from a prominent southern Illinois family and was educated at Ewing College and also at a business school in Chicago. He was married 22 years ago to Miss Effie Link, of Ewing, Ill., and is survived by his wife and two daughters, Mrs. Homer J. Elkins, of Vienna, Ill., who before her recent marriage was Miss Rosalind Roberts, and Miss Roberta Roberts. He also leaves one sister, Mrs. G. C. Patterson, of Makanda, and Edgar Roberts, of St. Louis.

The deceased was a deacon in the Cairo Baptist Church and the funeral will be held there Sunday afternoon, being conducted by the pastor, and the remains taken to Makanda for interment. He was a member of the Masonic order and they will attend the funeral in a body.

Mr. Roberts was conscious to the end and recognized the members of his family shortly before death. He was strick in the prime of his life and his demise is a distinct loss to the community.

(John Frank Roberts married Effie Link on 15 May 1890, in Franklin Co., Ill.  His marker in Evergreen Cemetery at Makanda reads:  J. F. Roberts Born Jan. 9, 1869 Died March 22, 1912.—Darrel Dexter)

Thomas W. Gannon, superintendent of the Cairo Water company, left Thursday night for Williamsport, Pa., to attend the funeral of President James A. Beeber, whose death occurred there Thursday morning.

CAIRO LOST FRIEND IN THE DEATH OF JAMES A. BEEBER

In the death of James A. Beeber, president of the Cairo Water Company, mention of which was made in The Citizen last evening, Cairo has lost a true admirer and a great friend. He had been coming to this city off and on for about twenty years.

He was interested in the growth of the city and made improvements in the water plant to keep pace with the progress of Cairo. He was well known personally to many citizens, especially among businessmen.

He was a successful businessman, as well as a prominent attorney. He was associated in the practice of law with his son, William Beeber, and at one time was Attorney General of the State of Pennsylvania. He was president of the First National Bank of Williamsport, besides having public utilities and lumber interests in different parts of the country. The deceased died of apoplexy and is survived by his wife and son.

Thomas W. Gannon, manager of the Cairo Water Company, left last night on the Seminole and will attend the funeral which will probably be held at Williamsport, tomorrow.

KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS ADOPT RESOLUTION ON DEATH OF IVO PETTIT

Whereas it has pleased Almighty God in His divine Providence to call from our midst our beloved brother, Ivo Pettit, and whereas in the death of Brother Pettit, our council has lost a loyal and sympathetic member, his wife, a noble and devoted husband and his other relatives a true friend, his employers a worthy and conscientious employee and our holy church a devoted member.

Therefore, the Cairo Council 1027 Knights of Columbus in meeting assembled bow to the will of divine Providence, who does all things for the best, and be it

Resolved That a copy of these resolutions be spread upon the minutes of our meeting, and be it further resolved that a copy be ordered printed in the Cairo daily papers and that a copy be furnished to his wife and relatives.
Signed by committee on resolutions
W. E. Walker
Thomas E. O'Shea


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 23 Mar 1912:
FUNERAL OF SYRIAN WAS HELD FRIDAY

The funeral of S. F. George, the Syrian who was killed several nights ago by Phillip W. Harlan, the aged white man, was held Friday. The remains were interred in Beech Grove Cemetery.

FUNERAL OF LATE J. F. ROBERTS WILL BE HELD SUNDAY

The funeral of the late J. F. Roberts, who died at his home on upper Washington Avenue, Friday morning, will be held Sunday afternoon at the Cairo Baptist Church. The cortege will leave the family residence at 2:30 o'clock.

The remains will be taken to Makanda, Ill., for interment at 5 o'clock Monday morning. The Masonic order will have charge of the funeral services at the grave.

SHOT AT HAWK KILLED HIS BOY

Murphysboro, Ill., Mar. 23.—W. H. Walker, shot at a hawk flying about his place early today. His 8-year-old son jumped in the way and received the full charge from the shot gun. The boy died within a half hour.

Misses Maude and Etta Kennedy left this evening for St. Louis to attend the funeral of their cousin, Chester Hughes, who was killed by an automobile in that city.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Roberts—Died, Friday, March 22, J. F. Roberts, aged 43 years.

Funeral cortege will leave the family residence, No. 3400 Washington Avenue, Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock for the Cairo Baptist Church where service will be held by the pastor, Rev. Mr. Garrett.
Remains will be taken to Makanda for interment early Monday morning.

Friends of the family are invited to attend the funeral services.

MASONS

Officers and brethren of Cairo Lodge No. 237 A. F. & A. M. and visiting brethren will assemble at our lodge room at 1:15 p.m. Sunday, March 24th, to attend the funeral of our late brother, J. F. Roberts.
Special car will leave 8th and Commercial at 1:30 p.m. Funeral services at the grave will be at Makanda, Ill., by this lodge at 10 a.m. Monday morning. Train will leave here at 5:00 a.m. and we will return on No. 5 at 1:20 p.m.
By Order
C.S. Bourque, Worshipful Master
Attest
Ross C. Bates, Secretary

BROTHER-IN-LAW OF ZION BISHOP DEAD

Zion Bishop, the well-known feedman, received a letter from his sister this morning announcing the death of his brother-in-law, Morrison Smith, who passed away near Pennington Gap, Lee County, Virginia, last Sunday. The deceased was about 72 years old.

(Zion Bishop married Annie Himes on 19 Sep 1883, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 25 Mar 1912:
HONORED MEMORY OF DECEASED PRESIDENT

Out of respect for the deceased president of the Cairo Water Company, J. A. Beeder, the waterworks were shut down for ten minutes in Cairo Sunday afternoon, while the funeral services were being conducted at Williamsport, Pa.

Thomas W. Gannon, the local manager, attended the funeral.

OLD RESIDENT OF SIKESTON, MO., DEAD

Claude Smith, a resident of Sikeston, Mo., died at St. Mary's Infirmary, Sunday night, about 12:30. He was brought to the hospital several days ago. He leaves a family who reside at Sikeston. The remains were prepared for burial by Mrs. M. E. Feith, the funeral director, and sent to Sikeston on the afternoon Iron Mountain train.

OLD RESIDENT OF COUNTY DEAD

George Telle, an old resident of Alexander County, died at his home in Beech Ridge this morning. He had lived in and around Cairo for the past 40 years and was quite a character. For many years he was associated in business with Attress Horrel, his son-in-law, they being well known residents of the Beech Ridge community. In the old steamboat days he was a cook on many of the boats and will be remembered by the older river men.

REMAINS OF LATE J. F. ROBERTS TAKEN TO MAKANDA TODAY

The remains of the late J. F. Roberts, who died Saturday, were taken to Makanda, Ill., at 5 o'clock this morning, where interment was made in the family lot there.

The funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the Cairo Baptist Church, conducted by the Rev. Mr. Garrett. The pallbearers were Frank Spencer, C. L. Keaton, H. S. Antrim, J. C. Steinel, R. P. Flack, Fred Gaunt, Dr. H. A. Davis, and Al Staehle.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 26 Mar 1912:
DIED AS RESULT OF OVERDOSE OF "COKE"

Joseph Kelly alias "Goldie" died Saturday evening at St Mary's Infirmary from an overdose of cocaine in company with another white man named Harry Fee. They were arrested Saturday afternoon by the police and given a stay to leave town by Magistrate Whitcamp. According to Fee, they went to the upper end of town and stopped in a saloon near the bridge approach and bought several drinks of whiskey. After leaving the saloon, they sought shelter from the rain in a box car in a lumber yard near the approach, where they both took a dose of cocaine from a bottle they carried with them, Kelly took too much and became unconscious, whereupon Fee summoned help and the man was taken to the hospital, where he died shortly afterwards. Coroner McManus empaneled a jury and they rendered a verdict in accordance with the above facts.

In the man's pockets were papers indicating that he has relatives in Minneapolis and Coroner McManus communicated with them regarding the disposition of the body.

Uncle Charlie Woods, an aged colored citizen of this city (Mound City), died at his home Saturday and was buried Monday at Mounds.

J. A. Childers went to Olmsted last night to attend the funeral of his nephew, who died there last Sunday.

Negro Baggageman Dead—John Turner, a colored baggageman, died this afternoon at his home, 523 Twenty-third Street. He took seriously ill at the I.C. station at noon and was afterwards moved to his home in a carriage. He died while being taken up the stairs of his house on a stretcher. He was a thrifty, respected colored citizen and had been in the transfer business here many years. He leaves a family.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 27 Mar 1912:
Ray Crouse died here (McClure) Monday after a long illness of tuberculosis. The young man was highly respected. He lived with his parents, who moved from Jonesboro here several months ago. He was a member of Jonesboro M. B. of A., the body left here at 6 o'clock for Anna, where he was buried.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 28 Mar 1912:
CARD OF THANKS

The family and relatives of the late J. F. Roberts desire to thank their many friends for all the kindness and sympathy extended unto them in their recent bereavement and great loss.

Especially do they wish to thank the Masonic order for their splendid help that relieved the family of so many cares. To the pastor and members of the Cairo Baptist Church, who came with their Christian sympathy to strengthen faith in the Unseen One. To the quartette, who sang so beautifully at the funeral, and to the many friends and business associates of Mr. Roberts, who contributed flowers, which always speak their message of another life.
Mrs. J. F. Roberts
Dr. and Mrs. H. J. Elkins
Miss Roberta Roberts

TWO MINERS FELL TO DEATH TODAY

Lebanon, Ill., Mar. 28.—Dick Leslie and Virgil Dougan, miners, were crushed to death today when they fell 200 feet down the shaft of the Bennett mine here. They thought the cage was at the top of the entrance and attempted to push an empty car onto the cage to be lowered. The cage was at the bottom and the car plunged down the shaft carrying the men with it.

Lee Arnold and son Robert left Tuesday night for Paducah, where they will attend the funeral of Mrs. Eich. Mrs. Eich is a grandmother of Robert. (Mound City)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 30 Mar 1912:
OLD RESIDENT OF COUNTY DEAD
A. J. Bunch Passed Away at McClure Friday Night

A.J. Bunch, old resident of McClure, died last night. He had been in failing health for a long time and his death was not unexpected.

The deceased was born on January 31, 1837, and was therefore 75 years of age. He was a native of Alexander County, his birthplace being near where Elco now stands. His parents died during his infancy and he was reared at Jonesboro, where, when he was old enough, he learned the blacksmith trade. He ran a shop for himself for several years and then removed to Clear Creek, where he conducted a blacksmith shop for several years. Then he turned his attention to farming, which occupied his attention until in his declining years he turned over active pursuits to his sons.

Mr. Bunch was married March 12, 1862, to Miss Minerva I. Sams, daughter of Nathan Sams, and six children were born to them, Joseph, Herman, and Rodney, and Misses Minnie, Norma and Eunice.

(Cader Bunch married Maria Landers on 6 Jan 1831, in Union Co., Ill.  Andrew J. Bunch married Minnervia I. Sams on 12 Feb 1862, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Lindsey Cemetery near McClure reads:  A. J. Bunch Born Jan. 31, 1837 Died March 29, 1912.—Darrel Dexter)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 1 Apr 1912:

BILLY BRYAN DIED SATURDAY
Well Known Illinois Central Conductor Passed Away at Murphysboro

"Billy Bryan," an old resident of southern Illinois and formerly a veteran conductor on the Illinois Central, died Saturday at his home in Murphysboro, where he had made his home since his retirement from railroad service several years ago.

Mr. Bryan was quite a character, a typical representative of the type of the older school of railroad men. His railroad career was an eventful one, having risen from the ranks. When the old Texas and Pacific road chartered its line through this part of the state, Bryan began employment as a water boy, and was later one of the first conductors to have charge of a train for that corporation. When the Illinois Central purchased the line, Bryan remained with the new company and continued with same until about two years ago. The branch was extended over a larger territory and Bryan gained much popularity in his runs, not only with the natives along the line, but with the traveling men and others. His train was known as "Bryan's train" and as such it was listed on the company timetables and bulletin boards, here in Cairo and all intermediate stations along the route.

SON OF FORMER CAIRO PASTOR DIES ON TRAIN

The following from the DuQuoin Herald will be of interest to the many friends of Rev. W. T. Morris, who was formerly pastor of the First Methodist Church here:

Rev. W. T. Morris, pastor of the First M. E. Church, received a sad message this morning, apprising him of the sudden death of his son, J. M. Morris, who expired on the train while en route from Ogden, Utah, to Los Angeles, Cal., where he was going for the benefit of his health.

Mr. Morris had been in the hospital at Ogden for about two weeks and upon the advice of his physicians started for California, hoping that the climate would prove beneficial. He had been in the employ of a railroad freight office at Ogden and the close confinement is thought to have caused a general breakdown of health. Many DuQuoin people will remember Mr. Morris as he visited his parents last December.

The bereaved parents have the sympathy of the people of this city in their hour of sorrow. The remains will be shipped to Fairfield, Ill., for interment.

Obituary

Alice Spencer, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Spencer, was born in Pulaski, Pulaski County, Ill., June 17, 1893, and died at Bird's Point, Mo., March 28, 1912, aged 18 years, 9 months and 11 days. The house in which the deceased passed away was surrounded by water and the remains were brought to Cairo, Ill., in a skiff. She was a member of a family of ten children and hers was the first death in the family. She was a sister-in-law of our fellow townsman, Henry Hudson. Funeral services were held in Beechwood Cemetery last Saturday, conducted by the Rev. J. H. Runalls, pastor of the First Congregational Church of Mounds, and a goodly number of friends of the family were present at the graveside. Some beautiful floral offerings rested on the casket and at the close of the services the bereaved family returned to their home at Birds' Point, Mo. (Mounds)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 2 Apr 1912:
Negro Drowned at Bird's Mill

The levee at Bird's Mill broke today and the water rushed in so rapidly that Lee Foggy, a negro, was drowned before he could get to a place of safety. He was at breakfast when the break occurred.

MRS. T. B. ECHOLS DIED THIS MORNING

Mrs. Thomas B. Echols, of Grand Chain, died suddenly this morning. Her daughter, Mrs. J. E. Woelfle, was at her bedside, and Dr. Woelfle went to Grand Chain today, securing a launch to take him there as the Big Four train could not take him there.

(Thomas B. Echols married Ammon Brown on 1 Dec 1863, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  James E. Woelfle, 28, physician, born in Anna, son of John M Woelfle and Anna L. Clark, married Hortense Hannon Echols, 20, born in Grand Chain, daughter of Thomas B. Echols and Annie Brown, on 10 Oct 1900, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Amine B. Echols 1845-1912.—Darrel Dexter)

Billy Bryan, of Cape Girardeau, formerly conductor on the I. C., died Saturday at the Cape. (McClure)

The funeral of Andrew J. Bunch was held Sunday at his residence.  Rev. Father Murtough, of St. Vincent Catholic Church of Cape Girardeau, Mo., conducted the simple but impressive service. There was a large gathering of relatives and friends from Thebes, St. Louis, Cape Girardeau, and Cairo, besides his friends and neighbors at McClure. The floral tributes were beautiful. The pallbearers were F. M. Culley, James Hensley, James Lovell, William Knight, John J. Jacobs, and Ferdinand Glaab.  In the death of Mr. Bunch, McClure, with one exception, loses its oldest and most respected resident. Coming here over 40 years ago, he worked at his trade as a blacksmith and afterwards commenced farming. He has always taken an active part in its affairs. He was a Republican in his younger days and later turned a Democrat. He was a successful farmer and at one time an Odd Fellow of Jonesboro lodge, but after coming to McClure and he being the only member and not having a chance to attend lodge, he allowed his membership to lapse. He was a school director for several terms and was well read and kept well informed on public affairs and many of the people used to go to him for information. He was born Jan. 31, 1837. He leaves a wife, three sons, Joseph Bunch, Herman and Dr. Rodney, and two daughters, Minnie and Mrs. Norma Fullenwider, and nine grandchildren. The interment was in the Lindza Cemetery.

TWO MEN KILLED; ONE WOUNDED AT ODIN
Deputy Kills Drunken Men in Fight in Dry Town

Odin, Ill., April 2.—George Winger, deputized by City Marshall George Finn early today to help suppress a crowd of drunken men who were quarrelling and fighting, shot three of the men, killing two and seriously wounding another, within five minutes after he had been sworn in. In interfering, he was thrown to the ground in a rough and tumble fight and opened fire. Charles Drod, aged 20, was killed and Charles Day, 25, and Henry Gross, 24, wounded, Gross dying soon after. Odin is a dry town, but the men had secured the liquor in a neighboring city.

KILLED BY TRAIN AT MILL CREEK
Willard Holmes, 26, Fell under Mobile & Ohio Train

Willard Holmes, aged 26, was killed by Mobile & Ohio train No. 2 northbound at Mill Creek, Saturday. He had jumped on the train to ride a short distance and when he jumped off he lost his balance and the train ran over him, cutting him in two at the hips. He lived only 15 minutes after the accident. He was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Holmes. The coroner’s verdict was in accordance with the above facts and laid no blame upon the railroad company. Funeral services were held at the Congregational church Sunday and the remains were buried in St. John's Cemetery.

(His marker in St. John’s Cemetery near Mill Creek reads:  Willard son of O. P. & Etta Holmes Born June 14, 1885 Died March 30, 1912.—Darrel Dexter)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 4 Apr 1912:
JULIUS ZERFASS DIED LAST NIGHT

Julius Zerfass, second son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Zerfass, died Wednesday night at 12:45 o'clock at the family residence, 232 Twelfth Street, of brain fever. The illness was only of three days duration. Deceased was 15 years old. Besides his parents, two brothers, Edward and Alfred, and one sister, Miss Bertha, survive him.

The young man was in his first year at the high school, was exceptionally bright and well-liked by his fellow students and teachers. His brother Edward, a student at Culver Military Academy, will arrive tonight.

The funeral arrangements have not been made.

(His marker in Calvary Cemetery at Olive Branch reads:  Julius H. Zerfass 1897-1912.—Darrel Dexter)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 5 Apr 1912:
FIVE DROWNED AT BIRD'S POINT

William Lynn, his wife, and three children are reported drowned near Bird's Point. They were overtaken by the rising waters while attempting to reach higher ground. Two farmers are also reported drowned.

Edward Zerfass, who is a student at Culver Military Academy, arrived in Cairo Wednesday night called by the death of his brother, Julius Zerfass, which occurred Wednesday.



The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 9 Apr 1912:
Willard Holmes was born June 14 1885, at Springville, Ind., died March 30, 1912, aged 26 years, 9 months and 16 days. He was the oldest child and only son of Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Holmes. He leaves a father, mother, five sisters and a host of friends to mourn his loss.

At the age of 13 he united with the Methodist Church at Springville.  Although the grim reaper of death came and cut him down, we have the hope of meeting him on the other shore.

We desire to thank the many kind friends for the assistance and sympathy extended us at the time of our sad loss of our dead son and brother, Willard.

Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Holmes and family

Charles M. Farris, a prominent farmer living four miles east of Vienna, was shot and instantly killed by his nephew, Duff Howell, Sunday afternoon about 3:30 o'clock. Mr. Farris was driving along the country road and stopped in front of the house of his sister, Mr. and Mrs. Josh Howell.  They were standing at the fence talking to Mrs. Farris when the son came out on the porch with a gun and said: "Uncle Charley, I believe I will just shoot your hat off." Farris says, "Just crack down."  The gun went off and the ball striking him near the eye, causing instant death. He fell over in his wagon and remained there until Sheriff Veach and Coroner Hood arrived. The killing took place at Old Grantsburg, about seven miles east of Vienna. The coroner’s jury have not delivered their verdict yet. All connected in this unfortunate affair are prominent farmers.

IN MEMORIAM

In loving memory of my dear father, Moses B. Harrell, who died in Chicago, April 9, 1909, in the eighty-first year of his age.
Ida Harrell Castle


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 10 Apr 1912:
GREEK DROWNED IN THE OHIO
Workman Injured by Illinois Central Pile Driver Dies from Injuries

When a rowboat, in which they were trying to make their way to Wickliffe, Ky., capsized near Twelfth and Ohio streets, Tuesday, two Greek laborers employed by the Illinois Central fell into the river and one was drowned. The other narrowly missed a similar fate, but was rescued before he was swept down by the current to a watery grave.

The men took the skiff from its moorings in front of the stone depot at Fourteenth Street and started down the river. They had no oars, but used a board as a paddle. When near Twelfth Street, the board dropped from the hand of the oarsman into the river and when he attempted to reach over the side of the boat to get the paddle, the boat turned over and both men fell into the river. One sank several times when he attracted attention by his cries.  Several men on the bank threw a plank to him, but it was too late, and he sank out of sight for the third time.

The other managed to hold on overturned boat and floated down to Tenth Street, where he was rescued by Travis Kimmel in his launch.

The boat in which the laborers tried to make the trip was the property of Freight Agent Ladd, of the Illinois Central. By a strange coincidence, a son of Mr. Ladd was drowned by the capsizing of the same boat about thirteen years ago and the skiff has never been used since. The laborers had taken the boat without permission of Mr. Ladd.

Several days ago the Illinois Central sent about 400 foreign laborers to Wickliffe, Ky., to be transported from there to Chicago by the way of Paducah and it is presumed that the two men desired to go to Wickliffe for this purpose. The man who was saved cannot speak English, so the identity of his unfortunate companion could not be learned.

(The drowned man was identified as Anthony Cosnarearki in the 20 Apr 1912, issue.—Darrel Dexter)

Injured Man Dies from Injuries.

John O'Dies, the man who was injured at Cairo Junction Monday night, while at work on the pile driver there, died at St. Mary’s Infirmary late Tuesday afternoon, where he had been confined since the accident. He leaves a wife and several children. The remains were shipped today to his home at Calvert City, Ky., by Mrs. M. E. Feith, the undertaker.

FUNERAL OF LATE CYRUS SMITH HELD THIS MORNING

The funeral of the late Cyrus Smith, whose death occurred Saturday evening, was held this morning at 7:30 o'clock at Burke's undertaking establishment. The service of the Episcopal Church was read by Rev. Dr. F. A. Derosset and only the relatives and the employees of Smith Brothers Store were present. The remains in a double metallic casket weighing 700 pounds were taken on the tug Theseus to Mound City, from there to Mounds in a skiff and from Mounds in a wagon to Villa Ridge, where interment was made. The deceased's brother, E. A. Smith, and Rev. Dr. De Rosset were present at the burial.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 11 Apr 1912:
FORMER CAIROITE DIED WEDNESDAY

James Milne, former Cairoite, passed away at Los Angeles, Cal., Wednesday afternoon of paralysis.
The news of his death came in a message to The Citizen this morning.

Mr. Milne left Cairo several years ago for the coast, to make his home there with his children. He was for years head miller of the Halliday mills and was of the respected citizens of Cairo

He leaves a widow and a number of children, all grown.

CARD OF THANKS

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Zerfass and family hereby express their thanks to friends and neighbors who so kindly and willingly expressed sympathy and rendered aid during the illness and obsequies of their late son and brother, Julius.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 12 Apr 1912:
YOUNG MAN DIED OF TUBERCULOSIS
Thomas O'Laughlin Passed Away This Morning

Thomas O'Loughlin, aged 22, died at the home of his father, Patrick O'Laughlin, No. 228 Twenty-first Street, at 4:55 this morning of tuberculosis. He had been ill for about two years and a year ago went to San Antonio in search of health.

He leaves, besides his father, one sister, Mrs. Margaret Piersol and three brothers, Joseph, Stephen and John O'Laughlin.

Funeral arrangements have not yet been concluded, but burial will probably be Monday at Villa Ridge.

Attorney George E. Martin and wife attended the funeral of Rev. W. D. Margrave held in Vienna Thursday. Rev. Margrave was a former pastor in this city (Mound City).

The remains of Charles M. Farris, who was accidentally killed on last Sunday afternoon, were laid to rest in the Johnson County cemetery three miles east of town (Vienna) on Tuesday afternoon. Funeral services were conducted by Eld. J. L. Payne of the Baptist church. The deceased leaves a wife, aged mother, several brothers and sister and a host of friends to mourn his untimely departure. He was a brother of Dr. G. K. Farris, of Mounds, Ill. The Farris family is a large one and very prominent one in Johnson County. The coroner’s jury have not yet delivered the verdict and perhaps will not today on account of this being primary election day.

(Charles M. Farris, 28, born in Johnson County, a teacher, son of Thomas G. Farris, married Mary Viola Perhamous, 22, born in Williamson County, daughter of Thomas J. Perhamous and Miss Sanders, on 7 Sep 1896, in Union Co., Ill.  Thomas G. Farris married Catharine Gillispie on 13 Sep 1854, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Thomas G. Farris married Mandy Gillespie on 17 Jan 1859, in Johnson Co., Ill.  Thomas J. Perhamous married Mary L. Sanders on 27 Sep 1868, in Williamson Co, Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 13 Apr 1912:
OLD RESIDENT OF CAIRO DEAD
J. T. Jones Passed Away after a Long Illness

After an illness of two years, John T. Jones died Friday night at the family residence, 1701 Poplar Street.  His condition became serious about three weeks ago and since that time he failed rapidly.  He was in his 59th year, having been born in Springgreen, Wisconsin, August 17, 1853.

Mr. Jones was one of Cairo's respected citizens and was well known, having been in the employ of the Illinois Central for 22 years, being foreman of the shops both here and at Mounds.  At the latter place he resigned his position about eight years ago and embarked in the general store business there.  Several years ago he disposed of these interests there and returned to Cairo again to reside.

The members of his family are, besides his wife, two daughters, Misses Catherine and Helen, and four sons, Harry, William and Thomas, of this city, and John, of Birmingham, Alabama, and also a sister-in-law, Miss Margaret Chauncey, of this city.  He also has other relatives in Wisconsin.

Deceased was a member of the Cairo Commandery Knights Templar.  The funeral arrangements will be announced later.
 
EDWARD GALLIGAN DIED LAST NIGHT

Edward Galligan, aged 41 years, died last evening at St. Mary's Infirmary, after an illness of three weeks of Bright's disease.  The deceased was an engineer on the Mobile & Ohio railroad up to three months ago.  The remains were taken to the home of his mother, Mrs. Anna Galligan, No. 420 Twentieth Street, where the funeral services will be held tonight at 8 o'clock.  Owing to the conditions of the river, the funeral will be private.  The remains will be taken to Villa Ridge via Mound City, Sunday morning at 6 o'clock for interment leaving on the tug Frances.
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—Ed Galligan, aged 41 years.  Services will be held at the residence, No. 420 Twentieth Street, at 8 o'clock tonight, conducted by Father James Gillen.  The remains will be taken to Villa Ridge cemetery (via Mound City) for interment, leaving the wharf at Sixth Street, Sunday morning at 6 o'clock on the tug Frances.  Funeral private.  Omit flowers.

(A marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Edward Gallegan.—Darrel Dexter)
 


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 15 Apr 1912:
LAUNCH CAPSIZED, MAN DROWNED
Rudy Davis of Joppa Lost His Life at Bird's Point Sunday

Rudy Davis, a resident of Joppa, Ill., was drowned in the overturning of a launch Sunday afternoon back of Bird's Point.  In company with Otto Laird and Samuel Tucker, they were going to Charleston to look after a half-brother of Davis named Walter Davis.  In crossing the Iron Mountain track, which was submerged, their launch was overturned, and they were thrown out.  Laird and Tucker were able to get out, but Davis was swept away by the swift current and his body was not recovered.  The two survivors were brought over in a skiff by C. C. Hendricks.  The accident occurred at 5:30 Sunday afternoon. 

Davis was 20 years of age, unmarried and has a father living at Joppa.  He was dressed in a blue suit.  He was a man 5 feet six or eight inches in height.  According to Laird, the launch they were in was properly equipped and they were depending upon Davis, who said he knew the country there, to take them through to Charleston safely.
 
ELMER STEVERS KILLED AT MOUNDS
Shot in Parker's Saloon by H. W. Webb Saturday Night

Elmer Stevers was shot and instantly killed in Parker's Saloon at Mounds Saturday night.  H. M. Webb, an employee of the Illinois Central, did the shooting.  Stevers, who is known as "Little Pistol," gave Webb a very severe beating a few days prior to the shooting, according to the story given to The CitizenStevers had been running a crap game in another saloon. He was in Parker’s Saloon and had his knife out when Webb entered.  Seeing Webb, Stevers is said to have threatened to fix him, when Webb pulled a big gun and fired several shots, killing Stevers instantly.  After the shooting Webb gave himself up to the marshal.
 
TWO FUNERALS HELD TODAY
Remains of John T. Jones and Thomas O'Loughlin Interred at Villa Ridge

The funeral of the late John T. Jones, who died Friday night, after a prolonged illness, was held this morning at the family residence, 4701 Poplar Street, interment being made at Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge.  The pallbearers were Phil C. Barclay, B. McManus, Jr., Frank Gibson, Peter Day, M. S. Egan, and E. W. Walker.  A special Illinois Central train conveyed the remains to the cemetery.
Funeral of Thomas O'Loughlin

The funeral of the late Thomas O'Loughlin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Patrick O'Laughlin, of 228 Twenty-first Street, who died Saturday morning, was held this morning at St. Joseph's Church and interment made at Calvary Cemetery in Villa Ridge.

Rev. Fr. James Gillen, pastor of St. Joseph's Parish, was the officiating priest at both funerals.

(A marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  John T. Jones 1849-1912.—Darrel Dexter)
 
SHERIDAN MURDER TRIAL OPENED AT VIENNA TODAY

Vienna, Ill., April 15—The case of State's Attorney Thomas H. Sheridan, of Johnson County, accused of the murder of Harry Thacker here on September 16, 1910, was called in court today for trial.  The killing of Thacker was the result of a bitter arraignment of Thacker's father, Frank Thacker by Sheridan in his newspaper.  Sheridan claims he acted in self-defense.

(Francis B. Thacker married Nancy C. Peterson on 25 Oct 1866, in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
BODY RECOVERED IN OHIO TODAY
Remains of Thomas Gardner, Colored, Found This Morning

The body of Thomas Gardner, a colored man, who was drowned a week ago Saturday night, was recovered this morning. It was found at Eighteenth and Ohio Levee by militiamen patrolling the levee there.  Gardner, who was a member of the Cairo police force in Woodward administration, leaves a wife and five children.
 
The funeral service of Mr. C. O. Smith, of Ilmo, Mo., were conducted by the Rev. J. H. Runalls at the graveside in Beechwood Cemetery here (Mounds) last Thursday.  The deceased was a Freemason and the members of the local lodge of Freemasons attended the funeral in a body.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 17 Apr 1912:
Mrs. J. E. Woelfle and children have returned from Grand Chain where the death of Mrs. Woelfle's mother occurred very suddenly last week.
 
MRS. R. F. ROBERTSON DEAD AT LITTLE ROCK
Passed Away Today of Ptomaine Poisoning

Mrs. Anna Robertson, widow of the late R. F. Robertson, died suddenly at noon today at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. N. Moxley, at Little Rock, Ark.  News came in a telephone message to Mrs. H. O. Farrow, stating that she had died of ptomaine poisoning.

Mrs. Robertson for the past several years had made her home here with her daughters, Mrs. H. O. Farrow and Mrs. A. F. Staehle.  For the past year she has been on an extended visit with her daughter, Mrs. Moxley in Little Rock.

The Robertson family have been highly respected residents of Cairo for over 20 years, when they moved to this city from Virginia.  Mr. Robertson, who died several years since, was a public official in various city administrations.

Mrs. Robertson was 65 years of age and a native of Virginia.  She was a charter member of the Christian Science Church of this city.

The following children survive her:  Mrs. H. O. Farrow and Mrs. A. F. Staehle, of this city, Mrs. W. B. Hays, of Poplar Bluff, Mo., Mrs. John Parham, of Memphis, Tenn., and Mrs. J. N. Moxley, of Little Rock, Ark.

Funeral arrangements have not been made, but it is probable that the remains will be interred in the cemetery at Little Rock.  Mrs. Farrow and Mrs. Staehle will leave tonight for Little Rock, Ark., to attend the funeral.

(Albert Ferdinand Staehle married Daisy Edna Robertson on 2 Jan 1901, in Alexander Co., Ill.  William B. Hays married Lizzie L. Robertson on 23 Dec 1884, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 18 Apr 1912:
FORMER CAIROITE DIED AT KNOB LICK, MO.

Tony Overton, a former Cairoite, died at 10 o'clock last night at the home of his mother at Knob Lick, Mo.  The deceased was a member of Egypt Camp No. 18, Woodmen of the World, of this city.  He is survived by his mother, Mrs. Mary J. Overton, and two brothers, J. B. and R. S. Overton.
 
Tim Mahoney died last Monday night after more than two months’ illness.  The funeral services will be held at the Congregational church on Thursday at 1 p.m.  (Mounds)
 
Thomas Cassiday came from St. Louis to attend Timothy Mahoney's funeral, which is to be held today.  (Mounds)
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 20 Apr 1912:
BODY TAKEN FROM RIVER FOUND TO BE THAT OF GREEK

The body of a white man found floating in the Ohio River late yesterday afternoon by Wiley Hale and A. F. Nellius, was found to be that of the Greek, who was drowned near Fourteenth Street on April 9th.

The man wore a pair of corduroy pants and white sweater, and these correspond with those worn by the Greek.

He was identified by other Greek laborers as being the man who was drowned.

The body was taken to Burke's undertaking parlors, where Coroner McManus held an inquest.

In company with another Greek, the drowned man fell out of a skiff near the stone depot.  One was rescued and the other was drowned and his body was not recovered at the time.  They were among the laborers brought down from Chicago by the Illinois Central to work on the levees here during the flood.
Rev. A. M. Eels was chosen as foreman of the coroner’s jury.  After a Greek interpreter told the name of the drowned man in Greek, Rev. Eels, who is a Greek scholar, translated the name into English, which is Anthony Cosnarearki.

He is said to have been in America only five months and came from the island of Crete.
 
RICHARDSON STOLID TO THE VERY LAST
Slayer of John Violett Assumed Air of Bravado in Death Chair
ELECTROCUTION WAS SUCCESSFUL
Death Ensued a Few Minutes after Current Was Turned On

Eddyville, Ky., April 20—Walking jauntily between the death watch and preceded by the chaplain of the penitentiary, Willard Richardson convicted of the murder of John Violett, stepped to the electric chair and without a tremor took his seat in the place of death and awaited the adjusting of the apparatus that would take his life.

Turning to the small group of newspaper men and prison officials, he remarked, "It takes a brave man to do this, boys, doesn't it."  As the chaplain prayed, the straps were tightened around Richardson’s body.  The doomed man took no interest in either the prayers or the preparations, but as the hood was about to be placed over his face, he asked in a jocular tone:  "I've got my false teeth in; do you think the shock will jar them out?"  He had no desire to make a statement or receive any religious ministration, but with an air of bravado settled himself to await the end.

The current was turned on and in a very few minutes Richardson was pronounced dead.  Only the slightest movement of one finger outstretched on the arm of the death chair indicated that the strong current was passing through his body.

The electrocution was considered successful in every way.  The body was in no way disfigured and death was instant.

The officials at Eddyville assert that a more apparently depraved man than Richardson was never known at the penitentiary.  He has carried himself with a "daredevil" air ever since his incarceration and has never expressed any contrition for his crime.

He ate heartily and slept well on the days and nights preceding his electrocution.  His aged father entreated him to seek pardon in prayer, and to his solicitations Richardson replied, "Quit bellyaching around, you bother me."

Richardson's murder of Violett at Milburn, in Carlisle, County, on February 17, was absolutely unprovoked and mob violence was threatened at the time.  He was twice taken to Paducah for safekeeping and before his trial feigned insanity, reverting to a confession when placed on the stand.
 
Obituary

Timothy Mahoney, son of Timothy C. and Ellen Mahoney, was born in Cairo, Ill., Jan. 28, 1876, and died at Mounds, Ill., April 16, 1912, aged 36 years, 2 months and 18 days.  He was united by marriage on April 15, 1906, at Pulaski, Pulaski County, Ill., to Miss Ida Bird.  To this union four children were born, two of whom have preceded their father to that land from which no traveler returns.  Both he and his wife were baptized into the Christian faith on April 14, 1912.  He leaves a widow and two children, his father and mother, three brothers and one sister to mourn his early departure from this lower world.  Funeral services were held in the Congregational church last Thursday afternoon, conducted by the pastor, Rev. J. H. Runalls.  A quartet consisting of Mrs. J. B. Healy, Mrs. J. C. Mench, Messrs. J. C. Mench and Will Gallion with Miss Nellie Runalls at the organ, furnished the music appropriate to the occasion.  The church was filled with relatives and sympathizing friends and a good many beautiful floral pieces were borne to the church and grave by six ladies who kindly officiated in that capacity.  The interment took place in Beechwood Cemetery, where many friends awaited the funeral procession.  The beautiful flowers were placed on the grave and the minister having returned the thanks of the family to the friends, who had shown their sympathy with them in this hour of trial, they were dismissed.

(Timothy Mahoney married Ellen Armstrong on 31 Oct 1862, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Jonathon Stamper Gardner, an old citizen of our town (Bardwell, Ky.), died at an early hour yesterday, the cause of his death being the infirmities of old age.  Mr. Gardner formerly lived in Henry County, Ky., but came to Bardwell about five years ago and has since made his home with his half-brother, Judge T. T. Gardner.  He was eighty-nine years old last October and had never been married.  Religiously he was a Methodist and while his enfeebled condition did not permit him to get about much, he made friends of those with whom he came in contact.  The burial will take place this morning in the Bardwell Cemetery.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 22 Apr 1912:
MANY LOST LIVES IN CYCLONE SUNDAY NIGHT
Bush, Ill., Near Murphysboro, Almost Swept Off Map
DEAD REPORTED AT ORAVILLE AND HERRIN
Injured Rushed to St. Andrew's Hospital for Treatment—Heavy Hail Accompanied Storm

Murphysboro, Ill., April 22.—Many lives were lost and much property was destroyed by a cyclone which swept a number of towns and villages north and west of this city about 6 o'clock last evening.
The storm was accompanied by little rain, but large hailstones fell doing great damage.  The wind came in a circular manner, twisting houses and trees and picking people off their feet and hurling them to their death.

The damage to Murphysboro was slight.  One man, a farm hand named Naude, was killed just north of this city by being hurled against a tree.

At Willisville, 20 miles north of Murphysboro, 5 were killed and 25 injured.

At Bush, 10 are reported killed and 48 injured.

At Herrin, 6 were killed northeast of the city and several hurt.

It is reported that Bush was almost swept off the map.

Oraville and a settlement known as Niggerwood also suffered severely from the storm.
 
DEATH CLAIMED JOHN FARRELL

John Farrell, a resident of this city for many years, died about 8 o'clock Sunday evening at St. Mary's Infirmary, of abscess of the brain caused by a stroke of paralysis several weeks ago.

He was quite well known, being at one time a member of the city fire department and recently an engineer on the transfer steamer Henry Marquand.  He was 59 years of age and was a member of the Tribe of Ben Hur.  He leaves a wife and three children, who reside at 317 Division Street.  He also leaves a brother, Frank Farrell, who resides in Cincinnati and who arrived in the city Sunday.

The funeral will probably be held Tuesday.
 
MRS. OLLIE LOLLIS DIED THIS MORNING

Mrs. Ollie Lollis, wife of James Lollis, of 309 ½ Fourth Street, died at 6:30 o'clock this morning at St. Mary’s Infirmary of tuberculosis.  She had been ill for about three years.  They were married nine years. Surviving are two brothers living at Gold Dust, Tenn., and a cousin residing at Harrisburg.

Funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon and the remains will be taken to Beech Grove Cemetery, E. A. Burke having charge of the funeral.
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

John Farrell died Sunday night at 8 o'clock at St. Mary’s Infirmary.  Funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon at the residence, 317 Division Street, conducted by Rev. Father James J. Gillen.  Train will leave Fourteenth Street at 2:45 for Villa Ridge, where interment will be made.
 
AGED NEGRESS FATALLY INJURED SATURDAY AFTERNOON

Mariah Moore, an aged negro woman, and an old resident of Cairo, was fatally injured Saturday evening about 5:30, when she was struck by a moving freight car in the I. C. yards just above Fourteenth Street, and died a few hours later at St. Mary's Infirmary, where she was removed after the accident.

The old woman has been a familiar figure around the freight platforms and grain sheds in the various railroad guards of the city for many years.  It is presumed she was picking up grain Saturday evening along the tracks north of the stone depot, when a freight car being switched by one of the crew struck her.  Her body was crushed between the track and the platform there. She was found by a passerby in the yards and died at the hospital without regaining consciousness.

She had lived on Twenty-first Street between Sycamore and Poplar and was about 90 years of age.  She had no surviving relative.
 
32 DEAD IN TWO CYCLONES; ONE TOWN WRECKED
Illinois and Indiana Swept by Twisters that Injured Many Persons
SCHOOL HOUSE BLOWN AWAY
Death List at Bush, 15, at Willisville 5, and Morocco (Ind.) 9, According to Reports—Forty Injured Taken to Murphysboro

St. Louis, April 22.—Thirty-two persons are known to be dead, half a score are so severely injured they may die and 150 others hurt in two tornadoes which swept over southern Illinois, in one instance, and across northern Illinois into Indiana in the other, just before sunset last night.

Fifteen were killed at Bush, Ill., five at Willisville, names not obtainable, three at Reddick, Ill., and nine at Morocco, Ind.

Others may be found beneath the wreckage of what was Bush, every building being demolished.  Forty injured from this town alone were brought into Murphysboro, where the storm severely injured three late last night.

Some of the dead are:
Biggs, Mrs. Henry, Murphysboro
Conn, Miss, Morocco, Ind.
Hanger, Bruce, Morocco, Ind.
Hammel, Modde, Morocco, Ind.
Hulse, Nelson, Reddick, Ill.; crushed under his home when it was blown down
Hulse, Mrs. Nelson
Daughter of Mrs. Hulse
King, George and two daughters, Murphysboro
Rice, Mrs. Charles, Morocco, Ind.
Four young children of Mrs. Rice
Rice, Frank, a married son
Rice, Mrs. Frank
Smart, Miss Cassie, Morocco, Ind.
Infant sister of Miss Smart

Those injured so seriously they may die are:
Two children in the family of Nelson Hulse, of Reddick, Ill.
Smart, Charles, father of the Smart girls who were killed at Morocco, Ind.
Rice, Charles, head of the Rice family at the same place, which was wiped out
Wilderback, William, Murphysboro, Ill.
Wilderback, Mrs.
Black, Henry, Grant Park, Ill
Five-year-old son of Mr. Vanderberk
Redenbauch, Walter, Grant Park
Vanderberg, Grant Park
Rascher, Carl, Grant Park
St. Aupin, Napoleon, Grant Park
Fifteen Dead at Bush

(Nelson Hulse may be the same person as Nelson W. Hulse, who married Abba M. Smith on 8 May 1900, in Kankakee Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Murphysboro, Ill., April 22.—Fifteen persons were killed by a cyclone that struck Bush, a village of 600, at 6 o'clock last evening

The St. Louis Iron Mountain and Southern round house and shops were demolished and the general store of the Western Coal and Mining Company, the post office, Joe Berras' pool room and a row of company houses would be brought to Murphysboro.

A special train brought forty-one injured to the Murphysboro hospital.  Two children died on the train and one Italian woman died on the way to the hospital.  Members of the train crew state that but half of the wrecked district had been searched when the train was filled and fifteen bodies were found.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 23 Apr 1912:
BODY OF DROWNED MAN RECOVERED AT BIRD'S POINT

The body of Rudy Davis, who lost his life near Bird's Point, Mo., on Sunday, April 14, was recovered today.  It was found within 100 yards of where the launch capsized when it struck the Iron Mountain embankment.  C. C. Hendricks found the young man's body.  It will be sent to his home in Joppa tomorrow for burial.
 
PROMINENT NEW MADRID MAN DEAD
J. V. Conran Succumbs to Gun Shot Wound

J. V. Conran, a prominent citizen of New Madrid, Mo., and well known in Cairo, died at his home at 11 o'clock Tuesday night from the effects of a gunshot wound in the abdomen accidentally self-inflicted. Mr. Conran had been out hunting and returned in the evening. He had a shot gun in his hands and it dropped to the floor and was accidentally discharged, inflicting the wound which caused instant death.
The deceased was a prominent lawyer in New Madrid County and leaves a wife and one son.
 


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 24 Apr 1912:
BIRD’S POINT FARMER SHOT AND KILLED

James G. Forgey, a Bird’s Point farmer, was shot and instantly killed this morning about 8 o'clock by Oscar Parsons, a white man in his employ.  The cause of the shooting could not be learned, as there were no witnesses and Parsons, who later gave himself up to the sheriff of Mississippi County, would not make a statement.  Forgey is an old resident of Bird's Point and is about sixty years of age.  Parsons is a middle aged man.  Both have families and are well known in Cairo.  The remains of the deceased were brought to Cairo this afternoon to be prepared for burial by E. A. Burke.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 25 Apr 1912:
BURIED AT WICKLIFFE

The remains of the late James G. Forgey, who was shot and killed at Bird's Point Wednesday morning by Oscar Parsons, will be interred at the cemetery at Wickliffe, Friday afternoon, the funeral party going over in a gasoline launch.
 
ELDORADO MAN CONVICTED OF MURDER

Harrisburg, Ill., April 25.—Jeff Murphy was today convicted by a jury of the murder of Hiram Robertson and sentenced to fourteen years in the penitentiary.  The killing occurred at Eldorado where Murphy was one of the leading citizens.
 
ISAAC N. BRADLEY DIED AT HOME IN MADISON, WIS.

Word has been received in Cairo of the death of Isaac N. Bradley, which occurred at his home in Madison, Wisconsin, recently following an operation by the famous Mayo brothers for goiter.  Dr. Bradley was a pioneer settler of Madison and had held the position of librarian at the State Historical Library in that city since 1892.  He had also been assistant librarian since 1875.  In 1879 he married Miss Clara Dietrich, of Cairo, at her home here.  The Dietrich family were residents of Cairo some years ago and will be remembered by a number of old friends here.
 
FORMER CAIROITE DIED AT MURPHYSBORO

Mrs. Phoebe P. Lewis, aged 45 years, died at St. Andrew’s Hospital in Murphysboro Wednesday afternoon after illness of a week’s duration from pneumonia.  Deceased was wife of John A. Lewis, a veteran engineer on the north end of the Mobile & Ohio Railroad and was a daughter of the late Capt. H. F. Potter, of Cairo.  Mrs. Lewis was a graduate of the Cairo High School with the class of 1884 and resided in Cairo several years after her marriage.  The family removed to Murphysboro about twenty years ago.  Mrs. Lewis is survived by her husband, three daughters and two sons.  She was a member of the First Methodist Church of this city.

The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon.

(John A. Lewis married Phoebe Potter on 12 Feb 1888, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MORTUARY
Mrs. Harriet Warwick

Mrs. Harriet Warwick, mother of Mrs. C. A. Marchildon, of Thebes, passed to the higher life Saturday, April 20th, aged 88 years, 8 months and 21 days.  Mrs. Warwick was born in Montgomery, Ohio, July 30th, 1823.  Her parents were Levi and Eliza Bell Buckingham.  On the 24th of October 1843, she was married to I. M. Warwick, of Hamilton, Ohio, whose death occurred twenty-seven years ago.  Eleven children were born to them, five of whom survive, namely Mrs. Martha I. Marchildon, of Thebes; J. B. Warwick, of Lockland, Ohio; and Virginia, Maude L. and Adah A. Warwick, of Hamilton.  Of the third and fourth generations, there are three grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.  From infancy Mrs. Warwick was trained to see the beauty and simplicity of the faith that cheered and comforted her throughout her life.  She united with the Universalist Church when a girl in her home village.  During the greater part of her life, she enjoyed good health, was optimistic in her views and genial in disposition.  In her passing, the last of her generation in her family and connections, have gone from earth.

Her funeral took place at the residence and First Universalist Church at 2:30 o'clock Monday afternoon, the Rev. A. B. Beresford, pastor of the First Universalist Church, Cincinnati, conducting the service.  She was laid to rest in Greenwood Cemetery.
 
Rufus Bennett, who was seriously injured a few days ago by falling though a trap door in a local printing office, is in a precarious condition at St. Mary's Infirmary.  His relatives, who reside at Jackson, Tenn., have been notified of his condition.
 
George Bicorn returned home Wednesday from Paducah where he attended the funeral of a relative.
 
The Woman’s Club held a memorial service at the home of Mrs. Ruby Richie on Tuesday afternoon as a tribute to the memory of Mrs. Luella Hutcheson, whose death occurred Dec. 23, 1911.  Mrs. Hucheson was a charter member and is the first loss by death in the club.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 26 Apr 1912:
MORTUARY
Dr. Horace Wardner Eggleston

Some time ago the news of the death of Dr. Horace Wardner Eggleston was received here.  The following from a Birmingham paper gives a sketch of his life.

Dr. Eggleston was born on July 16, 1869, at Cairo, Ill., the son of George Cary Eggleston, the late author, and Marion Gregg Eggleston.  While in his infancy his parents moved to New York City.  He was educated in the private schools of the metropolis during his early life and was also a student in the Brooklyn Polytechnic School and the Wune College of Virginia.

He took a scientific course at Princeton University and a medical course in the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City.  He thereupon entered private practice in New York City and 14 years ago he engaged in the state medical service.

For some time previous to a year ago, he was first assistant physician at the Binghamton State Hospital.  He had been engaged in private practice in this city since leaving that institution, his home and office being at No. 129 Hawley Street.

Dr. Eggleston was a scientific man, but his manner did not reveal the profound studious and analytical mind he possessed.  On the contrary, he was the most friendly and unassuming individual imaginable, and just because of this characteristic alone he had many score friends.  He made many discoveries for the advancement of medical science.

Early in his life Dr. Eggleston engaged in the newspaper business and was one of the star men of the New York Sun staff for quite a period, a distinction that newspaper men will most readily appreciate.

On September 8, 1904, he was married to Miss Mabel Dunn, the daughter of Colonel and Mrs. George W. Dunn.

Dr. Eggleston was a Mason in high degree and a prominent club man.

He is survived by his wife, Ms. Mabel Dunn Eggleston, and by one son, George Dunn Eggelston, aged six years.

(George C. Eggleston married Marion Wardner Craggs on 9 Sep 1868, in Alexander Co., Ill.  George Cary Eggleston was a well-known author, his best known works being Dorothy South, History of the Confederate War and A Rebel’s Recollections.—Darrel Dexter)
 
John J. Lee died of consumption at Baker City, Oregon, on April 7th, says the Charleston Courier.  He was 31 years old and was a brother of Mrs. D. W. Faris, of Wolf Island, Mo. and also had another sister and two brothers.  He formerly lived in Wolf Island Township.  (Clinton, Ky.)
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 27 Apr 1912:
MADE RICH BY DEATH OF UNCLE

J. W. Buford, a renter on the farm of J. M. Blakemore, near Humboldt, and who has been a poor man and a renter all his life, has just received information that he has come into an inheritance of between $20,000 and $30,000 by reason of the death of a great uncle, which occurred in Louisville, Ky.  It appears that the uncle had been in the insane asylum for twenty-five years and that he had no nearer relatives than Mr. Buford.  According to present day standards, he is now known as Mr. Buford, instead of plain "John."—Hickman Courier.
 
Mrs. J. F. Roberts has been called to Benton recently by the death of her brother, is expected to return home Monday.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 29 Apr 1912:
CIRCUIT COURT CONVENES MAY 13
Gus Johnson Case One of the Most Important of the Term

One of the most important criminal cases is that of the People vs. Gus Johnson, for the killing of Napoleon Lipe.  The shooting happened several months ago, when Johnson, who is a colored officer, was performing his duties, having arrested Lipe for flourishing a deadly weapon.  When Lipe attempted to escape, Johnson shot at him.  At the time, the negro was apparently not injured by the officer’s fire, but some hours later after the arrest he complained of a wound, was taken to St. Mary's Infirmary, where he died.  Johnson was exonerated by the coroner’s jury, but was held by the grand jury of the last term of court, through the efforts of Green Lipe, the negro's father.
 
Misses Ada and Clara Potter and Stephen A. Potter, have returned from Murphysboro, Ill., where they went to attend the funeral of their sister, Mrs. Phoebe Lewis, which was held Saturday afternoon.  The remains were buried at Tower Grove Cemetery and the funeral conducted by the Rev. Harmon of the M. E. church.
 
Word was received in Cairo today announcing the death of John Werner at his home in Pittsburgh, Pa.  Mr. Werner was a brother of J. C. Werner, formerly bookkeeper of the River Coal Company in Cairo.
 
CHARLES KISTNER DIED SUNDAY
Well Known Liquor Man Passed Away at Age of 63 Years

Charles Louis Kistner died Sunday afternoon at St. Mary's Infirmary at 2:45 o'clock after an illness of several weeks, aged 63 years.  On Thursday, April 18th, he became ill and last week he was removed to the hospital.  He remained there several days, returning to his boarding place feeling much improved.  However on Thursday, he was stricken with paralysis, his whole left side being affected, and he lapsed into unconsciousness from which he never recovered.

The deceased was born in Baden Baden, Germany, Jan. 1, 1849, and came to America when but a boy of six years, locating with his parents at Hickman, Ky.  He was in business there when a young man and later went to Union City, Tenn., where he was engaged in the saloon business for twenty three years.  He has been a resident of Cairo for the past eight years, during which time he conducted several saloons here.  Lately he has been connected with the Fitzgerald & O'Rourke's place on lower Ohio Street.

Charles L. Kistner, Jr., a son, of Little Rock, Ark.; John Kistner, a brother, of Hickman, Ky.; and Mrs. L. M. Kayser, of Jackson, Tenn.; survive him besides other relatives.

The funeral was held this afternoon from the residence of John T. Watkins, 1015 Walnut Street, interment being at Villa Ridge.  Rev. Father James Downey, of St. Patrick's Church, officiated.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 30 Apr 1912:
B. F. WOODFORD FORMER CAIROITE DIES SUDDENLY

Word has been received in Cairo of the death of B. F. Woodford, a former resident of this city, which occurred near Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on April 25th.  The deceased was found dead in his bed, at a farmhouse six miles out in the country from Cedar Rapids, where he had been employed.

The deceased was at one time connected with E. Bucher in the packing business here, the firm being known as the Bucher Woodford Company.  For many years he was manager of Armour Company’s plant here.  He also conducted a dairy farm in the Drainage District at one time.

He is survived by a brother in Burlington, Kansas, a son, in Oregon, daughter in Rock Falls, Ill., and his wife, in Jackson, Tenn.
 
FORMER CAIRO LUMBERMAN DEAD

Frank H. Lusk, formerly a resident of Cairo, and engaged in the lumber business here with William Ryan, died suddenly at his home in Stanly, Wis., a few days ago of heart failure.  He was 37 years of age.

 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 1 May 1912:
T. C. BAXTER DIED LAST NIGHT
Well Known Liquor Man Succumbed to Complication of Diseases

T. C. Baxter, a well-known liquor man, died at 12:30 last night at this residence, 220 Seventh Street, after an illness of six months with a complication of diseases.  He only became seriously ill Monday and rapidly declined.

He was 49 years of age and was born in Bethel Springs, Tenn.  He came to Cairo in 1907 from Jackson, Tenn., to engage in the liquor business here.  He was a member of the firm of Kendrick & Baxter and they conducted a saloon on Ohio Street.  Later this connection was severed and Mr. Baxter has been in business for himself at Sixth and Ohio streets.

Besides his wife, he leaves one sister, Mrs. O. L. Jennings, of Maleseus, Tenn.; and two brothers, J. F. Baxter, and C. F. Baxter, of Idabelle, Oklahoma.

He was a member of the Jackson Elks Lodge and of the Eagles.  He was also a member of the Methodist church and attended in this city.  The funeral will be held Thursday at Jackson and the Elks will have charge.  A delegation of the local lodge will accompany the remains.
 


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 2 May 1912:
ARTHUR W. DANFORTH DIED WEDNESDAY AT LOWELL, MASS.

Arthur W. Danforth, husband of Mrs. Lulu Hacker Danforth of this city, died Wednesday, May 1st, at his home in Lowell, Mass.  Mr. Danforth had only been ill a short time and his death was unexpected.  He had been confined in a hospital in that city only a few days when the end came.

He leaves, besides his wife, three children, Albert, Grace, and Fred; a sister, Mrs. Mary Fletcher, of Lowell; and other relatives.

Mr. and Mrs. Danforth were married in China fourteen years ago, where the latter was on a visit with her aunt, who was a missionary there.  Mr. Danforth spent twenty years in the East, being an engineer in charge of various large cotton industries there.  In that capacity he was also in the employ of the U. S. government there for some time.

He was 60 years of age and was a native of New England.  Mrs. Danforth left today to attend the funeral.

(Albert Whitney Danforth married Loulou Fayetta Hacker on 5 Nov 1898, at Holy Trinity Cathedral in Shanghai, China.—Darrel Dexter)
 
There have been two deaths in this neighborhood (Barlow, Ky.) in the last few days.  Leander Stennett, 74, died of apoplexy and Stephen Moore died of malarial complications.
 
Obituary

Amos Davis was born in Makanda, Jackson County, on the 21st of December 1857.  Died April 27th 1912, age 55 years, 4 months and 6 days.  He was married to Mahala Deason, of Carbondale, December 26th 1876.  To this union five children were born, namely, Hattie (now Mrs. Thomas McClellan), Lena, Lon, Allie, and Marie, all of whom survive.  He had been afflicted with heart trouble for some time, but on the day of his death worked all day, being section foreman, ate a hearty supper and was in the best of spirits.  He came uptown for a shave, but found the shop full and did not wait.  On the way home he met his wife, who had started uptown, and told her he would wait till morning to get shaved.  She came on to town and on returning found him in great pain.  A physician was called and all that could be was done to allay his suffering, but he only lived a few minutes after the physician arrived.  He leaves a wife, five children, three grandchildren and a host of relatives and friends to mourn his loss.  He united with the First Baptist Church in Makanda when 15 years old and continued a member of that church till death.  The remains were taken to Makanda on train No. 2 Monday and interred in Makanda Cemetery.

Mrs. A. Davis and family wish to extend their thanks to the many friends who so willingly assisted them during their sad hours of need.

(Amos Davis married Mahala O. Deason on 26 Dec 1876, in Jackson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Rev. George Carlock, of Dongola, was here (McClure) Thursday and Friday visiting his mother, who is very ill and near death.  Mrs. Carlock died Sunday and was removed to Cobden Tuesday for burial.
 


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 3 May 1912:
GEORGE C. KINSLOW DIED THIS MORNING

George C. Kinslow died at his home on Union Street this morning after a several months’ illness.  He is survived by his wife and three children, two girls and a boy.  He was a former employee of the Singer Manufacturing Company and the family have lived here about seven years.  The deceased was a member of the Southern Methodist Church and of the Woodmen of the World.  The funeral arrangements have not been made.
 
LITTLE WOOD BABY DIED THIS MORNING

Kenneth, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter H. Wood, died at San Diego, Cal., at 2 o'clock this morning.  The little fellow has had a fight for existence during his entire fifteen months of life and his demise was not unexpected.  His twin brother died about six months ago.  Mrs. Wood went to California a number of weeks ago in the hope that the child's life might be prolonged and Mr. Wood expected to start this afternoon to join them when the dispatch came advising him of the child's death.
 
Word was received here (Thebes) today by Herschel Underwood that Mr. James Coleman, of Union County, a veterinary surgeon, was kicked by a horse yesterday, April 30th, and killed.  The accident happened at Goreville, Ill.  Mr. Underwood, who is an operator here, left for Goreville today to attend the funeral services and visit home folks.
 
Mrs. J. F. Roberts left Thursday night for Benton, Ill., called by a message announcing the dying condition of her brother.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 4 May 1912:
FUNERAL SERVICES SUNDAY AFTERNOON

Funeral services over the remains of George C. Kinslow, of Union Street, who died Friday, will be held Sunday afternoon at Calvary Baptist Church and the remains will be taken to Beech Grove Cemetery for interment.  Pallbearers will be O. B. Archibald, C. O. Webster, F. E. Fensterer, Harry Stout, William D. Butts, Otis McDaniels, Joseph Kindred, H. M. Goldsmith, J. L. Williams, J. W. Hodge, C. A. Petit, and J. M. Sutton.  The pallbearers are selected from his associates in the Calvary Baptist Church, the Modern Brotherhood of America and the Knights of Honor. E. A. Burke will have charge of the remains.
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

Kinslow—George C. died Friday May 3, at 9 a.m.

Funeral services will be held at the Calvary Baptist Church, Sunday at 1 o'clock p.m. and remains will be taken by special funeral train leaving Fourteenth Street at 2:45 p.m. for Beech Grove Cemetery.

Friends of the family are invited.

 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 6 May 1912:
YOUNG MAN DIED OF TUBERCULOSIS

Harlan C. Boyd, of 3305 Elm Street, died at 6:30 this morning at St. Mary’s Infirmary, after almost a year's illness of tuberculosis.  He was well known to uptown residents and worked in several of the mills.  He was a young man, 27 years of age.  He leaves three brothers, George, of this city; Lee, of Caruthersville, Mo.; and King, of Ft. Wayne, Ind., formerly of this city; and two sisters, Mrs. Kabler, of Ft. Wayne, Ind., and Miss Lucy Boyd, of this city.  E.A. Burke has charge of the remains and the funeral arrangements will be announced later.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 7 May 1912:
LITTLE WOOD BABY BURIED TODAY AT VILLA RIDGE

The remains of Kenneth Wood, the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Walter H. Wood, were interred at Villa Ridge cemetery this afternoon.  Mr. Wood met the body at St. Louis and brought it down to Villa Ridge this afternoon and a special train from Cairo leaving here at 12 o'clock took about forty friends up to attend the funeral services at the grave.

(A marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Emily W. Wood Born Oct. 23, 1902 Died Dec. 8, 1902.  Walter W. Wood Born Feb. 10, 1911 Died Oct. 29, 1911.  Kenneth H. Wood Born Feb. 10, 1911 Died May 3, 1912.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MRS. C. H. McNUTT DIED MONDAY NIGHT AT MAYFIELD, KY.

The following from the Mayfield, Ky., Messenger tells of the death of Mrs. C. H. McNutt, sister of J. D. Ladd, of this city.

Mrs. C. H. McNutt, wife of Chief of Police McNutt, died Monday night at the family home on North Fifth Street, near Broadway.  Mrs. McNutt's death came during the early morning hours and was unexpected, having come while the family slept and with no warning, though for some time past she has been in ill health with heart trouble.

The funeral was held at the family residence Tuesday morning at ten o'clock.  Rev. Castelberry, pastor of the Christian Church, of which she was a member, conducted the service.

Mrs. McNutt before her marriage on Sept. 22, 1868, was Miss Ladd, her parents being Esq. W. H. Ladd and Sarah Elder Ladd.  She was born on January 27, 1851, at Grayville, Ill., but has been a resident of Mayfield the greater part of her life.

Besides a husband, she leaves two children, Thomas L. McNutt, and Mrs. Andrew Gilbert, both of this city.  She also leaves a sister, Mrs. Sallie Coles, at the McNutt home, and a brother, John Ladd, agent for the Illinois Central at Cairo.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 8 May 1912:
BOYD FUNERAL HELD THIS AFTERNOON

The funeral of the late Harlan C. Boyd, who died Monday at St. Mary’s Infirmary after a lingering illness of tuberculosis, was held this afternoon at the residence, 3305 Elm Street, services being conducted by Rev. H. M. Loar, of the First Methodist Church.  The remains were interred at Beech Grove Cemetery, a special I. C. train leaving from 14th Street at 2:30 o'clock.

The pallbearers were:  Michael Egan, Will French, H. Brackey, Tom Gardiner, Will Sheehan, Hunter Huff, John Gerholdt, W. T. McGee, and Reuben McCrite.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 9 May 1912:
NEGRO SHOT AND KILLED BY ANOTHER OF HIS RACE

In a shooting that occurred about 6 o'clock Wednesday evening at Fortieth and Sycamore streets, near the Big Four crossing, Albert Lipe, a negro, was almost instantly killed by another of his race named John Mason.  A quarrel earlier in the day is said to have led to the shooting.

Lipe was on his way to the Drainage District where he is employed by one of the concerns, and meeting Mason near the Big Four crossing, some words were exchanged, whereupon Mason drew his gun and shot Lipe four times in the back.  Mason disappeared after the shooting and has not as yet been apprehended, although the police of all nearby towns have been notified to be on the lookout for the fugitive.

Lipe, who was 20 years of age, was the son of Fred Lipe and lived at 3013 Commercial Avenue.  He was a nephew of Green Lipe, a well-known negro.

The coroner’s jury held an inquest this afternoon.

The coroner’s jury was composed of R. A. Hatcher, foreman, and Ennis Morgan, Sam Forse, John Smith, and "Scoop" Hofheinz.
 
Word was received here (Mound City) from Indianapolis, Ind., of the death of W. W. Hough's mother.  He left immediately for that city.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 10 May 1912:

CORONER'S JURY FIND NEGRO NOT JUSTIFIED IN ACT

The coroner’s jury, summoned Thursday afternoon to inquire into the killing of Albert Lipe by another negro named John Mason, found from the evidence given by about fifteen witnesses that Mason was not justifiable in the act and that he be apprehended and held to a higher court until discharged by due process of law.

Mr. Phoebe Hibbert passed away Saturday morning of last week.  He leaves a wife and four children and a host of friends to mourn their loss.  He was a member of the M. W. A. camp here (Olive Branch) and of the Masonic Lodge of Mounds.

(His marker in Twente Crossing Cemetery reads:  Phebe Hibbert Born Sept. 8, 1862 Died April 27, 1912.—Darrel Dexter)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 11 May 1912:
TWO KILLED IN WRECK OF FLYER

Vincennes, Ind., May 11.—Two persons were killed, one fatally injured and six others hurt near here today when the Chicago & Eastern Illinois railroad's Dixie Flyer, northbound, sideswiped a freight engine on a siding.  The dead are W. L. Miller, Vicksburg, Ind., and F. M. Hyatt, Shelburn, Ind.

MOUNDS DRUGGIST DIED THIS MORNING

George H. Wood, the Mounds druggist, died at 1:15 this morning at St. Mary’s Infirmary, where he was taken a few days ago for treatment.

An operation had been decided upon in the attempt to prolong his life, but he grew worse so rapidly that he was not able to undergo the ordeal.

The deceased is survived by his wife and by his mother, and two brothers and sisters living in California.

Death was the result of an attack of appendicitis.  Mr. Wood was 42 years of age.

No funeral arrangements have yet been made.

Mr. Hunsaker, the monument man, was here (Cypress) this week putting up a fine monument to the memory of Garland Adams.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 13 May 1912:
Mrs. H. M. Hill received word today of the death of her uncle, Mr. Samuel E. Wilson, at St. Louis.   His father, Samuel S. Wilson, was one of Cairo's early settlers, and was prominent in the early history of this city.  The remains will be brought down to Villa Ridge for interment Wednesday.

(His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Samuel E. Wilson Born Aug. 14, 1847 Died May 13, 1912.  Emma A. Wilson Born July 15 1858 Died July 25, 1903.—Darrel Dexter)

C. W. HENDERSON DIED SUNDAY
Was One of Cairo's Oldest and Most Highly Respected Citizens
FUNERAL HELD THIS AFTERNOON
And Remains Will Be Sent to Vevay, Ind., This Evening for Burial

Charles W. Henderson, one of Cairo's oldest and mostly highly respected citizens, died Sunday afternoon about 12:30 o'clock at the family residence, 1206 Washington Avenue, after a prolonged illness.  Mr. Henderson was born in Vevay, Indiana, in 1832 and was 80 years of age.

He came to Cairo during the Civil War and in 1865 he married Miss Anna Garrack, of Vevay, Ind., who survives him.  For over thirty-five years, he has been engaged in the hardware business, and before he removed to his late location at 612 Commercial Avenue, he was located for many years at the corner of Twelfth and Commercial.

Mr. Henderson was a member of the Masonic Order and also of the Presbyterian Church.  The funeral was held this afternoon at the residence at 4 o'clock, Rev. A. M. Eells, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, officiating.  The remains will be taken to Vevay this evening where the burial will take place tomorrow.  The Masons will take charge and two representatives of that order, Rev. Eells and Jacob Held, will accompany the remains.

Mrs. Henderson will not accompany the funeral party, having been quite ill for some time.  Her nieces, Mrs. G. W. Smith, and Mrs. M. G. Beasley, of Chicago, will return the latter part of this week, accompanied by Mrs. Henderson, who will make her home with Mrs. Smith.

TIRED OF LIFE CAUSE OF SUICIDE
Mel English Ended His Own Life Sunday Afternoon
FACED MIRROR AND FIRED FATAL SHOT
Deceased Was a Cripple and Was Often Melancholy –Left Two Notes

Tired of life, made miserable by being a cripple, Mel R. English, 32 years of age, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert English, committed suicide Sunday afternoon in his father's store.  Holding a mirror before him, English placed a 32-calibre revolver to his forehead and fired, the bullet piercing his brain and causing immediate death.  The mirror was clasped tightly in the left hand of the dead man when found, his father rushing in from the rear of the store when he heard the shot.

Before committing the fatal deed, English left two letters explaining his reason, one to Dr. James McManus and one to his brother, John.  The letter to Coroner McManus directed that his body be turned over to E. A. Burke, the undertaker, for burial and declared that he was tired of life.  The contents of the letter to his brother was not made public.

English had been a cripple for many years and often became melancholy over his condition.  For the past several weeks he had been especially so, and this is the reason given for the manner in which he took his own life.

He leaves, besides his parents, three brothers, John, Will and Robert, of this city; and three sisters, Mrs. Minnie Murphy, of Bertrand, Mo., Mr. Sue Patrum, of Sardis, Miss., and Mrs. Laura Oliver, of this city.

Funeral services will be held at the residence of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. English, No. 340 Twenty-second Street, tomorrow afternoon, and the remains will be taken to Beech Grove Cemetery for interment.  E. A. Burke will have charge of the funeral.

The pallbearers will be Bob Davis, Mark Penman, Joe Blyer, Sid Marshall, Jeff Trent, and Will French.

WANTS TO FIND NEWCOMB HEIRS
Property Is Left to Children Formerly Living in Cairo

Does anyone know anything about Seth Newcomb or any member of his family, who formerly lived in Cairo?

Attorney J. N. Phillips, of Syracuse, N.Y., is making inquiry through The Citizen.

He writes as follows:

Christopher Columbus Newcomb, very old, recently died leaving no children, nor will.

At the time of his death, he owned some real estate.  His brother, Cyrus Newcomb, a ship carpenter, was last heard from in 1838 and was then living 20 miles north of Pensacola, Florida.  It is not known whether Cyrus left family.

Another brother, Orson Newcomb, of Clement County, Ohio, died and left a son, James, Grand View, Spencer County, Indiana.

Another brother, Moses W. Newcomb, Onondaga County, New York, left four children, Sarah, Wilton, Eliza, and Daniel.

Another brother, Seth C. Newcomb, of Cairo, Ill., left Seth C. and Jessie May.

Perhaps the brothers named may have descendants now living.  If so, they should write, giving full family history so far as they can, to Attorney J. H. Phillips, 76 Wieting Block , Syracuse, N.Y.

(Seth Crowell Newcomb was born 5 Jul 1810, in New York and died 2 Jan 1851, in Cairo, Alexander Co., Ill.  He married Julia Ann Whitman.  His son, Seth C. Newcomb, was born about 1843 in New York and served in Co. B, 1st New York Light Artillery during the Civil War.  He filed for a pension in Iowa in 1892 and died in 1904 in North Dakota.—Darrel Dexter)

FUNERAL NOTICE

English—Died, Malachi English, at residence of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. English, 340 Twenty-second Street.

Funeral cortege will leave residence Tuesday, May 14, at 2 o'clock p.m.  Special funeral train will leave Fourteenth Street at 2:45 p.m. for Beech Grove Cemetery for interment friends of the family are invited.

The body of George Wood was brought home last Saturday and the funeral is to be held next Thursday, to give his brother time to get here from California to be present at the funeral.  (Mounds)

Mayor Fletcher has requested all business to cease from 9 till 11 o’clock on the day of Alderman Wood’s funeral.  (Mounds)

J. F. Ireland, an old citizen of Alexander County, died Sunday, May 5, 1912, at Elco of heart trouble.  He was only sick a few minutes when death relieved his suffering.  He was born in Ohio, Feb. 12, 1842, and enlisted in the army in August 1861, served three years and nine months as private in Company A, Fifteenth Calvary.  Was married Sept. 21, 1878, to Alice Hurston, of Elco, who died six years ago.  To them were born four children, two of whom died in infancy, one son, L. S. Ireland, was killed by the cars three years ago, and one daughter survives him, Mrs. Addie Braddy, of Elco.  He leaves one sister, Mrs. W. B. Anderson, of St. Louis, three brothers, A. N. Ireland, of Commerce, Jesse Ireland, of Olive Branch, Ill., and W. W. Ireland, of Texas, with a score of other relatives to mourn his loss.  

(John F. Ireland, 19, of Santa Fe, Alexander Co., Ill., native of Santa Fe, Ill., 5’6”, auburn hair, hazel eyes, fair complexion, farmer, enlisted on 10 Aug 1861, at Cape Girardeau, Mo., as a private in Co. A, 15th Illinois Cavalry, and was mustered out Aug. 25, 1864, at Springfield, Ill.  John F. Ireland married Malinda A. Hurston on 21 Sep 1878, in Alexander Co., Ill.  William B. Anderson married Sarah E. Ireland on 3 May 1865, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Hazlewood Cemetery near Elco reads:  J. F. Ireland Died May 5, 1912 Aged 70 Ys., 2 Ms. & 20 Ds.—Darrel Dexter)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 14 May 1912:
WILL GAFFNEY DIED AT CHICAGO
Was Member of Family of One of Cairo's Earliest Settlers

Word has been received by relatives in this city of the death of Will Gaffney, in Chicago, which occurred at Mercy Hospital in that city, Sunday evening.

Mr. Gaffney was a member of a family of one of Cairo's oldest settlers.  He spent the early years of his life in this city, until the family moved to Kansas City, Mo.  From there he located in Chicago, where he married and was a prominent politician and businessman of that city.

Mr. Gaffney is a brother of Miss Belle Gaffney, the actress, and is also survived by another sister, Mrs. Thomas Brock, of Kansas City, Mo., both sisters attending him during his last illness.  His wife also died several weeks ago of typhoid fever.

The funeral will be held Thursday morning in Kansas City, Mo., from the residence of Mrs. Thomas Brock.

(William B. Gaffney married Ollie K. Beckwith on 20 Apr 1885, in Cook Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

FUNERAL NOTICE

Wilson—Died Monday, May 13, at St. Louis, Mo., Samuel E. Wilson, aged 65 years.

Funeral services will be at Villa Ridge cemetery.  Special train will leave Fourteenth Street Wednesday, May 15, at 2 o'clock for Villa Ridge and will meet train from St. Louis, bringing the remains for burial there.

Friends of the family are invited to attend the burial.

BURIAL WEDNESDAY OF SAMUEL E. WILSON
Remains Will Be Brought Down from St. Louis to Villa Ridge

The remains of Samuel E. Wilson, son of the late Samuel Wilson, one of Cairo's pioneer residents, who died in St. Louis Monday, will be brought down to Villa Ridge cemetery for interment tomorrow afternoon.  A special train will take friends from Cairo to the funeral, notice of the time being given elsewhere today.

Mr. Wilson was born in Smithland, Ky., on August 14, 1847.  He came to Cairo with his parents in 1854 and was for many years engaged in the general commission business on the Ohio levee.  In 1884 he removed to St. Louis and since that time has held a responsible position with the St. Louis Globe Democrat.

Two sisters, Mrs. Clara E. Kyle and Mrs. Lucie D. Milburn, of Cairo, survive him.

Mr. Wilson's son, Charles, will accompany the remains from St. Louis.

(Charles R. Kyle married Clara Wilson on 1 Apr 1873, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Henry H. Milburn married Lucy D. Wilson on 5 Jun 1879, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Word was received here (Mound City) Sunday from Bloomington, Ind., of the death of W. H. Slocumbe, a grandfather of Mrs. W. H. Ashbaugh, of this city.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 15 May 1912:
COUNCIL WILL BACK UP POLICE
Will See that Officer Gus Johnson Gets a Fair and Impartial Trial

At the meeting of the city council last night, $250 was appropriated with which to employ special counsel to defend Officer Gus Johnson, colored, who is charged with manslaughter.

Johnson, while in the act of arresting a young negro by the name of Napoleon Lipe, several months ago, shot the negro when the latter made an attempt to resist arrest.  The officer was exonerated by the coroner's jury, when the evidence showed that Lipe was armed and is said to have threatened Johnson.  At the last term of circuit court, Johnson was indicted by the grand jury on the charge of manslaughter.  The boy's father, Green Lipe, and several others being influential in securing the indictment.

When the officer was called into court yesterday, he was reprimanded by Judge Butler for not being ready for trial.  The judge gave the officer twenty-four hours in which to secure legal talent.

The city council believed that inasmuch as Johnson was in the act of discharging his duties and owing to the fact that he had been exonerated by the coroner’s jury, that the council should take such steps as would be necessary to provide the officer with competent legal talent in order that he might have a fair and impartial trial.

A resolution was therefore presented by Alderman Neff, recommending that the council appropriate $250 with which to employ counsel to defend Johnson and thus go on record as standing behind the officers in the discharge of their duties.

Attorney M. J. O'Shea had consented to take the case for this amount and the resolution was so worded that Mr. O'Shea should be paid $250 provided he had not already been appointed by the court to defend Johnson.  In case that Mr. O'Shea had been appointed by the court to defend the officer, the city council would only allow him $100.

Alderman Saup thought that $250 was an exorbitant amount to pay for special counsel, when the city had two attorneys, and the question was raised whether or not City Attorney Bird or Special Attorney Leek (who receives $200 per) could not defend Johnson in this case.

It was not stated that the city attorney could not defend the case and that Special Attorney Leek had received a retainer’s fee from the "other side" but had refused to participate either way.

The resolution as offered by Alderman Neff was therefore adopted by the council.

ON TRIAL FOR GIRL'S DEATH
Jury Selection Begins in Illinois Physician's Case—Co-Defendant Is Missing

Charleston, Ill., May 14.—The trial of Dr. Granville M. Walker, 74 years old, charged with the murder of Miss Aylea Burch, of Ashmore, by a criminal operation, was begun here in the circuit court before Judge Kimbrough, of Danville.

Dr. Walker was indicted jointly with Wesley Dallas, whom she charged in a dying statement with being responsible for her ruin.  Dallas departed immediately after the girl's death on April 25, and all efforts to find him have been in vain.

REMAINS FAILED TO ARRIVE TODAY
And Funeral of William C. Wise Will Be Held Tomorrow Morning

Because train connection was missed, the remains of William C. Wise, who died at Asheville, N.C., Monday, did not arrive this afternoon, but will reach here tonight at 1:45 and funeral services which were to be held tonight at the Elm Street church will be held at 9 o'clock tomorrow morning at the home of his niece, Mrs. E. E. Harrell, No. 625 Thirty-sixth Street.

Rev. Mr. Kennedy will conduct the funeral and the remains will be taken at 11:15 tomorrow forenoon to Anna for burial.  E. A. Burke will have charge of the remains.

The deceased was 54 years of age, and resided in Cairo for several years.  He was employed at the Singer factory.  He was a member of the Southern Methodist Church and also of the Odd Fellows Lodge at Anna.  He is survived by his wife and three daughters, Hazel, Pansy, and Hallie, and one son, Elmer.  Five sisters are also left, one of whom, Mrs. James Stewart, lives in Cairo.

Mr. Wise was the victim of tuberculosis and went to Asheville two weeks ago.

(William C. Wise, 32, a school teacher, born in Illinois, son of William J. Wise and Miss Thomas, married Emma Penninger, 23, born in Union County, daughter of G. W. Penninger and Miss Cook, on 21 Dec 1890, in Union Co., Ill.   W. J. P. Wise married L. F. Thomas on 7 Oct 1849, in Johnson Co., Ill.  George W. Penninger married Lutisha Cook on 26 Jul 1855, in Union Co., Ill.  James Stewart, 28, born in Howard Co., Ind., son of H. W. Stewart and Jane Pollic, married Sarah A. Wise, 25, born in Linn Co., Iowa, daughter of William Joseph Wise and Louisa Thomas, on 16 Mar 1880, in Union Co., Ill.  His marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  William C. Wise Born Dec. 13, 1857 Died May 20, 1912.—Darrel Dexter)

GUS JOHNSON CASE CONTINUED
Until Next Monday

In the circuit court this morning, Judge Butler set the trial of Police Officer Gus Johnson, indicted for manslaughter, for next Monday morning, May 20.  Up until today, Johnson had secured no counsel, but this morning he secured M. J. O'Shea to defend him and the attorney asked that he be given until next Monday to prepare the defense.

The funeral of Alderman Wood will be held at 9 a.m. Friday.  (Mounds)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 16 May 1912:
The funeral services of Alderman Wood will be held in the Catholic Church on Delaware Avenue tomorrow at 9 a.m.  (Mounds)

Mr. and Mrs. Crouse received a check Monday last for $1,000 from the M. B. A. Lodge, claim of their son, who died a few weeks ago.  He died at McClure, but was a member of Jonesboro Lodge.

Whereas:  In His Providence, God has seen fit to called from our midst our friends and neighbor, J. L. Holshouser, Be it

Resolved:  That we as fellow members with him in Mill Creek Camp No. 5446 M. W. of A., do adopt this means of expressing our feeling of sadness and loss caused by his departure.

Resolved:  That we realize that God is just and doeth all things well, we desire therefore to humbly bow to his ruling and submit to his will.  We extend our sympathy to the bereaved ones and commend the interest of this our brother to him who is able to keep them to the end.

Be it resolved:  That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the relatives and that it be spread upon the minutes of the camp.
A. F. Dillow
Scott Jordan
H. E. Dillow, Committee

(Jacob Levi Holshouser’s marker in St. John’s Cemetery near Mill Creek reads:  J. L. Holshouser Born Dec 22 1869, Died May 5, 1912—Darrel Dexter)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 17 May 1912:
OLD RESIDENT OF CAIRO DIED IN CALIFORNIA

Word was received today of the death of Moses Foss, which occurred in Chito, California, Thursday night.  The deceased was one of the old residents of Cairo, having left here about twenty-four years ago for Chito, where he made his home with his son, Walter.  He was 83 years old at the time of his death and has been ailing for some time.  He leaves surviving him five children, Mrs. Charles Bethel, and Mrs. F. D. Kelley, of Cairo, Mrs. Louis Lohr, of Dudley, Ariz., Mrs. McEwen, of Mound City and Frank Foss, of Wickliffe.

(Louis H. Lohr married Henrietta Foss on 12 Sep 1882, in Alexander Co., Ill.  J. L. McCuen married Anna Foss on 15 Jun 1882, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

We always have sympathy for those in trouble as Mr. and Mrs. Medcalf found their baby dead in bed this morning.   (Grand Chain)

(A marker in Ohio Chapel Cemetery at Grand Chain reads:  Truman Metcalf Born March 5, 1912 Died May 16, 1912.—Darrel Dexter)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 18 May 1912:
THOMAS MEEHAN LOSES LITTLE SON

James, the six-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Meehan, of 3015 Park Avenue, died about 10:30 last evening, of locked bowels, having taken seriously ill Wednesday.  The funeral will be held Sunday.  Mrs. M. E. Feith has charge of the remains.

FUNERAL OF GEORGE H. WOOD

One of the largest funeral congregations ever seen in Mounds was that which met yesterday morning to show their respect for George H. Wood, a man who had proven himself to be worthy of any and every honor his fellow citizens had bestowed upon him and who had been called suddenly from their midst when on the threshold of another term of valuable service to the city in which he had made his home.  He was born in Mound Valley, Kan., October 1st, 1870, and died at St. Mary's Infirmary, Cairo, Ill., May 11th, 1912, aged 41 years, 7 months and 10 days.  His widow, mother, two sisters and four brothers survive him.  About 22 years ago he came to Illinois and about 6 years later he moved to Mounds and took possession of the only drug store in the town at that time, and by close attention to business and honorable and courteous treatment to his customers, he built up one of the largest and most lucrative drug stores in this part of the state.  He was a progressive citizen, a manly man and a friend to be depended upon.

Funeral services were held in St. Raphael's Church on Friday morning at 9 o'clock and the building was not large enough to hold more than one half of the friends who were present to show their respect for the deceased, as well as their sympathy for the widow and other members of the bereaved family.  After the services in the church, the long procession in which was seen Mayor Fletcher and members of the city council, the officers of Mounds State Bank, Rev. B. A. Hoar and Rev. J. H. Runalls, the two resident pastors of the town, Doctors Boswell, Faris and Andrew, the Knights of Columbus, of which he was a member, and representatives of nearly every business in town, besides a larger number of other citizens of Mounds and Pulaski and Alexander counties.

The interment took place in St. Mary's Catholic Cemetery just north of the city.  The floral offerings were magnificent, some of them being the finest specimens of the florists’ skill and taste in color effect and arrangement.  The tradesmen of Mounds presented the mortar of pink rose buds with the pestle of white buds, a fitting emblem of his profession, and the Mounds Bank presented another beautiful set piece.

The crosses and wreathes and other emblems were exquisite in their makeup and a quiet evidence of the great respect in which the departed one was held by all classes and conditions of people in our city, and truly it can be said that when they buried him our city had seldom seen a costlier funeral.

(His marker in St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery at Mounds reads:  George H. Wood 1869-1912.—Darrel Dexter)

Freddie Hall, aged about 8 years, was shot and almost instantly killed by his playmate, Charlie Burkstaller, aged 10 years.  The accident occurred Thursday afternoon while the boys were playing.  Another youth, Roy Weaver, aged 12 years, had in his possession a 22 rifle with which he was shooting at targets.  It is reported that Beaver handed his gun to Burkstaller, telling him to try and shoot Hall, which the lad did, the bullet entering the boy's neck and lodging in the boy's left lung.  At the coroner's inquest held Friday morning, Beaver, was ordered to be held to await the action of the grand jury and young Burkstaller was released.  Young Hall was the son of John Hall, the well-known paper hanger and painter, who has been residing in St. Louis for the past few years, but was here on a visit with his family.  The remains of the little fellow was laid to rest Friday afternoon in Beech Grove Cemetery.  (Mound City)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 20 May 1912:
FUNERAL OF JAMES H. TUCKER HELD THIS MORNING

James H. Tucker, aged 51 years, died Saturday afternoon at his home, No. 209 Thirty-fourth Street, of apoplexy, after a short illness.  He was an employee of the Rhodes-Burford Furniture Company.

He leaves a wife and several children, the eldest, Elisha B. Tucker and a daughter, Miss Alice Tucker.  The funeral was held this morning at the residence, conducted by Rev. Fr. A. DeRossett, of the Episcopal Church and the funeral party went to the cemetery at Beech Grove on the 11:15 Illinois Central train, where interment was made.

GUS JOHNSON NOW ON TRIAL
Case of Negro Police Officer Charged with Manslaughter Began Today

The Gus Johnson case came up for trial in the circuit court this morning and the work of selecting a jury was begun.  Out of the eight talismen examined this morning, none were chosen.

The case is arousing much interest and a large crowd was present in the court room all day.

Johnson is the negro police officer, who several months ago shot and killed Napoleon Lipe, son of Green Lipe, when he resisted arrest.  Johnson was exonerated by a coroner’s jury, but was held for the killing by the grand jury of a previous term of court, through the efforts of the dead man's father.  State’s Attorney Alexander Wilson is being assisted in the prosecution by Attorney Reed Green and Attorney M. J. O'Shea is defending Johnson.

The case is proceeding very slowly.  This afternoon twenty-four talismen had been examined without a single one being selected as a juror by either the defense or the prosecution.  That a hard fight will be made by both sides is quite evident.

The case was originally set for last week, but Johnson had obtained no attorney.  At a meeting of the city council, in the meantime, that body appropriated $250 for the defense of Johnson and Attorney M. J. O'Shea took charge of the case in Johnson's behalf.  The council took such action because it was deemed that inasmuch as Johnson was in the discharge of his duties when the shooting took place, and as he was exonerated by the coroner’s jury, the city should go on record as standing behind the police department in such cases.

Saturday afternoon, Charles Rice, a negro attorney, of Mound City, filed an injunction for Green Lipe against the mayor and city council to prohibit the payment of the $250 to M. J. O'Shea or any other attorney in the defense of Johnson on the grounds that that body had no legal right for such action.  Judge Butler has set the hearing for Wednesday.


CARD OF THANKS

We wish to express our sincere thanks to our many friends and relatives who so kindly assisted us during the illness and death of our son and brother, James, and for the many beautiful floral tokens.
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Meehan and Family

NEGRO HELD IN CHICAGO WANTED FOR MURDER HERE

Chief of Police Egan received a message this morning from the chief of detectives of Chicago saying that they had arrested and are holding a negro named Carroll Johnson, wanted here for murder.  Johnson is the negro who engaged in a quarrel in John Darrah's barber shop on lower Commercial Avenue with another negro over a crap game and who drew his gun and fired at his partner during the game.  Eli Bobo, another negro, who was in the place at the time, was hit by the several bullets, was fatally wounded and died at St. Mary’s Infirmary the next day.

The coroner’s jury recommended that Carroll be apprehended and held for the killing and since that time Chief Egan has been using every effort to locate the shootist.  Chief Egan will send after Johnson immediately.

GIRL LOST LIFE IN GASOLINE EXPLOSION

LaRose, Ill., May 20—Margaret Kamp, 16, died near here early today from burns received in an explosion of the gasoline lighting plant in the Kamp home.  The girl's father and John Tontz were badly burned extinguishing flames, which resulted from the explosion.  The house was badly damaged.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 21 May 1912:

FUNERAL OF LATE W. H. STROUSE WAS HELD TODAY

The funeral of the late W. H. Strouse, who died at Willard Sunday morning was held today, the remains being brought from that place via the Iron Mountain and taken to Villa Ridge on the Illinois Central regular train at 2:35, where interment was made.  He leaves a wife and two children and a sister.  He was a son-in-law of Peter Hoover and was well known in Cairo, having been a resident of the Drainage District for many years.
 
DR. DICKERSON'S FATHER DEAD

Dr. E. S. Dickerson left this morning for Hamilton, Ohio, where he was called by the expected death of his father, Rev. John Dickerson.  Rev. Dickerson will be remembered by a number of the colored people having visited here several times.
 
Died, at her home in Elco, May 5, 1912, Mrs. Mary Jordan, wife of Alexander Jordan, age 57 years.  She leaves, besides a husband, ten children, seven boys and three girls.  She was a kind wife and loving mother.  The family wishes to thank the people for their kindness at the death of their dear mother.

(Alexander Jordan married Mary Angeline Gossett on 27 Sep 1867, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Her marker in Sims Cemetery near Elco reads:  Mary A. Wife of Alexander Jordan Died May 5, 1912 Aged 58 Yrs., 7 Mos., & 27 Dys.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 22 May 1912:
JURY SECURED IN JOHNSON CASE
Last Evening and Witnesses Were Examined Today

The four remaining jurors in the Gus Johnson trial were secured Tuesday afternoon and the trial opened with the opening statements of the attorneys of both sides.  The jurors secured yesterday were George Gilbert, Guy Carter, William Herrin and John Oberts, all from Thebes.

This morning the examination of witnesses was started and Drs. Samuel Dodds and James McManus, were the first called.  They told of being called in attendance upon Napoleon Lipe, the man who was shot by Johnson, and Dr. Dodds took down on paper a statement made by the dying man, telling facts regarding the shooting.  This was read to the jury.

James Patterson, probably the most important of any witness who will be called, told of Lipe forcing him to accompany him down Commercial Avenue, the morning of the shooting and told of the meeting of the police officers Johnson and Griffin at Twenty-seventh and Commercial, in front of a saloon there.  Johnson stepped up to speak to Lipe, who immediately used an oath and drew back, trying to fire his Winchester rifle at the officer, but the weapon refused to work.  Patterson said he remonstrated with Lipe not to have any trouble, and after a struggle in which the officers gave aid, he succeeded in wresting the gun from Lipe.

Witness said Lipe then ran up Commercial with the officers in pursuit, shouting "halt" to the fugitive.  In the chase, Johnson drew his gun and fired at Lipe and later they succeeded in catching Lipe and taking him into custody.  Several other witnesses testified among them, Green Lipe, father of the dead man.

The following is the jury:  Dennis O'Callahan, Max Kaufman, N. J. Casey, F. M. Baker and Gus Muthig, all of Cairo, and Charles Simpkins, C. C. Penefield, James Sowders, George Gilbert, Guy Cartner, William Herrin and John Oberts, all of Thebes.

It is expected that the case will not be completed until tomorrow morning, at which time it will go to the jury.

The injunction against the City of Cairo, which was filed Saturday at the instance of Green Lipe, to restrain the city from employing an attorney to defend Johnson, has been reset for tomorrow.


KILLED SWEETHEART; THEN SHOT HIMSELF

Havana, Ill., May 22.—William Brown, 22, a telegraph operator, shot and killed his sweetheart, Jennie Kelly, 17, when he met her on the street here today, and then killed himself with the same revolver.  The shooting was the result of a quarrel over the attentions of other suitors to the young woman.
 
BODY OF NEGRO FOUND IN WATER
Coroner's Jury Returned Verdict of Accidental Death

The body of a young negro named Andrew Gray was found this morning in a clump of bushes in the water just north of the Traction Company's powerhouse on upper Sycamore Street.  A negro, who was fishing for crawfish near the spot, noticed the body and Coroner McManus was summoned and held an inquest.

Gray was last seen Saturday night. It is supposed that in returning to his home on Fortieth Street that night, on account of the darkness, he fell into the water and because of the deep mud was mired and drowned before he could extricate himself.

The coroner's jury examined the body, but could find no bruises or marks to indicate foul play, so a verdict of accidental drowning was returned.  Gray was employed by several of the uptown factories recently and is survived by relatives.
 
BROTHER OF PHILLIP BURKHARDT DEAD AT RED BUD, ILL.

Chris Burkhardt, a brother of Phillip Burkhardt, of 531 Fifteenth Street, this city, died early this morning at his home in Red Bud, Ill., following a surgical operation in St. Louis.  The deceased leaves a wife and five children, two girls and three boys, besides a sister in Germany.  Mr. Burkhardt has been at the bedside of his brother for several days and his family went up to Redbud this afternoon to attend the funeral, which will probably be held Thursday.

(This may be the same person as Philip Burkhardt, who married Mary Koch on 22 Nov 1887, in Monroe Co., Ill., or Philip Burkhart, who married Mary Mikkin on 26 Mar 1895, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 23 May 1912:
JOHNSON ACQUITTED
Attorneys Complete Their Arguments and Jury Gets Case at 3 p.m.
JOHNSON ON STAND THIS MORNING
And Told of Circumstances Leading up to the Shooting of Lipe

After deliberating on their verdict for 45 minutes, the jury at 3:45 this afternoon returned their verdict finding Police Officer Gus Johnson not guilty of the murder of Napoleon Lipe.

The Gus Johnson case went to the jury at 3 o'clock this afternoon.

The testimony of the witnesses was completed this morning, when Johnson took the stand.

Prosecuting Attorney Wilson opened for the State, followed by Attorney O'Shea, for the defense.  This afternoon, Attorney Reed Green made the closing speech for the prosecution, after which the court read his instructions to the jury.

Gus Johnson took the stand in his own defense about 10:15 this morning and stood examination about a half hour.  During the time, he recited the incidents leading up to the shooting of Napoleon Lipe.  He said Officer Griffin and himself were called to Arey's saloon at Twenty-ninth and Poplar about 4 o'clock in the morning, where Lipe had previously made a disturbance, running everyone away from the place at the point of his Winchester rifle.

Lipe was not to be found when the officers arrived and they proceeded down Poplar to Twenty-seventh Street, and thence to Commercial, where they came upon Lipe and his companion, James Patterson.  Johnson started to speak to Lipe, whereupon the young negro called the officer a vile name, backed up, raised the rifle to his shoulder and tried to fire the weapon.

When the weapon failed to discharge, Patterson, with the aid of the officers, scuffled with Lipe, and after they secured possession of the rifle, Lipe broke and ran up Commercial, followed by the officers.  Johnson said that the ordered Lipe to "halt" several times and fired one shot.  The officer said that when Lipe reached the southwest corner of Twenty-eighth Street, he turned and made a motion as if to draw a weapon from his inside pocket.  Johnson, believing the man was intent upon shooting him, said that he (Johnson) fired three more shots.

Later, Officer Griffin overtook Lipe and the patrol wagon was called and the fugitive taken to police headquarters.  Lipe was placed in one of the holdover cells.  Several previous witnesses said that when the officer arrested the man at Twenty-ninth Street, he claimed to be shot and told the officers of his suffering.  Johnson said the only intimation that the man gave of suffering was that he complained of having the cramps.

He said that after Lipe was locked up at the jail that he went to his home and did not know that Lipe was taken to the hospital or that he was dead until notified by the coroner to appear at the inquest.

The strength of the prosecution centered about the law covering manslaughter cases.  Attorneys Wilson and Green did not attempt to show that it was a willful deed on the part of Officer Johnson in killing Lipe, but rather that he did it unlawfully.  Attorney Wilson said in the closing statements that Johnson was unfortunate, that he was not guilty of a deliberate taking of life, but the statute concerning manslaughter cases demanded that a man be punished for such an offense and that Johnson was guilty in that respect according to the penalty as so indicated.

The defense tried to show that Lipe had attempted to kill Johnson when the officer started to arrest him for flourishing a deadly weapon and that Lipe had a reputation as a bad negro.  Attorney O'Shea told of Johnson’s exoneration by the coroner’s jury after similar evidence as introduced at the present trial by the same witnesses.  He also told of Johnson's good record as a citizen and policeman and in the discharge of his duties as an officer he had used his gun to effect the capture of Lipe, who attempted to escape after committing an unlawful offense.  He asked the jurors to place themselves in Johnson’s place as an officer of the law and consider the trying circumstances and jeopardy of life that such an official must undergo in handling such characters.

Attorney Green laid stress upon the fact that Lipe had been persecuted by the officers after his arrest, was not given the proper treatments and that the officers knew according to the attorney that Lipe had been shot and was in need of surgical attention, which was not given him as soon as necessary.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 24 May 1912:
WEALTHY LAND OWNER SUICIDES

Wenona, Ill., May 24—William Worthington, 36, a wealthy land owner living near Pontiac, committed suicide today by hanging himself on his farm here.  His mind had been unbalanced.
 
MAN BELIEVED INSANE TAKEN INTO CUSTODY
DIED IN HIS CELL

Tom Smith, a white man, who was taken to the county jail last night and believed to be insane, died during the night in one of the cells and was found this morning.  Coroner McManus summoned a jury and it was found that the man's death was caused from natural causes.  Smith was a middle-aged man and had been employed at Baxter’s saloon on the corner of Sixth and Ohio streets as porter.  He had been acting strangely for several days and yesterday was taken into custody and was to have been examined today relative to his sanity.
 
A. J. Lingle and wife were called to Mill Creek the first of the week on account of the death of a relative, Mrs. Vina Dillow.  (Tamms)

(Levi A. Dillow married Lavina Poole on 21 Mar 1862, in Union Co., Ill.  Alfred Jefferson Lingle, son of Alfred Lingle and Eliza Poole, married Clara Belle Miller on 12 Apr 1888, in Union Co., Ill.  A marker in St. John’s Cemetery near Mill Creek reads:  Levi A. Dillow Born Oct. 11, 1843 Died July 20, 1894.  Lavina N. Dillow His Wife Born Dec. 3, 1849 Died March 20, 1912.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 25 May 1912:
NEGRO KILLED ON BRIDGE APPROACH TODAY

This morning about 11 o'clock, John Cooper, a young negro, about 21 years of age, while trying to board a fastly moving southbound Illinois Central freight train on the bridge approach was thrown beneath the wheels and met death in a horrible manner.

Several witnesses testified at the inquest held by Coroner McManus after the accident to the effect that they had seen Cooper on the approach as the train was coming up and he stated to them that he was going to board it and make his way to his home in Jackson, Miss.

They proceeded down the track and not seeing Cooper on the train as it passed, went back to look for him.

The sight that greeted them was indeed a gruesome one.  Bits of the negro's body were found strewn along the track for quite a distance. His head was found in one place, in another was an arm and several fingers and in still another were the man's legs.

The various parts of the form were picked up and put in a large clothes basket and later placed in a casket and turned over to Mrs. L. C. Falconer, undertaker, for immediate burial.

He had only been in Cairo for a few days and had been employed by the Upham & Agler Lumber Company.
 
NEGRO FOUND DEAD THIS MORNING

Charles White, a middle-aged negro, for many years employed at Smith Brothers saloon at Thirteenth and Poplar streets as porter and a familiar character, was found dead at his home No. 231 Thirtieth Street this morning.  Coroner McManus summoned a jury and found that death was due to natural causes.  Smith's wife died about a year ago under similar circumstances.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 27 May 1912:
Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Burkhardt, of 2315 Twenty-fourth Street, have returned from Redbud, Ill., where they went to attend the funeral of the former's brother.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 28 May 1912:
John Yates, residing at Rodney, Mo., was instantly killed near Bird's Mill this morning by the construction train on the Iron Mountain Railroad.  Yates was riding on top of the caboose, the train was switching cars on a siding when a sudden lurch of the car threw Yates between the caboose and the car following, the wheels cutting his body nearly in two.

Judge Browning, of Charleston, was notified and went to the scene of the accident and held an inquest.  The jury returned a verdict of accidental death.  Yates was in the employ of the railroad company, was about 35 years of age and leaves a wife and one son.  (Charleston, Mo.)
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 29 May 1912:
BODY RECOVERED FROM CACHE RIVER

The body of a man whose name could not be learned today, was recovered from Cache River near Mounds at 10 o'clock this morning when the explosion of charges of dynamite brought it to the surface.
News of the drowning was learned Sunday, when some boys found some clothing on the bank, and tracks where the man entered the water.  As no tracks were found showing where he came out, it was believed he was drowned.  A letter in one of the pockets identified him and his father was summoned.  The drowned man did not live in Mounds.

(The 1 Jun 1912, issue identified the man as Nelson Clapp.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 30 May 1912:
FOUND BODY OF HENRY DECKER
Remains of River Engineer Drowned Last January Discovered Monday
IN CORNFIELD AT BELMONT, MO.
Relatives Were Notified and Remains Were Identified by Clothing

After four months since the time he was drowned, the body of Henry Decker, who fell off the Halliday-Phillips wharf boat last January, was found Monday, at Belmont, Mo., just opposite Columbus, Ky.  The body was found in a cornfield and had probably floated there during the high water, where it was left when the water receded.  It was very badly decomposed.

Decker's family was notified of the finding by a farmer, who was in the city Wednesday, and in a conversation with John R. Ford, related the finding of a floater last Monday.  He stated that they had started plowing the land and, in passing over the ground that had been overflowed, they dug up the remains.

Misses Alice and Ora Decker, sisters of the deceased, went to Belmont early this morning and in a telephone message stated that the body was badly decomposed and the only means of identification was certain marks in the clothing, parts of which were still intact on the body.

The remains, which had been buried at Belmont, were taken up and brought to Cairo this afternoon on the M. & O. train.

The fact that the weather was very cold at the time Decker was drowned is probably the reason his remains were not more badly decomposed.

The last seen of Decker was on the night of Saturday, January 27th.  Capt. Hank Clark was one of the last persons to see Decker and was with him during the early part of the evening.  Decker was last seen sitting on the edge of the wharf boat smoking his pipe.

Later, the negro watchman heard someone calling and going out to where he had seen Decker sitting, he found Decker's cap and pipe, but no trace of Decker could be found.

Several days of search failed to find the missing man and he was given up as drowned.  The river was dragged, but without success.

The river was full of floating ice at the time and tougher with the swift current; his body was probably caught and carried downstream.

A filled tooth and one that had been missing from his lower jaw were also means of identification.
The remains were taken to Undertaker Burke's to be prepared for burial.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 31 May 1912:
FUNERAL OF HENRY DECKER TODAY

The funeral of the late Henry Decker, who was drowned last January and whose body was found last Monday at Belmont, Mo., was held this morning, Rev. C. Robert Dunlap, of the Lutheran Church, holding services at the grave in the cemetery at Villa Ridge.  The funeral party went up on the Illinois Central train at 5:15 this morning and came back on No. 21 at 10:30.

The pallbearers were John Haggerty, James Gilmore, Dr. Clancy, Ed Mahoney, Joseph Steger, and Capt. Harry Clark.

 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 1 Jun 1912:
MOUND CITY MAN COMMITS SUICIDE
German Merchant Swallowed Ends of Matches and Dies

William Weisker, a German merchant of Mound City, ended his life about 6 o'clock this morning by swallowing the tops of matches.  No reason is given for his rash act.

Weisker, who runs a grocery and meat market in the upper part of Mound City, leaves a widow, and two sons and three daughters, the children being all grown.  He was an old resident of Mound City.
 
MAN KILLED BY FALLING ROOF
Porch at Bandy's Saloon at Mounds Crushed Henry Will to Death
VICTIM WAS LARGE PROPERTY OWNER
Of Pulaski County Land—Accident Occurred This Morning

This morning about 10 o'clock, as an old land owner by the name of Henry Will, of Porterville, Ind., was standing under the porch roof of Bandy's saloon, on the corner of Oak and First streets, the whole roof collapsed and fell on Mr. Will, crushing his skull and killing him instantly.  A little girl had just passed from under the dangerous structure.  The deceased owned 740 acres of land south of Mounds on which the crops were destroyed by the high water and two of his tenants had quit their farms, and it was for the purpose of renting the land that he was there from Indiana.  The coroner was immediately notified of his death.

(The 4 Jun 1912, issue reported his name as James Willis.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Coroner’s Inquiry

Judge I. N. Taylor, acting as coroner last Wednesday, inquired into the cause of the death of Nelson Clapp, of Brocton, a man weighing about 180 pounds.  It was known that the man came to Mounds in search of work with the Illinois Central here and a letter of recommendation found in his pocket led to his identification.  Further evidence of his identity was a tattoo mark on his arm.  He is reported to have inquired last Sunday at the Y. M. C. A. for a swimming hole and was told of the Cache and warned of its danger.  The marks where he went into the water were seen as a search for the body was begun at once and continued until Wednesday morning, when it was found with the face and chest exposed to the air.  It was evidence that he was taken with cramps after entering the water, thus causing his death. The jury returned a verdict to the effect that he was accidently drowned while in bathing.  The body was turned over to Will Montgomery, the Mounds undertaker, who prepared and shipped it to his former home, Brockton, Ill.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 4 Jun 1912:
The funeral of William Weisker, who died Saturday, was held at the Baptist church at 2 o'clock Monday afternoon and interment in Beech Grove Cemetery. (Mound City)
 
The body of James Willis, who was killed at Mounds Saturday, caused by a porch roof falling upon him, was taken to Poseyville, Ind., Monday.  His son arrived here to take charge of the body.   (Mound City)

(The 1 Jun 1912, issue reported his name as Henry Will.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 6 Jun 1912:
AUTO SKIDDED:
OWNER KILLED

Edinburg, Ill., June 6.—Levi Harrod died today from injuries received when his automobile skidded over an embankment. Harrod lost control of the machine when a neighbor's dog ran in front of the car and he attempted to save the animal's life.
 
CAPT. J. H. MOORE IS DEAD
Former Steamboat Inspector Passed Away at Evansville

Evansville, Ind., June 6.—Capt. John H. Moore, 75, appointed United States inspector of steamboats by President Cleveland, and who served until a year ago, died here yesterday.
 
Mrs. Julia Oakley died at her home at Curry last Saturday, aged sixty years and a few days.  She was a consistent member of the Baptist Church.  Her funeral sermon was preached by the Baptist minister of Mound City.  She was followed to her last resting place by a large concourse of sorrowing friends.  She was interred in Rose Hill Cemetery.  She leaves a husband and an adopted daughter to mourn their loss. 

(Her marker in Rose Hill Cemetery near Pulaski reads:  Julia wife of E. Oakley Died June 1, 1912 Aged 60 Yrs., 1 Mo. & 1 Day.—Darrel Dexter)

 
George Shankin, one of the leading colored men of this place, received word Sunday that his brother, who resided in Chicago, was dead.  He went up to see about it and found that his brother, who was a Pullman porter, had shot and killed his wife and then killed himself.  The wife was buried at Chicago and the husband brought here (Ullin) Tuesday and then was taken to Martin, Tenn., for burial.

(The surname is Shanklin.  George Shanklin married Mary Mageline Taylor on 9 Feb 1893, in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
John W. Hileman, a lifetime resident of Alexander County and for many years a justice of the peace at Elco Precinct, died Thursday, May 30.  He leaves eight sons, two daughters and a host of friends to mourn their loss.  Funeral services were conducted at the residence by Rev. Hartley Vick, with interment in the Vick Cemetery.

(John W. Hileman married Rachel S. Reed on 3 Nov 1867, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  John W. Hileman, 34, born in Union Co., Ill., son of John Hileman and Polley Sowers, married Martha E. Heater, 20, born in Alexander Co., Ill., daughter of John Heater and Syntha Morris, on 9 Feb 1888, in Mill Creek, Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 8 Jun 1912:
FORMER CAIRO LADY DIED IN OKLAHOMA
Mrs. J. H. Norton, Widow of Late A. O. Phelps, to Be Buried Here

The remains of Mrs. J. H. Norton, who passed away in Oklahoma, will arrive from Oklahoma City this evening over the Illinois Central and will be taken to Beech Grove Cemetery for burial at 10 o'clock Sunday morning.  An interurban car will leave the station at 9 a.m. to take friends to the cemetery.

Mrs. Norton was the widow of the late A. O. Phelps, for many years a prominent photographer of Cairo and left Cairo ten years ago.

Her son, A. O. Phelps, Jr., still resides here.
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

Norton—Died in Oklahoma City, Mrs. J. H. Norton.

Funeral services will be held at Beech Grove Cemetery at 10 o'clock Sunday morning, June 9.  Special interurban car will leave interurban station at 9 a.m. for Beech Grove.  Friends of the family are invited.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 10 Jun 1912:
FORMER MOUND CITY LADY IS DEAD
Mrs. Frank Lemay Passed Away at Hamilton, Ohio

Mrs. Frank Lemay, formerly Miss Carrie Ervin, of Mound City, died at Hamilton, Ohio, last Friday night, according to word received in Mound City today.  She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Will Ervin, her father having been connected with the old pump factory.  They left Mound City about 15 years ago.  Besides her husband and parents, she leaves two brothers.  She was 31 years of age.
 
FORMER CAIROITE DIED SATURDAY

Lloyd C. Turner, a former resident of Cairo, and the eldest son of J. S. Turner, formerly of Cairo, died Saturday evening at his home in Waldron, Ill., after an illness of several months. He was a brother of Mrs. Jean M. Allen, of Fulton, N.Y., formerly Miss Bessie Turner, of this city.  Mrs. E. E. Ellis, of this city, another sister, left Sunday for Chicago to attend the funeral.

(Eugene E. Ellis married Minnie Maud Turner on 10 Aug 1898, in Cook Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
MOUND CITY LADY DIED SATURDAY
Mrs. Lafayette Deal Passed Away—Funeral Tuesday

Mrs. Lafayette Deal, wife of William Deal, of Mound City, and a sister of Mrs. D. D. Harris, died at midnight Saturday night and the funeral will be held tomorrow with Rev. Mr. Ferrell officiating.  The burial will be at Beech Grove Cemetery.

The deceased leaves her husband and a daughter.
 
OLD SOLDIER DEAD AT MOUND CITY
Lafayette Collins Passed Away at Age of 75 Years

Lafayette Collins, aged 73 years, passed away at his home in Mound City Saturday morning.
The deceased was once county jailer of Pulaski County, holding the position for many years.

Services were held at the residence this afternoon and the remains were buried in the National Cemetery, Rev. Joseph Buey, pastor of the Congregational Church, officiating.

Mr. Collins leaves a widow and one son.

(Lafayette Collins died 7 Jun 1912, and was buried in Mound City National Cemetery in Section E grave 3694J.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 11 Jun 1912:
RESOLUTION OF RESPECT
To Our Late Sister Effie Ryal by Ladies Aid of the Lake Milligan Baptist Church

Whereas, the all wise Father has seen fit to call our beloved sister from earth to heaven,

Resolved, that we the members of the Ladies Aid express to the family our deepest sympathy in their sad bereavement and to all those who mourn her loss

Resolved, that we express our sympathy to the Ladies Aid as we have lost one of our most useful workers

Resolved, that a copy of these resolutions be put on record, one given to the family and one sent to the Cairo Citizen to be printed.
Mrs. Grace L. Wicker
Mrs. M. E. Atherton, Committee

(Her marker in Baumgard Cemetery reads:  Effie M. Ryal Born April 3, 1880 Died May 19, 1912.  Come Ye Blessed.—Darrel Dexter)


Mrs. A. Corzine returned home Saturday night from Ashley, Ill., where she attended the funeral of her grandfather.  (Mound City)
 
MRS. GRACE HILLS DIED IN PADUCAH MONDAY MORNING

Miss Grace Hills, daughter of Mr. W. J. Hills, of Paducah, died at her home Monday morning of acute gastritis.  Miss Hills was one of the most popular young women in Paducah society and is well known in Cairo.  She visited this city last week, being in the party that came down from Paducah on the Rapids.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 12 Jun 1912:
Word was received in Cairo today of the critical illness of Mrs. H. R. Rothernberger, who is not expected to survive, at her home in Portland, Oregon.  Mrs. Rothernberger left Cairo about a year ago with her family to locate in Portland.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 13 Jun 1912:
SUDDEN DEATH OF CAPT. BRACKETT
Died Last Evening about 6 O'clock from Stroke of Apoplexy

Capt. C. H. Brackett dropped dead last evening about 6 o'clock in front of his office at Twenty-second and Commercial front of stroke of apoplexy.  The deceased was 80 years old.

Capt. Brackett had just left his office and was in the act of getting into his buggy to drive home when he noticed something the matter with the vehicle and attempted to fix it.  As he did so, he fell forward and died a few minutes later.

His body was taken to the undertaking parlors of E. A. Burke, where an inquest was held.  The jury found that he had come to his death from causes stated above.

The deceased was born in New Orleans in 1832.  He came to this city about twenty years ago and engaged in the hotel business.  Later he engaged in the real estate business, having accumulated considerable property.

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Kitty Brackett, who conducted the millinery store in the Opera House block.

The funeral arrangements have not yet been completed.
 
Mrs. Malinda Pickle, a sister to Mrs. William Mowery, of Wetaug, died last Saturday of dropsy.  She was about 60 years old and made her home with Mr. Mowery and family.

(They were half-sisters, having the same mother, but different fathers.  Franklin Costly married Catharine Davault on 28 Nov 1841, in Union Co., Ill.  Frederic Albright married Mrs. Catharine Costly on 11 Sep 1851, in Union Co., Ill.  William Junius Mowery married Mary C. Costly on 22 Nov 1866, in Union Co., Ill.  Michael Pickel, 26, married Melinda Albright, 21, on 3 Oct 1876, in Union Co., Ill.  A marker in St. John’s Cemetery near Mill Creek reads:  Michael Pickle Born May 1, 1850 Died Oct 9, 1899.  Mary J. Pickle Born Nov 10, 1879 Died April 5, 1889.  Frederick Pickle Born Aug. 1, 1890 Died April 6, 1910.  Malinda Pickle Born Jan 15, 1856 Died June 8, 1912.  Joseph D. Pickle Born Jan. 31, 1881 Died Feb. 20, 1899.—Darrel Dexter)
 
A young colored woman of Perks, name McDonald, died Wednesday of an abscess of the brain.  (Wetaug)
 
Mrs. Thomas Hacker and family returned last Tuesday from Vienna. They attended the funeral of Mr. Hacker's father.  (Grand Chain)
 
Mrs. Mary Brimmer, of Boskeydell, and Mrs. Mattie Gore, of Wolf Lake, were called here (Thebes) on account of the serious illness of Grandma Aldridge.  Mrs. Brimmer is a stepdaughter of Mrs. Aldridge. 
Grandma Aldridge passed away Tuesday night and burial was held at Thebes Cemetery late Wednesday afternoon.  This is the first death in Thebes since last November.

(Peter N. Brimmer married Mary C. Penrod on 15 Jun 1876, in Jackson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 14 Jun 1912:
MRS. ROTHERNBERGER DIES AT PORTLAND

Mrs. Helen Rothenberger, wife of H. R. Rothenberger, formerly of this city, died at her home in Portland, Ore., Thursday afternoon, according to a message received by friends in this city.  The Rothenberger family were well-known uptown residents. Mrs. Rothenberger having conducted a shoe store at the corner of Twenty-eighth and Commercial for many years.  The family removed to the Pacific Coast only several months ago.
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—Capt. C. H. Brackett, age 80 years.

Funeral cortege will leave E. A. Burke's undertaking parlors at 8:45 a.m.  Funeral services will be conducted by Rev. DeRossett at the Church of the Redeemer at 9 a.m. Saturday, June 15th.  Ascalon Lodge No. 51 K. of P. will hold services at the grave.

Special train will leave Fourteenth Street at 9:45 a.m.  Interment at Villa Ridge cemetery, friends of family invited.

(His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  C. H. Brackett 1835-1912.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 15 Jun 1912:
FUNERAL OF CAPT. BRACKETT HELD TODAY

The funeral of the late Capt. C. H. Brackett, who died Wednesday evening from a stroke of apoplexy, was held this morning, the services being conducted at the Church of the Redeemer by Rev. Fr. A. DeRosset.  The church choir sang several anthems, the favorites of the deceased.

Ascalon Lodge Knights of Pythias, of which the deceased was a member, attended the funeral in a body and conducted the services at the grave.  Interment was at Villa Ridge.

The following were pallbearers:  James Galligan, W. A. McKnight, Frank E. Davis, Dr. Morris, C. C. Terrell, R. E. Wiley, C. S. Bourque, E. A. Buder, Sr., A. H. Newman, and F. H. Atwood.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 17 Jun 1912:
KILLING AT TAMMS SUNDAY EVENING
Jim Hopkins Shot and Killed by T. D. Wilson, Town Marshal
OUTCOME OF BITTER FEELING
Which Has Existed Between the Men for Over a Year.

Thomas D. Wilson, city marshal at Tamms, shot and killed Jim Hopkins Sunday evening about 6 o'clock in the Tamms saloon in the presence of Oscar Tamm, Lee B. Davis and others.  Wilson fired two shots, both taking effect, and Hopkins died within half an hour.

The killing was the outcome of trouble that had existed between Officer Wilson and Hopkins for about a year.  On June 20, 1911, Wilson attempted to arrest Hopkins for beating a man by the name of Jim CrainHopkins resisted the arrest and pulled a knife and cut the officer across the face, leaving a deep gash, whereupon Wilson drew his gun and shot Hopkins.  It is said the wound badly crippled Hopkins.

On April 6 last, the trouble was further renewed between the two men, when, according to the information available, Hopkins entered the Tamms saloon and seeing Wilson seated at a table playing cards, deliberately pulled his pistol and shot Wilson, the wounds taking effect in the officer's shoulder.  Wilson got up from the table and shot at Hopkins, who ran through the door of the saloon and was not injured by Wilson's shot.

Hopkins was later arrested and put under bond and Wilson was suspended from duty as marshal by the city council until after an investigation, at which time he was reinstated in the office.

After the shooting Sunday, Wilson gave himself up and was brought to Cairo by Sheriff Fraser, who with Deputy W.P. Greaney and Chief of Police Egan, went over to Tamms in an automobile when notified of the shooting.

When seen at the police headquarters, this morning, Mr. Wilson made a statement saying that he acted in self-defense.  He said he was in the saloon talking when Hopkins entered.  He declared that Hopkins made a motion towards his back pocket whereupon he (Wilson) pulled his gun and fired.  Wilson said that Hopkins had threatened to kill him for some time and that Saturday he learned of further danger in this respect from his friends, several of whom it is said, Hopkins told saying he would "get" Wilson.  No gun was found upon Hopkins' person after the shooting.

Wilson was a police officer in Cairo during the administration of Mayor Claude Winter and afterwards removed to Tamms to take the position of town marshal, which he has held for a number of years.  He has quite a large family.

Hopkins is said to have been hard-working fellow and had a large following of friends.  He was a married man, but had been separated from sometime from his wife. Lately he had been employed at a place called Reynoldsville, in Union County, and came down to Tamms Friday night.

Coroner McManus who was up in the central part of the state, Sunday, was notified and arrived in Tamms this afternoon to hold an inquest.  Wilson went up to Tamms this afternoon to be present at the hearing.
 
CORONER'S INQUEST IN WILSON CASE WILL BE HELD HERE

The inquest will be held at the courthouse tomorrow afternoon in Cairo. The coroner’s jury empaneled by Coroner McManus is as follows:  L. E. Denison, Thomas McFarland, C. G. Miller, of Cairo, and Oscar Taylor, A. W. Parker and W. E. Vick, from the county.  The inquest was to have been held at Tamms, but has been changed to Cairo.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 18 Jun 1912:
MAYOR REINSTATES OFFICER JOHNSON

Gus Johnson, colored police officer who recently was tried for killing Napoleon Lipe in the circuit court and was found not guilty, was reinstated by Mayor Parsons last night, his nomination being unanimously confirmed.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 19 Jun 1912:
WILSON CLEARED BY CORONER'S JURY
For the Killing of Jim Hopkins at Tamms Last Sunday

Thomas D. Wilson, city marshal of Tamms, who shot and killed Jim Hopkins, in the Tamms saloon last Sunday evening, was exonerated by the coroner’s jury at the inquest held Tuesday afternoon at the courthouse in this city.  The inquest began at 3 o'clock and it was about 6:30 before a verdict was given out, the jury deliberating sometime.

About fifteen witnesses were examined. Included among them were Oscar T. Tamm and Lee B. Davis and the testimony of all except those who actually saw the shooting was to the effect that they had heard Hopkins threaten to take the life of Wilson at various times. Several had seen him on the day previous to the shooting and heard him say he would "get" Wilson.

Wilson himself took the stand and told of the beginning of the trouble between the deceased and himself, which began in June 1911, he having shot Hopkins one time for resisting arrest.  The trouble was renewed again during April last, when Hopkins entered the saloon at Tamms and shot Wilson.  From that time on, Wilson was apprehensive of losing his life at the hands of Hopkins, who had made threats and he (Wilson) was always on his guard.

On last Sunday evening, as previously stated in The Citizen, Wilson entered the Tamms saloon and saw Hopkins at the end of the bar.  After a few minutes Wilson was about to leave the place, when Hopkins walked towards him and made a motion towards his back pocket as if to draw a gun when Wilson shot him.  The testimony of several witnesses in the saloon at the time was substantially to this effect.
 
Mrs. Mary Bird (colored) died last Thursday after an illness of more than a year with consumption.  (Grand Chain)
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 20 Jun 1912:
Mrs. Ada Oliver died at her home last Sunday morning after suffering with a cancer for more than two years.  Funeral services will be held at the M. E. church Thursday, after which the body will be shipped to Jonesboro for burial.  (Pulaski)
             (Charles C. Oliver married Ada Moore on 29 Jun 1892, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  A marker in Jonesboro Cemetery reads:  Ada M. Oliver Died June 16, 1912 Aged 38 Yrs., 5 Mos., & 12 Ds.  Charles C. Oliver Died Oct. 19, 1900 Aged 30 Yrs., 11 Mos., & 23 Ds.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mortuary

             Mary Amanda Aldridge was born January 10, 1843, near Makanda, Jackson County, Illinois, and departed this life, June 12, 1912, at her home in Thebes, Ill., aged 69 years, five months and two days.  The maiden name of the deceased was Wallace, being a daughter of Dr. Wallace, of Makanda.  In 1860 she was married to John Gregory and to this union two children were born, one daughter, Mrs. Alice Walker, survives her and lives in Thebes.  Mr. Gregory met death by accident and she was united in marriage in 1868 to John G. Penrod.  One daughter was born to them—now Mrs. Annie Oberts, wife of William Oberts, of Thebes.  After the death of Mr. Penrod, she was married to James Aldridge and two sons were born to them, Charles, of Cape Girardeau, and Thomas, of Thebes.  Mr. Aldridge died several years ago.  She leaves eight grandchildren and one great-grandchild to mourn her departure.  The deceased had been a member of the Baptist Church nearly forty years.  She was a devoted Christian. She was a kind and loving mother and was loved by all who knew her.  Short funeral services were held at the Baptist church, followed by interment in Thebes Cemetery.  The deepest sympathy of the community is with the bereaved family. The children of the deceased desire to express their thanks for all of their kindness during the sickness of their dear mother and also for the many beautiful floral offerings.

(John C. Gregory married Mary A. Wallace on 16 Dec 1860, in Jackson Co., Ill.  John G. Penrod married Mrs. Mary A. Gregory on 22 Nov 1867, in Jackson Co., Ill.  James Aldridge, 26, married Mrs. Mary Ann Penrod, 47, on 20 Jun 1875, in Union Co., Ill.  William M. Oberts, 20, son of John Oberts and Nancy Hancock, married Anna Penrod, 17, daughter of John G. Penrod and Amanda Wallace, on 18 Dec 1887, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter) 
 
Mrs. George Dougherty went to Pulaski today to attend the funeral of the late Mrs. Ada Oliver, which occurred this morning. Mrs. Oliver was for years president of the Tri-County W.C.T.U., and several of the members of that organization attended the funeral.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 21 Jun 1912:
TWO DROWNED IN MISSISSIPPI
Thomas Barre and Son, Fishermen, Lost Their Lives This Morning
BOAT CAPSIZED IN THE SWIFT STREAM
And Men Were Carried Down Before Help Could Reach Them

While on their way to the Ohio River at Cairo Point to ply their daily toil as fishermen, two white men, Thomas Berrie and his son, Irvine Barre, were carried down to their death, when their small flat boat capsized in the swift eddies of the Mississippi River just opposite the Mobile & Ohio flag station at Thirtieth Street and the Mississippi levee this morning about 9:30.

The drowning was witnessed by a number of fishermen, who have their houseboats moored to the bank there.  The cries of the men in the water attracted their attention, but before a skiff could be rowed to their assistance, the two unfortunate men sank below the surface of the swift current of the Mississippi.

As was their daily custom, Barre and his son set out from their tent in the cottonwoods just above Fortieth Street to fish in the Ohio River just above Cairo Point, favorite spot with many who make their living that way.  Their conveyance was what is familiarly known as a “johnboat” and it was a rather small affair.  The Mississippi in that vicinity is full of swift eddies and suck holes and is known to be dangerous.

The accident must have happened so quickly that the occupants were taken completely unawares and had little chance to cling to the boat in an effort to save themselves.  According to a fisherman, who was a witness, they had barely gotten a skiff in readiness to aid the drowning men when the cries for help suddenly ceased as the men went under.

Barre had a family, including his son, with whom he met his death, his wife, a daughter about 21 years old, and a young baby.  He was 44 years of age and his son was a lad of 15 years.

Up until a month ago the father had been employed at the Harris Saddlery Company and was laid off at that time because of the quiet business.  Since that time they had been living in a tent just above Fortieth Street on the Mississippi Levee.  The father and son supported the family by fishing. The family came to Cairo last September from Quincy, Ill., and it was here that a married daughter resides.

Coroner McManus was notified of the accident and had several men working with drag hooks and lines in an effort to locate the bodies.
 
Mrs. Samuel Shoemaker was called to Creal Springs this afternoon by a message announcing the serious illness of her mother, Mrs. M. K. Ford.

(Samuel W. Shoemaker married Annie W. Ford on 20 Nov 1883, in Alexander Co., Ill—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 22 Jun 1912:
FISHERMAN LEAVES FAMILY IN DESTITUTE CIRCUMSTANCES

Thomas Barre and his son Irvine Barre, the two fishermen who were drowned in the Mississippi River Friday morning, have left destitute a sorrowing wife and mother with two small children, a girl eleven years of age and a baby girl about two years of age.

As stated in last evening’s Citizen, the father and son supported the family by fishing and selling the article in the city. Up until a month ago, the father was an employee of the Harris Sadlery Company, but was laid off on account of slack business and since that time he and his son had engaged in fishing as a livelihood.  The father and son were of the hard-working sort and supported the family well considering the adverse conditions.

Since their death, the mother and the remainder of her family have lost their means of support and, being without money and with but few acquaintances, they are in a sad plight and their case is indeed a pitiful one.

At present the family is being cared for at the home of Mrs. Mary Simmons, 413 Union Street, who, with the help of kind neighbors, will endeavor to shelter the family until they can be looked after by charitable authorities.  Mrs. Barre desires to remain in Cairo until the bodies of her husband and son can be found.

Mrs. Simmons has requested The Citizen to state that, since the family is without money and very few clothes, any donations of this kind sent to her address will be properly appreciated.

Coroner McManus had the river dragged in the vicinity of the drowning, but without avail.  On account of the swift current at the place, it is probable that the bodies floated on down the river and their finding will be an uncertainty for some time at least.
 
BOAT CAPSIZED;
NEGRO DROWNED

Tom Mitchell Lost Life This Afternoon at Barrett Fleet

Tom Mitchell, colored, was drowned about 3 o'clock this afternoon at the Barrett fleet when a yawl in which he and his companion, Henry Howe, were taking a boat load of ice, to the steamer Pacific No. 2 of the Barret line capsized in the heavy waves of the steamer Henry Marquand.

The yawl was loaded to its utmost with the ice and sat low in the water.  The heavy swells of the passing steamer easily swamped the boat and the two men were thrown into the river.  The accident happened near a fleet of barges and Mitchell, before he could realize his dangerous position, was sucked under one of these barges.  Howe was more fortunate, however, and managed to swim ashore, although his clothing was a serious handicap.

Mitchell lived on Fourth Street and is married.  Both men are well known.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 24 Jun 1912:

WOODMEN OF THE WORLD HELD MEMORIAL SERVICES SUNDAY

The Woodmen of the World, Egypt Camp, held their annual memorial service at the Villa Ridge and Beech Grove cemeteries Sunday afternoon, going up on a special Illinois Central train at 1 o'clock.

Several monuments to departed members were unveiled and the graves decorated.

About 200 members and their families attended the services. At Villa Ridge are the graves of Earnest Atherton, James E. Sproat, Walter Watts, Edward Galligan, Harry Decker and Oscar Bell. At Beech Grove are the graves of Cass Peeler and G. C. Overton.

FLOATER FOUND IN MISSISSIPPI TODAY

This morning about 10:30 o’clock Capt. A. A. Peck, who runs a launch ferry between Cairo and the Missouri side on the Mississippi River opposite Thirty-sixth Street, found the body of a floater lodged in a pile of drift wood a few feet from the Missouri shore. He towed the body to the Cairo side and Coroner McManus was notified.

Upon examination by the coroner's jury, the body was recognized as that of a young body, probably about 16 years of age. The body had on a blue blouse waist, black knickerbocker trousers, held up with suspenders and a leather belt, a grey coat, black stockings and shoes. Decomposition had set in the face and on the other parts of the body, which has been in the water at least several days.

This description may reach some upriver point, the identity of the person learned and some disposition made of the body.

Mr. and Mrs. Beadles took flowers to Ullin yesterday to decorate the graves of their departed ones. (Mounds)

LEARNS THAT HER HUSBAND IS DEAD

Guiseppi Triello did not meet his wife and children last Sunday when they arrived from sunny Italy, as they had expected, for he had been foully murdered the week before at White Ash by the dastardly Black Hand.

He had been here several months and sent money home in order that they might come to him. It was very sad to see her countenance change from the expectancy of seeing her husband to hear her friends tell of his cruel murder. –Marion Post



The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 25 Jun 1912:
FISHERMAN'S BODY FOUND MONDAY

The body of Thomas Barre, the fisherman, who with his son, Irvine Barre, was drowned Saturday in the Mississippi River opposite the cross levee at Thirty-sixth Street, was found late yesterday afternoon near Tenth Street by several fishermen. The body was taken to the undertaking parlors of Mrs. M. E. Feith and prepared for burial at the expense of the county. The body of the son has not as yet been found.
The body of the young white boy that was found Monday morning in the Mississippi opposite Thirty-sixth Street near the Missouri shore in a pile of driftwood was identified as the body of a boy named Becker who had been missing from his home in St. Louis since Monday, June 17.  Relatives came here and upon identification had Mrs. Feith make proper preparations and the body was sent to St. Louis today.

Mrs. J. M. Mozley returned home Sunday from Johnston City, Ills., where she went a few days ago to attend the funeral of her sister. (Mound City)

(J. Marshal Mozley married Norma E. Gore on 26 May 1889, in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)



The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 26 Jun 1912:
Choosing a time when everything was quiet in that vicinity, seven prisoners confined in the county jail at the courthouse broke out of the large steel cage in which they were confined and made their escape about 9 o'clock last night.  None of those who escaped have been caught, although the towns around Cairo have been notified to be on the lookout and have been given descriptions of them by Sheriff Fraser.

The prisoner who escaped were all negroes: Carroll Johnson, charged with the murder of Eli Bobo, another negro, several months ago in a crap game at a negro barber shop on lower Commercial and who was recently captured in Chicago; Henry Gholson, attempt to commit murder, Henry Orange, Will Webb, Will Perry, Will Cunningham alias "Frog," charged with an attempt to kill his wife.  Henry Smith, a negro charged with larceny, got out with the rest of the men, but instead of escaping, immediately went to Jailer Peter Fraser, who was upstairs in the sheriff’s office and notified him of the delivery.

MRS. LAURA WHITE DIED THIS MORNING

Mrs. Laura White, wife of James A. White, an employee of the Big Four, died early this morning at her home at 2211 Sycamore Street.

The deceased leaves a family.  E. A. Burke has charge of the remains and the funeral will probably be held Friday with interment at Beech Grove Cemetery.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 27 Jun 1912:
ENGINEER KILLED IN M. & O. WRECK
Rear End Collision Occurred Near Jonesboro Today

Alto Pass, Ill., June 27.—In a rear-end collision between two freight trains on the Mobile & Ohio railroad just north of Jonesboro this morning, Engineer Parker of the rear train was killed and Fireman Wilson injured, while John Gurley, of Murphysboro, one of the crew of the first train, was also hurt. The accident occurred about 9 o'clock and was between the first and second sections of No. 39. Eight cars were ditched and a passenger trains are detouring over the Illinois Central this afternoon.

Engineer Parker jumped when he saw the collision was about to occur and he struck his head on the step. This is believed to have caused his death. His engine left the track and went into a creek.

WILLIAM PREETORIOUS ENDS OWN LIFE
Former Cairoite Committed Suicide at Evansville Wednesday
ILLNESS AND LOSSES BELIEVED CAUSE
Deceased Was Formerly President of the Cairo Lumber Company

The St. Louis Globe-Democrat today says:

William Preetorius, a wealthy lumberman of Pine Bluff, Ark., and known in St. Louis, where he has relatives, shot and killed himself yesterday in his room in the Acme Hotel, Evansville, and, according to dispatches last night, recent heavy losses in the Chicago wheat pit coupled with ill health, are the causes assigned.

Preetorious was 64 years old and made his home at Pine Bluff, though his lumber business called him to Chicago a great deal. For several years he was president of the Cairo Lumber Company, which did a large business over the South and West. Two years ago he suffered a stroke of paralysis and since then had brooded considerably though he never gave any intimation of taking his life, it is said.

Edward L. Preetorious, president and general manager of the German American Press Association, a cousin of the man, was notified of the suicide over the long distance telephone yesterday afternoon. The dead man also has a sister in St. Louis, Mrs. Marie Miller. He also has a brother in Joppa, Ill., a sister who is abroad, and a son, Carl Preetorius, in Chicago. Edward L. Preetorious last night said ill health was the only cause he could assign, as he never had heard of the alleged losses in wheat. He said his cousin was known to lumbermen here and had visited in St. Louis several times.

The funeral arrangements will be made by his son. The burial probably will be at Pine Bluff. Preetorius had been in Evansville about two weeks, going there from Memphis.

FUNERAL OF MRS. WRIGHT HELD TODAY

The funeral of Mrs. Laura Wright, who died Wednesday, was held this afternoon from the residence at 2211 Sycamore Street, conducted by Rev. M. H. Loar, of the First Methodist Church. Interment was held at Beech Grove, the funeral party going up on a special interurban train.

The deceased is survived by her husband, James Wright, an employee of the Big Four, and eight daughters, Mrs. F. W. Finely, Mrs. Charles A. Wright, and Mrs. James Wright, of Cairo, Mrs. John Johnson, of Milwaukee, Wis., Mrs. John Wilson, of Murphysboro, Ill., Mrs. John E. Wright, of Willard, Mrs. Thomas Johnson, of East St. Louis, and Mrs. C. McDonald, of Murphysboro.

(James A. Wright married Laurie E. Parker on 24 Mar 1870, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  T. W. Finley, 28, house carpenter, born in Mound City, son of James W. Finley and D. E. Braden, married Lillie M. Wright, 24, born in Villa Ridge, daughter of James Wright and Laura Parker, on 2 Dec 1896, in Pulaski Co,. Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 28 Jun 1912:
D. C. PHILLIPS HAS PASSED AWAY

D. C. Phillips, aged about 75 years, and a former resident of this city, died at his home in New Madrid, Mo., last Sunday.  His death was sudden and is attributed to old age.

The deceased is survived by his wife, three daughters and a son. The funeral was held Monday. The family formerly resided in Cairo and Miss Louise Phillips, who is a well-known here, is a daughter.

Mrs. George Parker was called to Cairo Wednesday on account of the death of Mr. Parker's aunt, Mrs. James Wright. (Mound City)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 29 Jun 1912:
George Merchant died at the home of his brother, Frank, here in Grand Chain Friday morning at 11 o'clock.  He had been ill for several months with consumption.  He leaves a mother, five brothers and two sisters and many friends to mourn his death.

(G. W. Merchant, 24, married Mrs. Callie Yocum, 29, on 14 Aug 1896, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  W. J. Yoakum married Callie Guy on 22 Dec 1885, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  George W. Merchant Born May 3, 1872 Died June 28, 1912.—Darrel Dexter)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 1 Jul 1912:
INFANT SON OF JOHN HENRY SERBIAN DIED IN MOUND CITY

Rudolph Leonard, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. John Henry Serbian, died in Mound City at 3 o'clock this morning. The child was aged 2 months and 18 days. The funeral will occur at 1:30 Tuesday afternoon, services to be conducted by Rev. C. Robert Dunlap, pastor of the Lutheran Church in Cairo. Burial at Beech Grove.

KILLING AT GRAND CHAIN

Saturday night at about 9:30 John Freeman shot and killed Lewis Jackson. Both were colored. The boy died at 1:30 that night. Freeman had torn up a watch belonging to Jackson and when he demanded pay for it, the Freeman boy shot him. The coroner and sheriff were in town Sunday, but no trace has yet been found of Freeman. It is thought he is in hiding somewhere near Grand Chain.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 3 Jul 1912:
John Freeman (colored), who shot and killed Lewis Jackson Saturday night, has not been found, but is being watched for all the time.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 5 Jul 1912:
MISS MARY HARVEY DIED THIS MORNING

After a lingering illness of over three years, Miss Mary Harvey died this morning at the residence of her sister, Mrs. T. B Farrin, at 722 Twenty-third Street, with whom she has resided for the past ten years. The deceased was born in Madison County, Mississippi, and was 69 years of age. She spent all of her life with the exception of the past ten years, in Cairo, at her home in Mississippi. Her sister, Mrs. Farrin, is the only survivor. She was a member of the Methodist Church.

The funeral will be held tomorrow morning at 8:30 from the residence on Twenty-third Street, conducted by Rev. A. H. Loar and a special train will leave the foot of Fourteenth Street at 9:30 for Villa Ridge, where the burial will take place.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—Miss Mary Jane Harvey, age 69, at residence, 722 Twenty-third Street.  Funeral services will be conducted by Rev. A. H. Loar, at the residence, Saturday, July 6th, at 8:30 a.m. Special train will leave Fourteen Street at 9:30 a.m. Interment at Villa Ridge. Friends of family invited.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 9 Jul 1912:
DEATH CLAIMED YOUNG WIFE TODAY
Mrs. C. T. Barnum Passed Away after Short Illness

Mrs. C. T. Barnum died this morning after an illness of over a month at the residence of Miss Virginia Rennie, 607 Washington Avenue.

Mr. Barnum is in the employ of the government forestry service and has been conducting a series of experiments and research work at the plant of the Pioneer Pole and Shaft Company in the Drainage District.

Mr. and Mrs. Barnum came to Cairo in February from Madison, Wis., first residing at the Wenger, latterly with Miss Rennie. During her short residence here, they have become favorably known by many friends.

The remains of the deceased will be shipped tonight to Pottsville, Pa., her former home.

Mrs. Barnum became ill June 4th and was removed to St. Mary’s Infirmary, where an operation was performed. At that immediate time, her life was despaired of, but after several weeks, she was greatly improved and about a week ago was removed to her apartments at the Rennie residence. The past several days blood poisoning and complications set in and she gradually grew worse, the end coming at 7:20 o'clock this morning.

Miss Fannie Haverty, of Pottsville, Pa., a sister of Mrs. Barnum and who is a trained nurse, has been in constant attendance since the deceased first became ill and was taken to the hospital.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 10 Jul 1912:
FLOATER FOUND IN OHIO RIVER
Body of Young Man Found at Echols Landing Tuesday

A young man was found floating in the river at Echols Landing near Grand Chain Tuesday by Jesse Culbertson and Will Crippen, who were working along the river.

It is thought his name was Ben Walraven, of Canton, Ill.  He had two letters in his pocket, one from his mother and one from his sweetheart at Granville, Ill. The mother's letter was dated July 1; it is thought he may have been drowned July 4. Telegrams have been sent to Canton and a coroner's inquest was held Tuesday night and he was buried near the bank of the river, but will be taken up and sent to his friends and relatives if they wish him to be.

JOHNSON SENT TO PENITENTIARY
Negro Who Shot Another in Crap Game Got 14-Year Term
PLEADED GUILTY TO THE CHARGE
Defendant Was One of Prisoners Who Broke Jail and Was Later Captured

In the circuit court Carrol Johnson, alias "Cal Nicholson," pleaded guilty to murder and was sentenced to the penitentiary for 14 years by Judge Butler. Johnson is the negro who shot another negro named Eli Bobo in a crap game episode, in a negro barbershop on lower Commercial last January.

Johnson shot at another negro, but his aim was wild and Bobo, who was standing near the rear door of the place, received two bullet wounds in the back, which caused his death several days afterward at St. Mary's Infirmary. Johnson was one of the negroes who participated in the jail delivery a number of weeks ago and he was caught at Sikeston, Mo., by Deputy Sheriff Robert Greaney and brought back by Deputy W. P. Greaney.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 11 Jul 1912:
HARRIS BERRY IS DROWNED
Well Known Harrisburg Athlete Meets a Tragic Death in Saline Creek

Harrisburg Chronicle—Harris Berry, the well-known athlete of the Harrisburg Township High School, met with a tragic death last week while bathing in Saline Creek, seven miles southeast of Harrisburg and a mile and a half from his home in Cottage Grove Township.

Berry was one of a party of picnickers who were enjoying the Fourth on the banks of Saline Creek. He and several of his friends decided to go in bathing and left the other members and walked a half mile or so up the creek. After the boys had been in the water for some time, Berry decided to try and swim across the stream, which was sixteen or twenty feet deep.  He was only a fair swimmer and he was cautioned by his associates to not attempt to cross. He persisted, however, and while in the middle of the stream apparently became frightened at the swift current. He was seen to cease his efforts to swim and began to sink. Other members of the party were scattered up and down the stream and hastened to him with all possible speed. Just as the nearest associate was in the act of grabbing him, he sank out of sight for the third time. Assistance was at once summoned, including Dr. Butler, of this city. The body was recovered with grab hooks in about an hour, but all efforts to resuscitate the dead were of no avail.

The sudden and tragic death of Harris Berry cast a gloom over Harrisburg, Saline County, and Southern Illinois. He was the star athlete of the high school track team and only a few weeks ago did he capture the individual cup and other medals at the athlete meet in Carbondale. He also won the jumping events at the Harrisburg meet. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Alvis Berry, of Cottage Grove Township, and was one of the most popular young men in Saline County.

Berry will be remembered by many Cairo young people who attended the track meet at Carbondale several months ago and saw him win the contest for Harrisburg, besides the many individual honors.

Several from here (Wetaug) are attending court at Mound City this week. Abe Meals’ trial for the killing of the town marshal Bob Casteen will come off this week.

William J. Mowery, the eldest Mowery now living of a large family, went fishing the 3rd of July, was out in a hard storm and is now quite ill as a result. (Wetaug)

John Hall, a prominent colored farmer, died at his home east of Wetaug last Friday, July 5, of typhoid fever. Mr. Hall owned 150 acres of land was a leading citizen of his community and far above the average of his color.  He was aged about 60 years and leaves four sons and a daughter.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 12 Jul 1912:
INFANT CHILD BURIED TODAY

The funeral of Arthur Lynn Rogers, the 15-month old child of Mr. and Mrs. O. E. Rogers, of 412 Union Street, who died Thursday morning, was held this afternoon, interment was at Beech Grove Cemetery. Mr. Rogers is an employee at the Singer plant. E. A. Burke had charge of the funeral.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 13 Jul 1912:
FORMER THEBES MAN IS STRICKEN
John Norman Passed Away at Illmo, Mo., Early Today

John Norman, formerly a prominent citizen of Thebes, died suddenly at his home in Illmo, Mo., at 2 o'clock this morning, following a sudden attack of illness about midnight.

Mr. Norman came to Thebes during the period of the building of the bridge and with W. K. Murphy, founded the Bank of Thebes.  He also had a lumber yard there.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 15 Jul 1912:
NEGRO STRUCK BY TRAIN DIED
Slept on Bridge Approach and Was Run Over by Train

Brown Tyas, a negro about 19 years of age, died this morning as a result of serious injuries received Sunday night, when he was struck by a Mobile & Ohio freight train on the bridge approach.

Tyas, in company with two other negroes, were waiting in the approach about 11 p.m. for a southbound train, to beat their way to Tennessee, and had laid down on a pile of bridge timbers opposite the track to sleep until the train was due. They heard the train coming and started to get up.  Just emerging from the sleeping state, they were somewhat confused and the electric headlight on the engine dazzled them to such an extent that Tyas not knowing his direct position, stumbled over the track just in time to be struck by the engine, the impact crushing his skull and the entire train passed over this right leg, severing that member from his body.  He was conscious when taken to the hospital and died there two hours later. His two companions rolled down the embankment in the confusion.

Tyas had worked at various places in Cairo and had been here about a month. His companions were Dave Robinson and Will Meyer, both Cairo negroes, and they were all bound for the south to do harvest work. Coroner McManus is making an effort to locate the dead man's relatives in Brownsville, Tenn., that being his former home.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 16 Jul 1912:
THREE PROMINENT CAPE GIRARDEAU CITIZENS DEAD

Cape Girardeau, Mo., July 16.—The death of Maj. W. W. Ward here July 11, the death of H. P. Pierronet in Mullanphy Hospital Sunday and the death at Ocean, Md., Sunday of Leon J. Albert left three vacancies in the directorate of the Southeast Trust Company of this city. Maj. Ward had been a farmer and financier of Cape and Scott counties for forty years. H. P. Pierreonet, a merchant of the Cape for thirty years, and L. J. Albert had been either cashier or president of the Sturdevant Bank about forty years and for twenty-three years had been a regent of the State Normal School of Cape Girardeau.

MAN KILLED ON M. & O. "Y"
Robert Forbes, White, Meets Tragic Death Early This Morning
HIS COMPANION SERIOUSLY INJURED
And Is Now Occupying Cot in St. Mary's Infirmary

Robert Forbes and Henry Aden, two white men, were the victims in a boxcar accident at the Mobile & Ohio Railroad "Y" between Cairo junction and Davis early this morning in which the former lost his life and the latter was seriously injured.

The men had boarded the cart at Union City and had beaten their way to Cairo. They had stood in one end of the car in a vacant space left by the uneven piling of lumber. When they reached Cairo (Davis Junction) they started to get out. Before they could do so, a switch engine backing into the train of cars struck the train with such force that the lumber slipped forward, pinning the men to the bulk head of the car. The impact killed Forbes instantly and Aden was painfully injured. Aden's cries for help attracted the attention of switchman Louis Caffall, who seeing the position of the two men had the engine bump the car sufficiently to slip the lumber back, this relieving Aden.

The injured man was taken to St. Mary’s Infirmary and the body of Forbes was brought to Tenth Street where Coroner McManus held an inquest and the body was moved to the undertaking establishment of E. A. Burke. Upon examination of the dead man's clothing a note book was found in his pocket and the following being written on two of its pages: "In case of death notify my sister, Mrs. R. C. Moseley, 1032 Hattie Street, Fort Worth, Texas. My name is Robert Forbes."

Aden told of meeting Forbes at Union City several days ago and that they came to Cairo together saying that they had expected to go down the river on a fishing trip. He said Forbes had told him that he had a wife and several children residing at Memphis, but that he was separated from them. Aden will recover, according to adding physicians.

Undertaker Burke communicated with Forbes' sister in Fort Worth, Texas, as instructed in the memorandum book in the deceased's pocket, and he received instructions to ship the body to that place this afternoon.

Mrs. Race Jenkins, of Pine Bluff, Ark., attended the funeral of her little niece, Ella Piland, here (Mound City), Sunday afternoon.

The funeral of the little girl, Ella Constant Piland, who died Friday afternoon, was held Sunday afternoon from the home of her grandmother, Mrs. B. F. Ulen. The services were conducted by Rev. Baker, of the Methodist church, and Rev. Ferrell, of the Baptist Church. Interment was made at Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.

LOCATES PARENTS OF YOUNG NEGRO

Undertaker Burke telephoned to Brownsville, Tenn., this morning and located the parents of Ed. Tyas, the young negro who was killed on the bridge approach Sunday night, having been struck by a southbound Mobile & Ohio freight train. The deceased's father will arrive tonight to take charge of the remains.

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 17 Jul 1912:
DEATH FARM MYSTERY IS BEING PROBED

Mt. Vernon, Ill., July 17—State and county officials today started an investigation of the "death farm" mystery here which has thus far cost the lives of nine persons.  John Ackerman, the last of the nine to die, showed the same symptoms as the others and all doctors who examined him during his short illness admitted that they were baffled.  All of the victims became ill shortly after making their home on the farm.  In the case of each victim the malady that caused death came upon them gradually.  At the first the victim found himself wasting away.  He grew thin but doctors could find no reason for the growing weakness.  Then a sudden paralysis seized the sick person.  Following death the body became spotted.  The cases are believed to be without precedent.

Miss Mary Kay, aged 76 years, 7 months and 14 days, a respected old colored citizen of this city (Mound City), died on Tuesday morning at 6:30 o'clock.  Funeral was held today from the Main Street Baptist Church.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 18 Jul 1912:
Mr. John Huddleston, formerly of Thebes, died at his home near East Cape last Saturday morning.  Burial at Thebes late Saturday afternoon.

He leaves a wife, one child and three sisters to mourn his loss.

Dropsy and consumption being case of death.

A still born babe came to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Den Brown Tuesday night and will be buried at Thebes today.  The mother is reported very sick.

Mr. Walraven, of Chicago, Ill., was here (Grand Chain) Friday and Saturday.  He had his brother removed from the bank of the river where he was buried last week to the Grand Chain cemetery.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 19 Jul 1912:
John Huddleston, aged 35 years, died Friday last of dropsy of the stomach.  He leaves a wife and a child.  The interment was made at Thebes.  (McClure)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 20 Jul 1912:
YOUNG MAN DIES OF TYPHOID

Frank Joslin, a young man 24 years of age, died Friday evening at St. Mary’s Infirmary of typhoid fever.  The remains were taken charge of by Undertaker E. A. Burke and shipped to the deceased's home in DuQuoin this afternoon.

TRAMPS KILL TWO ON TRAIN
William Forrester, Nephew of Halliday Estate Manager, One of Victims

DuQuoin, Ill., July 20—The bodies of William Forrester and Henry Lavell, two residents of Hallidaysboro, eight miles south of here, were found near the tracks of the Illinois Central Railroad at Elkville early Friday morning by the crew of a passing freight train.

Forrester showed signs of life and was hurried to a physician at Elkville where he died shortly after noon.  Before he expired he muttered in response to questions that he had been thrown from a train.  Lavell had been dead some time and apparently had been murdered, as two ugly bullet wounds were found in his body, besides numerous bruises and contusions.

The two men were here Thursday and it is supposed that they boarded a freight train to ride home and were attacked by tramps. Forrester, superintendent of the Halliday estate at Halliday, and of John Forrester, general manager of the Paradise Coal Company of this city.
The coroner of Jackson County has begun an investigation.  Both Forrester and Lavell leave families.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 22 Jul 1912:
The body of Mrs. Frances Elizabeth Newton, who died at Kevil, Ky., last Saturday was brought to Mounds yesterday for interment in the old cemetery.  She was the daughter of Marcus and Seney Welton, her father being known as Judge Welton.  Her husband, Theodore Newton, was formerly employed in the I. C. blacksmith ships in Mounds, but was on a farm at Kevil, Ky., at the time of her death at the age of 34 years and 29 days.  Her father and mother were charter members of the Congregational Church in this city and the Rev. J. H. Runalls, the present pastor, officiated at the grave and Miss Norma Clanton, Mrs. Poole and Will Gallion furnished the music.  Besides her husband, she leaves three sisters, Mrs. Jean Gatton, Mrs. Britt and Mrs. John Mahoney.

(Theodore Newton, 22, of Beechwood, machinist, born in Hinkleville, Ky., son of Henry Newton and Mary Elliott, married Frances E. Welton, 18, of Beechwood, born in Pope Co., Ill., daughter of Mark Welton and Lencey Farris, on 28 Feb 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  John Mahoney, 28, of Beechwood, carpenter, son of Timothy Mahoney, married Corda Welton, 23, of Beechwood, daughter of Squire Welton, on 6 Feb 1898, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Eugene Gatton married Cynthia Welton on 24 Dec 1890, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)



The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 23 Jul 1912:
FORMER CAIROITE LEAVES ESTATE WORTH $390,000

Richard M. Sayers took our letters of administration Saturday on the estate of his father, Henry Sayers, of 50 Kingsbury Place, who died July 16 last in London, England.

His estate is valued at $390,000, mostly personal property.  He left no will.

The property will go to his widow, Mrs. Pauline H. Sayers, who is now at Flint, Mich., and his children, Mrs. Alice Bloomfield, of Verbena, Ill., Mrs. Blanche Palester, of St. Louis, and Richard and A. H. Sayers.  Mr. Sayers was a grain merchant and president of Shaare Emeth Congregation.

Mr. Sayers was a resident of Cairo about 30 years ago and was engaged in business with the late Charles Gilhofer.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 24 Jul 1912:
OLD RESIDENT OF MOUND CITY DIES
Mrs. Margaret Mason Passed Away This Morning at Age of 89 Years

Mrs. Margaret Mason, a resident of Mound City for the past fifty years, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Sarah Schoenfeld this morning at the advanced age of 89 years.

The deceased is survived by two daughters, the other being Miss Henrietta Mason, of Mound City.  One sister also survives her in Iowa.

The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at Grace M. E. Church, the Rev. M. D. Baker officiating.  The interment will be held at Beech Grove Cemetery.  Interurban car will leave station at 2:30 p.m.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 25 Jul 1912:
OLD RESIDENT OF BALLARD COUNTY DEAD

Mrs. Elizabeth Gholson, 80 years old, one of Ballard County's oldest and most prominent women, died suddenly at 8:30 o'clock Monday morning at her home near Lovelaceville, following a short illness of heart trouble.  Mrs. Gholson was born in Trigg County, but came to this end of the state when only five years of age.  She was a faithful member of the Methodist Church and had many friends all over Ballard County.  She is survived by four sons and three daughters.  Her husband died several years ago.—Paducah News Democrat

Dorothy May, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Underwood, died Tuesday night and was buried at Thebes, Wednesday, July 24th.  Little Dorothy was about six months old and will be greatly missed in the home.  Relatives have the sympathy of all in their bereavement.  (Thebes)

OLD RESIDENT HAS PASSED AWAY
Mrs. Sarah O'Shea, Aged 70 Years, Died This Morning

Mrs. Sarah O'Shea, an old resident of Cairo, died this morning about 8 o'clock at her home, 2514 Sycamore Street, after an illness of about a year.  Mrs. O'Shea had been ill for some time, but only recently was considered in a serious condition.  The deceased was 70 years of age.

Mrs. O'Shea was born in Canada and came to Illinois, her family locating in Pulaski County, where she spent her childhood.  Later the family removed to Cairo and it was here, sometime before the war, that she married Mr. O'Shea.  Mr. O'Shea was an old settler of Cairo and died in 1892.  Nine children were born to the union and seven survive:  Thomas E. O'Shea, John J. O'Shea, Joseph O'Shea, Julia D. O'Shea, Katherine O'Shea, and Frank O'Shea, of Charleston, Miss., and Mrs. Cecelia Billingsly, of Newport, Ark.  The oldest child, Mrs. Minnie Aldred, died several months ago at Kansas City, Mo.  Attorney, M. J. O'Shea, of this city, is a nephew.  Mrs. Abe Weence, of Levings, Ill., is a surviving sister and there are many grandchildren.

The funeral will be held Saturday morning at St. Joseph's Church of which the deceased was a member, Father J. J. Gillen officiating.  Interment will be at Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge, Mrs. M. E. Feith having charge of the funeral.

FORMER CAIRO GIRL DIES SUDDENLY AT MEMPHIS

Mrs. James B. Pierson, formerly of this city, died very suddenly at her home in Memphis about 9 o’clock this morning.  Mrs. Piersol was formerly Miss Margaret O'Laughlin, of Cairo, and is survived by her husband and two small children, Margaret and James, her father, Patrick O'Laughlin, and three brothers, Joseph, Steve and John, of this city, and her aunt, Miss Kate Leveett and her uncle, Tim Donovan, of this city.

Mr. Piersol is a contractor and the family, who formerly resided at 626 Thirty-fourth Street, this city, removed to Memphis some time ago.  The deceased was 25 years of age.  The remains will be brought to Cairo tonight and the funeral arrangements will be announced later.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 26 Jul 1912:
The funeral of the late Mrs. Margaret Mason was held here (Mound City) Thursday at the Methodist church and interment at Beech Grove Cemetery.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 27 Jul 1912:
FUNERAL SERVICES HELD THIS MORNING

Funeral services over the remains of Mrs. Sarah O'Shea were held this morning at St. Joseph's Church and the body was taken to Villa Ridge for interment in Calvary Cemetery.  The pallbearers were Patrick Egan, Martin Donahue, John Barry, P. T, Langan, Jacob Klein, and T. J. Kerth.  Mrs. O'Shea was one of the oldest residents of Cairo.

CONVICT KILLED IN ROCK CRUSHER

Chester, Ill., July 26.—Convict, John Owens, 58 years old, who was received at the penitentiary from Vermillion County last month on a charge of burglary and larceny, was caught in the cable hoist at the rock crusher and killed.  Owens would never divulge the names of any relatives.

YOUNG MAN LOSES LIFE IN SWIMMING
Gus Smith Drowned in Ohio River—Body Recovered Today

The body of Gus Smith, aged 20, who was drowned while in swimming in the Ohio River, at Twentieth Street Friday evening, was recovered shortly before noon today and taken in charge by Mrs. M. E. Feith.

The young man with several companions was in swimming and was diving off a barge.  After one of these dives he came to the surface, but appeared to be in distress and sank before aid could reach him.

He resided with his sister, Mrs. Earnest Grace, at 408 Twentieth Street, and was employed by the Halliday Milling Company. He came to Cairo several months ago from near Belleville.

The body was discovered by a lad named Raymond Powers near where it went down.  Coroner McManus held an inquest and a verdict of accidental drowning was returned.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Smith—Died Friday, July 26, Gus Smith, aged 20 years,  Funeral cortege leave the residence, 410 Twentieth Street, at 1:30 Sunday afternoon for St. Joseph's Church where services will be held.  Remains will be taken by special train from Fourteenth Street to Villa Ridge, where interment will be made.  Friends of the family invited to attend.

Mrs. Edward Martin, of Cairo, attended the funeral here (Mound City) Thursday afternoon of the late Margaret Mason.

Benjamin Rucker, one of the oldest and most highly esteemed colored residents of this city (Mound City) died Wednesday at the Anna hospital, where he was taken a few weeks ago for treatment.  The funeral was held Friday afternoon and the remains interred at the Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds.  The deceased had resided in this city for the past 45 years.

(Ben Rucker is the head of a household in Mound City Precinct in the 1880 census.  He was listed as a mulatto, 35, born in Kentucky, and his parents were born in Virginia.  Also in the household was his wife, Louise Rucker, 26, born in Virginia, and his two children, Josephine Rucker, 8, born in Illinois, and Nancy E. Rucker, 8 months, born in Illinois.  Benjamin F. Rucker, 55, of Mound City, farmer, married 2nd Mrs. Anna Lightfoot, 50, of Mound City, on 18 Jul 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 29 Jul 1912:
COMPANIONS TRIED TO LOCATE BODY
Dived Again and Again After Gus Smith—Water Too Deep for Them

Companions of Gus Smith, who was drowned while in swimming in the Ohio River Friday evening, made strenuous efforts to recover the body.  Several of the boys, among them Louis Zanone, Jr., Joe Johnson, Richard Ehs and George Wilbourn, dived again and again in search of the body and they thought they touched it several times, but the water so deep there that it was impossible for them to locate it.  The body was found Saturday near the place where the boys were diving.

FUNERAL SERVICES OF GUS SMITH HELD SUNDAY

The funeral survives of the late Gus Smith, who was drowned Friday, occurred at St. Joseph's Church Sunday afternoon, the services being conducted by Rev. Father James J. Gillen.  The funeral cortege was carried on a special train to Villa Ridge where interment was made at Calvary Cemetery.  The pallbearers were active:  Messrs. Thomas and Will Darmody, George Kobler, Ed Flagler, Richard Ehs, Mike Galvin; honorary:  Albert Fischer, George Walter, Louis Zanone, and Tom Dwyer.

GIRL BROKE DOWN ON WITNESS STAND
As She Told the Story of the Quarrel that Led to Her Brother's Death
SHERIDAN TRIAL RESUMED THIS MORNING
State Continued to Present Evidence to Prove Harry Thacker's Death was Unwarranted

Vienna, Ill., July 29—Miss Kate Thacker, sister of the victim, Thomas H. Sheridan's bullet, was the first and principal witness in the trial now in progress in the Johnson County circuit court to determine whether Thomas H. Sheridan was guilty of murder in killing Harry Thacker in September of last year.  She told her story of the tragic events of that day, of which she was a witness and broke down and cried when they were again brought vividly to her mind.

Court was a little late in opening this morning.  Judge Duncan came over from Marion in an automobile which broke down on the way over and occasioned some delay.  Shortly after 8 o'clock, however, the trial was resumed with Miss Thacker on the stand.  The adjournment from Saturday gave everyone a chance to rest and the attorneys and jurors all appeared refreshed.

At the time of the tragedy which ended her brother’s life, Miss Thacker was employed in the circuit clerk's office.  She was on the street talking with some other ladies just before the trouble and saw her father meet Sheridan and get the cut of himself that had caused all the trouble.  This was a newspaper cut that Sheridan had run in his paper, in connection with the article reflecting on Thacker.  The witness said that Sheridan spoke to her father as he gave him the cut and his manner was very gruff and he seemed very angry.  Witness then started up the street and the next thing she saw her brother, Harry and Sheridan in a scuffle on the stairway leading up to Sheridan's office.  She said that Sheridan had her brother's head down, under his arm, while her brother was trying to hold Sheridan's right arm in which Sheridan held a gun.  She said she screamed and then she heard the shot fired and saw her brother fall.  Here she broke down and cried.

The cross examination was conducted by Attorney White of Marion, in which the attorney for the defense tried to bring out the fact that Harry Thacker had come to Vienna on that day with the intention of giving Sheridan a whipping.  The witness denied positively that her brother had come to Vienna with any such intention.  She was asked if she did not say that she hoped her brother would make a good job of it, or that if she was a man she would whip Sheridan, but entered denials of both conversations.  She did admit that her feeling toward Sheridan prior to the day of the murder was bad.

Following Miss Thacker, William Moore, Sheriff John Mathis, Deputy Sheriff Veatch, Dr. McCall and Earl Veatch testified during the forenoon.  Sheriff Mathis arrested Sheridan in his office shortly after shooting and he was spirited out of Vienna and brought to Cairo by Deputy Sheriff Veatch.

A strict control is kept of the crowd attending the trial.  The opera house does not hold many persons and only as many as can obtain seats are allowed to attend the proceedings.

Mrs. Wallin died at her home Friday afternoon.  She was about a century old and much of her life has been spent in and around Grand Chain.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 30 Jul 1912:
OLD RESIDENT PASSES AWAY
Thomas Meehan Died Monday at Ripe Age of 88 Years
HAD LIVED IN CAIRO SINCE YEAR 1857
And for Many Years Was Engaged in Contracting, Filling Many of Cairo's Streets

Thomas Meehan, old resident of Cairo and contractor for much of the street work in the early days, passed away at St. Mary’s Infirmary at 11:35 o'clock last night, at the ripe age of 88 years.  He had only been ailing a few days and death was due to the failure of his heart to act.

Mr. Meehan was a native of County Tipperary, Ireland, and after a few years' residence in America came to Cairo in 1857.  He has resided here ever since.

In the early days he was actively engaged in contracting and among his jobs were the filling of Railroad Street and Walnut Street.  Among his associated in this contracting were David Thistlewood and Patrick Fitzgerald.

His wife died about fifteen years ago, but his is survived by five sons and a sister who resides in Philadelphia.  The sons are William Meehan, of Birmingham, Ala., David and James Meehan, of Cairo, John Meehan, of Fort Stanton, N.M., and Thomas Meehan of Charleston, Miss.  All of these sons will attend the funeral except John Meehan, who cannot reach Cairo from New Mexico in time.

Services will be held at St. Patrick’s Church Wednesday morning and the remains will be taken to Calvary Cemetery, Villa Ridge, for interment.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Meehan—Died, Monday, July 29, Thomas Meehan, aged 88 years.

Funeral cortege will leave residence of James Meehan, No. 401 Washington Avenue, at 7:45 a.m. Wednesday, July 31, for St. Patrick’s Church, where services will be held at 8 o'clock.

Remains will be taken on special Illinois Central train from Fourteenth St., at 9:15 for Calvary Cemetery, where interment will be made.

Please omit flowers.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 31 Jul 1912:
FUNERAL SERVICES OVER THOMAS MEEHAN

Funeral services over the remains of Thomas Meehan were held at St. Patrick's Church this morning conducted by Father J. J. Downey and the remains were taken by special train to Calvary Cemetery for interment.

JAMES CARROLL SUMMONED TODAY
Old Resident Passed Away at Age of 80 Years

James Carroll, old resident of Cairo, passed away shortly after 11 o'clock today, aged 80 years.
The deceased was born on May 1, 1832, at Buffalo, N.Y., and was the last survivor or a family of eleven children.

In 1859 he removed to Carondelet, Mo., where he was employed by the government and from the area sent to Mound City, where the government ship yards were located during the war.  From there he came to Cairo.

He retired from active business fifteen years ago.

During his long citizenship here he served in the city council under the administrations of John H. Oberly, Col. S. Staats Taylor, Col. John Wood, Col. C. O. Patier, and Thomas W. Halliday.

Fifty years ago on May 16th, 1862, he married Miss Margaret Deneen at Chicago and eight children were born to them.  James E., of Buffalo, William B. Carroll, and Mrs. W. P. Greaney, of Cairo, Mrs. Charles McCormick, of St. Louis, and Miss Lucy E. Carroll, of Cairo, with their mother surviving.  There are also six grandchildren.

Mr. and Mrs. Carroll celebrated their golden wedding anniversary on May 16th last, the occasion being an especially happy one.

SHERIDAN TOLD HIS STORY TODAY
Defendant on Stand Gave His Version of Trouble Leading to the Homicide
COURT RULES OUT COPIES OF PAPER
Sustained Objection of Defense Against Admitting Articles Attacking Thacker

Vienna, Ill., July 31—Thomas H. Sheridan, the defendant, took the stand in his own behalf shortly before 10 this morning.  His defense and cross examination occupied the remainder of the morning.  He told of having been repeatedly warned by friends of threats made against him by Harry Thacker, as a result of articles that had appeared in Sheridan's paper.  Defendant told of being accosted by Harry Thacker in his stairway a few weeks prior to the difficulty.  On this occasion Thacker threatened to whip Sheridan and he walked away to avoid trouble.  Sheridan had found cards placed under his door at his office on several occasions on which were written threats against him.  One of these occasions he heard the door open and on going to see who was there saw Harry Thacker going down the stairs.  Thacker looked back and warned Sheridan to get his head in the door.  Then he told him his meeting with Frank Thacker and the circumstance concerning the cut.  Witness told of getting the cut and handing it to Frank Thacker, when he turned to go up the stairs, when Harry Thacker grabbed him.  Sheridan pulled away and again started up the stairs, when Thacker grabbed him and began striking him in the face and on the head, as he is so, bearing down and pressing his arm around defendant's head.  He stated that he was in a weak physical condition as a result of chills and fever and believing Thacker had a gun, and was going to kill him, defendant pulled his gun out of his coat pocket and fired one shot.  Had been assaulted several times previously and carried the gun for the purpose of self-defense, as he was not physically able to defend himself.

Tuesday night's session was devoted to the testimony of witnesses regarding the threats said to have been made by Harry Thacker against Sheridan.  John Slack testified Tuesday afternoon of having sold cartridges to Harry Thacker a few days before the killing and the following night had seen Thacker hiding behind a rose bush in Jean Beal's yard, with revolver drawn.  This place is on the street leading to Sheridan’s home.

The testimony will likely be conducted today after which the argument will be begun.

The court at noon today gave his decision in the matter of the introduction of copies of Sheridan's paper containing the articles attacking Thacker, sustaining the objection of the defense against their introduction.

A. J. Davis, aged 81 years, passed away early Sunday morning at his home in Marion, following a stroke of paralysis about a month ago.  He was the grandfather of Aud Davis, secretary to Mayor Parsons.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 1 Aug 1912:
FUNERAL SERVICES HELD TOMORROW
Over the Remains of the Late James Carroll

Funeral services over the remains of the late James Carroll will be held Friday morning.  The cortege will leave the family residence on Twenty-eighth Street at 7:45 for St. Joseph's Church, where services will be held at 8 o'clock.  The remains will be taken to Calvary Cemetery for interment.

Pall bearers have been chosen as follows:

Honorary—Capt. W. M. Williams, A. Comings, J. M. Lansden, William Kluge, William Oehler, B. McManus, M. J. Howley, P. Cahill, P. Egan, A. T. DeBaun, Dan Kelly, Patrick Greaney, J. W. Spies, James Quinn, Peter Saup, Frank Gazzola, A. Botto.

Active—George Shaw, M. P. Cullinan, John Barry, P. T. Langan, William Magner, M. S. Egan, Frank Thomas, C. A. Pettit, Emmett Tibbs, Louis Zanone.

(His marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Father Carroll 1832-1912.—Darrel Dexter)

ATTORNEYS MAKE PLEAS TO JURY
And Fate of Thomas H. Sheridan, Slayer of Harry Thacker, Will Soon Be in Their Hands
ENTIRE COUNTY IS LINED UP IN CASE
Either for or Against the Defendant—Rebuttal Testimony Presented Last Night

Vienna, Ill., Aug. 1—A death like silence hung over the court room today while the attorneys for the opposing sides in the Sheridan case deliver their arguments to the jury.  The building was packed from the stage to the stairway leading to the street, and the public square was a mass of vehicles, the entire population of the county having come to town to attend the most dramatic trial in the history of Johnson County made so by the fact that the state's attorney, the public prosecutor, was on trial for his life.

Attorney Cowan for the state laid much stress on the point that Sheridan had not sought to avoid trouble, but had rather forced it upon himself by his repeated articles regarding the Thacker family, which he continued to publish after he had been warned to the contrary.  The attorney endeavored to show that Sheridan, owing to his position in life, having been a school teacher and a lawyer, was all the more dangerous to society, judging by his acts.

Attorney Hartwell for the defense sought to prove that Sheridan had endeavored to avoid trouble with Thacker on numerous occasions by going out of his way to keep from meeting Thacker.  The attorney reviewed each article written by Sheridan and raised the point, if a newspaper man did not have the right to expose the public acts of officials, if in his judgment he believed them to be contrary to law and the welfare of the people of whom he was a public servant.

The attorney contended that the fight being made against Sheridan was the result to these articles, exposing true conditions as Sheridan believed them, and a desire to get Sheridan out of the way before he might expose too much.  Attorney Hartwell became very dramatic and when he closed someone started to applaud.  He was followed by Attorney English for the state who delivered a strong speech for the state.  Attorneys White and Green for the defense spoke immediately following the noon recess and Attorney Lingle will close for the state late this afternoon.

Vienna, Ill., Aug. 1—The court house was crowded to its fullest capacity this morning with the relatives and friends of the defense and prosecution when the arguments were begun in the case of Thomas H. Sheridan, charged with the murder of Harry Thacker.

There is probably not a man, woman or child in Johnson County who is not lined up either with one side or the other.  There is no middle ground.  The feeling is intense.

Special State’s Attorney Cowan made the opening speech for the state this morning speaking an hour and a half.  He was followed by Attorney Hartwell for the defense.  Attorney English spoke for the state just before noon.  This afternoon Attorneys White and Reed Green will follow for the defense and Attorney Lingle will close for the prosecution.

The instructions to the jury will probably be delivered by the court Friday morning.
Prosecution Attacks Slack's Testimony

The afternoon and evening session of court Wednesday were spent in hearing testimony in rebuttal.  A large number of witnesses were called by the state for the purpose of impeaching the testimony of John Slack, the witness for the defense who testified that he saw Harry Thacker hiding behind a rose bush in the yard of Jean Beal on the Wednesday night, Sept. 7, 1910.  The state endeavored to prove by the testimony of these witnesses that on the night in question, Harry Thacker was sitting up with a corpse at the home of Tom Burris, a mile and a half west of Vienna, and that the weather on that night was cloudy and it had been raining and on the following night, Sept. 8, 1910, Harry Thacker was a the home of his aunt, Mrs. Mary Thacker, about five miles east of Vienna until nearly 10 p.m.  Witnesses who gave this testimony were Tom Burris, Ward Burris, Mrs. Looney, Tom Coleman, Mabel Burris, Joe Crice, Mrs. Cates, I. T. Cummings, Ed Simpson and Dr. and Mrs. Brown.  These testified that Harry Thacker on Wednesday night, Sept. 7, 1910, sat up with the corpse as above stated.  Those who testified that Harry Thacker was at the home of his aunt, Mrs. Mary Thacker, on the following night were Mrs. Mary Thacker, Arthur Thacker, Americus Thacker, Nora Thacker, Samuel Gourley, and others.

On cross examination the defense endeavored to break down this testimony as to the witnesses actually knowing where Thacker was during the entire evening and attempted to make the witnesses admit that he could have left sometime during the evening without their knowledge.  They also endeavored to entangle the witnesses regarding the weather on that evening.

The feeling is most tense.  The attorney are fighting every inch of the way and the excitement is running so high that the very air is surcharged with feeling.  One senses it the minute he steps into the court room.

During his examination and in fact throughout the trial, Sheridan has appeared cool and self-possessed.

 

LITTLE HOPE FOR RECOVERY OF ROY L. HARTER

Roy L. Harter, an employee of P. T. Langan's planing mill was probably fatally injured Wednesday afternoon as a result of falling on a revolving circular saw.

There were no witnesses to the accident, but the man’s cries attracted the attention of the other employees who saw him walk a few feet from the machine before he fell to the floor unconscious.  He was taken to St. Mary’s Infirmary where it was found that his skull had been penetrated by the saw which made a gash about five inches in length and penetrated the brain.

Harter has been employed at Langan's for the past six months and is 19 years of age.  He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. William L. Harter, of 417 Twenty-seventh Street.  The young man was in a critical condition this afternoon and his recovery is doubtful.

Mrs. Charlie Brimm had a fainting spell and fell on a hot stove and was severely burned.  Two children who were at home at the time tried to pull their mother off the stove, but being unable, ran for help and brought in neighbors to rescue her.  The woman was severely burned and little hopes are entertained for her recovery.  (McClure)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 2 Aug 1912:

THOMAS H. SHERIDAN "NOT GUILTY" SAYS JURY
State's Attorney and Editor Exonerated for the Killing of Harry Thacker on Sept. 10, 1910
JURY WAS OUT LESS THAN TWO HOURS
Instructions Read by Court This Morning and Case Went to the Jury at 9:45

(By Selden Fisher)

Vienna, Ill., Aug. 2—“Not guilty” is the verdict of the jury in the case of Thomas H. Sheridan charged with the killing of Harry Thacker at Vienna, Ill., on Sept. 20, 1910.

 Decision was reached at 11:30 o’clock, less than two hours after the jury took the case and the state’s attorney and editor is now a free man.

Shortly after 8 o’clock this morning, the court read the instructions to the jury and the case passed into their hands at 9:45.

Only a small crowd gathered in the court room this morning to listen to the reading of the instructions, that part of the trial not being of much interest to the citizens and farmers of Johnson County, who had thronged the court room to suffocation during the two weeks of the trial.

The jury repaired to the Masonic Hall after receiving the case, where they reviewed the evidence before reaching their decision.  The opera house, where the case was held on account of repairs being made to the court house, was without a proper place for the jury to discuss the case away from all outsiders.

Summary of the Case

The effect of the verdict on the people of Johnson County only tended to widen the breach existing between the two factions—the friends of the Thackers and the friends of the Sheridans.  But there is one especially happy woman in Johnson County and that is Mrs. Sheridan, wife of the defendant, who has been in constant attendance at the trial, but who displayed no emotion whatsoever, having wonderful control of her feelings, which nevertheless were deep-seated.

The attorneys who scored the victory in this case are Attorneys Reed Green and Angus Leek, of Cairo, and White and Hartwell of Marion.  Those who assisted in the prosecution were Cowan, of Peoria, Attorney James Lingle, of Jonesboro, and Attorney English, of Vienna.

The jury was composed of J. R. Tyler, H. A. Cox and Guy Osborne, of Ozark; Sam Firley, Will Litaker and M. J. Bost, of Cache Township; R. L. Ross of Simpson; Joe Jenkins, Daniel Hudspeth, J. A. Hettig and Van Denison, of Goreville and Joe Miller, of Cypress.

The case, which has been continued on several occasions, came to trial on Monday morning, July 26th.  The jury was not secured until the following Friday and over a hundred venire men were examined.  The case was hard fought by the attorneys on the opposing sides every inch of the way and nearly a hundred witnesses were examined.

Summary of the State Evidence

The State endeavored to prove that Sheridan had made frequent and vicious attacks upon the character of the Thacker family, even after he had been warned to cease the publication of these articles in his paper, the Vienna News.  That he had continued to abuse the good name of the Thacker family and had told several persons that if the Thackers didn’t like it, they would have to stand the consequences of words to that effect.  That on the day of the killing, Sheridan wore a coat, which was unusual for hi and that he was armed.  That his manner was vicious and in his encounter with Harry Thacker in the stairway leading to his office, he had been the aggressor.

Summing Up the Defense Evidence

             The defense endeavored to prove that Sheridan had endeavored at all times to avoid trouble and had repeatedly gone out of his way, so as not to meet any of the Thackers.  That in so far as the newspaper articles were concerned, they had no bearing on the case, according to the law and the ruling of the court in the case.  That he had a perfect right, as an editor to publish articles about the conduct of public officials, if in his judgment, their acts were contrary to the law an the welfare of the community.  That Sheridan had been threatened repeatedly by Harry Thacker and that on the day of the trouble, Harry Thacker had come to Vienna for the sole purpose of giving Sheridan a whipping.  That Harry Thacker had attacked the defendant in the latter’s stairway and was the aggressor and was beating and choking Sheridan, when the defendant pulled out his revolver and killed Thacker in self-defense having armed himself because of several previous attacks having been made upon him by others and the warning received that day that Harry Thacker was going to kill him.  And that the attack upon Sheridan was a conspiracy by the Thacker family to “get even” and endeavor to put him out of the way for fear that he might cause further embarrassment by showing up conditions in the court house.

An Intermingling of Emotions

             Vienna, Ill., Aug. 2—The tense felling the pent-up emotions and the physical and mental strain under which the defendant, the plaintiff, the attorneys, the jury, witnesses and the large crowd of spectators, have labored during the two weeks of the trial of Thomas Sheridan, have characterized it as one of the most dramatic cases that has ever come to trial in Johnson County and probably no case here has ever created such wide interest or aroused a greater amount of feeling and animosity between the relative and friends of the opposing factions.

             What a marked contrast there was in the human emotions intermingling in this case.

             On the one hand was the craving for a verdict of punishment, on the other a desire for freedom.

On one side of the room sat an old man, father of the deceased, bent with age, feeble in voice and limb, his hair snowy white, suggesting the ripe old age which he has now reached in the downward journey of life.  There he sat surrounded by his family, whose blanched and worn faces depicted the ordeal through which they have been passing, and whose heart aches stained their cheeks with tears, their souls hungering for the conviction of the man who took the life of their son and brother.

             On the other side of the room sat another man, now no longer young.  He too is somewhat stooped.  No longer has his stride that elastic spring of youth.  His head is also sprinkled with the gray hairs of advanced years.  What was the expression mirrored on his face?  It was the desire for freedom, the expectant and appealing look that his plea of self-defense would be vindicated.  This is the picture of Thomas H. Sheridan—hopeful cheerful courageous, surrounded by his family, on whose lips was the prayer that their husband and father should be exonerated for the crime of which he was charged.

             An the jury, twelve patient men, whose faces have withheld all expression of their feelings in the case with wonderful, self-control, endeavoring to keep the oath to which they were sworn to fulfill their duty to the state and mete out justice as they saw it to their fellow man.

             Such a marked contrast it was that pervaded the old building—the opera house—where laughter and merriment gave place to grave faces and a deep silence, with one faction picturing justice behind the bars; the other, the restoration of a happy home and fireside.

             Attroenys Green and Leek returned to Cairo at noon today.

             (Thomas F. Sheridan married Fannie Throgmorton on 24 Nov 1891, in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


INJURIES FATAL TO ROY L. HARTER
Youth Hurt at Langan's Mill Died at St. Mary’s Infirmary

Roy L. Harter, employee of Langan’s planing mill, died at midnight last night at St. Mary’s Infirmary, as a result of injuries received Wednesday evening, when he fell upon a revolving saw, sustaining injuries to his head, the saw penetrating his brain.

The deceased, who was 19 years old, was a son of Mr. and Mrs. William L. Harter, of 417 Twenty-second Street.

There were no witnesses to the accident, but the man’s cries attracted the attention of the other employees who saw him walk a few feet from the machine before he fell to the floor unconscious.  He was taken to St Mary’s Infirmary, where it was found that his skull had been penetrated by the saw, which made a gash about five inches in length and penetrated the brain.

FUNERAL SERVICES HELD TODAY

Funeral services over the remains of the late James Carroll were held this morning.  The cortege left the family residence on Twenty-eighth Street at 7:45 for St. Joseph's Church, where services were held at 8 o'clock.  The remains were taken to Calvary Cemetery for interment.

The funeral was attended by a large number of the old citizens of Cairo, who had known the deceased for years.  The floral offerings were very profuse and beautiful and consisted of cut flowers and several large pieces.

Pallbearers were chosen as follows:

Honorary—Capt. W. M. Williams, A. Comings, J. M. Lansden, William Kluge, William Oehler, B. McManus, Sr., M. J. Howley, P. Cahill, P. Egan, A. T. DeBaun, Dan Kelly, Patrick Greaney, J. W. Spies, James Quinn, Peter Saup, Frank Gazzola, A. Botto.

Active—George Shaw, M. P. Cullinan, John Barry, P. T. Langan, William Manger, M. S. Egan, Frank Thomas, C. A. Pettit, Emmett Tibbs, Louis Zanone.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 3 Aug 1912:
MOUNDS BOY KILLED IN FALL FROM TREE
Head Struck on Cement Walk and His Skull Was Fractured

Walter Earl, youngest son of William Earl, of Mounds, fell from a tree Friday evening and fractured his skull when he struck on a cement walk.  He died within a few minutes.  The accident occurred near his home.  The lad, who was about 9 years old, was the son of Engineer William Earl of the Illinois Central.

The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at the Methodist church.

DIED AT DAUGHTER'S HOME FRIDAY NIGHT

Mrs. Mary McElany died Friday night at 11:30 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. H. L. Brackey, 732 Thirty-fourth Street.  The remains will be taken to Metropolis for burial, leaving Cairo at 6 o'clock Sunday morning.  The deceased was 56 years of age.

(The 7 Aug 1912, issue reported her name as Mattie McElhaney.—Darrel Dexter)

MORTUARY
Miss Mary Jane Harvey

Miss Mary Jane Harvey was born in Madison County, near Canton, Miss.  She joined the church when about 18 years of age and has been a member of the Methodist Church for over 50 years.  She was a successful school teacher for a number of years in her native state.  She came to Cairo about 10 years ago, making her home with her sister, Mrs. T. B. Farrin.  In this home she is missed because of her sweet disposition, calm and serene and uncomplaining, she always was, although for the last three years her suffering has been intense.  She bore it all in the spirit of her Master, because His spirit dwelt within her and actuated her life.  She was a member of the Logan Bible Class, in 1909, where her faithful attendance, her gentle attentive, inspiring manner is lovingly remembered.  She was always present and glad to be, unless detained by illness.  She was an intelligent student of the Bible, as proven by the fact that she practiced its teachings, in church by her attendance at home by her patience and unselfishness.
Miss Harvey was 68 years of age at the time of her death.  She is survived by her sister, Miss Farrin, and a large number of nieces and nephews by whom she was loved and honored.

In Memoriam

In Memory of Mrs. Minnie Alba, who entered into eternal rest, August 3, 1906, 6 years ago today.
By Her Children


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 5 Aug 1912:
WILLIAM DESIMONI AT DEATH'S DOOR

According to information received this morning by Charles Desimoni, his brother, Will Desimoni, of this city, who has been in Chicago for several months, is very low and his life is a question of but a short time.  Mr. Desimoni left at once for his brother's bedside.

Will Desimoni has been a victim of tuberculosis for several years and repeatedly had made trips to health resorts in search of cure.  Lately he has been in Chicago, being promoter of an amusement concession at Riverview Park and was doing well.

M'AULIFF FUNERAL HELD TOMORROW
Services at Mounds and Burial at Villa Ridge

John McAuliff, a former resident of Cairo, died August 3 at Brookport, Ill., of acute indigestion.  He was an old river man, having been employed for many years on transfer steamers in the Cairo harbor and also at Columbus, Ky.  He was 54 years of age and leaves a married son, John McAuliff, Jr., of Columbus, Ky., a married daughter, Mrs. Miles Pulley, of Mounds, and a sister, Mrs. M. E. Smith, also of Mounds.  Funeral services will be held at Mounds Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock at St. Raphael’s Church, with interment being at Villa Ridge cemetery.  A special funeral train will leave the foot of Fourteenth Street at 8:30 in the morning for the benefit of Cairo friends who wish to attend.

FORMER CAIROITE DIED FROM SERIOUS BURNS AT GALATIA
H. M. Johnson, Illinois Central Agent, Dies from Burns

Mr. and Mrs. F. L. Moore have returned from Galatia, Ill., where they were called by the sudden death of Mrs. Moore's brother, J. M. Johnson, who was agent for the Illinois Central railroad at that place.          

His body was brought to New Burnside for interment.  A brother, P. A. Johnson, of this city, and Claude A. Hornbuckel, a nephew, attended the funeral also.  Mr. Johnson at one time was employed by the Big Four here as telegraph operator, later having several different stations along that line.

He came to his death, while seated at his desk when a lamp exploded near him throwing oil over his clothing.  The office was soon filled with the flames.  He sustained serious burns before he could tear his clothing from his body, but still had presence of mind and got the fire extinguisher and put out the flames in the office saving the building.

He lived about a week and died Friday, Aug. 2.

He leaves a wife and two little girls, age 9 and 6 years.

CHARLES L. EWING DEAD IN CHICAGO
Former Illinois Central Railroad Official Passes Away

Chicago, Ill., August 5—Charles L. Ewing, for over a quarter of a century a prominent railroad man in Illinois, died last evening at his home here.  Ewing has been in ill health for nine months.

He was 54 years old.  For about fifteen years he was superintendent of the St. Louis Division of the Illinois Central Railroad with headquarters at Carbondale, Ill.  When I. T. Harahan succeeded Stuyvesant Fish as president, Ewing came to Chicago as superintendent of the Chicago division.

Previous to his engagement with the Illinois central he had been prominent in the Rock Island and Southern Railroad systems.  He retired about two years ago.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 6 Aug 1912:
The body of John McAuliff, who died suddenly at Brookport, Ill., last Saturday, was brought to the home of his sister, Mrs. Smith, on Blanche Avenue, yesterday and the funeral is announced for 9:30 a.m. this morning.  He was born in Fort Wayne, Ind., June 15, 1858 and died at Brookport, Ill., Aug. 3, 1912, aged 54 years, 1 month and 19 days.  A large number from Cairo attended the funeral.  (Mounds)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 7 Aug 1912:
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to thank our friends and neighbors for their kindness and sympathy to us during the illness and death of our mother, the late Mrs. Mattie McElhaney
Mrs. H. L. Brackey and family


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 8 Aug 1912:
Died at the home of Mrs. M. Fields, Mrs. May Fields, of Moorehead, Miss., at 8 o'clock Monday morning.  Mrs. Fields has been a resident of Grand Chain all her life until last year; she has been residing in the South.  She was 47 years of age and leaves a husband and a daughter, Mrs. Rufus Gibbons, of Mississippi, and a son, Ezekiel.  She also leaves a sister and brother and many other relatives and friends in Grand Chain.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 9 Aug 1912:
GRAND CHAIN BOY KILLED HIS FATHER
Homicide Occurred in the Country Near There Thursday Afternoon
BOY CLAIMS HIS FATHER ATTACKED HIM
But Coroner's Jury Held Him to the Grand Jury after Hearing Evidence
Another Account of Tragedy

Grand Chain, Ill., Aug. 9—Walter Woods shot and killed his father Thursday afternoon at their farm about five miles from town.  Mr. Woods had been drinking too much and had let the stock all out in the corn.  The young man says while he was trying to get them up, his father attacked him with a knife.  He states that he had to shoot in self-defense.  He then came to town and gave himself up to the officers, but they did not arrest him then.

The body was brought to their home in town late last night.  Mr. Woods was an ex-cowboy and their former home was in Oklahoma.  It is thought his remains will be sent there.  He leaves a wife and three little girls and one son, the boy who did the shooting.

Undertaker Montgomery and Coroner Steele, of Mound City, arrived shortly after the killing.
It is said, however, that there is another side to the affair and it was on this evidence that the coroner’s jury held young Wood to the grand jury.

A report reached Cairo today that the father had been drinking and had threatened the whole family.

The elder Woods just recently opened a small grocery store in Grand Chain.

Young Wood had not been brought down to Mound City at noon today.  Sheriff Wehrenberg sent for the boy, but he was held at Grand Chain, pending a hearing of his case.

The homicide occurred in the country about four miles from Grand Chain.

(His marker in Grand Chain Masonic Cemetery reads:  Wesley M. Wood Born Oct, 9, 1858 Died Aug. 8, 1912.—Darrel Dexter)

A telegram was received Saturday night stating that Mrs. Hill’s brother, Nelson Boles, of Marion, was dying and all went to Marion Sunday morning and have not as yet returned.  (Thebes)

John Rymer, after a lingering illness of six months, died Friday, August 2, of dropsy.  (McClure)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 10 Aug 1912:
OLD RESIDENT OF WILLARD IS DEAD
R. E. Cavender Passed Away from Paralytic Stroke

R. E. Cavender, 77 years of age and an old resident of Willard, died at 10 o'clock Friday evening at the home of his daughter, Mrs. John Gosset, with whom he has made his residence for several years.  Mr. Cavender had been ill for a year or more and the direct cause of his death was a stroke of paralysis.  He was a large land owner in Alexander County.

The following children survive him:  Mrs. S. H. Yates, Walter S. Cavender, Mrs. Julia Gosset, of Willard; Mrs. Minnie Thompson, of Eugene, Oregon, and Mrs. Blanche Brewer, of Cache, Ill.

The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the residence of Mrs. Gosset, at Willard, conducted by Rev. Lippett, of the Methodist Church.  Interment will be at the family burying ground there.  E. A. Burke, the undertaker has charge of the remains.

(John Gossett married Laura D Cavender on 20 Sep 1885, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Spirus H. Yates married Julia B. Cavender on 3 Dec 1879, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Cavender & Schindler Cemetery reads:  R. E. Cavender Born March 25, 1836 Died Aug. 9, 1912.  Next to this marker is one which reads:  L. A. wife of R. E. Cavender Born July 17, 1836 Died June 17, 1896.  Maggie E. daughter of R. E. & L. A. Cavender Born Sept. 17, 1879 Died April 18 1893.—Darrel Dexter)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 12 Aug 1912:
WILLIAM DESIMONI DIED AT CHICAGO SUNDAY EVENING

William Desimoni, brother of Charles and Joseph Desimoni, of this city, died at Chicago Sunday evening, after an illness of several months of tuberculosis, the past three months having been spent in Chicago, where he has been engaged in the show business at one of the amusement parks.  He became seriously ill about a week ago and rapidly declined.  Prior to going to Chicago, the deceased spent several months in Florida, but met with slight improvement.

The remains will be brought in Cairo for burial, arriving at 5 o'clock Tuesday morning.  The deceased was 33 years of age and was reared in Cairo.  He leaves besides his two brothers, one sister, Mrs. Charles Jordon, of Cincinnati.

The funeral will probably be held Wednesday morning.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 13 Aug 1912:
OLD RESIDENT OF CAIRO PASSED AWAY THIS MORNING

Mrs. Elizabeth Collins, one of the oldest residents of this city, passed away at St. Mary’s Infirmary early this morning at the age of 85 years.  Death was due to the infirmities of old age.

For the past several years the deceased had made her home at the infirmary.  She has been a resident of Cairo for seventy years, coming here from Ireland, when she was fifteen years old.  She was born at Dunmanway, County Cork, Ireland.

She is survived by two sons, Jack Collins, the well-known fireman, and Joseph Collins.  One sister also survives her, Mrs. Catherine Callahan, of Kansas City.  Mrs. Callahan will be unable to attend the funeral.

The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at St. Joseph's Church, Rev. James Gillen officiating.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Desimoni—Died, William Desimoni, aged 33 years.  Funeral services will be held at St. Patrick’s Church Wednesday morning, cortege leaving residence, No. 514 Commercial Avenue at 8 o'clock.  Burial will take place at Villa Ridge, conducted by Rev. J. J. Downey.  Special train will leave foot of Fourteenth Street at 9:30 a.m.  Friends of the family invited to attend.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Collins—Died Tuesday, August 13, Mrs. Elizabeth Collins, aged 85 years.

Funeral cortege will leave Mrs. Feith's undertaking parlors, Eleventh and Washington, Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. for St. Joseph's Church, where services will be held at 2 o'clock.

Remains will be taken on special train from Fourteenth Street to Villa Ridge cemetery where interment will be made.

Friends of the family are invited.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 14 Aug 1912:
FUNERAL SERVICES OVER WILLIAM DESIMONI

The funeral services over the remains of the late William Desimoni were held this morning at 8 o'clock at St. Patrick’s Church, Rev. Father James Downey being the officiating priest.  A special train leaving Fourteenth Street at 9:30 conveyed the funeral party to Villa Ridge where the interment was made.

The pallbearers were Dr. Blake Hannon, John Sanders, William Williams, Louis Oehler, Jr., William Fitzgerald, John Largamarcino, and John Raggio.  The funeral of T. B. Woods was held Sunday afternoon.  Several relatives from the west were here for the funeral.  (Grand Chain)

PARENTS MOURN LOSS OF INFANT SON

Lee Baker, the three-month-old son of Mrs. and Mrs. R. L. Baker, of 2814 Sycamore Street, died late Tuesday afternoon at the family residence after a short illness.  The funeral was held this afternoon.  Interment being at Beech Grove Cemetery, the cortege going up on a special interurban car.  E. A. Burke had charge of the funeral.

WHO KNOWS MAN BY NAME OF JOE GIBSON?

Chief of Police Egan received a message from an undertaking firm at Gary, Ind., asking him to locate Joseph alias "Dump" Gibson who is supposed to be in Cairo and inform him that his brother, Arthur, is dead.  Gibson could not be located last night.  His name does not appear in the directory.

The message did not state whether he is white or colored.

FORMER CAIROITE BURIED TODAY AT KUTTAWA, KY.

The remains of Herbert Boughter, of this city, who died Saturday at a hospital in New Orleans, were interred in the cemetery at Kuttawa, Ky., Monday.  The deceased formerly lived in Cairo being employed at the store at James Meehan at Fourth and Washington.  He was 35 years of age and is survived by a wife and children, who have been residing at Fulton, Ky.  Mrs. T. J. Bayard, of 314 Washington Avenue, is a sister, as is also Mrs. Arch Purdy, of Chicago, formerly of this city.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 15 Aug 1912:
WIFE MURDERER SENTENCED TO HANG

DuQuoin, Ill., Aug. 15—George Engel, the recently convicted wife murderer has been sentenced to die on the gallows Friday, October 18th, between the hours of 9 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Judge B. W. Pope pronounced the sentence and the prisoner maintained the same stolid countenance that has characterized his attitude since he was arrested for the crime.

Mrs. Thomas J. Billingsly, who was called to Cairo recently by the death of her mother, the late Mrs. Sarah O'Shea, left today for her home in Newport, Ark.

Secretary Mench had a light electric shock last Monday afternoon near Shiloh Chapel where he had gone to conduct a child's funeral.  The funeral party were overtaken by the storm and Mr. Mench took shelter in a barn and while his hand rested against the barn he felt the shock up his arm and found that his watch had been stopped.  (Mounds)

Mrs. Will Gammon, of Illmo, and Rob Morris, south of Thebes, are both reported very low with consumption and are not expected to live but a short time.  (Thebes)

John Winn, aged 50, died here (McClure) Tuesday after a short illness.  Deceased has been in poor health for a long time.  Three weeks ago he took sick and his jaw locked and nourishment was fed to him through a quill.  He leaves a wife and one child.


W. K. Klegg returned from the north a few days ago, where he attended the funeral of his father.  (Olive Branch)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 19 Aug 1912:
CHILD VICTIM OF MENINGITIS

Freda May, the 18-month-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ray McKinney, of Stoy, Ill., died Sunday at the home of her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Walker, at Horse Shoe Lake.  The McKinney family had been visiting at the Walker home and the child took suddenly ill with meningitis, death soon resulting.  The remains will be taken to Stoy for interment.  E. A. Burke had charge.

SYRIAN ROBBED AND MURDERED?
Police Now Believe Wadeah Wehbie Met with Foul Play
HAS BEEN MISSING SINCE LAST FRIDAY
And Was Last Seen in Company with Two Negroes Who Later Crossed River

That Wadeah Wehbie, a young Syrian who has been missing since Friday morning, met with foul play, which resulted in his drowning in the Mississippi River, is the belief of the police and also Wehbie's relatives, who have been searching for him since his disappearance.

Wehbie, who with his brother Thomas conducts a grocery store at the corner of Fourth and Washington left the place early Friday morning as was his daily custom to go to the upper part of town to meet the farmers and buy vegetables for the store.  He was seen at Twentieth and Washington about 7 o'clock.  When he did not return later in the day, his relatives became alarmed and started a search.  They scoured the entire city and all the roads leading into Cairo, but to no avail.

Sunday morning Thomas Wehbie searched along the Mississippi levee in the vicinity of Twenty-eighth Street and learned from a fisherwoman that she has seen the young man in company with two negroes, Friday.  She was entirely sure about the matter as she had known the young Syrian personally.  She said the three passed her shanty going south towards the Greenfield Landing.  Later, the two negroes came back, unaccompanied by Wehbie and inquired for a ferryman to take them across the river.  They seemed very anxious to get across and told her they would pay double fare if they could get the skiff immediately.  She directed them to a ferryman who took them to the opposite side where they caught the steamer Kentucky which was going up river at the time.

Sunday morning, John Dewey found a bundle of clothes under a pile of driftwood on the bank near the Greenfield Landing.  He called the attention of a fisherman to them who gave the clothing to E. A. Smith who chanced to be passing in his automobile and who took them to police headquarters.  Mrs. Mary Wehbie, mother of the young man, was notified and she identified the effects as belonging to her son.  In the clothing was found $1.30 in money.

After the clothing was found, Thomas Wehbie, assisted by other local Syrians, dragged the river near the ferry landing in an effort to locate the body, but were unsuccessful.

The fact that the bundle of clothing was found buried beneath a pile of driftwood, and that the two negroes acted suspiciously when they were over desirous to be taken across the river seem to indicate that they might have assaulted Wehbie, stripped him of his clothing when they robbed him, threw his body into the river and then hurriedly made their getaway.  Wehbie had quite a sum of money on his person when he left home Friday morning and the fact that his clothing only contained $1.30 when found makes the robbery motive stronger.

The suicide theory is not plausible because had the man wished to take his life, he could have found other means before he left his place of business and then again it is hardly possible that he would have taken off his clothes in order to drown himself.  It is not thought that he went in swimming, since he had lived here practically all his life, and knew the danger of the Mississippi at that point, where many persons had lost their lives in late years.

The police are in hopes that the body may be found, as marks of foul play, if such is the case can probably be found.  Meanwhile efforts are being made to locate the two suspicious negroes, in whose company Wehbie was seen by the fisher woman.

Wehbie is well known, having resided in Cairo since he was a lad.  He attended the public schools and was well educated.  He is survived by his mother and three brothers and several other relatives in the Syrian colony.

REMAINS BURIED AT GRAND CHAIN

After a long illness of Bright's disease, George Abbott died Sunday morning at the residence of his brother-in-law, W. T. Hallerfield, 229 Thirty-fourth street.  The body was taken to Grand Chain by the parents of the deceased and the funeral was held there today.  E. A. Burke, the undertaker had charge of the funeral.

Abbott was formerly an employee of the Illinois Central road here and was well known.

NEGRO KILLED BY CENTRAL TRAIN

An unknown negro lost his life Sunday morning near Cache bridge it is presumed by one of the night trains of the Illinois Central.  The body, which was badly mangled, was found lying on the west side of the southbound track by the train crew of train No. 24.  There was no means of identification as nothing except a pair of dice was found on the dead man's person.  Coroner McManus held an inquest shortly afterward the notification by the train crew.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 20 Aug 1912:
CRAZED NEGRO JUMPS INTO RIVER
After Shooting at Negro Boy and Pulling Gun on Railroad Man
TERRORIZED PEOPLE IN CENTRAL YARDS
Was Twice Put Off Passenger Train and Took It Out on Others He Met

The immediate vicinity of the Illinois Central round house and yards at Eighteenth and Ohio levee was terrorized this afternoon about 1:45 by an unknown drunken negro, who angered because he was put of the Illinois Central train, No. 2 north, vented his spleen on the neighborhood by shooting at a small negro boy and turning his gun on Yardmaster Harry Stout.  After the gun flourishing, he jumped over the stone wall there, ran down into the river, swam around for about 10 minutes and disappeared beneath the water.  A search is now being made for his body.

Presumably because he was drunk the negro was put off the I. C. train near Twentieth Street.  However, he boarded the last car again when the train started and was again put off by the train officials.  Coming through the yards he met two small negro boys and began cursing them and knocked one of them, Albert Hicks, down with his fist.  The boy jumped up and ran and his aggressor pulled a 32 caliber "bulldog" pistol and shot twice at the fleeing lad, who was about 20 feet distant.  That the boy was not killed is strange.

Proceeding further down through the yards, the negro met Yardmaster Stout and demanded at the point of his pistol that he institute a search for the negro boy, who had by this time gotten out of harm's way.  Stout replied that he had no knowledge of the lad's whereabouts whereat the drunken man snapped the revolver several times, but it failed to go off to which the yardmaster incidentally owes his life.
Stout grabbed the gun when it failed to respond to the trigger and in the tussle that followed he wrestled the weapon from the crazed negro.  Several other switchmen ran to the scene but the negro was too quick for them and broke away from Stout, running and jumping over the stone wall there.  The men followed and found the negro lying near a clump of bushes, evidently feigning exhaustion.  Someone shouted, "Here comes a policeman,” when the drunken terrorist jumped up and ran down to the river bank.
At first he seemed to hesitate, but in a second he rushed madly into the water, swam out to a group of oneline piling and disappeared beneath the surface.  The whole affair happened so quickly that it took the participants and the spectators some time to realize the situation of an "attempted Murderer a Suicide."

Chief of Police Egan immediately employed several men to search for the body and efforts were made all afternoon with drag hooks to find the remains.

The man was unknown and the fact that he was intoxicated in such terribly hot weather made it appear that he was crazy.

CLANAHAN FUNERAL WAITS ON SISTER

Arrangements for the funeral of Willis Leonard Clanahan, poet and humorist, who died yesterday, will not be made until his sister, Miss Belle Clanahan, of Louisville, Ky., arrives in St. Louis, says today's St. Louis Republic.

Arrangements will be in charge of Mrs. Leonora Thiel Clanahan, the writer’s former wife, who lives at 4024 Lindell Boulevard.

His death occurred at the Christian hospital after a four days’ illness of uremic poisoning.  He was 45 years old and was born at Metropolis, Ill., where his father was a clergyman.  He entered the newspaper field when a young man.

Mr. Clanahan gained most of his recognition as a writer in St. Louis where he was employed for several years on The Post-Dispatch.
Well Known in Cairo

The deceased was well known in Cairo, having been engaged in newspaper work in Cairo several years ago.

He was a cousin of Milo Clanahan, who was engaged in the insurance business here for several years.

SUICIDE THEORY IS ADVANCED
By Chief of Police Egan in Sudden Disappearance of Wadeah Wehbie, the Syrian
GIVES REASONS FOR THIS OPINION
River Again Dragged Monday without Success of Finding the Body

Was Wadeah Wehbie the young Syrian who disappeared Friday morning and whose clothing was found under a pile of driftwood on the banks of the Mississippi River Sunday morning, a suicide?  After threshing over the various other theories of death by foul play, accidental drowning, and willful disappearance from the city, Chief of Police Egan is of the opinion that the young man actually took his own life by drowning himself in the Mississippi River near the Greenfield Ferry Landing.

Chief Egan bases his belief on the fact that Wehbie is said to have been in ill health for some time and for several weeks past had been despondent.  That the clothes of the missing boy were found neatly folded under the pile of driftwood leads the police official to think that Wehbie, before plunging into the river, carefully arranged his personal effects to give the appearance that he had been robbed and murdered that the suicide theory might be scouted and save his family the disgrace.

That Wehbie was not robbed and murdered by the unknown negroes who were said to be in that vicinity is the chief's belief.  In the first place, what would Wehbie be doing in company with two negroes and in that part of the city asks the chief, when he supposedly went, as was his custom to the upper part of town to buy produce from the incoming farmers?  Why would the negroes make an attempt at robbery, when according to available information, Wehbie had only several dollars on his person, was only ordinarily dressed and neither wore diamonds nor jewelry?

Accidental drowning, too, is out of the question, for Wehbie was not a swimming enthusiast and as a novice he would not have chosen such a place knowing full well as nearly everyone here does, about the danger.

Another idea advanced is that Wehbie had planned for some time a trip to the east, where it is said he would locate and that he took such an opportunity to disappear because of the mystery attached and the consequent freedom from annoyance in another locality.  However his relatives assert that he had no surplus money, so for the time being such a theory is put to rout.

Monday afternoon the river was again dragged in hopes of bringing the body to the surface and several charges of dynamite were exploded but to no avail.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 21 Aug 1912:
BODY OF CRAZED NEGRO NOT YET RECOVERED

The body of the unknown negro, who, after being put off Illinois Central train No. 2 northbound, terrorized persons in the I. C. yards in the vicinity of the roundhouse at Eighteenth and Ohio Levee, and was drowned when he ran madly into the river has not as yet been recovered.

The identity of the negro has not as yet been learned.  He was either drunk or a "dope fiend" and he proceeded to "whoop things up" in one of the passenger coaches of the train, soon after it pulled out of the station here.  When Conductor McKee remonstrated with him, he knocked that official down.  When the train reached Twentieth Street, it was topped and the bad actor was ejected.  He tried to get on a second time, but suffered the same experience at the hands of the trainmen.  It was then that he ran amuck in the yards, flourished his pistol, with probable intent to kill and met his fate by drowning.

Charlie Baker, a well-known colored man, died last Saturday of heart trouble.  He had been in the restaurant business at 2809 Commercial Avenue for many years.  He was a member of Mt. Moriah Church.

WEHBIE'S BODY FOUND AT HICKMAN
Remains Recovered Sunday and Buried There
BROTHER BELIEVES IN MURDER THEORY
While Chief Egan Still Contends That It Was a Case of Suicide

The body of Wadeah Wehbie, the young Syrian, who in some unaccountable manner lost his life in the Mississippi River, presumably last Friday was found Sunday at Hickman and buried there after an inquest.  This information was received by relatives here who sent to Hickman early this morning to claim the body.

It was learned through a communication over long distance phone with the city marshal at Hickman, that there were no marks on the body that would indicate murder.  One bruise on the body is supposed to have been caused by the body striking an obstruction on its downward course in the river.  It must have traveled the 409 miles distance in quick time.

It is said the relatives of the dead body still socur the theory that the case was suicidal.  They don't believe that Wehbie had reason to take his life, since some of them assert that he was not given to melancholy, neither was he despondent nor in ill health.  On the other hand, others of the Syrian colony assert that the young man was of peculiar temperament from constant despondency and that he suddenly became deranged and in such a passion he made away with himself.

Peter Wehbie, one of the brothers, says he thinks it was a case of murder.  He believes that his brother was first robbed then assaulted and denuded and thrown into the river.  Then the clothing was piled up in a neat way to give the impression that the young man had gone in swimming and had been accidentally drowned.  That $1.30 was found in the clothing was also a ruse of the murderers, according to the dead man's brother, to carry out the accidental drowning idea, because his brother had at least $5 in possession when he left home Friday morning.

Chief of Police Egan does not believe the murder theory probable, because there surely would have been a tussle between Wehbie and the unknown parties, and the clothing would have born evidence of this.  Then again, the chief says, traces of blood would have been found, had there been a killing.
In answer to this, Wehbie states that the struggle could have taken place some distance from where the clothing was found, Wehbie says his brother was in good health and had many pleasures and enjoyments.  Only recently he went on an excursion to Louisville and had a good time and had been in good spirits since that occasion.  He does not believe that it was a case of suicide.

The body of Wehbie will be brought back to Cairo one on of the night trains.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 22 Aug 1912:
WEHBIE'S BODY FOUND BY BOYS
While in Swimming at Hickman Sunday Morning
REMAINS WERE RE-INTERRED THERE
Decomposition Prevented Removal Now—Murder Theory Still Believed

The floater found in the Mississippi River Sunday morning at Hickman, Ky., was identified as the body of Wadeah Wehbie, the young Syrian, who had been missing from his home here almost a week.  Relatives from here went down to Hickman, recognized their kinsman, but on account  of the badly decomposed state of the remains, interment was made at the cemetery there.

The body was found by four boys who were in swimming and they pulled it to the shore.  Decomposition had set in and immediate burial was deemed advisable but the authorities there.  When the relatives from here arrived, the situation was explained to them.  The body was taken up for identification by the Syrians and then it was buried a second time.

The body will be brought here later on and buried in the family lot at Villa Ridge cemetery.

Thomas Wehbie, one of the brothers of the deceased, says he was told by those who saw the body when it was first found that there were several marks and bruises on the body that would indicate foul play.  He strongly believes that theory, and says had his brother met death by accidental drowning at the spot near where his clothes were found, the corpse would have been lodged in the underbrush that exists in great quantities in that locality and not have floated down the river so quickly.


The many friends here (Ullin) of both Frank Fisher, of Dongola, and Marion Burnett, of Pulaski, were extremely sorry to hear of their sudden passing away in the prime of their lives.  Both had the faculty of making and retaining friends and were all around good fellows of the kind who will be missed in their respective neighborhoods.


Sam Manley (colored) died at his home in Grand Chain Monday after a lingering illness of several weeks.  (Grand Chain)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 23 Aug 1912:
NEGRO TAKEN TO JACKSON TO ANSWER MURDER CHARGE

Deputy Sheriff Harris, of Jackson, Tenn., was in the city today to take back to that place a negro named Henry Hunt, who is wanted there for assault to kill.  The negro was captured several days ago by Chief Egan, who had his description from the Jackson authorities.

BODY OF CRAZED NEGRO FOUND BY TWO KENTUCKIANS

The body of the unknown negro who ran amuck in the Illinois Central freight yards at Eighteenth and Ohio streets Tuesday afternoon were found late Thursday afternoon by two East Cairo men at almost the exact spot where he was drowned.

The Kentuckians were coming over in their skiff and were nearing the bank at Eighteenth Street, when suddenly the body shot up from the depths just in front of their boat.  They secured a rope and pulled the body to the shore and then notified Coroner McManus.

A jury was empaneled on the scene and a verdict of drowning with suicidal intent was returned.  A number of witnesses were examined, including several who were on the train when the negro raised a disturbance and was put off by Conductor McKee and special agent Maxey.

He was in the day coach using profane language among a crowd of ladies.  The train officials testified that the man was intoxicated and his actions indicate those of a crazed person.

Nothing that would lead to identification was found on the body.  The negro looked to be about 18or 20 years of age.  He was buried today at the expense of the county by Mrs. L. C. Falconer, the undertaker.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 26 Aug 1912:
EAST CAIRO RESIDENT DEAD

Miss Halley Elizabeth Gaunt died at her home in East Cairo this morning.  Interment will be made at Cain Creek Cemetery Tuesday.  The deceased was a young woman and her people are farmers across the river.  E. A. Burke, the undertaker, has charge of the remains.

MOTHER OF MRS. J. P. GARDNER DEAD

Mrs. Charles Holly, of Fayville, mother of Mrs. J. P. Gardner, of Cairo, died Sunday morning of Bright's disease and dropsy.  She was 40 years of age.  Funeral services were held this morning at Olive Branch and the remains were buried in the cemetery there.  The deceased left four children besides her husband.


Hughes Bronson, formerly connected with the Indian Refining Company in Cairo, is reported to be very low with pneumonia at Louisville, Ky.

SUDDEN DEATH OF H. B. GRADEN FORMER CAIROITE

Friends in Cairo of H. B. Graden, of Paducah, Ky., formerly a resident of this city, were shocked to learn of his death, which occurred very suddenly Sunday afternoon at Paducah, as the result of pneumonia. He was only ill three days.

The deceased until a few months ago, was employed at the jewelry store of Charles F. Miller, 806 Commercial Avenue.  He was an optometrist and went to Paducah to take a similar position with a jewelry store there.  He had been a resident of Cairo for several years, coming to this city from Cape Girardeau, Mo.  He was about 32 years of age.

The remains will arrive in Cairo this evening at 8 o'clock from Paducah over the I. C. and will be met by members of the local lodge of Elks and escorted to the parlors of E. A. Burke undertaking establishment, where they will lie in state until 3:30 Tuesday morning.  At 4:15 they will be taken on Bryan's train to Thebes and thence to Cape Girardeau.  From there they will be taken to the home of the deceased at Jackson, Mo., where the interment will be made.

Exalted Ruler Parsons of the Elks has named the following as pallbearers:  A. L. DeMontcourt, Gilbert Casey, Hunter Bird, Fred Lind, Albert Nelson, F. E. Buder, Dr. M. W. Cox, Karl Miller, Dan Woods, Will Winter.  All others of the Elks who can are requested to meet the remains at the station tonight and form the escort to the undertaking parlors.

The St. Louis Globe Democrat contained the following item in today's issue:

Messenger—Passed from this life on into the life more abundant, E. Grace Messenger, on August 24, 1912, at the residence of her sister, Mrs. Mary Hill, 756 Bittersweet Place, Chicago, Ill.  She was a resident of St. Louis for twenty-seven years.

Burial at Warsaw, Ill., Monday, August 26, 1912.

Cairo (Ill.) papers please copy.

SUE SALOONKEEPER FOR FATHER'S DEATH
Carl Noll Defendant in $10,000 Action Filed by Children of the Late John Neale

Alleging that their father's death was indirectly due to liquor sold to him by Carl Noll, a saloonkeeper, John Neale, Jr., Joseph and Ernest Neale, have filed suit for $10,000 damages in the circuit court.

The complainants allege that it was while under the influence of liquor procured in the Noll Saloon at 1302 East Reservoir Street, on April 13, last that their father strolled upon the Wabash tracks at Tenth Street and Phillips Avenue and was hit by a train and killed.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 27 Aug 1912:
FORMER MAYOR OF DUQUOIN DEAD

DuQuoin, Ill., August 27—The death of William E. Brookings, former mayor of DuQuoin, whose lifeless body was found in his apartments in the Brookings block, marks the passing of one of the oldest citizens and businessmen of this city.  He has been slowly declining in health several months and recently spent few weeks in St. Louis hospital with the hope of improving his condition.

The deceased was born at New Haven, Pa., February 12, 1849, and at his death was 63 years old.  He became a resident of DuQuoin in 1857 and had since resided here.  The funeral services were conducted Monday morning at the First Methodist Episcopal Church, Rev. Marion Teague and Rev. W. T. Morris, officiating.

MOUND CITY BOY DROWNED MONDAY

Edward Westerman, aged 12 years, was drowned Monday afternoon about 4:30 o'clock while swimming in the Ohio River at Mound City.  The deceased is a son of Mr. and Mrs. William Westerman.
The body was recovered shortly after the accident by James O'Sullivan of the Marine Way.

The lad with several companions were in swimming a short distance south of the Marine Ways.  Westerman ventured out in deep water and became frightened and before help could be summoned he was swept away by the strong current and drowned.

The funeral will be held Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock services at St. Mary’s Catholic Church.  Special interurban cars convey the funeral party to Mounds where interment will be made in St. Mary's Cemetery.

(His marker in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Edward Westerman 1899-1912.—Darrel Dexter)

Robert Arnold has returned home from Paducah where he attended the funeral of Mrs. Arnold's uncle.  Mrs. Arnold and daughter Christie Mae will remain a while longer. (Mound City)

Judge W. A. Wall and wife and Mrs. Maude Southal left Sunday for Cypress, Ill., to attend the funeral of William Adams, of Washington, D.C.  Mr. Adams died there Sunday morning.  (Mound City)

Harry Phillips, the three-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Hoewischer, of 521 Fifteenth Street, died at the family residence last night after a several days’ illness.  The funeral was held this afternoon, interment being at Beech Grove Cemetery.

H. B. GRADEN WILL BE BURIED WEDNESDAY

The remains of the late H. B. Graden, who died Sunday at Paducah, arrived in Cairo last night and after lying in state at Burke's undertaking parlors, were taken this morning on Bryan's train to Thebes and from there to Jackson, Mo.  Interment will be made at the latter place Wednesday.

Mr. and Mrs. George Koehler, Miss Fay Koehler, Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Miller, and a brother of the deceased, accompanied the remains to Cairo from Paducah and they were met by a delegation from the local Elks lodge.  The above party also accompanied the remains to Jackson, Mo., this morning and Karl Miller and Albert Nelson went along being delegated to attend the funeral as representatives of the Cairo lodge of Elks.

Mr. Graden had been employed at the Wolfe jewelry store in Paducah as optometrist for several months.  For several years previous he held a similar position with Charles F. Miller, the jeweler here.
He leaves one brother and two sisters, who reside at Jackson, Mo.

CARD OF THANKS

We desire to extend our heartfelt thanks to the friends and neighbors who showed us so many acts of kindness during the illness and on the death of our wife and mother, Mrs. John T. Woods, and also for the beautiful flowers they sent.
John T. Woods and family


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 28 Aug 1912:
NEGRO ROUSTABOUTS IN CUTTING SCRAPE

A cutting scrape occurred on the Halliday-Phillips wharf boat this afternoon about 1:30 o'clock between two negro roustabouts of the steamer Rees Lee.  Henry Davis was the cutist and he badly wounded the other negro, whose name is Alexander Smith.  The injured man was removed to the Marine hospital and while the case is very serious, there is a slight chance for recovery.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 29 Aug 1912:
Mrs. Maggie Fitzgerald and Walter Huett, Jr., of Cairo, attended the funeral of the late Edward B. Westerman, which was held Wednesday morning in the St. Mary’s Catholic Church. Rev. Father Darley and Rev. Father Engle conducted the services.  (Mound City)

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Willis died Sunday of cholera infantum and was interred Tuesday at Anna.  The sorrowing family have the sympathy of their many friends.  (Ullin)

One of the twin babies of Mr. and Mrs. Will Allen died Thursday of last week and the other one was quite seriously ill, but is better at this writing.  (Ullin)

(Her marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  Genevieve Allen Born Nov. 12, 1911 Died July 9, 1912.—Darrel Dexter)

Rev. Mr. Jones, of Cypress, preached at the Baptist church Saturday and Sunday, returning home early Monday morning to conduct the funeral services of Mr. Doll Adams, who died at Cypress Sunday.  (Thebes)

Died, at her home south of town (Thebes), Monday, Aug. 26, Mary, wife of Thomas Tanksley.  The deceased leaves a husband, four children and a host of friends to mourn their loss.  Interment was made Wednesday at the Sims Cemetery.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 4 Sep 1912:
HERRIN RESIDENT DIED IN CAIRO

Patrick McCann, of Herrin, died this morning at 8 o’clock at St. Mary’s Infirmary of heart disease and Bright's disease.  Mr. McCann had been ill for some time and came here about a week ago in enter the hospital.  He was a member of the firm of McCann Bros., railroad contractors, and had a wide acquaintance in southern Illinois.  He was 47 years of age and leaves a family.  A brother of the deceased arrived in Cairo this afternoon to take charge of the remains.

CHILD DIED OF SCARLET FEVER

Little 8-year-old Daisy Fuller died at the home of her parents at Sixteenth and Commercial Tuesday morning of scarlet fever.  The funeral was held this morning interment being at Hodges Park Cemetery.  Mrs. L. C. Falconer had charge of the remains.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 5 Sep 1912:
The infant babe of Mr. and Mrs. John Ellis died one day last week after some five or six week’s illness of summer complaint.  (Pulaski)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 6 Sep 1912:
MRS. S. H. YATES DIED THURSDAY
Passed Away at Bondurant Hospital after Short Illness

After a short illness of acute peritonitis, Mrs. Julia Yates, wife of Spirus H. Yates, of Miller City, died Thursday night at the Bondurant Hospital at 11:40 o'clock.  She had been confined at the hospital with the illness since last Sunday.

The deceased was born 53 years ago in Indiana, but had resided in this county nearly all of her lifetime.  Before her marriage to Mr. Yates, she was Miss Julia Cavender.  Her husband is a prominent farmer near Miller City and was well known in Cairo and throughout Alexander County.

The survivors of the family are three daughters, Mrs. Maude Moore and Winifred and Vivian Yates, and two sons, Wayne and Haron Yates, all of whom were at the bedside of their mother at her death.  She also leaves three sisters, Mrs. Blanch Brewer, of Cache, Mrs. Dee Gossett, of Miller City, and Mrs. Minnie Thompson, of Portland, Ore., and one brother, Walter Cavender, of Miller City.

The funeral will be held Sunday from the undertaking parlors of E. A. Burke in this city and a special interurban train will convey the party to Beech Grove Cemetery where the interment will occur.

(Spirus H. Yates married Julia B. Cavender on 3 Dec 1879, in Alexander Co., Ill.  John Gossett married Laura D. Cavender on 20 Sep 1885, in Alexander Co., Ill.  —Darrel Dexter)

FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—Mrs. S. H. Yates, of Miller City.

Funeral cortege will leave E. A. Burke's undertaking parlors, 906 Commercial Avenue on special interurban car at 1 o'clock p.m., Sunday, Sept. 8.  Services at Beech Grove Cemetery conducted by Rev. J. A. Bell, of Opdyke, Ill.

Friends of the family invited.

Warren Aldridge, of Cape Girardeau, was found dead on the railroad tracks Tuesday morning, supposed to have been killed by a train as he had been drinking.  We have not yet heard the coroner’s verdict.  The body was brought to Thebes Wednesday for burial.  He leaves a wife and five children.  His oldest son, aged seventeen, was killed last October by a train.

(Warren Aldridge, 25, born in Union Co., Ill., son of James Aldridge and Huldah Welch, married Melissa C. Miller, 21, born in Union Co., Ill., daughter of Thomas F. Miller and Sarah Holmes, on 21 Aug 1894, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 7 Sep 1912:
FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—Mrs. S. H. Yates, of Miller City.

Funeral cortege will leave E. A. Burke's undertaking parlors, 906 Commercial Avenue on special interurban car at 1 o'clock p.m., Sunday, Sept. 8.  Services at Beech Grove Cemetery conducted by Rev. J. A. Bell, of Opdyke, Ill.

Friends of the family invited.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 9 Sep 1912:
PURSUED NEGRO JUMPS INTO RIVER
Sunday Afternoon and Was Drowned After Trouble with Police Officer

After resisting arrest at the hands of Officer Edward Powers, an unknown negro, when pursued by the officer, in the vicinity of Sixth and Ohio streets, near the Halliday-Phillips wharf boat jumped into the river and was drowned.  Efforts towards finding the body by dragging the river at that point Sunday and today have failed thus far to recover the negro's remains.

The incident occurred about 4:30 Sunday afternoon and several hundred people including excursionists on the steamers Rapids and Robinson from Paducah and local citizens who had gathered to watch the boats depart on their return trips were witnesses.

Officer Powers made an attempt to arrest the negro at Sixth and Railroad streets on a charge of drunkenness and disorderly conduct.  The negro was in company with a white man and they had been making a disturbance that prompted the officer to tell them to move on or be taken to jail.  The white man went his way, but the negro persisted in ugly talk and the officer took him by the coat collar and started to march to headquarters.

The negro, however, angered at this move, broke away from the policeman and ran down to Sixth and Commercial.  Powers followed and again took him into custody.  They had only gone a few steps when the negro again broke loose and ran up the levee with the officer in close pursuit.  After catching him again at Railroad and Sixth streets, Officer Powers had quite a tussle with the negro, who broke away for the third time and ran towards the levee front.

He gained considerable headway on the officer in the run and when he refused to halt at the officer’s command, Powers fired his gun at the ground, thinking the negro would stop.  This seemed to increase his intentions to get away and after gaining the top of the levee, he ran down the slope through the crowd of people.  Some of the bystanders seeing the trouble started after the negro, but he gained the water’s edge and jumped in and was drowned.

The negro's identity is unknown, but some say he was from Missouri.  He was apparently between 25 and 30 years of age.

MOUND CITY LADY DIED EARLY SUNDAY

The death of Mrs. Mary Conley, who passed away Sunday morning at 12:45 o'clock, Mound City lost an old resident.  She had been ill about three months when death came.  Funeral services will be held Tuesday at 9 a.m. conducted by Rev. Father Jumbour, of the Catholic Church, and the remains will be taken by special interurban car to St. Mary's Cemetery at Mounds for interment.  Surviving her are two daughters and six sons.

(Her marker in St. Mary Cemetery at Mounds reads:  Mary Conley 1848-1912.—Darrel Dexter)

Little August Frederick, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Vaughn, died at the home of his parents, at Conran, Mo., Sept. 5, at 5:15 a.m. at the age of two years and four months.  The remains were laid to rest in the New Hope Cemetery.  Mrs. Vaughn was formerly Miss Lottie Ronnebeck, the oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. August Ronnebeck, of 408 Thirty-second Street, and a sister of Mrs. Ed Steger.

(The grandparents may be the same people as August F. Ronnebeck and Caroline D. J. Hoffman, who were married on 9 June 1867, in Madison Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter) 

NEGRO KILLED OVER CARD GAME SUNDAY
Shooting Occurred in Negro Saloon at Thirty-Third and Commercial

Following a quarrel over a game of cards in the saloon of D. W. McPherson, at 3301 Commercial Avenue, Louis Oliver was shot and killed by another negro named Richardson Anderson.  The men had been playing a game of "pitch" and following an argument, Anderson became enraged at Oliver, and drew his gun and fired a bullet into Oliver's breast which caused almost instant death.

Officer John Wade was near the scene at the time and arrested Anderson.  The shootist is known as a "bad man" and is well known in police circles.  On numerous other occasions he has tried to kill several other men it is said, for petty grievance.

Oliver had been regarded as a peaceful hardworking negro and had resided at 208 Thirty-third Street, the house just in the rear of the place in which he was killed.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 10 Sep 1912:
Night Marshall Joseph Mulvey, who was taken to St. Mary’s Infirmary last week, died there Monday evening.  (Mound City)

BODY OF NEGRO WHO DROWNED SUNDAY RECOVERED TODAY

The body of the unknown negro, who ran into the Ohio River Sunday afternoon to evade arrest and who was drowned, was found this morning near the ferry dock of the steamer Three States.  The body arose to the surface and was seen by the ferry boat watchman, who with others pulled the corpse out of the water.

Coroner James McManus empaneled a jury and after investigating the case they conclude that the negro was drowned of his own accords and exonerated Officer Powers from any blame in the matter.  No means of identification were found upon the body.

NEGRO IDENTIFIED AS "COCAINE JIM"

The unknown negro, who had the trouble with Officer Edward Powers after which he drowned himself in the Ohio River, is said to have been a bad character and hailed from Charleston, Mo.  According to a deputy sheriff from Charleston, the negro was known either as "Cocaine Jimmy" and had been a well-known police character and the officers of that town had experienced considerable trouble with him.

OLD RESIDENT OF MOUND CITY DEAD

Joseph Mulvey, an old resident of Mound City, died Monday afternoon at the Bondurant Hospital, after an illness of several weeks of typhoid fever.  He was 62 years of age at his death.

He was a widower and leaves one brother, John Mulvey, of Stonefort, Ill., and a nephew, Joseph Mulvey, of St. Louis.  The body was taken from Mound City this afternoon to Stonefort, Ill., under the auspices of the Vienna lodge of Odd Fellows of which the deceased was a member.

(Joseph Mulvey married S. J. Bohn on 13 Nov 1877, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

NEGRO DIED FROM EFFECTS OF WOUNDS

Lot Thomas, the negro who was shot Sunday evening by another negro named Bird Hunt, on a farm a mile inland from the Greenfield ferry landing on the Missouri side of the Mississippi River, died Monday afternoon at St. Mary's Infirmary.  The trouble, according to a dying statement of Thomas, occurred when Thomas became acquainted with a young negro girl, with whom Hunt was infatuated.  Several quarrels ensured between the two men, which finally led to the shooting.  Coroner McManus held an inquest this afternoon for the coroner of Mississippi County, the expense of same being charged to that official.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 11 Sep 1912:

SUDDEN DEATH OF MRS. ALMA WATSON

       Following an illness of several months, Mrs. Alma Watson, mother of Mrs. W. F. Smith, died at the residence of her daughter, No. 322 Seventh Street, Tuesday evening.  The death was sudden, since Mrs. Watson had shown signs of improvement several days past.  While taking nourishment, she fell prostrate on the bed, and expired before a physician could be summoned.

       Mrs. Watson was the widow of the late John Watson, of Milwaukee, and came to Cairo several months ago from that city to reside with her daughter.  The only other survivor of the family is a son, Herbert Watson, of Tuscaloosa, Ala.  He was immediately notified of his mother's death and will arrive today to accompany the remains to Milwaukee where the interment will be made.

       Private funeral services were held at the Smith residence this afternoon at 5 o'clock and the remains taken to Milwaukee via Chicago on the Seminole at 10 o'clock.  Mr. and Mrs. Smith also accompanied the remains.

       The pallbearers will be Edward Pink, A. S. Staehle, P. H. Schuh, Herman C. Schuh, Dr. J. H. Davis, George G. Koehler and John Meyer.
 
The remains of the late Joseph Mulvey were shipped from here (Mound City) to Stonefort where the remains were laid to rest.  The Vienna Lodge of I. O. O. F. will have charge of the funeral as the deceased was a member of that order.
 
The funeral of the late Mrs. Mary Conley was held Tuesday morning from the Catholic church in this city and the remains interred in the St. Mary's Cemetery at Mounds.  The services were conducted by Rev. Fr. Mumbour and assisted by Reverend Fathers Bannon, of East St. Louis, Van Delft, of Prairie du Rocher, and Mensa, of Wickliffe, Ky.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 12 Sep 1912:
Rev. Mr. Bell, of Opdyke, was in town (Olive Branch) over Sunday.  Rev. Bell was called to preach the funeral of Mrs. Yates on Sunday, while Mrs. Bell visited friends.
 
The funeral services of Mrs. S. H. Yates occurred Sunday evening Sept. 8th, at 1 o'clock, the funeral train consisting of two interurban cars well loaded with friends and relatives who had gathered at the undertaking parlors of E. A. Burke.  After reaching the beautiful Beech Grove Cemetery at Mounds, the funeral procession gathered in the shady grove to hear the funeral discourse and touching songs contributed to the life and good works of Mrs. Yates.  Rev. Mr. Bell of Opdyke Church, Opdyke, Ill., preached a touching and very instructive sermon.  The music was rendered to a mixed quartet from the First M. E. Church of Cairo, after which she was laid to rest.  Sympathy and love were expressed everywhere.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 13 Sep 1912:
MRS. WALTER FUNK, FORMER CAIROITE DIED THIS MORNING

       News reached here today of the death of Mrs. Walter Funk, which occurred in St. Louis this morning.  Mrs. Funk was a former resident here about eight years ago, when Mr. Funk was superintendent of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company’s local branch. She was well known, having been a member of the First Methodist Church here and had many friends.  Since removing to St. Louis, Mrs. Funk had visited here on several occasions.
 
WICKLIFFE MAN DEAD

       W. A. Hall, an ex-sheriff of Ballard County, died suddenly at his home in Wickliffe this morning at 10 o'clock.  He was a well-known resident of West Kentucky and also in Cairo, being a frequent visitor to this city.  He was a member of the K. M. K. C. lodge here besides holding membership in the Masons, Elks and a number of other orders.  The survivors are two brothers and one sister.  The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon, interment being at the Wickliffe cemetery.  E. A. Burke has charge of the remains.
 
Anthony Trexler, an old resident of this vicinity, died in Ullin Saturday, August 24th, of tuberculosis, after twelve years illness of the disease.  His wife died about three years ago of the same disease.  He leaves several children of whom two daughters, Mrs. Jessie Rammage and Mrs. George Sichling, reside in and near town (Ullin).

       (Anthony J. Trexler married Mary E. Stephens on 4 Mar 1869, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Anthony J. Trexler married Angiline Billingsly on 31 Oct 1880, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Anthony J. Trexler married Minnie Hemsker on 12 Oct 1886, in Pulaski Co., Ill. George Sichling, 23, of Ullin, born in Union Co., Ill., son of George D. Sichling and Catherine Branstom, married Stella May Trexler, 18, of Ullin, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., daughter of Anthony J. Trexler and Annie Billingsly, on 6 Aug 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Eunice Kearney, the eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Kearney, of Wetaug, aged nine years and ten months, died of congestion of the brain following a chill Tuesday morning.  She was an unusually bright and intelligent child for her age and leaves many child friends in that village.  (Ullin)
 
James Brown, one of the best known businessmen of Ullin, died Saturday, August 31, from brain fever, following a weeks' illness.  He was so hearty and strong and such a jolly good fellow that his many friends and acquaintances were much surprised and shocked to learn of his untimely death.  Mr. Brown was reared near Dongola and had been in the saloon business here for several years.  He conducted his business successfully was honest and square in his dealings and had many friends.  He leaves a wife and two small children and a brother, Will Brown, of Perks.  Interment was made at the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola Sunday, Sept. 1st.  (Ullin)
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 14 Sep 1912:
It has been suggested that the writer call the attention of persons who have relatives and friends buried at Thebes to the condition of nearly all of the graves, only a few are kept in decent shape.  A few are cleaned, others halfway cleaned for Decoration Day and nothing more done until Decoration Day the next year.  If each person would care for their own graves the cemetery would not be called "pasture" by strangers.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 16 Sep 1912:
PARDON ASKED BY MOTHER FOR SON

       An application to the State Board of Pardons will be presented by Mrs. Florence E. Wood of 3014 Sycamore Street, asking that body to commute the sentence or pardon her son, William Hackney, who was convicted for the murder of John __ldron, in the Alexander County circuit court at the May term of court in 1911.  Hackney received a life term at the Chester penitentiary.

       Mrs. Wood for the past several months has been busy securing signatures to a petition to be presented to the board.  Her list is a large one and includes many of the businessmen.  The next meeting of the board will be held on October 14th.
 
News has been received here (Mound City) by friends of Rev. J. M. Sutherland, informing them of the death of his son, Norman, who was found dead in his bed at their home in Minot, N. D., the cause of his death was hemorrhage of the brain.  The remains were shipped to Cando, N.D., for burial.  He was about 21 years old and when a boy resided in this city, his father then being pastor of the Congregational Church.  He was a linotype operator.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 18 Sep 1918:
APPENDICITIS CLAIMS YOUNG HIGH SCHOOL GIRL AS VICTIM

       Eugenia Josephine Foster, the 14-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Foster, died this morning at 5:45 o'clock at St. Mary’s Infirmary of appendicitis, following an operation.  She had been confined at the hospital since last Friday, having taken ill several days previous to that time.

       The deceased was born in Willard, this county.  She had a host of friends who knew her as a classmate.  When school opened on Monday, Sept. 9th, she entered the first year of the Cairo High School and that day she was taken ill.  Her father is well known in Cairo and also throughout the county, having been a former deputy circuit clerk and at present is a candidate for circuit clerk on the Democratic ticket.  Besides her parents, the deceased is survived by two younger brothers.

       The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at the residence services being conducted by Rev. Mr. Clark of the Calvary Baptist church at 12:30 and a special interurban train will leave in front of the residence at 1911 Washington Avenue for Beech Grove where the interment will be made.
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

       Died—Miss Eugenia Foster, Wednesday, Sept. 18, age 14 years.

       Funeral services at the family residence, 1911 Washington Avenue, Thursday, Sept. 19th, at 12:30 conducted by Rev. Mr. Clark, special interurban car will leave Twentieth and Washington at 1 p.m. for Beech Grove Cemetery.  Friends of family invited.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 19 Sep 1912:
MAN SHOT BY PADUCAHAN
United Press Dispatch:

       Harrisburg, Ill., Sept. 19—Leon Wells, the Peoria race horse man, was shot by Ed McEwen, of Paducah, at the Harrisburg ground.  Sheriff Mooneyhan received a telegram today from Tiptonville, Tenn., that McEwen was under arrest there and the sheriff left for Tiptonville after him.
 
Henry Metcalf died Thursday night and was buried Friday at the Williamson grave yard.  He was 33 years old and leaves a wife, a host of friends and relatives to mourn his loss.  (Olive Branch)

       (Henry Metcalf, the husband of Edith Dunn, is buried in Williamson and Strader Cemetery near Olive Branch, but there is no marker.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Cleveland Howard and Lloyd Evans, of Morely, Mo., came over Thursday on account of the sickness of their cousin, Henry Metcalf, and attended the funeral Friday and returned home Saturday.
 
Mortuary

       Martin V. Norris was born in Vigo Co., Ind., Oct. 24, 1854, and died at his home near Beech Grove Church in Alexander County, Ill., Sept. 15th, 1912.

       He was united in marriage to Lucinda Hicks, March 10th, 1885.  To this union six children were born, five survive, viz.:  Charlie, Jesse and James, of Thebes; Mrs. Nellie Babbs, of Freeport; and Mrs. Phenia Griswold, of Edgewood; and Harry, who died in his infancy.

       Mr. Norris united with the Beech Grove Baptist Church in April 1911.  He leaves a wife, five children and several grandchildren to mourn their loss.

       Mr. Norris had resided in this community only a few years and was a hardworking man and is said to always pay his debts, which credit is due him.

       Their friends extend sympathy in their bereavement.

       Interment took place Monday at Mt. Zion Cemetery.
 
Card of Thanks

       We wish to extend our heartfelt thanks to our neighbors and friends who were so kind to us during the death and burial of our dear husband and father.
Mrs. Lucinda Norris and Children
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 20 Sep 1912:
FORMER CAIROITE DIED AT ST. LOUIS

       Ira W. Williams, former Cairoite, died in St. Louis Thursday night, where he had resided since leaving Cairo in 1895.  While here, he was employed as switchman in the M. and O. yards.  He was a member of Safford Lodge No. 67 Odd Fellows.
 
RICHARD TAYLOR DIED TUESDAY

       Richard Taylor, an old and well-known colored resident of Cairo, died Tuesday morning at his home, 2110 Sycamore Street, of tuberculosis, having been ill for the past year or so.  He leaves a wife and two daughters and one son.  He was 66 years of age and came to Cairo when a young man.  During his life was in a number of business enterprises, having had a saloon on lower Commercial Avenue for many years.  The place became notorious as a negro resort and Taylor was forced to close the place, when the council refused to renew his license.  Before his death he accumulated considerable property and means.  The funeral was held this afternoon, interment being made at the National Cemetery at Mound City, the deceased having been a soldier in the Civil War.

       (Richard Taylor served in Company C, 2nd Tennessee Colored Heavy Artillery and filed for a pension in 1890.  His widow filed in 1912.  Richard Taylor married Annie Archer on 21 Oct 1870, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Richard Taylor, private, U.S. Army, died 18 Sep 1912, and was buried in Section E, grave 3850A, in Mound City National Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Died, Friday, Sept. 13th, Mrs. Oscar Thompson, at Horse Creek.  (McClure)
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 21 Sep 1912:
Ed Lynch, for many years a passenger conductor on the Cotton Belt Railway, running into Cairo, died in Colorado last Saturday night, where he had gone in search of health.  He will be buried at Greencastle, Ind.  He had been afflicted with Bright's disease for the past week.  He was well known here and was a brother of Conductor J. T. "Stormy" Lynch
 
CARD OF THANKS

       We desire to publicly express our heartfelt gratitude and appreciation to the many friends and acquaintances who were so kind and sympathetic during our hour of bereavement and for the many acts of kindness before, during and after the funeral of our beloved daughter and sister Eugenie Foster, and for the many beautiful floral tributes and especially desire to thank the good sisters and nurses for their attention to our dear one.
Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Foster and family
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 23 Sep 1912:
MAN BURNED TO DEATH AT VIENNA
G. W. Robertson, Aged Father of J. A. Robertson, Loses Life When Barn Burns
FOUL PLAY IS SUSPECTED
And W. S. Wamsley Is Suspicioned—Inquest Being Held and Great Excitement Prevails

       Vienna, Ill., Sept. 23—News reached Vienna Saturday evening that the barn of J. A. Robertson, near Gauntown, in this county, had burned at 2:00 o'clock p.m. and that his aged father, G. W. Robertson, was burned with it. Sheriff Veach, Coroner Dr. H. J. Elkins, and State's Attorney Sheridan and several of our citizens went out to hold the inquest and Saturday afternoon and all day Sunday great crowds gathered there.  There seems to be some foul play.

       The particulars are as follows:  The Robertson family moved to Gauntown from Danville, Ill., some time ago and bought land in this county and were considered quite wealthy.  He and his son-in-law, W. S. Wamsley, were in the barn on his son's place to get some sheep.  The son-in-law, Wamsley, who is strongly suspicioned of foul play, tells the following story.  He was at the farm of his brother-in-law cutting corn, which was the home of the deceased's son.  The elder Robertson had bought some sheep from the son and went to get Wamsley to help him drive them home.  The Robertson family were away from home and there was no one present but Robertson and son-in-law Wamsley Wamsley says that Robertson went into the barn and climbed in the hay loft to throw down some hay and called to him to come to him.  As he was climbing the loft something struck him on the head and he fell to the floor, unconscious, and when he came to himself, the barn was on fire, he ran out in a dazed condition.  Ed Carlton, Jr., who was hunting some distance away heard a gun fire and as he reached the top of a hill, he saw smoke issuing from the barn.  He ran over there in time to see Wamsly running out of the barn.  He first whistled to him and then called him; he stopped and said he believed the old man Robertson was in the barn burning up.  At this time the fire had gained such headway, neither of them could enter and all was consumed by fire.

       The body of Robertson was all burned but the trunk of the body, also about 40 head of hogs.  There was two shot guns burned in the barn and one gun with both shells snapped by the plunger, were also found in the ruins.  The body was burned so bad that it could not be ascertained whether he had been shot or not.  Wamsley had several bruises on his head and face and is still sticking to his story he first told.  Robertson was at the barn of his son, J. W. Robertson.  His home had burned some six weeks ago.  The coroner's jury is still investigating and no arrests have yet been made.  Some of the elder Robertson’s children arrived from the north at noon yesterday and went out to the scene of the tragedy to take the remains back to the old home near Danville, Ill. for burial.  The general opinion of our citizens is that this is one of the worst crimes in the history of the county and whether the son-in-law or some unknown party did this deed, is yet to be learned.  We learn that the family have secured the services of a detective who will soon be put to work on the case.  Our county officials are doing all they can to solve the mystery.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 24 Sep 1912:
WAMSLEY HELD FOR ROBERTSON'S DEATH
Examination of Dead Body Revealed Shot Showing Murder Caused Death
REMAINS BURIED AT DANVILLE MONDAY
Wamsley Bought Black Suit to Wear at Funeral, But Was Not Allowed to Go

       Vienna, Ill., Sept. 24—The coroner’s jury and county officials after investigating the death of G. W. Robertson, who was burned in his son's barn on last Saturday afternoon in Johnson County near Ganntown, after a thorough search and taking testimony, returned a verdict late Monday afternoon to the effect that the deceased had been murdered and death was caused from shotgun wounds.  On examining the trunk of the body they found numerous shots with four in the heart.

       The son-in-law, J. E. Wamsley, who was with Robertson at the time of the murder, and was the only one person known to be about the premises at that time until the arrival of Deputy Sheriff Ed Carlton's son, who was hunting nearby, was held without bond to await the action of the grand jury, which convenes next Monday.  He is now in jail and declares he is innocent.  It is said his wife, mother-in-law, and brother-in-law, all believe him to be innocent.

       The remains of G. W. Robertson were taken to the old home near Danville, Ill., for burial Monday afternoon accompanied by his wife, son and daughter.

       The accused man seemed terribly disappointed that he did not get to go and help bury "Dad," as he put it.  He had just bought a new black suit of clothes from J. H. Carter & Company, his mother-in-law, Mrs. Robertson, standing good for them to go with the funeral party.

       There is considerable mystery surrounding this murder and much talk and excitement among the citizens all over this section of the county.  This family of people just lately bought land in the southeast part of the county and moved there from Danville, Ill., and not much is known of them.  They seemed to be people of wealth and to be good, desirable citizens.  Most of our people think Wamsley guilty and some seem to think him innocent.  He is putting on a good front.

       Some think there is still a deeper mystery yet surrounding this murder, as the deceased's residence was burned very mysteriously some six weeks ago.  Wamsley was held only on circumstantial evidence and unless some new evidence appears, it is not likely he will be convicted.
 
FUNERAL OF MOUND CITY GIRL HELD TODAY

       The funeral of the little Leila May Franklin, the six-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. Franklin, who died Monday morning at the home of her parents in Mound City, was held this morning conducted by Rev. Father Mumbar, of the Catholic Church.  Interment was made in the Catholic cemetery at Mounds.  E. A. Burke of this city had charge of the funeral.
 
DISAPPOINTED IN LOVE, TAKES POISON

       Sedalia, Mo., Sept. 24—The third daughter of Frank Dunthon, who tried to kill herself because of unrequited love, died here Monday from poison taken Sunday.  She was Minnie, aged 16.

       When her sister, aged 17, ended her life in 1903, the father killed her admirer and is now serving a 28 years' sentence in the penitentiary.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 25 Sep 1912:
Lila May, the 6-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Franklin, of upper Main Street, was buried at Beech Grove Cemetery Tuesday.  Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Father Mumbour, of the Catholic Church.  (Mound City)
 
The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Winters died Tuesday afternoon after an illness of diphtheria.  (Mound City)
 
Mrs. Anna Rolland died Sept. 17.  She was 68 years old and had been confined to her bed for several years with rheumatism.  She leaves a husband, two sons and one daughter.  (Barlow, Ky.)
 
James T. Moreland left today for Metropolis, Ill., to attend the funeral of his brother's wife, Mrs. Walter H. Moreland.  She died at 5 o'clock this morning.  The funeral will be held Friday.

       (James T. Moreland married Minnie Gray on 11 May 1879, in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 26 Sep 1912:
FORMER CAIRO BOY CHARGED WITH MURDER AT DALLAS, TEX.

       The police here and in other cities are on the lookout for Alfred Shackleford, formerly of Cairo, who is wanted in Dallas, Tex., on a charge of murder, said to have been committed by him at that place on Sept. 9th.  Police Chief Egan received a message from Dallas some time ago, giving the above information, but no particulars of the tragedy were given.

       Shackelford, who is a young fellow, just a few years past his majority, was employed by Swoboda Brothers as bartender in their saloon at Eighteenth and Poplar streets.  During the high water period last spring, he gained much notoriety by creating a disturbance in a Thirteenth Street resort and also in several downtown saloons.  He was a member of Company K and following the trouble which was committed while he wore his uniform he was dismissed from the company by Lieutenant Charles Woods, who was in command.

       There is a rumor current that Shackleford was killed a few days ago at Memphis while resisting arrest at the hands of an officer there, who knew of the Dallas killing and who recognized Shackleford by the description sent out by the Texas authorities.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 27 Sep 1912:
CHILD DIED FROM BURNS
Lawrence Creighton Died Today Result of Playing with Matches Yesterday

       Lawrence Creighton, the 7-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Martin Creighton, of Thirty-fourth Street, died this afternoon from the effects of the burns he received Friday while playing with matches.
The boy was playing with some matches when they set fire to his clothes.  His screams brought his grandmother to his aid, but he was badly burned before she reached him.  In putting out the flames, her hands were also badly burned.

       The accident occurred at his grandmother’s home on Commercial near Twenty-seventh Street, with whom he was staying and his death occurred there today.

       (Martin Creighton married Mary Cullinan on 6 Feb 1870, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Lawrence J. Creighton 1905-1912.—Darrel Dexter)
 
DENNIS O'CALLAGHAN HAS PASSED AWAY
Old Resident of Cairo Died at Home of Sister Thursday Night

       Dennis O'Callaghan, an old resident of Cairo, died Thursday night at 11:20 o'clock at the home of his sister, Mrs. Margaret Dezonia, 331 Eighth Street, of a complication of diseases.  He had been a sufferer from several diseases for a number of years and for the past two weeks he had been confined to his bed. Thursday afternoon an operation was performed upon him by Drs. Bondurant and Rendleman, in hopes of prolonging his life.

       He was 55 years of age and was born in Chicago.  He came to Cairo in his boyhood days and remained here most of the time up until about fifteen years ago, when he went to the southwest where he was a railway conductor in Old Mexico, New Mexico and Arizona.  He had been previously employed as a switchman on roads in Cairo.  About ten years ago, while employed as a conductor on the Frisco, he was badly injured in a wreck and was confined in hospitals at Springfield, Mo., and Memphis, and for months afterwards he came to Cairo. He never recovered from these injuries and he suffered greatly at times.  On account of his poor health, he occupied a number of light positions where no manual labor was required and his latest was night watchman at the First Bank and Trust Company of Ohio Street.

       The only survivors are his sister, Mrs. Dezonia, and a number of nephews and nieces.

       He was a member of the Order of Railway Conductors.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 28 Sep 1912:
INFANT CHILD DIED EARLY THIS MORNING

       The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Comings died early this morning at the family residence, 811 Twenty-third Street.  Interment was made at Beech Grove, the funeral party driving up.  E. A. Burke was in charge of the funeral.
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

       O'Callaghan—Died Thursday night, Sept. 25, Dennis O'Callaghan, aged 55 years.

       Funeral cortege will leave the residence of Mrs. Margaret Dezonia, 331 Eighth Street, Sunday at 1:30 p.m. for St. Patrick’s Church, where services will be held, conducted by Rev. Father James Downey.  Remains will be taken by special train from Fourteenth Street to Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge for interment.

       Friends of the family are invited.
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

       Creighton—Died Friday, Sept. 27, Lawrence James Creighton, son of Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Creighton, of 505 Thirty-fourth Street.

       Funeral services will be held at the residence of the grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Martin Creighton, No. 2706 Commercial Avenue, Sunday at 1:30 p.m. conducted by Rev. James Gillen, of St. Joseph’s Church.  Remains will be taken by special train from Fourteenth Street to Villa Ridge cemetery for interment.

       Friends of the family are invited.

 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 30 Sep 1912:
YOUNG MAN FOUND FOULLY MURDERED BY HIGHWAYMAN
Body of John Wegener Discovered Lying on Road Near his Drainage District Farm
BULLET WOUND IN BACK CAUSED DEATH
Watch Missing Leads to Belief that Robbery Was Motive of the Crime

       John R. Wegener, a former resident of Cairo and more recently farmer in the Cairo Drainage District, was found dead sometime last Saturday night after 9 o'clock.  The belief is that he was murdered by unknown parties while on his way to his home with his team of horses and wagon.  His body was found at a point about 150 yards west of what is known as the halfway house road, on a spur of that highway, which leads to the Wegener farm.  The discovery was made by the dead man's wife and Ury Sayers, a neighbor.

       Wegener had come to Cairo earlier in the evening to make some purchases as had been his custom on Saturday nights.  When he did not arrive home at his accustomed hour of 8:30 or 9 o'clock, his wife became worried.  Time dragged on and when her husband had not returned she began to be alarmed regarding his safety.  It was about 10 o'clock when she heard the rumbling of a wagon on the road.  She went to the door, noticed the team and the wagon but the driver was absent.

       Mrs. Wegener, suspecting something was wrong, notified several of the neighbors and a search for the missing man was instituted.  Sayers accompanied Mrs. Wegener down the road in a wagon and when about a half mile from the Wegener place, the horses shied at something in their path.  When the occupants of the wagons got out and investigated, the object proved to be Wegener's lifeless form, stretched across the roadway.

       At first the searchers were inclined to think that there must have been a runaway and that Wegener met his death by being thrown out of the wagon and trampled by the horses or run over, by the wheels of the wagon, however, no bruises were found on the body.

       In the meantime the authorities here were notified of the affair and Sheriff Fraser, in company with Deputy W. P. Greaney, Coroner McManus and others, went out to the scene.  The coroner empaneled a jury on the scene and a thorough investigation was conducted, but nothing that would lead to the perpetrators of the deed was discovered. 

       Blood stains were found on the seat of the wagon and also at the place in the road where the body was found.  Two bullet wounds, one in the back and one in the wrist of the dead man, were evidences of murder.  One shot was fired from the rear and the bullet entered the back about 3 inches below the shoulder blade and ranged diagonally though the body, emerging from the opposite side several inches higher.  It cut through a branch of the aorta or main artery leading to the heart.  The other shot was fired from close range as powder marks on the flesh indicate and the powder set fire to the lining of the coat sleeves and shirt.

       When Sheriff Frazer searched the dead man's clothing he found only 36 cents in the pockets. Wegener's gold watch was missing.

       The officials returned to Cairo about 6 o'clock Sunday morning, bringing Wegener's body with them and placing it in the undertaking parlors of Mrs. M. E. Feith.

       Death at the hands of highway men is theory advanced by both the city and county officials who are engaged in ferreting out the mystery.  They believe that Wegener was waylaid a short distance from where his body was found, that men evidently held Wegener at bay with a gun, one of them standing at the side of his seat in the wagon, weapon in hand, commanding him to get down out of the wagon probably to be searched by the other or any valuables that Wegener offered some resistance and his assailant in the wagon fired the gun at close range, the bullet entering the victims wrist and that at his juncture, Wegener probably jumped out of the wagon and the man in the wagon shot at him when he ran.  Both such probabilities are strengthened by the existence of the wrist wound and the powder burns and the wound in the back fired from the rear.  Whether the highwayman relieved Wegener of his watch before or after they shot him is a matter of conjecture.

       The officers scout the theory of death at the hands of an enemy. Wegener was known to have a few, but it is not believed there were any of the nature to incite a desire to kill.

       Many highway robberies have been committed in the Drainage District lately and the actions of the perpetrators in the cases that have come to the attention of the authorities leads them to believe that Saturday night's crime was an addition to the list of depredations by the same persons.

       Sheriff A. S. Fraser has authorized a reward of $100 for information that will lead to the arrest and conviction of the party or parties who murdered Wegener.

       John Wegener was the son of Mrs. Minnie C. Wegener, of 412 Nineteenth Street.  He was 30 years of age.  He is survived by his wife and two small children, his mother, a sister, Miss Pauline Wegener, of Benton, Ill., and a brother, Charles Wegener, who resides in Montana.

       Previous to the time that the deceased had lived in the Drainage District he was an insurance agent, having been connected with several companies in Cairo.  He was known to be a quite unissued, hardworking young man.  He recently went to farming after a period of ill health, thinking to benefit his health.  He had leased 80 acres in the Drainage District from the Cairo Trust Property and had been doing fairly well until the flood came.  He sustained heavy losses during the high water.

       The remains were removed from Mrs. Feith's undertaking parlors to the Wegener home on Nineteenth Street.  The funeral will be held Wednesday.

       The authorities spent all Sunday and today scouring the scene of the crime for some clue. That might lead to the identity or apprehension of the murderers.  Nothing has been forthcoming that would give officers something to start on.

       Wegener was last seen in Cairo Saturday night at Otto Schuh's pharmacy at Thirty-third and Sycamore streets about 9:10 o'clock.  He purchased some medicine there.  Shortly before that he bought a barrel of salt at Ehs & Greaney's store at 2017 Washington Avenue.

       Ury Sayer, the neighbor who with Mrs. Wegener found the body of the dead man, is being held by the authorities, pending further developments in the case.  Sayer has not been accused of participation in the crime, but the officials are taking no chances in trying to throw some light on the mystery.

       The coroner’s jury is waiting for more definite information before rendering a verdict.
Negro Held Up and Robbed

       Saturday night about 9 o'clock a negro named Meade, a Villa Ridge farmer, was held up on the county road by two white men at the point of a gun.  He was searched by the two men and besides a small amount of money they took his watch and ordered him to drive on.  It is thought that these two men attacked Wegener.

       Albert Kasee, a man residing near Mound City, was held up about 8:30 by two white men, each of whom leveled a gun at his head.  They secured about $2.50 for their trouble.

       Several weeks ago, Albert Hurst, a well-known Drainage District farmer, was held up by two white men as he was on his way home on the Beech Ridge road near Cairo Junction.  He had only a small amount of money and he hid it beneath the cushion of his seat.  The robbers searched him but as he had no valuables on his person, their job was fruitless.  Last Saturday night, he too had been to Cairo and while driving home he noticed a man on the road a short distance ahead of him.  He could see very plainly as the moon was bright.  When he neared the man, the stranger disappeared in a clump of bushes along the road and gave no ear to Hurst’s commands to come out on the road.  Hurst thinks probably this person might have been one of the two who held up Wegener.
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

       Died—John Wegener, aged 30 years.  Funeral services will be held Tuesday, October 1, 1912.  Funeral cortege will leave residence on Nineteenth Street at 1:30 o'clock for Immanuel Lutheran Church, where services will be held at 2 o'clock.  Interurban car will convey remains to Beech Grove Cemetery where interment will be made, leaving Douglas and Washington.  Friends of the family are invited to attend.
 
$100 REWARD

       A reward of $100 is hereby offered for information that will lead to the arrest and conviction of the party or parties who are responsible for the murder of John R. Wegener, which was committed Saturday, Sept. 28, 1912, sometime after the hour of 9 p.m. on what is known as the Half Way House Road, a spur of the main county road leading westward.
A. S. Fraser
Sheriff of Alexander County
 
BODY OF JIM FEXTON NOT YET RECOVERED

       The body of Jim Fexton, the old sailor who fell off the steamer Rapids Saturday and was drowned, has not yet been recovered.  Fexton was not blown off the boat by the explosion of an exhaust pipe as was first reported.

       (The 2 Oct 1912, issue records his name as James Sexton.—Darrel Dexter)
 
The little son of G. Moore, of Karnak, was brought to the cemetery here (Grand Chain) for burial, after a short illness of diphtheria.
 
FUNERAL OF DENNIS O'CALLAGHAN

       The funeral of Dennis O’Callaghan was held Sunday at the Dezonia residence on Eighth Street.  The services were conducted by Father James Downey, pastor of St. Patrick’s Church.  The remains were interred in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge.  The funeral was largely attended, the deceased being a well-known and highly respected citizen of this city.
 
FUNERAL OF LITTLE CREIGHTON BOY SUNDAY

       The funeral of Lawrence Creighton, the little son of Mr. and Mrs. Martin Creighton, of Thirty-fourth Street, was held Sunday at the home of his grandmother, Mrs. Creighton, at 2706 Commercial Avenue.  Father James Gillen, pastor of St. Joseph's Church, conducted the services which were largely attended.  The remains were interred in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge.
 

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Top of Form

Tuesday, 1 Oct 1912:
NO CLUE FOUND IN WEGENER CASE
Murder of John Wegener Last Saturday Night Still Shrouded in Mystery

No further development have come to the attention of the authorities that would tend to solve the mystery connected with the murder of John A. Wegener, the young Drainage District farmer, whose lifeless form was found lying in the road a she short distances from his home last Saturday night with two bullet wounds in the body.  Every effort is being made by the officials to find the murderer or murderers and no stone is being left unturned that would tend to unravel the mystery of the murder.

One official is inclined to discredit the theory of the death of Wegener at the hands of highwaymen because of the isolated vicinity.  Highwaymen, he thinks would have chosen a more frequented spot for a hold up than where the crime was committed. Had the object been robbery all the money in the dead man's pockets would have been taken.  He is certain that the deed was accompanied by an enemy.

Others contend that the disappearance of Wegner's watch is conclusive proof of robbery and the previous hold up that same evening also warrants the holdup idea.
 
DEATH OCCURRED ON ANNIVERSARY OF HER WEDDING
Mrs. Robert Blattler Passed Away at Bondurant Hospital

Mrs. Robert Blattler, of 415 Eleventh Street, died at the Bondurant Hospital at 8 o'clock this morning following a very serious operation performed a few days ago.

The deceased was a daughter of Jacob Lehning, of 601 Commercial Avenue.  She is survived by her husband, who she married just 18 years ago today, and two brothers, Theodore Lehning, of Cairo, and Jacob Lehning, of Des Moines, Ia.

Funeral arrangements will be announced later, but will probably be held Thursday.

(Robert Blattler married Bertha Lehning on 1 Oct 1894, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Her marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge has no dates, but reads:  Bertha Blattler.—Darrel Dexter)

 

OLD RESIDENT OF GRAND CHAIN DEAD

Mrs. Angy Calvin, age 82, one of the oldest residents of Pulaski County, died Sunday evening at the home of her daughter, Mrs. John Lewis, at Grand Chain.  She is survived by three daughters, Mrs. John Lewis, of Grand Chain, Mrs. James Barber, whose residence is at the old homestead, and Mrs. Norman Keller, of Pine Bluff; one son, Hiram Calvin, of Olmsted.

The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon, services at the Congregational Church at Grand Chain.  Interment will be at the old family burial grounds at Levings.

(John Lewis married Lina Calvin on 14 Oct 1891, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  James A. Barber married Elizabeth Calvin on 3 Jul 1881, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  N. A. Keller married Mattie B. Calvin on 20 Jan 1886, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Her marker in Calvin-Barber Cemetery, east of Olmsted, reads:  Angeline wife of R. T. Calvin Born Dec. 5, 1828 Died Sept. 30, 1912.—Darrel Dexter)
 
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank all the kind friends who by their many acts of kindness and expression of sympathy assisted us in our bereavement in the death of our dear son and grandson, Lawrence, especially the Rev. Father Gillen and Downey and the Sisters and pupils of St. Joseph's Catholic School, who so lovingly displayed their love for their little classmate by guarding his casket on its way to his eternal home, also those who sent the beautiful floral pieces.

Signed
Mr. and Mrs. Martin Creighton, Jr.
Mr. and Mrs. Martin Creighton, Sr. and family
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 2 Oct. 1912:
FRED W. SALZNER DIES FROM INJURIES
Young Man Struck by Train Succumbs after Operation

Fred W. Salzner, aged 26, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Salzner, of 26 Sixteenth Street, died last night at the Bondurant Hospital as the result of injuries sustained by being struck by an Iron Mountain train.  An operation was performed upon the injured man from which he did not recover.

The funeral services will be held Thursday morning at the home of the parents on Sixteenth Street, conducted by Rev. Clarke of the Calvary Baptist Church.  The remains will be taken on the Illinois Central train at 11:15 a.m. for Anna, Ill., where interment will be made.

(His marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Fred W. Salzner Born Dec. 6, 1885 Died Oct. 1, 1912.—Darrel Dexter)

 
FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—Fred W. Salzner, at Bondurant Hospital, Oct. 1st, 1912.

Funeral services at residence, No. 26 Sixteenth Street, at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 3rd.  Burial at Anna Cemetery.  Train will leave Illinois Central depot at 11:15 o'clock.
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—Mrs. Bertha Blattler, wife of Robert Blattler, No. 415 Eleventh Street.

Funeral services will be held at the residence at 1:45 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 3rd, conducted by Rev. E. Robert Dunlap of the Emmanuel Lutheran Church.  Train leaves at 2:45 at Fourteenth Street for Villa Ridge cemetery.

Friends of the family are invited.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to express our thanks and appreciation of the many acts of kindness shown us during our terrible affliction in the death of our husband, son and brother, John A. Wegner.
Mrs. John A. Wegener
Mrs. M. C. Wegener and family
 
RECOVER BODY OF MAN DROWNED OFF STEAMER RAPIDS

The body of James Sexton, the white man who was drowned off the steamer Rapids while the boat was en route to Cairo last Saturday, was found this morning floating down the river at a point opposite the Weis-Peterson box factory at North Cairo.  Sexton was engaged in doing work as a deckhand on one side of the boat on the bottom deck and in some manner fell into the river.  Before assistance could reach him he disappeared beneath the waters and was drowned.

Sexton was 51 years of age and lived in Paducah.  It is said he has no relatives.  He was well known in Cairo among the river men, having been employed on various boats.

The remains were removed to the undertaking parlors of E. A. Burke.
             (The 30 Sep 1912, issue reported his name as Jim Fexton.—Darrel Dexter)
 


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 3 Oct 1912:
WEGENER MURDER TO REMAIN MYSTERY
Police Unable to Find Any Clue to the Crime

Will the murder of John Wegener, the young farmer who was shot and killed while driving to his home in the Drainage District last Saturday night prove to be one of the unsolved mysteries that have enshrouded similar occurrences in that region of North Cairo in late years?  The failure of the authorities to find a single clue that would aid in establishing the identity of the party or parties responsible for the crime or lead to their whereabouts causes many to think that such will be the case.

The sheriff's office, as well as the police department, have exhausted every source from whence a clue or trace of the murderer or murderers might appear, but the efforts have been devoid of results.

Ury Salyers, the neighbor who with Mrs. Wegener found Wegener's body on the road a short distance from their home on the night of the murder, and who was held for several days pending a thorough investigation of the affair was Wednesday released from custody.  The authorities are convinced that Salyers had no hand in the killing of Wegener as was first suspected.

Sheriff Frazer has sent postcards to the officials of adjacent cities and counties offering the reward of $100 for information that will lead to the arrest and conviction of the guilty parties.
 
FUNERAL OF MRS. BLATTLER HELD THIS AFTERNOON

The funeral of Mrs. Bertha Blattler, wife of Robert Blattler, of 415 Eleventh Street, who died at the Bondurant Hospital Tuesday morning, was held this afternoon at the family residence, conducted by Rev. C. Robert Dunlap, pastor of the Lutheran Church of which the deceased was a member.  Interment was at the Villa Ridge cemetery, a special train conveying the party to that place.

The pallbearers were Peter Day, William Brinkmeyer, Patrick Doud, Peter Saup, Frank Davis, F. W. Gibson, Peter Lind, and John Ogg.

Mrs. L. C. Falconer, the undertaker, had charge of the funeral.
 
MRS. W. T. FRIGANZA DIED IN ST. LOUIS
Former Mound City Girl Passes Away of Tuberculosis

Mrs. W. T. Friganza, wife of Willis T. Friganza, formerly manager of the Bell Telephone Company, of Cairo, died in a hospital in St. Louis at 10:20 last night of tuberculosis.

She was born and reared in Mound City and was in her 32nd year.

Her husband and one son, Filbert, aged 3 or 4 years, and two brothers Albert and Joseph Mertz, of St. Louis, besides her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mertz, of Mound City, survive.

The remains were brought down from St. Louis this evening.

After leaving Cairo, Mr. and Mrs. Friganza sought various places in the southwest in the hope of benefitting her health, but without benefit.  Only recently Mr. Friganza became manager of the Bell Company at Hannibal, Mo., and Mrs. Friganza had just gone there, when she was taken so much worse that she was removed to St. Louis.

(Charles W. Mertz married Alice Belle Streeter on 1 May 1873, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
SALZNER FUNERAL THIS MORNING

The funeral of Fred W. Salzner, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Salzner, of 226 Sixteenth Street, who died at the Bondurant Hospital following injuries received by being struck by an Iron Mountain train, was held this morning.  The remains were taken to Anna, Ill., for interment, accompanied by members of the family and a delegation of Woodmen of the World, the deceased being a member of that lodge.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 4 Oct 1912:
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to express our thanks and appreciation of the many acts of kindness shown us here and at Anna, Ill., during our bereavement in the death of our beloved son and brother, Fred W. Salzner.
Mr. and Mrs. William Salzner
Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Wehling and family
 
ISAAC NEWTON PHILLIPS DIES
Was Reporter of Illinois Supreme Court for Eighteen Years

Bloomington, Ill., Oct. 4—Isaac Newton Phillips, 67 years old, former reporter of the Illinois Supreme Court, died suddenly here last night.  He studied law with Robert G. Ingersoll and ranked among the leading lawyers of Illinois.

He was chairman of the Board of Railway and Warehouse Commissioners four years and reporter of the Supreme Court for eighteen years, recently resigning.  He was an authority on Abraham Lincoln and his book upon the emancipation attracted wide attention.  He was one of the leading Republicans of Illinois.  He was prominent as a Mason and a member of the Grand Army of the Republic.
 
MURDER NEAR CENTRALIA TODAY

Centralia, Ill., Oct. 4—Carl Phelps, a well-known citizen, of Hickory, near here, was shot and killed by his brother-in-law, Sant Martin, today.  Phelps was driving with his wife when they met Martin.  The trouble started over a wire fence which Phelps accused Martin of cutting a few nights ago.  Following the shooting, Martin dashed away on horseback and officers have not yet located him.
 
The Jackson Tennessee Sun in Thursday’s issue tells of the death of A. R. Brogan, a well-known Mobile & Ohio Railroad engineer in that city last Wednesday night.  The deceased had a wide acquaintance among local railroad men having had a passenger run into this city for many years.  He had been in the employee of the M. & O. for over 40 years.
 
Edward Wilson, a former resident of this place (Ullin), died at Farmer, Mo., of a congestive chill, Sunday and is body was brought here and interred at Cache Chapel east of town.
 

The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 5 Oct 1912:
WEGENER'S SLAYER IN COUNTY JAIL?
Dal Harper, White, Arrested at Mound City, Suspected of Crime

Arrested at Mound City, Thursday night, Dal Harper, a white man, is being held at the county jail under suspicion of being one of two highwaymen who held up and robbed several persons on the county road last Saturday night and whom it is thought murdered John Wegener, the young farmer near his home on the same night.

Harper’s arrested was effected by Sheriff Charles Wehrenberg, Jr., of Pulaski County and that official brought the prisoner to Cairo Friday afternoon.

Albert Kesee, a young man of Mound City and Moses Meeks, a negro of Villa Ridge, both of whom were held up last Saturday night, have identified Harper as one of the holdup men who detained them on the road and took their valuables.

Harper is rather reticent about giving any information concerning himself and his answers to questions put him by the authorities have been misleading.  This and what is believed to be a bloodstain found on his hat leads the authorities to believe that the man is part of the crime and he will be held pending further developments in the case.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank our friends for their kindness and sympathy to us during the illness and death of our late beloved, Mrs. Bertha Blattler, and particular do we thank the members of the Mannerchoir for the beautiful music rendered by them at the funeral services.
Robert Blattler
Jacob Lehning
Theodore Lehning
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Monday, 7 Oct 1912:
Grandma Calvin died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. W. Lewis, of this town (Grand Chain), Monday afternoon.  She has been in ill health for a long time and has been bedfast for several days.  The deceased has long been a resident of Pulaski County and has for many years made her home in Grand Chain.  She was about 80 years old and leaves many relatives and friends to mourn her loss.

(She was identified as Angy Calvin in the 1 Oct 1912, issue.—Darrel Dexter)
 
There was a large congregation at the funeral of Mrs. Friganza in Beechwood Cemetery yesterday evening, as the sun was setting in a cradle of gold in the western sky.
 
R. S. Drake, aged 83 years, died of old age Thursday, Sept. 26th.  He has been living with his married daughter, Mrs. Dave McLinn.  The interment was in the McRaven Cemetery.  (McClure)
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 8 Oct 1912:
FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—William Dick, aged 64, at residence No. 425 Union Street.  Funeral services will be conducted at the residence by Rev. Dunlap of the Lutheran Church at 1 p.m. Wednesday. Special interurban car will leave Union Street and Sycamore at 1:30 p.m.  Interment at Beech Grove Cemetery.  Friends of family are invited.
 
DEATH CAUSED BY RHEUMATISM
Mrs. Maggie Johnson Succumbs After Short Illness

Mrs. Maggie Johnson, wife of P. A. Johnson, foreman of the Farmer's Handy Wagon Company’s plant in the Drainage District, died last night at 12:15 o'clock at the family residence, at 714 Twenty-eighth Street.  Her death was caused from sciatic rheumatism, having been a sufferer from this disease for a number of years.  She had been confined to her bed since last Saturday.

The deceased was 46 years of age and is survived by her husband and two daughters, Mrs. Daisy Combs, of San Antonio, Texas, and Mrs. Annie Unruh, of St. Louis.  The former will not arrive until Wednesday, when it is expected the funeral will be held.

E. A. Burke has charge of the remains.

The funeral service over the remains will be held at the residence Wednesday afternoon by Rev. Allen R. Wallace, pastor of the First Christian Church.
 
WILLIAM DICK DIED LAST NIGHT

William Dick, aged 64 years, a former employee of the Chicago Mill, died at 12:30 o'clock last night at his home, 425 Union Street, his death being caused by heart failure. He is survived by his wife and family.  The funeral will probably be held Wednesday with interment at Beech Grove.  E. A. Burke has charge of the remains.
 
The funeral of the late Mrs. W. T. Friganza was held Sunday afternoon at the Congregational Church.  Rev. Buie conducted the services and delivered a very impressive sermon.  The choir of which she had been a member for years rendered several numbers, all being the favorite songs of the deceased.  The vacant place in the choir loft was marked by a large bow of white satin ribbon.  As a request, Miss Cora Fullerton sang a solo "Star of the East," which was very effective, this being the last song Mrs. Friganza sang in the church.  The deceased was very popular and loved by all who knew her; consequently the church could not accommodate the large crowd that attended her funeral. The funeral tributes were numerous and beautiful which told of the high esteem in which she was held.
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 9 Oct 1912:
FUNERAL SERVICES HELD OVER ENGINEER JAMES SHARINGTON

James Sharington, a well-known railroad engineer, running into Cairo for many years, was killed last Thursday in a wreck on the Illinois Central near Swanwick, Ill., and the funeral took place Tuesday afternoon at East St. Louis.  The deceased was known in a wide circle of acquaintances here.
 
FORMER CAIROITE DIES IN ST. LOUIS
Mrs. Mary Donahue Succumbs after a Short Illness

News was received here today announcing the sudden death of Mrs. Mary Donahue, which occurred in St. Louis at 5 o'clock this morning.  Mrs. Donahue was born and reared in Cairo, her maiden name being Mary McCarthy.  Her husband, who was a railroad engineer, died about a year ago and their eldest son, John, died about six months ago.  The family left Cairo about 20 years ago and have resided in St. Louis ever since.

Mrs. Donahue was about 50 years of age and had been in previous good health.  She is survived by two daughters and two sons and also an adopted daughter, Miss Alice Sagafia, who is a sister of Mrs. M. J. O'Shea, of this city.  The deceased was a cousin of William Curran, of 209 Fourth Street, this city.
Mrs. Donahue owned considerable property in Cairo.  She will be remembered by many of the older Cairoites, she having attended the public schools here when a girl.  The funeral will be held in St. Louis on Friday.
 
Mrs. Joseph Essex died last Saturday, Oct. 5, after a lingering illness of some two months.  During her sickness her suffering was intense, yet she bore it all with much patience to the last.  She was a true Christian woman and had been consistent member of the Baptist Church for more than 20 years. The funeral services were conducted Sunday afternoon by Rev. Mr. Ferrell, of Mound City, at the Baptist church in the presence of a very large concourse of people.  Mrs. Essex leaves a husband and four children, besides a host of relatives and friends to mourn their loss. Not only will she be missed so badly at home, but the church to which she belonged and the whole community will sadly miss her, and her Christian influence.  (Pulaski)

(Joseph W. Essex married Mamie Winsted on 8 Mar 1885, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  A marker in Rose Hill Cemetery at Pulaski reads:  Joseph W. Essex 1861-1929 Mary E. Essex 1866-1912.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 10 Oct 1912:

MRS. JOHNSON'S REMAINS SHIPPED TO NEW BURNSIDE

The remains of the late Mrs. Margaret Johnson, who died Tuesday, were shipped this morning to New Burnside, Ill., by E. A. Burke, the undertaker, where the interment will be today.

A. L. SMITH SUCCUMBED TODAY
Remains Will Be Taken Friday to Paducah, Ky., for Interment

A.L. Smith, 49 years of age, a well-known uptown resident, died suddenly this morning following a short illness.  He had been employed for many years as machinist at both the Chicago Mill and the Stuger plant.  He leaves his wife and two daughters, Misses Nettie and Myra Smith, of 620 Thirty-sixth Street.  The remains will be taken Friday to Paducah, the former home of the deceased, where the interment will be made.  E. A. Burke has charge of the remains.

Mrs. A. P. Hacker and daughter, Mrs. Mary Fletcher, who have been visiting the former's son, Capt. J. S. Hacker and family, left this evening for New Orleans, where they will spend the winter.

 

DEATH FOLLOWS ILLNESS OF DIPHTHERIA
Little Agatha Wilson Dies after Five Weeks

Agatha Wilson, the 5-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Wilson, of 419 Union Street, died this morning as the after result of an attack of diphtheria.  She has been sick for the past five weeks.  Mr. Wilson is an employee of the Singer Manufacturing Company.  The funeral services will be held Friday afternoon at the family resident at 1:30 conducted by Rev. D. R. Kennedy of the Southern Methodist Church and interment will be made at Beech Grove.  E. A. Burke has charge of the remains.

On Monday, Sept. 30, occurred the death of Gertie Underwood, aged 37 years.  She leaves a husband and six children to mourn their loss.  She had been sick since January and suffered greatly with dropsy and other diseases.  Funeral services were conducted at the Baptist church by Rev. J. R. Mitchell and interment was made in Thebes Cemetery.  The relatives have the sympathy of all in their great bereavement.

(A marker in Thebes Cemetery reads:  Gerty  Underwood  1868-1912 Mother—Darrel Dexter)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Friday, 11 Oct 1912:

LITTLE AGATHA WILSON BURIED THIS MORNING

The funeral of little 5-year-old Agatha Wilson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Wilson, of 419 Union Street, who died Thursday morning following an illness of diphtheria was held this morning, conducted by Rev. R. E. Kennedy, of the Southern Methodist Church.  The funeral party drove to Beech Grove in carriages where the interment was made.

CARD OF THANKS

We are very grateful to the many friends of our beloved wife and mother, Mrs. Margaret Johnson, and wish to express our earnest appreciation for the kindnesses shown during her illness and death.  May each be so comforted when such bereavement comes to them.
P. A. Johnson
Mrs. W. A. Unruh
Mrs. A. L. Combs

(William A. Unruh married Anna E. Johnson on 6 Oct 1895, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

D. K. Layton, former resident of Bardwell, died in Oklahoma one day last week and his remains were brought to Arlington for burial, the interment taking place last Friday.  Mr. Layton was in business here (Bardwell, Ky.) for many years and was prosperous.  A few years ago he sold his property here and went to Oklahoma, where he engaged in business.  He is survived by one brother, John G. Layton, of Harrisburg, Ark.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Saturday, 12 Oct. 1912:
WEALTHY SIKESTON MAN KILLED BY TRAIN

Capt. Sam Tanner, of Sikeston, capitalist, land owner and public administrator of Scott County, who was struck by an Iron Mountain train and fatally hurt so that he died in St. Anthony's Hospital in St. Louis last Saturday, was buried Thursday.  The funeral was delayed until the arrival of his son, Frank Tanner, from San Bernardino to his farm near Poplar Bluff, when a fast train struck his team.  Both mules were killed and Capt. Tanner was thrown against the engine and his skull crushed.

CARD OF THANKS

We desire to express our gratitude to the friends who showed so many acts of kindness at the death of our husband and brother, William Dick.  We are especially grateful, for the beautiful flowers which were given so generously.
Mrs. William Dick
Mrs. Robert Grindler and Family
Carl Dick

INFANT DAUGHTER DIED LAST NIGHT

Frances Elizabeth Moss, a six-month-old child, died at the home of her parents, at 308 Sixteenth Street, last night.  The remains were taken to Mt. Vernon, Ill., this morning for interment.  Mr. Moss is a millwright employed at the Halliday Milling Company.  Mrs. L. C. Falconer, the undertaker, had charge of the remains.

Mrs. Anna Yeltmer died Thursday morning at the home of her father, Anton Nelson, on Main Street (Mound City) of tuberculosis.  She was 24 years old and has been in a serious condition for several months.  Her remains were taken to Montgomery and Stockton undertaking rooms where they will be kept until Sunday afternoon, when interment will be made at Beech Grove Cemetery.  She leaves no other relatives than her father.


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Tuesday, 15 Oct 1912:
JOHN C. GHOLSON HAS PASSED WAY
Long Illness Ended at An Early Hour This Morning
WAS ONE OF CAIRO'S SUCCESSFUL MERCHANTS
Came Here as Youth and Entered Business of His Brother, Late W. E. Gholson

John C. Gholson, one of Cairo's most prominent merchants, and an old resident of this city, died shortly before 2 o'clock this morning, at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Louis Waldschmidt, 2515 Walnut Street, of tuberculosis-laryngitis.  He had been a sufferer for the past year and his death, while not unexpected, was sudden.  He was 51 years of age.

Mr. Gholson was the son of John and Rebecca Gholson, and was born in Ballard County, Ky., and attended the country schools there.  When quite a young man, he came to Cairo and took a business education, fitting himself for a position in mercantile lines.  For many years he was associated in business here with his brother, the late W. E. Gholson.  Severing that connection, Mr. Gholson went in business for himself about 15 years ago, opening a clothing store at 707 Commercial Avenue.  The venture was a highly successful one, and several years ago he took into partnership one of his salesmen, A. F. Staehle, the firm, now being known as Gholson & Staehle.

The deceased was a straightforward, steady businessman and a devout Christian, an active member of the Cairo Baptist Church, and contributing much to its welfare.  He was kindly disposed to all and of genial temperament.

Mr. Gholson was married Sept. 3, 1900, to Mrs. Mary Francis Sarber, who died six years ago, and he is survived by her three children, Mrs. Glendale Morgan, Mrs. Louis Waldschmidt, and John Sarber, to whom he was devoted.  He also leaves three brothers, Fred F. Gholson, of McCracken County, Ky., and Lloyd T. and R. L. Gholson, of Ballard County, Ky.

Upon becoming ill about a year ago, he practically retired from business pursuits and spent a month in Colorado seeking to benefit his health.  He returned from that climate several months ago and since that time had been steadily failing.

The deceased was also a member of the Masonic fraternity.

The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 1:30 at the residence, Rev. Garrett, of the Cairo Baptist Church, conducting the services.  Interment will be at Villa Ridge cemetery.

(John C. Gholson married Mary F. Sarber on 3 Sep 1900, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Wednesday, 16 Oct 1912:
OLD CAIRO RESIDENT PASSES AWAY

Mrs. Mary Quinn, aged 80 years, died this morning at 10:20 o'clock at the home of her niece, Mrs. A. S. Magner, of Twenty-eighth and Poplar streets.  The deceased was an old resident of Cairo having come here when a young girl from County Ketty, Ireland.  She married some years later, Mr. Kane Mahoney and after his death was married to the late Patrick Quinn, who died about fifteen years ago.

Mrs. Quinn leaves surviving her, a sister Mrs. Cornelius Shanahan, and three nephews in Ireland, and two nieces, Mrs. A. S. Magner and Mrs. Mary Linehan.

The funeral will be held Friday morning at St. Joseph's Church of which the deceased was a member.  Rev. Father J. J. Gillen, pastor of the church, will officiate.  Interment will be made at Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge.

(Cain Mahoney married Mary Florr on 30 Dec 1865, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Patrick Quinn married Mrs. Mary Mahoney on 15 Jul 1876, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Cornelius Linehan married Mary Shanahan on 5 Dec 1889, in Alexander Co., Ill.  A marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Patrick Quinn Died Nov. 19, 1897 Aged 52 Years.  Cain Mahoney Died Aug. 15, 1866 Aged 37 Years.  Mary Quinn  1840-1912.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. Will Unruh and daughter, Margaret, of St. Louis and Mrs. A. L. Combs, of San Antonio, who were called to Cairo by the death of the late Mrs. Margaret Johnson, left Tuesday for their homes.

ENTERED INTO REST TUESDAY, OCT. 15th

John C. Gholson, age 51 years, at residence 2515 Park Avenue.  Funeral services will be conducted at residence by Rev. A. P. Garrett, of Cairo Baptist Church, Thursday, Oct. 17th, at 1:30 p.m.  Cairo Lodge 237 A. F. and A. M. will have charge of services at the grave.  Interment at Villa Ridge cemetery.  Special train will leave 14th Street at 2:45 p.m.  Friends of the family invited.

Active pallbearers:  A. F. Staehle, Frank Spencer, C. L. Keaten, R. P. Flack, H. C. Steinel, P. C. Barclay, Dr. J. W. Dunn and C. C. Terrell.

MASONS ATTENTION

Special meeting is hereby called at 12:45 p.m. Thursday, October 17th, to attend the funeral of our late brother, John C. Gholson.

Special car will leave Eighth and Washington Avenue at 1:15 p.m. for residence, 2515 Park Avenue.
Interment will be at Villa Ridge special train leaving Fourteenth Street at 2:45 p.m.  Masonic services will be held at grave.
C. S. Bourque, W. M.
R. C. Bates, Secretary

 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Mowery attended the funeral of Mrs. Mowery’s father, Moses Barringer, near Wetaug, Friday.  (Ullin)

(Moses A. Barringer, 21, born near Dongola, Ill., son of Aaron Barringer and Melvina Hileman, married Manda Jane Brown, 18, born near Dongola, Ill., daughter of Sandy Brown and Clementine Miller, on 5 Nov 1882, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

George Dunn, the oldest resident on Butter Ridge, is quite ill from catarrhal pneumonia.  (Ullin)


The Cairo Evening Citizen, Thursday, 17 Oct 1912:
LAST RITES OVER JOHN C. GHOLSON
Funeral Services Were Largely Attended This Afternoon

The funeral of the late John C. Gholson, who died Tuesday morning after a year's illness of tuberculosis, was held this afternoon from the residence of the deceased's daughter, Mrs. Louis Waldschmidt, 2515 Park Avenue.  Rev. Garrett, of the Cairo Baptist Church, conducted the services at the