Obituaries and Death Notices

 

The Cairo Evening Citizen

 1 Jan 1906- 31 Dec 1906

Cairo, Alexander County, Illinois


Transcribed and annotated by Darrel Dexter

darreldexter@hotmail.com
 

The Cairo Evening Citizen

Monday, 1 Jan 1906:

SEARCH FOR BODIES MAY BE GIVEN UP.

Remains of Walter Jocelyn and Leo Mueller Still Unfound.

RIVER DRAGGED WITH NO RESULTS.

Points Below Cairo Notified to Keep Watch Out for Bodies.—Story of Sad Accident

Search for the bodies of Walter Jocelyn and Leo Mueller, drowned in the Ohio River Saturday evening, will be discontinued.  The hope of recovering them is so slight that the only steps which will be taken will be to keep watch should the bodies rise to the surface at any point below here.

This morning the river was thoroughly dragged in the effort to dislodge the bodies and bring them to the surface.  The barges under which the ill-fated launch went to its doom Saturday evening were removed, and the bottom of the river was dragged from the point where the boat went under to Cairo Point.  A number of skiffs were out and lines with grab hooks attached raked the bottom of the river.  Nothing was encountered except snags.  No trace even of the launch was discovered.

It was at first suggested that dynamite be used in the hope of bringing the bodies to the surface, but this has been abandoned.  The river is very deep there and the possibility of accomplishing anything by this means is considered very remote indeed.

Mr. E. E. Cox, Logan Mueller, Charles Hatcher and others were out on the river all morning working in the vain hope of recovering the bodies.

A gloom was cast over the entire city Saturday evening when the sad news was learned that two well-known Cairo boys had been drowned in the Ohio River and two others narrowly escaped the same fate.  The young men who met with their death were Walter Jocelyn, son of Dr. and Mrs. W. C. Jocelyn, and Leo Mueller, son of Capt. Joseph E. Mueller. Those who were saved were Charles Woods, son of the late Dr. William Woods, Charles Hatcher, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Hatcher of Thirty-third and Washington.

Charles Woods was seen by a Citizen representative and gave an account of the awful affair.  He stated that the four of them had started for Beech Ridge on a hunting trip in a gasoline launch owned by Mueller.

The engine of the launch was disabled and the boys had trouble with the boat.  The current was so swift that the boys lost all control of the boat.  The Combine’s fleet was lying near the Big Four incline and the Wash Honshell had dropped a tow of empties at the upper end of the fleet.  It was against these empty barges that the launch was being carried and finally dashed to pieces.

One of the boys made an effort to change the direction of the launch’s course, but his efforts were in vain and when they next seeked to use the oars, only one could be found.

Woods says that Jocelyn must have remained in the bow of the boat, as he did not see him jump out, which the rest of them did, as soon as the launch struck the barge.

Woods says he passed under the corner of one of the barges and when he came to the surface he managed to catch one of the ropes that had been thrown him by the crew of the Honshell, and was lifted out of the water.  He says Hatcher passed under the entire length of one barge and when he came to the surface he was saved by a ladder, which was let down from the Honshell.

Mueller, who passed beneath the barges, was thrown a rope by the crew, but was too weak to grasp it and was drowned in full view of those on board the towboat.

As stated before, Woods says they did not see anything of Jocelyn after they jumped from the launch and he was waited down with ammunition, it is thought he was caught beneath the barge and perhaps held there until he was drowned. 

The accident occurred about 5:45 Saturday evening and the news spread like wildfire throughout the city.

The death of young Mueller is a great blow to the father of the deceased, Capt. Mueller, and to his brother, Logan Mueller, owing to the recent death of Mrs. Mueller.

What might be termed a coincidence, lies in the fact that young Jocelyn met with an accident a few years ago, which probably would have cost him his life if it had not been for the presence of mind of his companion, Leo Mueller, and now at this time the two companions seemed to have been fated to lose their lives together.

The accident referred to occurred when Jocelyn was out hunting.  In climbing over a fence, his gun became tangled in some underbrush and was discharged, the load taking effect in Jocelyn’s shoulder.  Mueller, who was with him, rushed to the slaughterhouse for aid and secured a wagon in which Jocelyn was removed to his home and prompt attention given him.

The parents and relatives of the two unfortunate young men have the sympathy of the entire community in their hour of bereavement.

 

Mrs. Robert Browning, of Oklahoma City, is visiting her brother, Mr. Charles Carey, and family of No. 2805 Elm Street.  Mrs. Browning was called here by the serious illness of her mother, Mrs. Edna Carey.

 

Will Exhume Remains—The remains of a child, one of the victims of the Pittsburg disaster, was exhumed today and shipped to Leavenworth, Ind., for re-interment at the home of the McCullough family.  Among the passengers of the ill-fated steamer, City of Pittsburg, which burned on the Ohio River, near Grand Chain in April 1901, were Mr. and Mrs. McCullough and family.  The two children were lost; one body was recovered and buried at Beech Grove, Mr. McCullough hoping to find the other body.  He spent several weeks’ time and a large sum of money in prosecuting the search, but without success.  Mr. L. E. Falconer, the undertaker, received a letter from Mr. McCullough on Saturday directing her to exhume the remains and ship them to Indiana on the arrival of the towboat Sprague.

 

 

Tuesday, 2 Jan 1906:

Fatally Injured—Ray Palmer, the nineteen-year-old son of Editor A. M. Palmer of the Mound City Sun, received injuries last evening while working at the Mound City Chair Factory, which resulted in his death.  Palmer was injured by a piece of wood, which flew from the saw and struck him on the head, fracturing his skull.  The accident occurred about 7 p.m. and the young man died at 11 p.m.  The remains were taken to Metropolis this afternoon on the Fowler for interment.

 

Harry Daniels, brother of Charles Daniels, of our village (Pulaski), died at his brother’s of consumption on Dec. 26, 1905.  Mr. Daniels had been to California for his health and had returned only about two weeks ago.  The funeral was preached at the Baptist church at Mounds, burial at Beech Grove Cemetery.  The following persons from Pulaski attended the funeral:  J. B. Kennedy, C. G. Sheets, P. Mullen, H. B. Eshleman, Sam Sheets, John Sterns, Fred Fox, Ed Smooth and others.  Mr. Daniels leaves a wife and three little girls to mourn his death, besides two sisters and two brothers.

             (Harry E. Daniels married Bettie Trainer on 5 Aug 1896, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

ONE-HUNDRED DOLLAR REWARD

A reward of $100 is offered for the body of Leonhardt C. Mueller, aged 17, height 5.10, weight 130, dressed in canvas hunting coat and half-length, black leather laced hunting boots.  Was drowned at the Combine Coal Co.’s fleet Saturday, December 30, 1905.

Cairo, Ill., January 1, 1906

Joseph E. Mueller

 

 

Wednesday, 3 Jan 1906:

German Girl Dies—Miss Bertha Glass, aged eighteen years, died yesterday morning at the residence of Mrs. Rebecca Cordell on Sycamore Street, from consumption.  The deceased came to Cairo from Stuttgart, Germany, fifteen months ago.  Her only relative in this country is Miss Sophia Glass, who is employed in the family of D. L. Marx.  The deceased’s parents and other relatives reside in Germany.  The funeral was held this afternoon, the services being conducted by Rev. Armstrong at the Lutheran Church.

 

 

Thursday, 4 Jan 1906:

Death of Richard Singleton—Richard Singleton, a negro laborer, who resided at No. 326 Twenty-first Street, died this afternoon about 2:30 o’clock of pneumonia.  The deceased is survived by his wife.  He was employed at the Cairo elevator.

 

WELL KNOWN CONDUCTOR KILLED

U. S. Phipps Caught in Wreck on Johnston City Branch of Central

Carbondale Free Press:  U. S. Phipps, freight conductor on the Illinois Central, was killed Tuesday night in an accident on the Johnston City branch of the road, three miles northeast of Carbondale.

Phipps was caught beneath the wreckage of some empty freight cars, which had jammed together after the long train had broken in two.  Six cars in all were overturned and piled up in the collision.  The body was not found until after midnight.

Conductor Phipps has been a resident of this city for six years or more during which time he has been with the I. C.  He has taken a prominent part in the trainmen’s organization, the B. of R. T. and has been one of the best known of the many railway employees of this city.  He was also a member of the Odd Fellows and Rebekah lodges.

The dead man is survived by a wife and three children, two daughters and one son.

(This may be the same person as Ulysses S. Phipps, who married S. Estella Seymour on 26 Aug 1891, in Cumberland Co., Ill.  This may be the same person as Ulysses Grant Phipps, who married Anna T. Riddell on 30 Nov 1893, in Cook Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The funeral of Mrs. Rudemaker Monday afternoon was the saddest that has occurred here in many years.  It was held in the Methodist church, which was packed to overflowing, many persons coming long distances to pay their respects to her memory and if possible to comfort her sorrowing relations.  There were three ministers present, Rev. Fidler of the Methodist Church, Rev. Bosworth of the Congregational Church and Rev. Armstrong of the Lutheran Church at Cairo, who preached the funeral sermon, of which both Mr. and Mrs. Rudemaker were members.  Interment took place at the cemetery here.  Mrs. Rudemaker was in her 55th year at the time of her death, was married to Mr. John Rudemaker in 1875, at Iowa and has lived here most of the time since.  She was a fine neighbor, a most excellent lady everyway and her loss is felt to be a public calamity.  Her bereaved husband and children have the heartfelt sympathy of everyone who has heard of the shocking accident.  In regard to the accident, a coroner’s jury looked into the case Saturday and decided that it was an unavoidable accident.  Mrs. Rudemaker had been walking for some distance on the path on the west side of the southbound track.  There was a long freight train moving on the northbound track and when the caboose of the train came opposite to her she stepped over the rail onto the southbound track and was struck immediately by the passenger, which had been following her.  Evidently the noise of the freight train had prevented her hearing the approaching passenger.  Mr. Harry Green and wife, her daughter, were not with her, as they had started by the path through the field and before going far Mr. Green ran back to the house for something.  Mrs. Green waited for his return before proceeding and they did not reach the spot until after the terrible accident had occurred.  Mr. L. F. Crain acted as deputy coroner, and the jury was composed of William Spaulding, foreman, Joseph Dille, A. K. Wilkinson, Thomas Roach, W. L. Hildebrand, and George Green.

 

Died, at his home in Dongola, Saturday night, Dec. 23, at 11 p.m. Mr. George Resh, age 78 years, 11 months and 23 days.  He was a wagon maker by trade and was an industrious man and a good citizen.  Funeral services were conducted at the residence Monday at 1:30 p.m. by Rev. Kiest, interment in Odd Fellows Cemetery.

             (His marker in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  George Resh Sr. 1831-1907.  Father.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Died, Wednesday, Dec. 27, 1905, at 12:30 o’clock at St. Mary’s Infirmary at Cairo, Ill., Mrs. E. A. Walker, age 68 years, 6 months, and 5 days.  The remains were brought here (Dongola) Thursday and taken to her daughter, Mrs. R. A. Cuhl, where she has made her home for some time past.  Funeral services at the Congregational church in Dongola, Friday, Dec. 29th, at 2 p.m.  Interment in I. O. O. F. Cemetery.

             (Her marker in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Anna Walker Born June 12, 1837 Died Dec. 28, 1905.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Patrolman James Clark, who was shot by John Tice, the negro who was killed in the battle that followed, is worse today.  He suffered terrible agony.  The wound in his ankle, where the bullet pierced the bone, is still extremely sore and Mr. Clark’s condition is still considered serious by Dr. Jeff Robertson, who is attending the wounds.

 

 

Friday, 5 Jan 1906:

Honored Old Family—T. J. Holtslaw returned Monday night from Iuka where he attended the funeral of a relative, Daniel Holtslaw, aged 92 years and 17 days, being the first death in a family of father, mother and 11 children, the youngest being a pair of twins past fifty years of age.  All of the children are comfortably settled around the homestead.  On the 9th of last June the father and mother celebrated their 69th anniversary of their wedding.—Mt. Vernon Register

 

 

Monday, 8 Jan 1906:

Death of W. T. Bradley—Mr. W. T. Bradley, an old citizen of this city, passed away at St. Mary’s Infirmary this morning about 8:30 o’clock, after a week’s illness.  The deceased was 62 years of age.  He is survived by his wife and two sons, Riley and Charles Bradley.  The deceased was employed for several years at the Golden Eagle clothing store at Sixth and Commercial.

 

Died at Chicago—Rev. E. L. Roland, rector of the Episcopal Church, was called to Chicago yesterday by the death of his brother, Mr. William Roland.

 

 

Tuesday, 9 Jan 1906:

Death of Mrs. T. A. Head—Mrs. T. A. Head, wife of Elder Head, who died Saturday night after an illness of eight months, was buried Monday at Hodges Park.  Her ailment was lung trouble.  She was 28 years old and leaves a boy baby of 17 months.  She was a daughter of Parchal Avington, of Hodges Park, and leaves four brothers and four sisters.

 

 

Thursday, 11 Jan 1906:

Mrs. Henry Butts died Dec. 22, aged 59 years.  Funeral services at M. E. church conducted by Rev. S. A. Cecil

             (Henry Butts married Mary C. Holt on 4 Oct 1864, in Gallatin Co., Ill.  Her marker in Hazlewood Cemetery near Elco reads:  Mary C. wife of Henry Butts Died Dec. 22, 1905 Aged 59 Yrs., 11 Mos., & 14 Ds.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Died Dec. 23, Mrs. Fordice Ireland, aged 46 years.  Funeral services at M. E. church conducted by Rev. Kirkman.  Mrs. Ireland was the daughter of John Thurston, an old citizen of Alexander County.

             (Her marker in Hazlewood Cemetery near Elco reads:  Alice wife of J. F. Ireland Died Dec. 23, 1905 Aged 46 Yrs., 6 Mos., & 6 Ds.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Died Jan 8th, Mr. James Allen, aged 69 years.  Funeral the 10th inst.

             (His marker in Sims Cemetery near Elco reads:  James Allen Born Dec. 13, 1837 Died Jan. 8, 1906.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Cairo friends of Mr. Benjamin Jones, of Sandusky, will learn with regret of the death of his daughter Lana.  She was the eldest child and was 12 years old.  She had been afflicted with a nervous trouble for a couple of years and Mr. Jones has taken her to many doctors and specialists in the hope of effecting a cure.  She died very suddenly New Year’s Day, having been taken suddenly ill only a few hours before the end came.  The funeral was held at the Diswood Baptist church and was conducted by Rev. J. H. Albright, assisted by Rev. Morse and Rev. Milton, and the remains were buried at the Hulen Cemetery.  Mr. and Mrs. Jones have asked the citizens to express their deep appreciation of the kindness of the good people of Unity, Sandusky and Diswood in their affliction.  Their loss was very severe, for their daughter was a favorite wherever she was known

             (Her marker in Hulen Cemetery reads:  Inez Leandra Jones Born Oct. 26, 1893 Died Jan. 1, 1906.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

Friday, 12 Jan 1906:
SUDDEN DEATH OF MRS. JOHN O’SHEA
Passed Away This Afternoon—About 2 O’clock—Leaves Baby Week Old

Mrs. John O’Shea died very suddenly this afternoon about 2 o’clock at her home on Seventeenth and Washington.  The deceased was 28 years of age.

About a week ago the deceased gave birth to a son and since that time she has been critically ill.
Mrs. O’Shea is the wife of Mr. John O’Shea, the well known plumber and her sudden death is very sad owing to the circumstances, leaving her young babe without a mother so early in its life.

The deceased is survived by her husband, a little girl about 1 year and a half old and a son about a week old.  She is also survived by a sister, Mrs. George Steinhouse.

(A marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Lottie O’Shea 12 Jan 1906.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
Saturday, 13 Jan 1906:
MRS. GIST ACQUITTED ON CHARGE OF MURDER

Murphysboro, Ill., Jan. 13.—Mrs. Clemena Gist, of this city, on trial here on a charge of murder, was acquitted yesterday, the jury being out fourteen hours.

Mrs. Gist shot and killed Antonio Bossi, an Italian, at her home here a year ago.  Bossi with his brother-in-law were passing through Mrs. Gist’s yard.  She called to them to halt and when they would not, she fired, killing Bossi.  Mrs. Gist claimed that Bossi attempted to raise the window of her bedroom.
 
CORONER’S JURY EXONERATED GREEN
From All Blame in Shooting of His Stepfather, Thomas Guinn.
BOY WANTED TO PROTECT HIS MOTHER.
Guinn Struck His Wife over the Head with a Lantern and Then Threatened “to Kill or Be Killed.”

The coroner’s jury in the case of Henry Green, charged with the murder of his stepfather, Thomas Guinn, rendered a verdict exonerating the boy with all blame.  Green is about 16 years of age.
The jury was composed of T. A. Fuller, foreman; H. M. Sullivan and James E. Sydes, Alex Moss, Henry Moss and James Lee.

A shooting scrape occurred last evening about 8 o’clock at the home of Tom Guinn, a negro, at No. 2202 Sycamore Street, at which time Guinn was fatally shot by Henry Green, alias Hill, his stepson.

The shooting was the result of some words over Mrs. Guinn’s little two-year-old daughter.

Susie Guinn is hired out during the day.  Returning to her home last evening, she found her little child suffering from injuries, which gave rise to the belief that the child had been assaulted.

The child’s father is employed at the Big Four roundhouse at night and sleeping during the day.  He was supposed to have been the only one in the house with the child during the day.

The mother took the child to the neighbors to find out its ailment, and was advised to consult a physician.

Dr. Dickerson examined the child and pronounced the disease one often prevalent with children of that age.

Mrs. Guinn had been suspicious that her husband had injured the child and had spoken of it to her son, Henry Guinn.  Henry went to his father and told him what his mother had said.  It seems that Henry was afraid his mother would have Guinn arrested, and warned him in time to evade the police.
Guinn became angry and went home.  Entering the house he found his wife and child lying on the bed.  He struck her over the head with his lantern.

The boy, seeing his mother being cruelly beaten, picked up an ax and endeavored to take his mother’s part.

He struck at Guinn, but the latter grabbed the ax and a scuffle ensued.  The boy then left the house, was gone according to witnesses, about a half hour.  During the time intervening, Guinn walked the floor with the ax, saying that he “would kill or be killed.”  Jesse Johnson, a negro who boards at the house, was present at the time of the trouble.  He stated to the coroner’s jury that he had coaxed Guinn to put down the ax and finally succeeded in quieting Guinn somewhat.

The boy came back to the house with a musket, which it is said he got from an uncle at Twentieth and Cedar streets.

Witnesses testified that Guinn made ____ toward the boy, axe to hand and exclaiming, “I’m going to kill you.”

Witnesses testified that the boy then shot Guinn, killing him instantly.

Green then started to run, but his mother told him to go to police headquarters and give himself up.  He went to Fire Station No. 1 and gave himself over to Capt. Jones and he was taken to the city jail.

The coroner’s inquest was held this morning at 9 o’clock at the courthouse.
 
SERVED IN HOME OF GOV. DENEEN
Mrs. Gist on Trial for Murder in Jackson County Was Domestic in His Family.

The closing scenes of the Gist murder case attracted a crowded courtroom, says the Carbondale Free Press.  Almost one third of the audience were women.  Mrs. Gist, dressed in black with a black cloak and large black hat, sat facing the court.  By her side sat her husband, Paul Gist, her father, Mr. Craven, and a sister.  Mrs. Bossi, the widow, with her child, was seated with the attorneys for the state.  The good character of Mrs. Gist was shown by numerous witnesses from among the best people of Carbondale and Williamson County.  Among other things brought is the fact that while working in Carbondale she was recommended to the family of Charles S. Deneen, now governor, and went to Chicago and served as a domestic in that family for some time.  The closing arguments of the attorneys on both sides and the instructions of the court were listened to with wrapt attention by all the large audience.
 
MOTHER AND CHILD TO BE BURIED TOGETHER

Mrs. William Brown died at Thebes this morning of consumption.  Her year-old baby died Thursday morning.  Mother and child will be buried in the same coffin.
 
 
Monday, 15 Jan 1906:
AUGUST BODE DIED SUNDAY AT MIDNIGHT
Well Known Cigar Maker Passes Away after Long Illness

August Bode, Sr., the well known cigar maker of No. 1103 Washington Avenue, died Sunday night at 11:55 o’clock.  The deceased was 55 years of age.

The death of Mr. Bode was not unexpected.  He had been in poor health for many months and in a critical condition for the past several weeks.  He suffered from a complication of diseases.

The deceased was one of Cairo’s most highly respected citizens.  He was a man of quiet disposition and was a devoted husband and father.  He was an active member of Immanual Lutheran Church, the German Maennerchor, Cairo Casino, Safford Lodge, I. O. O. F. and the Cairo Building and Loan Association.

The deceased is survived by his wife, Mrs. Louisa Bode; a daughter, Miss Emma Bode; and three sons, August, Jr., Carl and Willie.

Mr. Bode was born in Westphalia, Germany, Oct. 28, 1850.  Two sisters and a brother residing there survive him.  He served from 1874 to ‘75 in the German Army.  He was married Jan. 14, 1880.  He came to America in May 1880 and came directly to Cairo.  He was a cigar maker by trade and worked a long time for George Wichert.  Later he engaged in business for himself and built up a large trade.  A short time ago he transferred the business to his son, August, who will continue the business.

(His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  C. F. A. Bode 1850-1906.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Re-Arrested on Charge of Murder

Henry Green, the negro boy who fatally shot his stepfather, Thomas Guinn, Friday night and who was exonerated of the crime by the coroner’s jury, has been rearrested on the charge of murder.  The warrant was sworn out by the deceased Guinn’s father.
 
 
Tuesday, 16 Jan 1906:
Boy Kills His Hunting Companion

Carmi, Ill., Jan. 16.—In an endeavor to get a good aim at a squirrel they were endeavoring to shoot, John Goodman shot and instantly killed Sam Meddlin, his companion. A coroner’s jury exonerated Goodman.
 
Mr. M. J. Howley returned this morning from Notre Dame, Ind., where he was called by the death of his cousin, Sister M. Josepha, of the Holy Cross Order.  She died Friday evening and was buried in the Community Cemetery at the mother house at St. Mary’s Notre Dame, at 10 o’clock Sunday morning.  She was also a cousin to Mr. J. C. Crowley and Mr. P. J. Purcell.
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

Bode—Died, January 14, 1906, at 11:55 p.m. August Bode, Sr., aged 55 years, 2 months and 17 days.

Funeral services will be held at the Lutheran church Wednesday, January 17th at 2 p.m.  A special train will leave the foot of Eighth Street at 2:45 o’clock for Villa Ridge, where interment will be made.  Friends of the family invited.
 
Mr. M. J. Howley returned yesterday from South Bend, Ind., where he was called by the death of his cousin.
 
 
Wednesday, 17 Jan 1906:
Funeral of August Bode—The funeral of the late August Bode, Sr., was held this afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Immanuel Lutheran Church, of which the deceased was a member.  The funeral was largely attended.  The remains were taken to Villa Ridge cemetery for interment. The pallbearers were A. T. Ivy and L. Landon from Safford Lodge, William Schat and H. Rothenberger from the Cairo Casino Lodge, John Lattner and Herman Gunther from the Germania Maennerchor and Mr. Will Gibson.
 
DIED LAST NIGHT

Geraldine Augustine, the seventeen-month-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hagey, of 223 Seventeenth Street, died last night at 8:30 o’clock of pneumonia after an illness of several weeks.
The funeral will be held at the home tomorrow morning at 9 o’clock.  The remains will be taken to Villa Ridge tomorrow by carriage for interment.
 
JOHN FITZGERALD DIED THIS MORNING.
Passed Away at Home of His Mother at Fifth and Walnut Streets

Mr. John Fitzgerald, a well-known young man of this city, died at 8:55 a.m. at the home of his mother, Mrs. Mary T. Fitzgerald, Fifth and Walnut streets.  The deceased was 34 years of age.

The deceased had been in poor health for the past five months.  Until a few months ago, he resided at Memphis, Tenn.  He was married several years ago and leaves a wife and a child seven years old.  The deceased is also survived by his mother, three brothers, Lee, Jim and Phil, and two sisters, Mrs. Cannon, of Cairo, and Miss Loretta Fitzgerald.

The funeral arrangements have not been completed.

(A marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  John Fitzgerald 1874-1906.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Postmaster Sidney B. Miller was called to Creal Springs Monday by the serious illness of his mother.
 
 
Thursday, 18 Jan 1906:
Mrs. Emma Cummings was buried at Rose Hill Cemetery on Sunday last.  Mrs. Cummings was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry King, of near Liberty, and was highly respected in this community (Pulaski).  Mrs. Cummings had been married for a year or more and had made her home at Gale, Ill.  The whole community extends their sympathy to the bereaved husband and entire family.

(Her marker in Rose Hill Cemetery at Pulaski reads:  Emma wife of A. P. Cummins Died Jan. 12, 1906 Aged 25 Yrs., 4 Mos., & 18 Ds.  Erected by O. King.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mr. James McClelland, of Mounds, who formerly lived at Pulaski, died on the 15th of January and was buried at Rose Hill at 1 o’clock January 16th, 1906.  The remains and friends and Odd Fellows Lodge being brought from Mounds on the fast train.  Mr. McClelland was a member of Rose Hill Baptist Church and also a member of Egypt Lodge No. 739 I. O. O. F. of this place (Pulaski).

Mr. Karraker, the pastor of Rose Hill Church, preached a very impressive funeral service, after which the lodge performed the funeral services of this order, assisted by Meridian Lodge, I. O. O. F., of Villa Ridge.

The entire community (Pulaski) extended to the family of the deceased brother their sympathy.

(His marker in Rose Hill Cemetery reads:  James T. McClellan Born May 28, 1870 Died Jan. 15, 1906.—Darrel Dexter)
  
FUNERAL NOTICE

John J. Fitzgerald died Wednesday, Jan. 17, 1906, age 34 years. Services will be held at St. Patrick’s Church tomorrow morning at 9 o’clock.  Funeral procession will leave foot of Eighth Street at 9:45.  Friends of the family invited to attend.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to extend our thanks to our friends and neighbors who were so kind to us during our bereavement over the death of our husband and father. We wish to extend our thanks especially to Safford Lodge I. O. O. F. No. 67, Cairo Casino Lodge, the Germania Maennerchor, the cigar makers’ union and the Lutheran choir.
Mrs. Louise Bode and Family
 
 
Friday, 19 Jan 1906:
Colored Man Drowned—It was reported late this afternoon that a colored man was drowned at the Big Four incline.  The news could not be verified.
 
DEATH SEVERS MARRIAGE TIES
Bride of Less Than Two Weeks Died Monday after a Short Illness

Mrs. Roper Alexander, aged 31 years, died Monday afternoon at 5 o’clock of locked bowel, says the Thebes Star.  She was taken ill Tuesday and everything possible was done to save her life, Dr. Mitchell, of Carbondale, being called to attend her, but to no avail.

The deceased’s maiden name was Laura Allen and she was married at Cairo about two weeks ago to Roper Alexander.  He was employed by the Heath, Witbeck Lumber Company and lived in a house in the company’s yards.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon.
 
KNEW WILKES BOOTH
Death of a Man Who Was Present When Abraham Lincoln Was Assassinated

Decatur, Ill., Jan. 19—John W. Redman, who was in Ford’s Theater the night Abraham Lincoln was shot and who was an acquaintance of John Wilkes Booth, died here last Tuesday.  At the time of Lincoln’s assassination, Redman was on guard duty in Washington, having been wounded at the Battle of the Wilderness.  At times, he ate at the same table with Booth.

Mrs. Surratt, his landlady, was afterward hanged on the charge of complicity in the assassination.  The morning after the assassination, Redman was arrested on the charge of desertion, because he was not in the camp when the soldiers were called to arms.  Redman attended the trials of Booth’s conspirators.
 
 
Saturday, 20 Jan 1906:
Died at her home at Gale, Alexander County, on Jan. 12, Mrs. Cummins, who will be remembered as Emma King, of this place, aged about 25 years.  She was loved and respected by all who knew her.  She was united in marriage to Mr. Cummins about two years ago.  She leaves a young husband, father, mother, brother and three sisters.  The remains arrived here Saturday and were laid in the Rose Hill Cemetery Sunday—Pulaski correspondence.
 
Death of Prominent Anna Citizen

Daniel W. Brown, former mayor of Anna and former county commissioner of Union County, died last Saturday at his home in Anna, of Bright’s disease.  He was 64 years of age.  He was a native of Unity, Alexander County, and his parents were Daniel and Elizabeth Hooppaw Brown.  He married Miss Nancy A. Davie and six children survive with their mother, Warren T., Hendra W., Antoinnette, Abigal, Anna Serena and Helen.  He is also survived by a half brother, J. E. N. Edwards.

The funeral was held Monday attended by the Masonic fraternity.

(Daniel Brown married Elizabeth Hooppaw on 9 Apr 1840, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Ezra N. Edwards married Mrs. Elizabeth Brown on 2 Sep 1849, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Daniel W. Brown married Nancy A. Davie on 10 Oct 1867, in Union Co., Ill. His marker in Jonesboro Cemetery reads:  Daniel Warren Brown Born at Unity, Alexander Co., Ill., July 15, 1841 Died at Anna, Jan. 13, 1906.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Dead Man Found—Coroner James McManus received a telegram this morning that a dead man was found one mile and a half south of Hodges Park on the Mobile & Ohio Railroad track.  Dr. McManus went up to Hodges Park to hold an inquest over the remains.
 
Mr. J. E. Hahn, the Eighth Street photographer, was reported very low today and was not expected to live until morning.
 
 
Monday, 22 Jan 1906:
DEATH RELIEVES LONG SUFFERING.
J. E. Hahn, the Well Known Photographer, Died Sunday of Tuberculosis.
REMAINS TAKEN TO FORT SCOTT, KANSAS
The Home of the Deceased.—Funeral Services Conducted This Noon by Father Roland.

J. E. Hahn, proprietor of the Studio Grand No. 227, Eighth Street, died Sunday afternoon at 3:15 o’clock of tuberculosis, after an illness of several weeks.  The deceased was 32 years of age.

Mr. Hahn came to Cairo in July 1904, and engaged in the photography business.  His knowledge of this art and the fine quality of work which he produced won for him a reputation as a high-class photographer and his business was successful from the start.

The deceased learned the photography business when a lad of twelve years and obtained a position as an apprentice in Fort Scott, Kansas, his hometown.  He was successful in his chosen profession.  Mr. Hahn was a member of the State Photographers Association of Kansas and held several offices, the last being that of vice president.

Before coming to Cairo, Mr. Hahn had engaged in his profession in Chicago, St. Louis and Denver, Colo., and bore a reputation as a high-class photographer in each of these cities. 

Reproductions of his work were often printed in newspapers and leading magazines on photography and art.

The deceased was born at For Scott, Kansas, July 31, 1873.  He was married in January 1893 to Miss Nellie Lentz, of Brown City, Mich.

The deceased is survived by his mother, three sisters and two brothers.  They are Mrs. Elizabeth Hahn and Misses Emma and Elizabeth Hahn, of Fort Scott, and Miss Sadie Hahn and Messrs. Jake and Chris Hahn, of Chicago.

The deceased was first taken ill the day before Christmas and was confined to his bed ever since, with the exception of one day, when he rose and dressed himself.

He was a member of the Woodman of the World, the Eagles and a St. Louis lodge, which is an auxiliary of the W. O. W.

The funeral was held at his home, No. 227 Eighth Street, this noon, the services being conducted by Father Roland, of the Church of the Redeemer and were largely attended by the friends of the deceased, which were many.

The remains were shipped to Fort Scott, Kansas, this afternoon, accompanied by his wife and sister, Miss Sadie Hahn, of Chicago.

During his residence in this city, Photographer Hahn made many friends by his social disposition and through his business.  He was well liked by those who knew him and his untimely death will be deeply regretted.
 
Miss Anna Gaverick continues dangerously ill at the home of her sister, Mrs. Charles Pink, of Ninth and Washington Avenue, there being little hope for her recovery.
 
 
Tuesday, 23 Jan 1906:
Died of Tuberculosis—The remains of Charles Lipperdt, a nephew of Mr. Fred Teichman, and a well known cigar maker, will arrive tomorrow noon from San Antonio, Texas, where he died Monday. From here the remains will be taken to Barneville, Ohio, the former home of the deceased.  The deceased went to San Antonio several days ago for the benefit of his health, but received no benefit.
 
 
Wednesday, 24 Jan 1906:
Being Tried for Murder—The preliminary trial of Henry Green, charged with the murder of his stepfather, Thomas Guinnn, on January 12th was held today in Justice Whitcamp’s court.  Green was exonerated by the coroner’s jury but the father of the deceased swore out a warrant for his arrest on the charge of murder.  The trial occupied all day.
 
Miss Ann Gaverick, sister of Ms. Charles Pink, was reported very low today and there is little hope for her condition.
 
FIRST VICTIM OF COLD WEATHER

H. D. Campbell, who was a year ago cared for at the Baptist sanitarium, St. Louis, but made his escape and was later found and brought to his home at Sparta and tried for insanity, was taken to the hospital for the insane at Anna, Ill., where he remained until Saturday, when he escaped.  Tuesday morning a telegram came to this city that he was frozen to death near Benton, Ill.  Presumably he lay out Sunday night and was frozen.  The body will be shipped here for interment.  Mr. Campbell has many relatives in St. Louis.—Carbondale Free Press
 
Mr. Miller died last Friday after a long illness and was buried Saturday.  (Goose Island)
 
 
Thursday, 25 Jan 1906:
Death of Former Cairoite—A party of Charleston people passed through Cairo this afternoon for Mattoon, Ill., with the remains of Mrs. W. C. Turner, wife of Conductor Turner of the Iron Mountain.  She died at Charleston at 11 o’clock last night.  There were thirteen in the party, which accompanied her remains.  The deceased formerly resided in Cairo and was well known here, but recently resided at St. Louis.
 
Floater Found—The tug found a floater this afternoon. Whether or not the body could be identified could not be learned at time of going to press.
 
YOUTHFUL MURDERER HELD FOR CRIME
Henry Green Bound Over to Await Action of Grand Jury

The evidence in the case of the People vs. Henry Green, charged with murder, was completed last evening in Justice Whitcamp’s court and the arguments were made this morning.

Attorney Angus Leek represented the father of the deceased, Thomas Guinnn, who swore out the warrant against young Green, while Attorneys M. J. O’Shea and John Magee represented the boy.

The lad was bound over to await the action of the grand jury at the February term of circuit court.  He was held without bond.

The coroner’s jury exonerated Green, but it seems the evidence produced at the preliminary trial was of an entirely different nature which resulted in his being held to the grand jury.

The trial attracted much attention among the negroes.
 


Friday, 26 Jan 1906:
ANOTHER OLD TIMER HAS PASSED AWAY
Mr. William Dewitt C. Dougherty Died at Ripe Old Age

Mr. William DeWitt C. Dougherty, an old resident of this city, died Thursday night at the home of his daughter, Mrs. John Hogan, of No. 300 Twelfth Street.  The deceased was 78 years of age.

Mr. Dougherty has resided for many years at Mound City, but since the death of his wife, he made his home with his daughter.

The deceased was born at America, Ill., in 1828 and was married in 1856 to Miss Almenia Bellows.  Four children, three daughters and a son, resulted from this union

The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o’clock at the home.

(William D. C. Dougherty married Almena J. Bellows on 29 Nov 1855, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FLOATER WAS A WELL DRESSED WOMAN
Thought to Be the Young Bride Who Was Drowned Near Elizabethtown, Ky., Last Fall

The body of a well dressed woman was found in the Ohio River, late yesterday afternoon by Capt. George Spence, of the tug Theseus, as exclusively stated in The Citizen last evening.

The remains were turned over to Coroner McManus, who had them taken to Mrs. Feith’s undertaking rooms.

From appearances the woman was about 20 years of age, but had probably been in the water for some time, as decomposition had set in and the skull and face were gone.  The body was in good condition, but the clothes were partially torn off, having probably come in contact with obstructions in the river.

The woman is described by Coroner McManus as follows:

She wore a pair of high heeled lace shoes, size 36-2, number 8323 and bore the trademark of Kuhn, Coope and Geary, Nashville, Tenn.  A pleated wool over shirt of dark blue, or grayish blue, blue silk underskirt, a silk corset, black stockings and underwear of the best material completed her apparel.  She was 5 feet and 6 inches in height and appeared to have been a blonde, although her hair was entirely gone from her scalp.  She appeared to be under 25 years of age, although nothing definite as far as her age could be determined owing to the distortion of her features.  No marks of identification were discovered.

While nothing definite is known as to the time or place of the accident, the theory is advanced that she was drowned last fall and at some river point between Evansville and Elizabethtown.

It is thought by some that she may be the unfortunate Elizabethtown bride who was crossing the river in a skiff with her husband and turned over by the waves of a passing steamer.  Whoever she is, she appears to be of a first-class family.

The body will be packed away in a hardening compound, such as embalmers use, and will be kept indefinitely awaiting the outcome.
 
MAJ. A. J. ALDEN PASSED AWAY
Former Cairoite Died at Soldier’s Home.—Burial at Benton

Yesterday’s DuQuoin Call said:

“The remains of Major A. J. Alden, who died in the Soldiers’ Home at Quincy, passed through this city this morning for Benton, where the interment took place this afternoon.  Roy Alden, a son of the deceased and cashier of the Percy National Bank, accompanied his body.

“Major Alden was for many years a prominent figure in public life in Perry County and was the founder and first editor of the Evening Call.  He was associated in the management of the paper by John A. Wall, of Mt. Vernon.”
 
Harrisburg, Ill., Jan. 26.—Maj. Frances Pickett, died at his home in this city suddenly of heart disease yesterday morning, aged 68.  He arose apparently in the best of health, ate a hearty breakfast and was in the act of putting on his overcoat to go to his office when he fell over and expired.

Maj. Pickett served as a private in the Civil War, but near the close was appointed major. After the close of the war he came to his city and entered the publishing business, which he has followed continually for the past forty years, being editor and publisher of the Saline County Register at the time of his death.  He was postmaster under Harrison’s Administration.
 
Mr. Will Dougherty and family arrived today from Mound City, called here by the death of William Dougherty, who died last night.
 
 
Saturday, 27 Jan 1906:
IS FLOATER BODY OF MRS. MANGRUM?
Belief Strong that Body Is that of Nashville, Tenn., Woman
Left Home with $3,000 on Her Person
On Dec. 14th Last—Description Tallies and Husband and Sister Coming to View Remains

Is the body of the woman found in the Ohio River Thursday evening the remains of Mrs. Rosa Mangrum of Nashville, Tenn., who has been missing from that place since Dec. 14, and who is believed to have been foully dealt with?

This is the belief of Coroner James McManus and the authorities at Nashville.

Dr. Manus was in communication with the chief of police at Nashville by long distance telephone and by wire today and he furnished them a description of the woman taken from the river.  As a result, the husband and sister of the woman will arrive here tonight to personally view the remains.

Mrs. Rosa Mangrum, the wife of a Nashville barber, left her Tennessee home on the night of December 14, supposedly for St. Louis.

She had, it is said, over $1,500 in cash and diamonds to an equal value with her.

She was bound for Chicago on business connected with the Young Woman’s Christian Association, with which she has been connected in an executive capacity for some time, and expected to visit in St. Louis.

Sometime after her departure it was noticed that she was not carrying out her usual plan of writing to members of the family several times a week, and they started an investigation.

When she left home she had $1,500 in cash and diamonds to probably the same amount.

Mrs. Mangrum is described as being 5 feet 6 inches in height and weighing 120 pounds.  She is a decided blonde and has a profusion of blonde hair. Her eyes are blue and complexion light.  She is pretty.
 
Al Anderson Dead—Al Anderson, the well-known barber, died this morning about 7 o’clock.  He was strick with paralysis several days ago and gradually grew worse.  It will be remembered that several months ago Anderson was shot in the head by a man named Guyman.  The shooting was the outcome of a quarrel over Anderson’s wife.  The deceased was about 35 years of age and is survived by his wife. Mr. Anderson conducted a barbershop at Sixth and Railroad streets and formerly worked for Charles Wunderloch.  The funeral arrangements have not been completed.
 
 
Monday, 29 Jan 1906:
IDENTIFICATION OF BODY POSITIVE
Floater Taken from Ohio River Remains of Mrs. Rosa Mangrum of Nashville
MYSTERY SURROUNDS DEATH OF THE WOMAN
Believed that She was Chloroformed and Robbed and Her Body Thrown into River

The body found in the Ohio River last Thursday evening by Captain George Spence of the tug Theseus was yesterday positively identified as the remains of Mrs. Rosa Mangrum, of Nashville, Tenn.

J. O. Mangrum, husband of the woman who disappeared from Nashville on Dec. 14th last, and Mrs. Florence Trousdale, of Birmingham, arrived yesterday, viewed the body at Mrs. Feith’s undertaking establishment and positively identify it and left with it at 1:40 p.m. for Nashville.  They identified the clothes, the marks on the body and the general appearance of the remains as those of the missing woman.

It is their belief that Mrs. Mangram was chloroformed and robbed and her body thrown into the Cumberland River at Nashville, from whence it floated down to Cairo.

There is considerable mystery about the murder and today’s St. Louis Globe-Democrat adds to it:

“God has given me my sister’s body.  I came down from Nashville yesterday.  I was right.  Protect me there.
(Signed)
Mrs. Logan T. Trousdale

“The above telegram was received yesterday by Acting Chief of Police Lally from Mrs. L. T. Trousdale, sent from Cairo, Ill., where she has gone in search of her sister, Mrs. J. O. Mangrum, of Nashville, Tenn.

“Mrs. Trousdale, while in St. Louis on January 18, stated that her sister had disappeared from her home after announcing her intention of coming to St. Louis.  No trace was found of her here.  Mrs. Mangrum was last seen, her sister stated, in company with a woman of Nashville, who is supposed to have used an undue influence over her.

“From the telegram it would appear that Mrs. Mangrum had lost her life in the Cumberland River and that the body had floated down to the Ohio River and from there down to Cairo.

“The police are puzzled over the last sentence of the telegram, ‘Protect me there.’  It is interpreted to mean, however, that Mrs. Trousdale is of the opinion that the woman with whom her sister was last seen is in St. Louis and will attempt to do her harm.  The woman is supposed to be in St. Louis.”


Died from Bullet Wound—It is said by the attending physician of the late Al Anderson, the barber, that his death was due to the bullet wound in his head, which he received last September while engaged in a quarrel with one Alvin Guyman.  Mr. Anderson was told while in the hospital that the wound would ultimately result in his death.  The bullet lodged in the brain and caused an abscess which brought on a stroke of paralysis and this finally caused his death.  It is said that Guyman has left the city, fearing that he might be rearrested on a charge of murder although he was exonerated by the coroner’s jury.
 
Remains Taken to Keenes, Ill.—The remains of Al Anderson, the well known barber, were taken to Keenes, Ill., near Centralia, yesterday, for interment.  A brother of the deceased came down to look after the remains.
 
Mrs. Will Meecham, wife of Alderman Will Meecham, of this city (Mound City), died Sunday morning about 9:30 o’clock after an illness of only three days of pneumonia.  The deceased was 46 years of age.

The deceased is survived by her husband and eight children, Mrs. Stout, of Cairo, Mrs. Will Koehler, of this city, Miss Dora Meecham, of Cairo, Jean Meecham, of Cairo, and Loren, Roy, Will and Dan.

The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o’clock.

(Robert E. L. Stout married Mayme C. Meacham, daughter of William Meacham and Lottie Downs, on 27 Feb 1898, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 
Tuesday, 30 Jan 1906:
Mrs. J. E. Hahn returned today from Fort Scott, Kan., where she accompanied the remains of her husband.  Mrs. Elizabeth Hahn, mother of the deceased, accompanied Mrs. Hahn home.  Mrs. J. E. Hahn will continue the photography business at Studio Grand, No. 327 Eighth Street.
 
Mrs. Roy Keenan left yesterday for Mt. Carmel to attend the funeral of Mrs. Martin Walter.
 
 
Wednesday, 31 Jan 1906:
Mrs. Scruggs, one of our (Villa Ridge’s) oldest citizens, died last week after a long illness from cancer.  She resided near Liberty Church.
 
Killed at Anna—Barney Flannigan, of Cobden, Ill., was killed at Anna Sunday by a passenger train.  Flannigan attempted to board the train, intending to go to his home in Cobden, when he slipped and fell.  The train passed over his body, killing him instantly.  The remains were taken to Cobden.  The young man was well known in Cairo.

(His marker in Cobden Cemetery reads:  Barney Flannigan 1892-1906.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
Thursday, 1 Feb 1906:
COLORED BOY SERIOUSLY CUT
And Lies at Point of Death at St. Mary’s Infirmary.—Quarrel Over a Girl

As a result of a cutting scrape, which took place yesterday afternoon at 1:30 p.m. at Twentieth and Walnut streets, Oscar Thomas, colored, lies at the point of death at St. Mary’s Infirmary from wounds inflicted upon him by Ed Pearson, colored.

Thomas with several of his companions had been teasing and annoying the Pearson boy about a girl that had just passed by and as Thomas walked off Pearson made the threat that if Thomas would come back he would show him a thing or two.  Thomas came back and Pearson, drawing a knife, cut Thomas in the abdomen and arm.  Drs. Bondurant, Clarke and Dickerson attended the injured boy.  Pearson, who did the cutting, escaped and up to latest report had not been arrested. Both boys have a bad record.  They have been employed in the stave factory.

Both boys are about 15 years of age.
 
Sister Antonio was called to Decatur, Ind., today by the death of her brother, who was killed in a railway accident.
 
Mr. Alviron Mize, an old-time resident of Pulaski, dropped death of heart disease on Friday, January 26.  Mr. Mize had been under the treatment of Dr. Hale, of Anna, for some time and had returned home the night before.  He had eaten a hearty breakfast and was sitting talking with his wife and started to go into another room.  Dr. Brown, who lives just across the street, was called, but before he reached the house, Mr. Mize was dead.  The funeral was conducted by Rev. Karraker, of Dongola, at the residence on Saturday at 2 p.m.  Burial at Mize graveyard, 1 ½ miles north of town (Pulaski).  This was an awful shock to the family and they have the sympathy of the entire community in their sad hour of bereavement.
 
Mrs. William Scruggs, mother of George M. Scruggs, of near Liberty, died on Friday morning of cancer.  Mrs. Scruggs had suffered for several months.  She was a member of the Baptist Church since she was 14 years old and at her death was over 70 years old.  Mrs. Scruggs was well known and respected and leaves many friends and relatives to mourn her death.  The funeral was at 11 o’clock at Liberty Cemetery.

(Her marker in Liberty Cemetery reads:  Elizabeth Scruggs Born Jan. 1, 1828 Died Jan. 24, 1906.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
Friday, 2 Feb 1906:
Mr. and Mrs. Jean Meecham, of No. 231 Twelfth Street, returned home yesterday from Mound City, where they attended the funeral of Mr. Meecham’s mother.
 
 
Saturday, 3 Feb 1906:
Rev. H. H. Wallace, of Charleston, Mo., passed through the city yesterday en route home from Cobden, Ill., where he conducted the funeral services of Barney Flannagan, who was killed at Anna by an Illinois Central train.
 
Miss Maggie Weber left Wednesday for Armenia, Ark., where she went to attend the funeral of her brother, Mr. Will Weaver.  The deceased formerly resided in this city and was well known here. He is survived by his wife and two children.
 
 
Tuesday, 6 Feb 1906:
PROMINENT COLUMBUS CITIZEN DEAD
Mr. W. A. Gest, Merchant and Banker, Dies Suddenly.

Word from Columbus, Ky., to Mr. C. B. S. Pennebaker, of this city, announces the death of Mr. W. A. Gest, a prominent merchant of Columbus.  The deceased was about 69 years of age and had been in poor health for some time, but his death was quite sudden and unexpected.

Mr. Gest was a pilot on the river during the war.  At the close of the war, he formed a partnership with his brother-in-law, Mr. Dupree, and conducted a general store.

Later he bought out the interests of his brother-in-law and conducted the business in his own name.  He was also president of a bank at Columbus and was a public spirited man.

He is survived by a son and two daughters.

The deceased was well known in Cairo.

The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon and Mr. Pennebaker will attend from this city.
 
PAINTERS QUARREL, SHOOTING FOLLOWS
Ralph Orr Lies at St. Mary’s Infirmary at the Point of Death Shot by Charles Crook.
WOMAN IN CASE ACCORDING TO POLICE
Orr Accused of Telling Lies about Crook—Six Shots Fired—Crook Under Arrest

Ralph Orr, a painter, lies at the point of death, at St. Mary’s Infirmary as a result of being shot through the breast by Charles Crook, a painter.  The shooting occurred this morning at the home of a painter named Crowley, who resides between Thirty-third and Thirty-fourth streets on Park Avenue.
From information learned from the police, it is said that Orr had told Crowley some tales about Crook, in which Crook had been talking about Crowley’s wife.

Crook learned of the affair and this morning, and in company with his employer, John C. Fischer, the painter went to Crowley’s house to deny the stories and settle the matter.

To Crook’s surprise, when he knocked at the door, Orr opened it.  When Crook began to deny the stories to Crowley, Orr called Crook a liar.  Crook replied that he would see Orr later as he did not wish to have any trouble at Crowley’s house.

As Crook and Mr. Fischer turned to go, Orr is said to have darted back into the house.  He reappeared and shot at Crook.  The latter pulled his gun and fired back. Three shots were fired by each man and one of Crook’s took effect in Orr’s breast passing into his lung.

After the shooting Crook went home where he was later arrested by Chief Egan.

Orr walked down to the infirmary after the shooting and is in a serious condition.

An attempt was being made this afternoon to secure bond for Crook and release him from custody.

Crook is a fine painter and decorator and has been in the employ of Fischer, the painter, for some time.  He is considered a peaceable man and this is said to be his first trouble.

It is stated that Orr has been involved in cases of this kind before.
 
 
Thursday, 8 Feb 1906:
Died Last Night—Mr. Fred Hoffheinz, the popular policeman received a message today stating that his father, Mr. John Hofheinz, of Hot Springs, Ark., had died.  The funeral will be held Sunday at Centralia, Ill.
 
John Hileman, living about four miles northwest of here (Mill Creek) was found dead in bed last Tuesday night.  He trimmed fruit trees all day Tuesday and when he went to the house he took a load of wood and when he got to the porch he fell and the women folks got him in bed and sat up with him until about 9 o’clock.  The next morning they found him dead in bed.

(John M. Hileman married Elizabeth C. Cruse on 27 Nov 1851, in Union Co., Ill.  His marker in St. John’s Cemetery near Mill Creek reads:  John M. Hileman Died Feb. 1, 1906 Aged 81 Yrs., 4 Mos., & 26 Ds.—Darrel Dexter)
 
W. W. Atherton, son of W. N. Atherton, died at the residence of W. N. Atherton on Sunday, February 4th, of consumption. Mr. Atherton had been sick for over a year and had tried a change of climate, but did him no good.  The funeral was preached by Rev. Hunsaker, of Anna, at Rose Hill, at 1 o’clock Tuesday.

(A marriage license was issued on 5 Aug 1864, in Pulaski Co., Ill., for William N. Atherton and Sarah A. Stringer.  His marker in Rose Hill Cemetery at Pulaski reads:  Webb W. son of W. N. & Sarah A. Atherton Born Dec. 28, 1871 Died Feb. 4, 1906.  Edith M. Atherton his wife Born May 17, 1880 Died Jan. 29, 1904.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Rev. Phillips filled his regular appointment by preaching Saturday night and Sunday at 11 o’clock, but was obliged to return Sunday to his home at Pomona, to be at the bedside of his mother, who is not expected to live.  There was no service Sunday evening.  (Unity)
 
CHILD WAS BURNED TO DEATH
A Terrible Calamity Befalls the Happy Home of Frank C. Evans

Sunday afternoon about 4 o’clock, while the children of Mr. and Mrs. Frank C. Evans were playing in the yard at their home three miles east of town, the clothing of little Ila Evans caught fire from the embers in a pile of ashes in the yard.  The children screamed at sight of the danger, which threatened their companion and Mr. Evans ran out of the house and at once grabbed the child and rolled her over and over on the ground as he tore her clothes from her body.  Dr. Moorman Beeler was at once summoned and he dressed the wounds and left the child in some measure relieved.  She was burned on the hip and back and it was hoped she would soon rally from the shock, as no vital spot seemed to be involved, but she died Monday afternoon at 4 o’clock. Little Ila was one of the twin girls born three years ago on the 11th of November.—Clinton Democrat
 
Mr. Frank Susanka, who was called here by the death of his father, the late A. Susanka, will return to Chicago Friday.

(His marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Albert Susanka Born Aug. 24, 1836 Died Dec. 26, 1905.—Darrel Dexter)
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—Caroline Marqard, aged 69 years, 11 months.  Funeral will leave house at 8 o’clock for St. Joseph’s Church Friday morning.  Funeral will leave church at 9:30 o’clock for train which will leave foot of Eighteenth Street for Beech Grove Cemetery.  Friends of family invited to attend.
 

 

Friday, 9 Feb 1906:
Died at Norris City—Mr. E. E. Allen received word this morning of the death of his mother, Mrs. E. Allen, who died last night at Norris City. Mr. Allen left today for that city.

 


Saturday, 10 Feb 1906:
MOUND CITY PASTOR STRICKEN
Rev. Legdell, Methodist Minister at Mound City, Has Stroke of Paralysis

Rev. A. J. Ligdell, pastor of the First M. E. Church at Mound City, had a stroke of paralysis this afternoon at 1 p.m. He had been ailing for the past few days, but was in no serious condition. He returned home this afternoon and was seated in a chair when the stroke came. He is now in a dying condition, there being little hope for his recovery.

(His name was actually A. J. Littell.—Darrel Dexter)


Luther, John and Dent Rhymer are here (Dongola) this week at the bedside of their mother, Mrs. Joseph Rhymer, who is dangerously ill.


DuQuoin Call: The grim reaper visited the Onstott home on North Washington Street at 3 o’clock this morning and hushed the life of one of the city’s best known and most successful businessmen and citizens—Mr. Don Onstott.

Don Onstott was born southwest of this city, March 11, 1850. He began his business career in early life, entering the hardware store of his father as clerk. He continued in this business for many years and, on the death of his father, he assumed the management and successfully conducted the business until some seven years ago, disposing of the entire interest to Harry C. Miller. Since then he has devoted a greater portion of his attention to the business management of the Red Hoop Mill in which he was interested. Mr. Onstott was an early stockholder in the First National Bank of this city and for several years a director of this institution.

He suffered a partial stroke of paralysis several years ago and this has gradually deprived him of an active business life. Within the past few weeks his entire nervous system became affected and during the hours preceding his death, his life slowly ebbed away.

Mr. Onstott was prominent in the early municipal history of DuQuoin and was at one time mayor of the city, as was his father in early days.

With the exception of a brief residence in Rockford, this state the deceased had been a resident of this city during his entire life.

A wife, two sons, H. H. and Kyle Onstott; a daughter, Miss Constance Onstott; a stepson, Dr. Henry Pyle, of Chicago; and two sisters, Mrs. Ed Kimmel and Mrs. Isabella Parks, of this city, survive.

(Don Onstott married Mrs. Barbara Pyle on 5 Apr 1877, in Madison Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Mr. Fred Hofheinz, of 220 Sixth Street, departed this morning for Centralia, Ill., where he will attend the funeral of his stepfather, Mr. John Hofheinz, who died at Hot Springs, Ark., several days ago.

 


Monday, 12 Feb 1906:
S. S. GORE STRICKEN WITH PARALYSIS
Former Cairoite Received Stroke in DuQuoin Post Office Sunday

Mr. W. S. Gore, formerly of Cairo, was stricken with paralysis Sunday morning while in the post office at DuQuoin and was in a critical condition when his son, Wallace Gore, was called to his bedside last evening.

Mr. Gore is manager of the mill at DuQuoin. His family resides in St. Louis.


Mound City Pastor Dead—Rev. A. J. Littell, pastor of the First Methodist Church of Mound City, died Saturday afternoon. The deceased was stricken with apoplexy. He was 65 years of age and is survived by his wife. The funeral was held this afternoon from the church and the remains were taken to Beech Grove Cemetery for internment.


PULASKI COUNTY MURDERER ARRESTED

Sheriff Weaver and Night Officer Hultz went to Wickliffe, Ky., on advice that Will Cross, colored, was there and brought the prisoner to Mound City. Cross is wanted for the murder of a colored man some two years ago and it is likely he will suffer the penalty of the law for his crime. He is considered a bad character.—Ullin News


Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Stephens, of No. 424 Twenty-sixth Street, left this afternoon for Desoto, Ill., in answer to a message stating that Mrs. Stephens sister was dying.

 


Tuesday, 13 Feb 1906:
THIRD VICTIM DEAD
As Result of the Fight at New Madrid, Mo., Sunday

Ed Waters, who was one of the three white men shot at New Madrid, Mo., Sunday morning, died last night at St. Mary’s Infirmary, this city, from his wounds.

A fight occurred Sunday morning among several negroes in a saloon. The negroes went out on the street where they continued their quarreling. As a result of the shooting, three white men were fatally wounded. They were Will Pennsinger, Arthur Cavender and Ed Waters.

The remains of Cavender passed through Cairo yesterday en route to his former home at Anna, Ill., for interment. Waters was brought to Cairo and placed in St. Mary’s Infirmary, where he died last night.

The negroes were arrested and lodged in jail at New Madrid. The feeling is bitter against them and talk of lynching was engaged in on the streets of New Madrid yesterday.

The Citizen was in communication with parties at New Madrid this afternoon and it was learned that no further trouble has been experienced there. There was some talk of lynching, but as yet no attempt has been made in this direction.

(The 15 Feb 1906, Jonesboro Gazette says that William Penninger was shot and killed in Malden, Mo., “a few days ago” and was buried in Anna Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)


NO CLUE HAS BEEN FOUND
Reward Offered for Some Trace of Mrs. H. H. Beiberweiden

Cape Girardeau, Mo., Feb. 13.—No clue has been found as to the whereabouts of Mrs. S. H. Beiderweiden, who mysteriously disappeared from the home of her mother in this city Saturday morning. Her husband, H. H. Beiderweiden, arrived in this city and states that he knows of no cause other than despondency to have caused his wife to commit suicide. A reward of $200 has been offered for her body or some clue as to her whereabouts.


Funeral of Rev. Littell—The funeral of Rev. Littell, pastor of the Methodist Church at Mound City, was held Monday and was attended by Methodist ministers from all around here. Presiding Elder J. W. McNeil, of Carbondale, conducted the services and Rev. G. E. McCammon, of Carbondale, Rev. Margraves, of Vienna, Rev. J. W. Flint, of Murphysboro, Rev. W. T. Morris, of Cairo, and Mr. I. A. Humberd, assisted in the service. Burial was at Beech Grove Cemetery. The deceased was 65 years of age and leaves a widow.


Funeral of John Hofheinz—The funeral of John Hofheinz was held Sunday afternoon at the undertaking rooms of Haussler & Son. The services were conducted by the Metropolitan I. O. O. F. The miners band was secured for the occasion and the services at both the rooms and at the cemetery were quite largely attended.—Centralia Sentinel


Word from James C. Winters, advertising manager for The Citizen, who was called to Rock Falls, Ill., by the word that his father was dying, is that is father still lingers on, but that he can survive only a few days. He is rapidly failing. Mr. Winters reached his bedside before consciousness entirely left him.

 


Wednesday, 14 Feb 1906:
Died at Metropolis—Rev. W. T. Morris, pastor of the Methodist Church, was called to Metropolis this afternoon by the death of his stepdaughter. His daughter, Miss Eva, accompanied him.  Mrs. Morris has been there for some time at the bedside of her daughter. The latter visited Cairo with her husband during the holiday.


Died This Morning—The two-month-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Ashworth, of Twentieth and Poplar streets, died suddenly this morning of complicated diseases. The child, who had been ill for several days, was rapidly improving, until last night. No arrangements for the funeral have been made.

A telegram to the Citizen from Mr. J. C. Winters, advertising manager of this paper, states that his father died yesterday at his home at Rock Falls, Ill., and the funeral will be held tomorrow. Mr. Winters was called to Rock Falls about ten days ago in response to a telegram stating that his father was very low and not expected to live. Mr. Winters has made many friends since his connection with the Citizen, who will regret to learn of his misfortune.


Mrs. Mary Dunning, an old resident of this vicinity (Olive Branch), passed away Saturday morning of pneumonia. She was the widow of the late William Dunning.

 


Thursday, 15 Feb 1906:
RALPH ORR REPORTED WORSE

Painter Who Was Shot by Charles Crooks in Precarious Condition at Infirmary

Ralph Orr, the painter, who was shot by Charles Crooks, recently, while engaged in a quarrel, was reported much worse. He is confined at St. Mary’s Infirmary.


Mrs. Mary Dunning, widow of the late William Dunning, was here (Clank) yesterday. Her children are all grown.


Died at her home in Dongola, Friday, Feb. 9, Mrs. P. L. Rhymer, age 58 years. Funeral services at the Lutheran church Saturday at 2 o’clock p.m., conducted by Rev. Kilch, of DeSoto, interment in the Odd Fellows Cemetery (Dongola)

 

DEMENTED MAN CAUSES SENSATION

F. R. Avery of Peoria, Ill., Gave Officers a Merry Chase Last Night

REPORTED THAT HE COMMITTED SUICIDE

At East St. Louis Today—Escaped from Officers Last Night—Nothing Seen of Him Since

             Officers Bert Nichols and Fred Whitcamp were led a merry chase last night by F. R. Avery, of Peoria, Ill., who arrived in Cairo last evening in a demented condition.

             Avery arrived on No. 1 and immediately registered at The Halliday Hotel.  He asked for a room with a bath and desired the services of a physician at once.  The man was given a room.  Dr. W. F. Grinstead was called.

             The doctor found Avery to be suffering with insanity and that he was in a demented state.  He wrote out a prescription, but this Avery refused to take.  He was put to bed and two men appointed to watch him.  He fell asleep, but suddenly awoke and said he must go outside and get some fresh air.

             Sergeant Cowell kept an eye on him until he went to the waiting room of the Illinois.  Later he was taken into a passenger coach and Officer Nichols was detailed to watch him.

             When Avery saw the officer was not watching him, he jumped from his seat and ran out of the car.  Up the middle of Ohio Street he ran with the policeman at his heels.  He turned out Eighth, continued his course up Commercial to East Douglas, then west to Washington, where he disappeared and has not been seen since.

             Avery is a man about 30 yeas of age, and is secretary of the Avery Manufacturing Company of Peoria, Ill.

             Night Hostler Harry Serbian says he saw a strange man answering the description of Avery at the I. C. round house last night about 2 o’clock.  He did not know at that time of the man’s condition or anything about him.  Mr. Serbian says he thought it strange that the man was wandering around at that time of the night.  When he saw him last, Avery was walking north on Commercial.

The Citizen was in communication with parties at Peoria, Ill., this afternoon regarding Avery.  Relatives at Peoria have received information that Avery went from Cairo to East St. Louis, where he committed suicide.  Whether or not this is true, could not be learned this afternoon.

             How and when Avery left Cairo, if he did go to East St. Louis, is not known here.

 


Friday, 16 Feb 1906:
NEGRO HANGED IN COOK COUNTY JAIL

Chicago, Feb. 16—Robert Newcombe, the negro who killed two men and one policeman, was hanged in the county jail this morning. He said he accepted the teachings of spiritual advisers and died in faith that his sins were forgiven.


DEATH OF BROTHER JUDGE HARKER

Judge Harker’s family received a message Monday evening importing the sad news of the death at St. Louis of Mr. George M. Harker, elder brother of Judge O. A. Harker, and a recent visitor in Carbondale, having attended the Hewitt-Harker wedding here January 24. The immediate cause of the death was not learned, but it is thought to be due to a sudden attack of illness, which the feebleness incident to his seventy-nine years hastened his death. He leaves a widow and two grown sons. Besides the brother, Judge Harker, one sister, who resides in Oakland, Calif., survives. Mr. Harker has been a resident of St. Louis for over sixty years and was for many years a newspaper man, having been connected with the Globe Democrat in an early day and later was editor of a price current publication.—Carbondale Free Press


BROKE HOLE IN ICE DROWNED HIMSELF
Sad Fate of F. R. Avery, Who Committed Suicide While Insane
AFFAIR OCCURRED AT CENTERVILLE
Small Town South of East St. Louis—Prominent and Wealthy Citizen of Peoria—Left Note to Wife

As mentioned in last evening’s Citizen, F. R. Avery, the demented man who caused a sensation in Cairo Wednesday night, committed suicide yesterday at Centerville, Ill., six miles south of East S. Louis.

It is not definitely known how or where Avery caught a train out of Cairo, but in some manner he reached Centerville nevertheless.

Leaving the train he had boarded at Cairo, after escaping his guard, he walked across the track at that point to a shallow pond, broke a hole in the ice with is foot, removed his coat, then lying down stuck his head in the water.  Several passengers noticed his queer actions.  They first thought he was preparing to wash his face, but as the train departed they saw he remained prone on the ground.  They told the conductor who mentioned the matter to Yardmaster Bennett when the train reached East St. Louis at 11 a.m. and he telegraphed Centerville, making inquiries.  An answer was received saying that the body had been found.  Bennet went to Centerville on switch engine and examined the boy.  Two notes were found.  One was written on the back of a receipt and read:

“To My Dear Wife:  If I am dead it is not by my own hand.  A tough gang have me in bad.  F. R. Avery.”

The other was in an envelope addressed to J. B. Bartholomew, Peoria, Ill.  The envelope was sealed, but there was no paper inside.  A note was scribbled on the inside of the envelope and read:
“I am going in the river at St. Louis. Feb. 16, 1906.  F. R.
Avery.”

It is the belief at Peoria, Avery’s home, that he took his life while insane, as a note left by him for his wife when he left home Tuesday indicated that he was mentally unbalanced.  Investigation of Avery’s accounts with the Avery Manufacturing Company has shown them to be in perfect order.
Avery was about 30 years of age.  He is survived by a wife and two children.  His wife was a Peoria girl.

Peoria, Ill. Feb. 16—Insanity, which is hereditary in the Avery family is given as he cause for the suicide of Fred R. Avery, a rich Peoria man and a trustee of the late Rev. C. B. Simmons’ church near East St. Louis yesterday.  Mr. Avery, who was 35 years old, left his home in this city some time Tuesday night.  He had with him but a few dollars in change and took no personal effects.  His wife had spent the evening at a church meeting and had expected him to meet her.

When she went home she found a note addressed to her, which read:

It breaks my heart to leave you, but I feel that I must.  My love to you and the children.  I feel that I must go, but after this I will be working for the betterment of man. Your loving husband.  FREDERICK

Another note was directed to the directors of the Avery Manufacturing Company.  It read:

I wish to tender my resignation as treasurer and director of the Avery Manufacturing Company.  A chain is no longer than its weakest part.  By going, the corporation will be stronger by the eliminating of the weakest part.
(Signed) F. R.
AVERY

Mrs. Avery did not tell of her husband’s disappearance until Wednesday morning, believing that he would return.  As soon as the fact became known, a meeting of the board of directors in the Avery Manufacturing Company, of which he was secretary, was called.  The books were gone over and his accounts found absolutely accurate.

Mr. Avery’s mother committed suicide several years ago after going suddenly insane in a similar manner.  Besides his widow, Mr. Avery leaves two children.  He inherited a large fortune last year by the death of his father, who was the incorporator of the Avery Company.

Mr. Avery had been treasurer and director in the Avery Company for thirteen years since the death of his father.  He has been prominent in the business world and always considered one of the best businessmen of Peoria.  Late last night W. N. Kilbourn, a brother-in-law, left for St. Louis to bring the body back to Peoria.
 


Saturday, 17 Feb 1906:
Death of Daniel Dinon—Yesterday’s St. Louis Republic contained the following death notice, which they requested the Cairo and Memphis papers to copy. The deceased was a nephew of Mrs. John Cain, of Cairo.

             Died—Daniel W. Dinon, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 9 p.m. Beloved husband of Nellie Dinon nee Whelan and brother of Mrs. Julia Boro and nephew of Mrs. Kate Burgess. Aged 39 years.

 


Monday, 19 Feb 1906:
Mr. Clarence Simpson, of Twenty-third Street, has been called to his home at Bowling Green, Ky., on account of the serious illness of his father.


Received Sad News—Mr. H. S. Birch of the Singer Company received a message yesterday stating that his sister-in-law, while walking on the railroad track at Glasgow, Mo., was struck, by a freight train and instantly killed. Mr. and Mrs. Bird departed yesterday afternoon for Glasgow.

 


Tuesday, 20 Feb 1906:
Died This Morning—The young son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank O’Rorke of Fourth Street which was born yesterday, died this morning.


Friday, 23 Feb 1906:
SUDDEN DEATH OF EXPRESS MESSENGER

Messenger Holmes of the American Express Company running between Chicago and Cairo over the Indiana Harbor and Big Four roads died suddenly this morning at his room on Washington Avenue. Dr. Strong who attended him pronounced the trouble heart failure.

Mr. Holmes came in off his run yesterday and complained of feeling badly. From that time until his death, he grew worse rapidly.


POPULAR YOUNG MAN HAS PASSED AWAY.
Barney Cozby Died Last Evening of Tuberculosis at Age of 23.
His Death a Shock to Community
Was Member of Presbyterian Church, Elks Club and Alexander Club—Funeral Tomorrow

             Barney Cozby, the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Warren Cozby, of Twenty-fifth and Sycamore streets, died last evening at 6 o’clock of tuberculosis, after an illness of about six months’ duration.  The deceased was 22 years of age.

             Barney Cozby was well known in Cairo and was one of this city’s most popular young men.  It is doubtful if any young man had more friends than did the deceased.  He was at all times polite and courteous, made friends easily and was not known to have an enemy in the world.  He was very popular among his associates and his death has cast a gloom over the entire community.

             As a son, he was a most devoted one, and the shock to his parents over his untimely death is apparent to all.  As a friend, he was loved for his manly ways and noble traits of character, and his sudden demise will be keenly felt by all who knew him.

             The deceased was a member of Cairo Lodge of Elks, the Alexander Club, and the Presbyterian Church, having united with the church a few days prior to his death.

             The deceased was first taken ill last August, but did not give up until about the first of September, when he was taken to his bed.  Some days he would seem quite like himself and would dress and sit up, but was too weak to get about.

             On November 9th, he went to Florida, hoping that he would receive some benefit for his health, but while there he was taken worse and was compelled to return home.  He returned to Cairo on December 7th.

             Since that time he has been confined to his home and unable to get out.  He was conscious up to the time of his death.

             The deceased was born at Anna, Ill., on October 13, 1883, and was in his twenty-third year.  He is survived by his parents and one brother, Grover Cozby, 14 years old.

             The young man, for the past several years and up to the time of his illness, was employed in the office of the Singer Manufacturing Company.  He was highly respected by his employers and fellow workers who considered him a most exemplary young man.

             The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon.  The Elks will hold a short memorial service at the house at 12:30 p.m. after which services will be held at the Presbyterian church.  The remains will be taken to Anna, Ill., for interment.  The Elks will hold a meeting tonight to make further arrangements.


The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Mutt, of Dallas, Texas, which was born Sunday, died shortly after its birth. Mrs. Mutt was formerly Miss Josie Halliday.

 


Saturday, 24 Feb 1906:
FUNERAL OF BARNEY COZBY
Held This Afternoon and Largely Attended by Many Friends

The funeral of the late Barney Cozby, one of Cairo’s most popular young men, who died Thursday, was held this afternoon and was largely attended by the many friends of the deceased.
The cortege left the house at 12:30 o’clock for the Presbyterian church, where Rev. A. S. Buchanan conducted a short service over the remains.

The Presbyterian choir sang a number of hymns. The remarks by Rev. Buchanan were well chose and in which he paid a high tribute to the character of the deceased.

There were many beautiful floral offerings, including some large pieces which were sent by the Elks Lodge and Bennie Bogal organization, of which deceased was a member.

The following were the pall bearers: Harris Schulze, Claude Winter, Jr., Louis Block, Harry Stark, Leo Kleb, of the Elks Lodge and Foree Bain and Charles Waggener of the Singer Company.


Went to Attend Funeral—Deputy Sheriff J. B. Collins has gone to Dongola, Ill., to attend the funeral of J. F. Richardson, his brother-in-law.


DEATH OF PROMINENT DuQUOIN CITIZEN
George D. Pugh Passed Away Thursday Afternoon

George D. Pugh, a prominent citizen of DuQuoin, died Thursday afternoon. The end has been expected for several days past, during a greater portion of which he was unconscious. His death is attributed to general debility, from which he has been suffering for some months past, though he had only been confined to his home for three weeks.

He was one of the oldest and most thoroughly informed Masons of DuQuoin City, of which order he became a member in 1868.

He embarked in the marble and granite business some 25 years ago and at his death was the sole owner of the DuQuoin Marble and Granite Works. He was successful in business and was actively engaged in the management until ill health prohibited.

(George D. Pugh married Mina Wegerick on 17 Dec 1879, in Perry Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 


Monday 26 Feb 1906:

A negro named Oscar Taylor was shot and hurt quite seriously in an affray in North Mounds Thursday night.

 


Tuesday, 27 Feb 1906:
RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT

Passed by the Dongola Lodge I. O. O. F. No. 343, Feb. 27, 1906, on the death of James F. Richardson, who died Feb. 22, 1906.

Whereas: it has pleased the Supreme Ruler of the universe in his infinite wisdom to remove from our midst our very worthy and faithful brother, James F. Richardson, a true Odd Fellow, a kind father, a living husband and an esteemed friend, one with whom not only the members of Dongola Lodge respected, but was a trusted friend by all who knew him. Realizing the loss to our order in general and this lodge in particular by reason of his death and the honor that he has justly merited therefore be it

Resolved, That in the death of Bro. Richardson this lodge has sustained a great loss, the widow a kind husband, the children a loving father and the community a good citizen and be it further

Resolved, That we extend to the family of our late brother our heartfelt sympathy in their deep sorrow and commend them to ourGreat Master who doeth all things well and further

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be spread upon the records of this lodge and a copy sent the Citizen, Cairo, The Democrat, Anna, Illinois, for publication and a copy be sent to the family of our late brother, and that the charter of this lodge be draped in mourning for thirty days and that the members wear the usual badge of mourning for the same space of time.
W. A. Ridge
L. J. Dodd
A. J. Harness, Committee


SHOOTING SCRAPE RESULTS FATALLY
Richard Buckner Shot Jesse Speed Who Died from Injuries. Both Negroes
QUARRELED OVER SLICE OF BREAD
At Lunch Room Adjoining Smith Bros. Saloon Last Night.—Speed Died This Morning.

Jesse Speed, who was shot last night by Richard Buckner, died at his home on Twenty-second Street, about 8:30 o’clock this morning.

The story of the shooting scrape as learned by the Citizen, is as follows: Buckner, Speed and a number of other negroes were assembled in the lunch room conducted by Will Walker adjoining Smith Bros. Saloon at Thirteenth and Poplar streets. It is said the negroes had been drinking. A quarrel arose between Speed and Buckner over a slice of bread. Some words were passed between the negroes, when Speed picked up a beer bottle and struck Buckner across the face.

Buckner ran out of the lunch room and, rushing into the saloon next door, leaped over the counter and grabbing up a big 44-calibre Colts revolver, went back to seek revenge.

He met Speed standing in the doorway of the lunchroom. When Speed saw Buckner coming with a gun he took to his heels and ran up Poplar Street.

Buckner fired three or four shots at his fleeing enemy, and two of the shots took effect in Speed’s back and side.

Speed ran out in the middle of the street and fell in the middle of the road, while Buckner went west on Fourteenth Street on a dead run.

The shooting created a big sensation among the negroes in the neighborhood and attracted a large crowd. It occurred shortly before 8 o’clock last night.

Speed was removed to his home on Twenty-second street, between Poplar and Sycamore streets, where he died form his injuries about 8:30 o’clock this morning.

Buckner escaped and as yet has not been apprehended. He is the same negro who shot Sergeant James Cowell several years ago, and is said by the police to be a bad character. He resided at Fifteenth and Poplar streets.

The coroner’s inquest will probably be held at 9 o’clock tomorrow morning.

 


Wednesday, 28 Feb 1906:
CORONER’S JURY HELD BUCKNER
Found Him Guilty of the Murder of Jesse Speed Today
MURDERER IS STILL AT LARGE
Belief Prevails That Negro Has Not Left But Is in Hiding in the City

The coroner’s inquest over the remains of Jesse Speed, colored, was held this morning at the courthouse. The jury rendered a verdict finding Richard Buckner guilty of the murder and recommended that he be apprehended and held to await the action of the grand jury at the next term of court.

The jury was composed of T. A. Fuller, Frank Young, Richard Fitzgerald, Nick Williams, Charles Anderson and George Sigler.

Buckner, after shooting Speed Monday night, the story of which was given in last evening’s issue, defied the police officers Dennis and Davidge to arrest him. As these officers were not together but appeared on the scene of the shooting singly, they can hardly be blamed for not making an attempt to arrest Buckner when he pointed a big 44 caliber Colts at their heads and dared them to make a move toward taking him.

After this, Buckner went to the coal office of Alderman Fred Nellis, by whom he was employed as a driver, and asked the alderman to go his bond, that he was willing to give himself up. While he was talking to his employer, he held his gun on him.

The alderman did not like his position and refused to go Buckner’s bond. The negro then disappeared and the police have heard nothing of him since.

A well known railroad man claims to have seen Buckner about 4 o’clock this morning in the yards of the Mobile & Ohio on the west side of the city and it is said that Buckner paid a visit to his home at Fifteenth and Poplar about daybreak.

It is believed that the negro has not left the city, but is in hiding.

Someone suggests that Officer Whitcamp be sent after Buckner, for it is dollars to doughnuts that Fred will arrest him or know the reason why.


DEATH OF PROMINENT DUQUOIN CITIZEN
George D. Pugh Passed Away Thursday Afternoon.

George D. Pugh, a prominent citizen of DuQuoin, died Thursday afternoon. The end had been expected for several days past, during a greater portion of which he was unconscious. His death is attributed to general debility, from which he has been suffering for some months past, though he had only been confined to his home for three weeks.

He was one of the oldest and most thoroughly informed Masons of DuQuoin City of which order he became a member in 1868.

He embarked in the marble and granite business some 25 years ago and at his death was the sole owner of the DuQuoin Marble and Granite Works. He was successful in business and was actively engaged in the management until ill health prohibited.

 


Thursday, 1 Mar 1906:
BIG FOUR BRAKEMAN WAS FATALLY INJURED
N. R. Putnam Injured at Tunnel Hill and Died from Injuries

N. R. Putnam, a well known brakeman on the Big Four, was fatally injured yesterday afternoon on the storage track a short distance south of Tunnel Hill, Ill.

Putnam was riding on the bumper of a car when his foot slipped and he fell beneath the wheels.
The injured man was placed on the southbound passenger train and arrived in Cairo late yesterday afternoon. He was taken to St. Mary’s Infirmary, where he died last evening. His home is in Mt. Carmel, Ill.

The remains of Putnam were shipped today to his home in Mt. Carmel.


Grace May, wife of W. B. Thornton, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Farnsworth, born May 12, 1884, died February 25th, 1906, age 21 years, 9 months and 13 days. She leaves father, mother, two brothers, husband and two little children to mourn and a host of relatives. (Villa Ridge)

             (William Thornton married Grace Farnsworth on 5 Aug 1900, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Mrs. Will Thornton died on Sunday night of consumption, was buried at Shiloh at 2 o’clock p.m. Tuesday. Mr. Thornton is a brother of Mrs. R. L. Britton and his wife was a daughter of Mr. Farnworth, of near Shiloh Church. (Pulaski)


Died, at his home in Dongola, Thursday, Feb. 22, 1906, at 1:50 o’clock p.m., James R. Richardson, age 69 years, 7 months and 25 days. Funeral from his late residence Friday, Feb. 23, at 2 o’clock p.m. under the auspices of Dongola Lodge No. 343 I. O. O. F. The deceased has conducted a barbershop here for a number of years and also was the proprietor of the City Hotel at the time of his death.

             (His marker in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  James F. Richardson 1837-1906.—Darrel Dexter)

 


Friday, 2 Mar 1906:
FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—John Miller, aged 41 years, beloved husband of Mrs. Mary Miller, Thursday, March 1, 1906. Funeral will be held at family residence, No. 408 Twentieth Street, Saturday, at 1:30 p.m. Special train will leave foot of Eighth Street at 2:45 p.m. Friends of the family are invited to attend.


STRAY SHOTS HIT TWO BYSTANDERS
One Dead, Other Dying, Result of Quarrel Over Open Door

Mt. Carmel, Ill., March 2—The Southern railway station here was the scene of a double tragedy Tuesday night. One man was killed and another fatally wounded.

Several men who have been employed as construction laborers on the improvements being made by the Big Four near here were occupying the waiting room as a place to sleep. Shortly after midnight J. W. Murphy, who keeps a restaurant near the station, and Charles White, who has also been employed on the railroad, entered the waiting room and insisted, it is alleged, on leaving the door open. The occupants of the room objected and put the intruders out.

Murphy and White went to the restaurant kept by the former where it is alleged they procured a revolver. Returning to the station one of them went to the back window and fired through it, it is charged. The occupants of the room stampeded for the door, but were met there, it is charged by Murphy, who had run around the building. The men in the waiting room claim he opened fire on them as they emerged from the room. One man was hit in the center of the forehead, the bullet piercing the brain, and another was struck in the mouth. The latter was killed instantly. The other man who was shot is Con Galvan, of Youngstown, Ohio.

Murphy was arrested almost immediately after the tragedy. White was arrested later. Both men are in jail here awaiting examination. White’s real name is said to be Dodd and he is said to be from Howell, Ind.


DEATH OF WELL KNOWN CAIRO BARTENDER
John Miller Died Last Night of Complicated Throat Trouble

John Miller, a well known Cairo bartender, passed away at his home on Twentieth Street last night, after an illness of several weeks of chronic throat trouble.

The deceased was 41 years of age and had resided in Cairo for a number of years. He had been employed at various times at the saloons of Rudy Laurant, Joseph Fields, John Ashley, and Louis Zanone.

His health had been poor for the past year, but he was taken to his bed about six weeks ago.

The deceased was a member of the Cairo Aerie of Eagles and the Bartenders’ Union. He is survived by a wife and an adopted daughter.

The deceased is also survived by his mother, who has been at his bedside for some time, and two brothers and two sisters, who reside at Pinckneyville, Ill.

The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 1:30 o’clock from the home.


Died of Tuberculosis—The news has reached here of the death of Hubert Cavanaugh, which occurred at Los Angeles this week. The deceased was a former Cairoite and went to Los Angeles several weeks ago for the benefit of his health. He was 21 years of age. His brother, Joseph, recently went to Los Angeles to be with him and will accompany the remains to Danville, Ill., for interment.


BARTENDERS NOTICE

All members of Bartenders’ Union No. 627 are hereby notified to assemble at the courthouse at 1:30 p.m. Saturday, March 3rd, to attend the funeral of our late brother, John Miller.
Thomas Flagler, Pres.
A. Whitcamp, Secretary

 


Saturday, 3 Mar 1906:
SUDDEN DEATH OF MRS. GEORGE ALDRED
Passed Away This Afternoon of Pneumonia After Brief Illness

Mrs. George J. Aldred died suddenly about 1:15 o’clock this afternoon of pneumonia after an illness of only five days’ duration.

The deceased resided at No. 815 Twenty-second Street and came to Cairo about four years ago. She was 29 years of age.

She is survived by her husband, a daughter, besides her mother, two sisters and a brother.

The funeral arrangements are not completed.


ILLINOIS CENTRAL SWITCHMAN INJURED
John Murphy Fell Beneath Engine and Both Legs Badly Crushed

John Murphy, a well-known Illinois Central switchman, while working at Gale yesterday, fell under an engine and had both legs badly crushed below the knees. Amputation was found necessary.
Murphy had been switching and in attempting to mount the engine slipped and fell under.

Dr. R. B. Hiller, the company’s surgeon, of Thebes, attended the injured man and sent him to Cairo, where Dr. Grinstead attended him on his arrival.

He was taken to the infirmary. Mr. Murphy, who is about forty years of age, has been employed by the railroad for several years and his many friends regret to hear of his misfortune.

Mr. Murphy was accompanied to this city by his wife and two children.


PROMINENT COLORED MAN IS DEAD.
Attress E. Horrell Passed Away at Beech Ridge Yesterday Afternoon.

Attress E. Horrell one of the most prominent colored men in Alexander County, died at his home near Beech Ridge at 4 o’clock yesterday afternoon. Consumption is said to have been the cause of his death. He leaves a wife and several children.

The deceased was a member of the firm of Telle & Horrell, which ran a store near Beech Ridge. He was a hard workingman and had accumulated considerable property.

The body was brought to Cairo last night for burial.

The funeral will occur Sunday afternoon from the home of David Ross, uncle of the deceased, on Fourteenth Street, at 2 o’clock p.m. and the remains will be taken to Villa Ridge for interment.


SHOT FOR TALKING TO ANOTHER’S WIFE
Otto Boershal Lies at Point of Death at St. Mary’s Infirmary
GUY SMITH IN COUNTY JAIL
Followed His Wife and Caught Boershal in Act of “Butting In.”

Those residing in the neighborhood of Twenty-eighth and Sycamore streets were aroused last night about 9 o’clock by the firing of several shots from a revolver.

The shooting was done by Guy Smith, who fired several shots at Otto Boershal, because the latter was seen following Mrs. Smith and a relative.

It is alleged that Boershal spoke to Mrs. Smith on Thursday night and she told her husband of the affair.

Last night when Mrs. Smith, in company with her sister-in-law, Mrs. Olmsted, went out, Mr. Smith followed them to see what would happen. Boershal, who lives on Twenty-eighth Street, seeing the ladies, is said to have “butted in.” Smith, seeing this, drew a 32-caliber revolver and fired five times. Boershal ran up Poplar and out Twenty-ninth Street, Smith following him. On reaching Sycamore Street, Boershal seeing a light in the home of Mrs. Anna Baber, ran into the house for protection, and fell in a faint on the floor.

Smith was arrested by Deputy Sheriff J. B. Collins and placed in the county jail.

At 9 o’clock Mrs. Baber and daughter Miss Bertha, who were in the sitting room sewing, heard several shots fired, but thought nothing of the matter at the time, as there is frequently shooting in the neighborhood. A few minutes later, Miss Baber, who was standing at the telephone, saw a man run in the yard and try the side door. Thinking it to be a burglar, Miss Baber screamed and ran to lock the front door. The man gained an entrance before she could reach the door and fell in the back room. Mrs. Baber, seeing who it was, immediately called for a physician and began giving him restoratives. Drs. Clancy and McManus dressed his wounds, which are thought to be fatal.

At 10:30 Boerchal was removed to St. Mary’s Infirmary. He remains conscious all the time, but did not know what shot him. Boerchal is quoted as saying that he had “butted in” with two ladies when someone shot him from behind.

Boerchal was shot just opposite his home, but ran up Poplar Street, because Smith was following him.

Boerchal is seriously injured, one shot passing clear through his lung.

Boershal was reported very low at St. Mary’s Infirmary this afternoon, and it was very doubtful if he will recover.

It is said that the young man is feeble minded and probably did not realize what he was doing. It is said that Smith did not know this fact at the time he shot Boershal.

These facts make the case all the more pathetic.


NEGRO DROWNED AT WHARFBOAT
Jeff Allen in Attempting to Walk Gang Plant to Sadie Lee Fell into River.

Jeff Allen, a well-known negro, was drowned last night at the wharf boat.

In attempting to board the Sadie Lee, Allen walked off the gangplank into the river and before he could be rescued his struggling body disappeared beneath the waters.

The negro had intended going south on the boat to work at once of the lumber camps when the accident occurred.

The deceased was about 40 years of age and a mulatto.  He was blind in one eye and it is thought that, owing to his fact, he became excited and fell from the gangplank.

He had been employed for the past twenty-five years at the grocery store of Mrs. E. Walsh, No. 1915, Commercial Avenue.

After falling into the river, it is said, he swam nearly to the Three States ferry landing, but instead of swimming toward the shore he seemed to get farther out into the river.

A search is being made for his body.


WELL-KNOWN RIVERMAN DIED THIS MORNING
John Smith, Aged 50 Years, Passed Away at Marine Hospital

John Smith, a well-known riverman, died about 5:30 this morning at the U. S. Marine Hospital. The deceased was about 50 years of age.

He had been ill with pneumonia for several days. The deceased has two brothers, Patrick Smith, who lives at Indianapolis, and Richard Smith, whose home is in Memphis. The latter is here.

The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon and the remains taken to the Catholic cemetery at Villa Ridge for interment.

The deceased was better known as “Mettle” and has resided in Cairo for many years.

 


Monday, 5 Mar 1906:
Otto Boerchal, who was shot by Guy Smith, continues very poorly at St. Mary’s Infirmary.

 


Tuesday, 6 Mar 1906:
DEATH OF MRS. FROHMAR
Mother of Mrs. John Bourgois Passed Away Last Night.

Mrs. Madeline Frohmar, mother of Mrs. John Bourgois, passed away at the home of her daughter on West Twenty-sixth Street, about 8:30 o’clock last night. The deceased was 67 years of age and had resided in Cairo for many years. She had been ill for several weeks and her death was not unexpected.

She is survived by her daughter, Mrs. Bourgois, and also has a daughter residing in Chicago. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon.


OTTO BOEDSHAL DIED FROM BULLET WOUNDS
Which He Received from Gun Fire by Guy Smith.—Smith Tried Today

Otto Boershal, the young man who was shot by Guy Smith last Friday night, because he was seen talking to Smith’s wife, died this morning about 2:15 o’clock at St. Mary’s Infirmary.

The story of the terrible affair is still fresh in the minds of Citizen readers. After being shot, Boershal ran to the home of Mrs. Baber at Twenty-ninth and Sycamore streets, where he rushed into the house rather unceremoniously and fell in a faint upon the floor. He was removed to St. Mary’s Infirmary and attended by Dr. McManus.

The deceased was about 27 years of age and is survived by his mother, Mrs. Paullina Boershal, three sisters, Misses Helena, Martha and Hattie Boershal and a brother, Albert Boershal.

The funeral arrangements have not been completed.

The coroner’s inquest was being held at 4 o’clock this afternoon and it is probable that Smith will be held responsible by the jury for his crime.

(His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Otto son of G. & P. Boerschel Born March 9, 1877 Died March 6, 1906.—Darrel Dexter)


FUNERAL NOTICE

Died, at 2:06 o’clock this morning, Otto Boerchal, aged 29 years.

Funeral services will be held at the family residence No. 223 Twenty-eighth Street, Wednesday afternoon, at 1:30 p.m. Special train will be taken at Eighth Street at 2:45 p.m. for Villa Ridge Cemetery, where interment will be made. The train will stop at Mounds for the conveyance of friends there.

Friends of the family are invited to attend.


Died This Morning—John Murphy, the brakeman who was injured at Gale Friday, died at St. Mary’s Infirmary about 6 o’clock this morning. The remains were taken back to Gale on Billy Bryan this morning.

 


Wednesday, 7 Mar 1906:
SMITH HELD BY CORONER’S JURY
Without Bail for the Murder of Otto Boerschal, Which Occurred Last Friday
EVIDENCE IN CASE IS CONFLICTING.
Preliminary Hearing Will Be Held Saturday Afternoon.—Crime Seems Not Justified.

The coroner’s inquest was held at the courthouse at 4 o’clock yesterday afternoon and a verdict rendered, finding that Otto Boershel came to his death by a bullet wound from bullets fired from a pistol in the hands of one Guy Smith, and further finding that said Guy Smith was not justified in the act and recommended that he be held without bail until acquitted by due process of law. The members of the jury were A. S. Magner, R. E. Powers, Ben Malinski, James E. Wright, Thomas Meehan and Frank Graham.

The testimony seemed to be of a conflicting nature. Mrs. Olmsted testified that Boerschel addressed Mrs. Smith and herself, by asking if he could walk with them. She said that he placed his arm around Mrs. Smith’s waist, and that the latter’s husband then fired the fatal shots. Other witnesses told different stories.

Smith was arraigned before Judge Ross for a preliminary hearing, which was continued until Saturday afternoon to give the defendant time to consult his attorney and secure his witnesses.
Attorney Angus Leek will probably defend Smith.

The crime has created a great deal of comment and discussion throughout the city. Some take the side of Smith in contending that he was perfectly justified in his act in shooting down a man who may have been endeavoring to win the graces of his (Smith’s) wife, which is a terrible crime, that of wrecking a man’s home. Others contend that though this may have been the case, yet Boershcel’s act was not one which would cause him to be shot down in cold blood, and that the act was one of lack of self control and ignorant judgment on the part of Smith as to what was right or wrong in the duty of a husband in a case of this kind.

The consensus of opinion seems to be that though Boerschel did have his arm around Mrs. Smith’s waist, (if this is really the case), Smith might have used better judgment and more diplomatic means of punishing Boerschel than by shooting him down in cold blood without giving him a chance to explain his act and repent for his misdemeanor.

It is probable that Smith did not realize what he was doing when he fired the fatal shots. His first, thought may be been that of protecting his wife and his home and in a fit of anger emptied the five chambers of his revolver at Boerschel for a man who would not protect his wife, mother or sister or his home is no man at all, is the argument.

On the other hand, could it not be reasonable to say that perhaps Boerschel did not realize the harm he was doing? In any light, which is thrown upon the face of this deplorable crime, the consensus of opinion seems to be against Smith’s rash act.

Another phase of the question, which should be probed into, is the alleged encouragement, which Mrs. Smith gave to Boerschel on several occasions prior to the one, which resulted in Boerschel’s murder. It is alleged that Mrs. Smith rather encouraged Boerschel in seeking and keeping her company and whether or not this is true should be found out in the preliminary hearing Saturday.

The trial Saturday will, in all probability, be keenly fought. The state’s attorney will endeavor to hold Smith without bail, while Smith’s attorney will of course do his utmost to release him from serving time in the gruesome county jail by giving him bail.


PROMINENT VILLA RIDGE MAN DEAD
N. N. Koonce Passed Away Early this Morning—Funeral Thursday

N. N. Koonce, a prominent and old time resident of Villa Ridge, died at his home there at 2 o’clock this morning. He was 75 years of age and leaves a wife, three daughters, and two sons. The daughters are Mrs. G. B. Kelly, of No. 915 Cedar Street, Cairo; Mrs. Ida Helman, of Villa Ridge, and Mrs. Tower, of Mounds. The two sons are L. H. Koonce, the Mounds liveryman, and Elmer Koonce, of Villa Ridge. The latter and his sister, Mrs. Helman, lived with their parents on the old place. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o’clock.

(G. B. Kelley married L. C. Koontz on 21 Oct 1874, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  M. L. Helman married Ida Koonce on 22 Jun 1887, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Mr. J. M. Hileman will leave for Anna, Ill., in the morning, called there by the death of his stepmother, Mrs. Jacob Hileman, formerly Mrs. E. H. Finch.

             (Jacob Hileman married Mrs. Sarah A. Finch, 59, born in Belleville, Ill., daughter of John Phillips and Leanah Tippy, on 21 Feb 1894, in Union Co., Ill.  E. H. Finch married Sarah Phillips on 20 Dec 1853, in St. Clair Co., Ill.  Her marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Sarah Finch Hileman Born April 7, 1834 Died March 6, 1906.—Darrel Dexter)


Death of Mrs. Stackhouse
—Mrs. W. S. Stackhouse died last night about 10 o’clock at her home on Twenty-eighth Street. The deceased was 36 years old and had been ill for a long time. She is survived by her husband and three children and an aunt, Mrs. Mary Ledford, of Harrisburg, Ill. The funeral will be held tonight at 7 o’clock at the family residence, conducted by Rev. Morris of the First Methodist Church. The remains will be taken to Beech Grove for interment.


Funeral of Otto Boershel—The funeral of the late Otto Boershel, who died from bullet wounds received last Friday night from a gun in the hands of Guy Smith, was held at the family residence on Twenty-eighth Street this afternoon. The Ben Hur Order, of which the deceased was a member, had charge of the services, in conjunction with Rev. C. H. Armstrong, of the Immanuel Lutheran Church. There were many beautiful floral offerings and many friends of the deceased and family attended. The remains were taken to Villa Ridge cemetery for interment.

 


Thursday, 8 Mar 1906:
Miss Mattie Endicott, youngest daughter of George W. Endicott, who has been mentioned in the Citizen several times, died last week and was buried Saturday in the cemetery at this place (Villa Ridge).  Rev. Armstrong, of the Lutheran Church at Cairo, conducted the services, which were held at the residence. Miss Mattie was held in very high esteem by all who knew her and a very large concourse of friends were present at the funeral to pay their tribute of respect to her memory.

             (Her marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Mattie Endicott.—Darrel Dexter)


Mr. N. N. Koonce, whose illness was mentioned recently, died Wednesday morning this week. He was one of our oldest citizens and a good man.


H. T. Mullinax died at his home here (Cache) early Sunday morning. Mr. Mulinax has been sick for some time.


The funeral procession of Mr. Mullenax, who died Sunday at Cache, passed through here (Unity) Monday.


CARD OF THANKS

We extend our heartfelt thanks to the members of the Ben Hur and the neighbors and all friends who assisted and sympathized in our bereavement over the death of our beloved son and brother, Otto Boerschel.
Mrs. Paulina Boerschel and Family
Argus and Bulletin please copy

 


Friday, 9 Mar 1906:

KILLED BY FALL FROM MOBILE TRAIN

Alto Pass, Ill., March 8—Charles Arnold, 20 years old, of this city, fell from a moving northbound freight train eight miles south of here Wednesday night and was instantly killed, his neck being broken. He was missed by his boy companions when they arrived here, but they supposed that he had gone home and the accident did not become known until the body was found by section men this morning.

(His marker in Alto Pass Cemetery reads:  Laban Otto Arnold Born Nov. 14, 1877 Died July 1, 1938.  Charles L. Arnold Born May 26, 1885 Died March 7, 1906.—Darrel Dexter)


DEATH OF PIONEER RAILROAD MAN

W. B. Rasback, one of the pioneer railroad men here, died at his home on North Elm Street last evening. He has been leading a retired life for a number of years, and has been in feeble health for some time. The funeral will be held at the residence at 2:30 o’clock Saturday afternoon. He was an engineer on the main line of Illinois Central for a number of years and also on the Cairo division. He is the last of the family here, his wife and children all having died before him. He was a man that was well liked by those who came in contact with him, and was open-hearted and liberal to those who were unfortunate.—Centralia Sentinel

 


Saturday, 10 Mar 1906:
DEATH OF FORMER RESIDENT OF CAIRO
Remains of Lemuel V. Waymer Buried at Jackson, Tenn.

The remains of Mr. Lemuel B. Waymer, a former citizen of Jackson, who died Monday morning at 3 o’clock, were shipped to this city yesterday morning over the M. & O. Railroad were interred at Hollywood Cemetery beside the graves of his two children and a brother, says the Jackson Whig.

Deceased lived here for a number of years and for two years was connected with the Jackson Milling Company. He afterwards moved to Cairo and then to Wickliffe.

The funeral service was conducted at the grave by the Rev. A. M. Hughlett, pastor of the First Methodist Church. The following relatives accompanied the remains to this city and returned to their homes last night: Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Waymer, Miss Alma Waymer and mother, Mrs. M. Waymer of Cairo, Ill., C. F. Waymer, of Iuka, Miss., Mr. and Mrs. S. K. Waymer, of St. Louis and children.

 


Monday, 12 Mar 1906:
NEGROES QUARREL MURDER IS RESULT
Bloody Fight Occurred Sunday Night in Vicinity of Twenty-fourth and Poplar Streets.
KNIVES THE WEAPONS IN DEADLY COMBAT
Alleged Remarks over a Woman Started the Trouble—Murderer Is in City Jail.—Claims Self Defense

As the result of a bloody fight Sunday night, which took place at the home of one William Gusby, colored, at Twenty-fourth and Poplar streets, Gusby is dead and Pink Christian, also a negro, is in the city jail charged with the murder and waiting the verdict of the coroner’s jury.

Christian was seen by a Citizen representative this morning and told the following story of the murder:

Gusby entered Swoboda’s saloon at Eighteenth and Poplar streets, where I am employed. He had been drinking. We had long been friends and fearing lest some evil might befall him, I took him home.

Gusby’s wife had gone to bed. I stayed at Gusby’s home for a few minutes to get warm. While there Gusby began quarreling with his wife and charged me with telling his wife about his (Gusby’s) affections for another woman. Mrs. Gusby denied the charges and told her husband that I had never told her anything at all. This angered Gusby, who was drunk, and he drew a knife and threatened to kill her if she did not confess that I had told her the stories. In her fright she said that I had told her. Gusby then turned his attention to me and slapped me in the face. I tried to pacify him because I knew he was drunk. Not being satisfied with slapping me, however, he put his arm around my neck and stabbed me in the back and arm with a pocket knife. I tried to pull away from him and he stabbed me in the neck.

“Losing all control of myself I lit into him with my knife to protect myself and stabbed him. We struggled and fell to the floor and were cutting at each other when one John Watson entered and pulled a gun on me and ordered me off.

“I then accompanied Watson to the city jail. I did not know that I had killed Gusby.

“We were always the best of friends. I used to board with him, but now live on Nineteenth Street. I work at Swoboda’s saloon and Gusby worked at the I. C. roundhouse. That’s all I know about the affair.”

Christian is a negro between 26 and 30 years of age and Gusby was about the same age. Christian is single, while Gusby has a wife and one child.

The coroner’s inquest was held in the city council chamber at 2 o’clock this afternoon.


CORONER’S JURY HELD CHRISTIAN
Charged with the Murder of Will Gusby with a Large Pocket Knife
EVIDENCE STRONG AGAINST CHRISTIAN
Defendant’s Plea of Self Defense Did not Harmonize with Testimony of Witnesses.

The coroner’s inquest over the remains of Will Gusby was held this afternoon in the city council chamber. The jury held Pink Christian, charged with the murder of Gusby, to the grand jury without bail.

The evidence was strong against the defendant, Pink Christian, the witnesses all testifying that no knife or razor was found in Gusby’s possession, and that Christian had made the statement that he was going to kill Gusby. The witnesses described the quarrel and murder as a cold-blooded affair.
From the evidence, it appeared that Christian was found by John Watson sitting on Gusby, stabbing him, when Watson entered house and ordered Christian off the wounded man at the point of a gun.
Watson then marched Christian down to the police station. Watson and others think that Christian would never have given himself up and would have skipped out, if Watson had not marched him to headquarters at the point of a revolver.

Some give as their opinion that Christian cut himself in several places with the intention of laying it on Gusby as he did.

The jury was composed of T. A. Fuller, R. A. Hatcher, R. E. Powers, Patrick McNamara, Lazarus Harris and George Siegler.

 

Judge William N. Butler will leave this week for St. Petersburg, Fla., to spend a couple of weeks. He had expected to go last week, as his mother is very low and he hardly expects to see her alive, but his sudden illness delayed the trip. Judge Butler is now recovering and will probably be able to get away about the middle of the week.


Death of Mrs. Murdock—Mrs. Dora Murdock died at her home, No 229 Twenty-first Street, about 5:30 o’clock Saturday evening. The deceased was 47 years of age and had been ill with dropsy for several months. The deceased had resided in Cairo for over thirty-five years. Her surviving relatives are four daughters, Mrs. H. H. Little, of Water Valley, Miss., Mrs. John Hunter, of Chicago, Misses Margaret and Lottie Murdock; and one son, William J. Murdock, of Cairo. The remains were taken to Villa Ridge cemetery for interment.


Death of Mr. Langsdon—Word has been received by Alderman Fred Nellis of the death of Mr. Dayton Langsdon, Mrs. Nellis’ father, who passed away at his home in Jonesboro, Ark., Sunday morning. The deceased had been ill for three weeks with paralysis. He was 68 years old. Besides Mrs. Nellis, of this city, two daughters and two sons survive him: Mrs. Eva Seawright, of Denver, Colo., Mrs. W. S. Butler, of Grayville, Ill., Fred Langsdon, of Jonesboro, Ark., and Verne Langsdon, of Chicago. The remains were brought to Cairo today and interred at Beech Grove Cemetery going by special train from Central Union Station at 2:45 p.m.

 


Tuesday, 13 Mar 1906:
DIED IN THE ANNA INSANE ASYLUM

John Thomas Knapper, a colored patient, who was taken from Cairo to the Anna hospital last Saturday, died there Monday. County Clerk Miller received a telegram from the superintendent there Monday afternoon.


Mr. Milton Sanchez, the well known traveling salesman for the Heinz Pickle Company, received the sad tidings today of the death of his mother, who died at her home in Donaldville, La., this morning. Mr. Sanchez departed at once for Donaldville.


LESLIE ATHERTON PASSES AWAY
Died at Chicago after a Brief Illness
Brother-in-law of Sheriff Roche

Word was received last night of the death of Leslie C. Atherton, who passed away at Chicago after a brief illness. The deceased was a brother-in-law of Sheriff Roche.

The deceased was born and reared in Alexander County and his home was near Willard.

He is survived by his wife, formerly Miss Grace Asher, of Thebes, besides his mother.

The deceased was about 33 years of age and was studying law at Northwestern University, Chicago, at the time of his death.

The remains will be brought to Cairo tonight.

(James S. Roche married Maggie Atherton on 7 Mar 1886, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 


Wednesday, 14 Mar 1906:

SUDDEN DEATH OF CHARLES W. THOMAS
Republican Candidate for Supreme Judge Express While Talking to His Relatives
DIED FROM EFFECTS OF AN OPERATION.
History of Judge Thomas’ Life—Outlook for a Successor to the Deceased Candidate

             St. Louis, March 14.—Judge Charles W. Thomas of Belleville, who was nominated on March 1 as Republican candidate for supreme judge of Illinois from the 1st judicial district, died after an operation at Mullanphy Hospital at 5:30 o’clock yesterday evening.  His family had called to congratulate him on his apparent recovery from the operation, which was performed Monday at noon by Dr. N. Bruce Carson.  In the midst of their congratulations, Judge Thomas’ head fell back and he expired within five minutes.  The body will be taken to Belleville at 3:30 o’clock this afternoon. The funeral will take place on Friday.

             Authority was given by the convention at Cairo to its executive committee to select an alternate candidate in case of disability or death of the chosen candidate, so that no confusion will result.  The nomination was given to Judge Thomas amid scenes of the wildest excitement on the 108th ballot.  There were three candidates, his opponents being Judge O. A. Harker and Judge Vickers. His nomination was made possible by the withdrawal of Judge Harker, whereupon Judge Thomas won by 89 votes over Judge Vickers’ 73.

             At the bedside when the judge died were his wife, formerly a Miss Rhoda Bissell, eldest daughter of former Gov. Bissell, of Illinois; his eldest son, Charles E. L. Thomas, a practicing attorney in St. Louis; a daughter, Josephine and her husband, Dr. H. B. Portunado, a prominent physician of Belleville.  He had another son, Bissell, who resides in Portland, Ore., two brothers, County Clerk George K. Thomas and Edward L. Thomas, of Belleville, and one sister, Mrs. Lucie McConaughty, of St. Louis.

Had Gone for Rest

             Exhausted by the strenuous weeks of campaigning for the Republican nomination, Judge Thomas went to Mullanphy Hospital four days after the coveted prize was won, desiring to rest.  It was not known that he had gone to the hospital, Belleville acquaintances believing that he had only come to St. Louis to visit relatives.

             Monday, believing that he had fully recovered from his exhaustion and deeming it a good opportunity for an operation, which had long been contemplating to get rid of an inconvenient though not dangerous growth, Judge Thomas ordered his physicians to proceed.  The operation took place at noon on Monday.  Judge Thomas entire family called on him at 5 o’clock Tuesday afternoon to congratulate him on his apparent perfect recovery.  Physicians of the hospital were around.  Neither Judge Thomas, apparently, nor anyone else had any suspicion that all was not as it should be.  The patient had just made some remark to his wife, who turned to speak to Charles Thomas, when the judge’s head sank on the pillow.  Within five minutes he was dead, life being extinct at 5:25.

Born on a Farm

             Charles Wait Thomas was born on October 6, 1840, on a farm in Jackson County, Ill., near the mouth of the Big Muddy River.  His father, William S. Thomas, was a Virginian, his mother, Elizabeth Wait, a daughter of the Wait family of Massachusetts.  The great flood of 1844 carried away the whole contents of the Jackson County farm.  William S. Thomas then settled in Belleville and became deputy circuit clerk.

As for a fortuitous result of the flood, Charles went into politics by natural inheritance. He graduated from Urbana University, Ohio, in June 1861.  He enlisted in the celebrated Fremont bodyguard commanded by Maj. Zagonyi, which was organized in St. Louis and later raised a battery of artillery.  He remained as an officer until wounded in a battle at Prairie D’Arm, Ark., which incapacitated him for further service.  He was admitted to the bar in 1866.

Judge Thomas was a personal friend of President Roosevelt and became known in Washington from his absolutely frank and unreserved criticism of certain of the president’s acts to the president himself.


L. E. Kountz, our popular liveryman, lost his father by death last Thursday. He resided near Villa Ridge. (Mounds)


Died This Morning—Word was received at St. Mary’s Infirmary today that Thomas Lonergan, son of William Lonergan, of this city, had died at Jacksonville, Ill., of consumption this morning. The remains will be brought to Villa Ridge tonight and the funeral will be held tomorrow morning at that place. William Lonergan, the father of the deceased, is now in St. Mary’s Infirmary and is not expected to live. Tom Lonergan is well known in this city, having passed his boyhood days here and he has many friends who will be greatly shocked at the news of his sudden death.


Funeral of Leslie Atherton—The funeral of Leslie Atherton, who died in Chicago, will be held at the home of the deceased at Goose Island, tomorrow morning at 10 o’clock. The remains will be interred at Richwood Cemetery, about two miles west of Unity.

             (His marker in Richwood Cemetery reads:  Leslie C. Atherton Born July 21, 1872 Died March 12, 1906.  Oh, how sweet it will be in that heartfelt land, So free from all sorrow and pain.  With songs on our lips and with harps in our hands, To meet one another again.—Darrel Dexter)

 


Thursday, 15 Mar 1906:
The people of Unity were shocked Tuesday to learn of the sudden death in Chicago of Leslie Atherton. A telegram was received Monday apprising the family of his illness. Mrs. Atherton started at once for Chicago only to find that he had died a few hours before she reached there. The remains will be brought home and interred in the Richwoods Cemetery. At the time of this writing, arrangements for the funeral have not been made known, but it is understood that it will take place Friday.


Mrs. Bertha Tippett is very low with consumption. Her husband was called home on account of her serious condition. (Olive Branch)


Died, March 10, 1906, at his home, Isiah B. Vick aged 75 years, 9 months, 21 days. For several years he has been confined to his room on account of paralysis.  Finally, about one year ago, his tongue became paralyzed and he could not talk well enough to be understood by anyone except those who were with him often. He grew constantly worse until death relieved him. He was born May 19, 1830, in Alexander County, on the farm now owned by Cephas Vick. On Nov. 27, 1854, he was married to Rachel Hargis and settled on the farm where he lived until a year ago, the house and barn were burned. The family then purchased the adjoining farm, where he lived until death. To the union above mentioned, there were fourteen children, ten of whom survive him, twenty-eight grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.  For many years he has been a member of the Baptist Church, constantly trying to uphold Christian principles and advance the cause of Christ. He leaves an aged widow, who is almost ready to join him once more where there will be “no good byes.” Three sons still remain with her to support her.

Grandpa is gone, but not forever.

Soon we’ll cross the shining river;
There we’ll see his face once more

And always dwell upon the shore. (Delta)

(His marker in Delta Cemetery reads:  Isiah Vick Born May 19, 1831 Died March 11, 1906.  Rachell Vick Born May 20, 1841 Died Aug 29, 1909.  Rest, Father & Mother, in quiet sleep, While friends in sorrow o’er thee weep.—Darrel Dexter)


FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—Tom Lonergan, aged 26 years. Funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon. The remains will be conveyed from Mrs. Feith’s undertaking parlors to St. Patrick’s Church. Special train will leave foot of Eighth Street at 2:45 p.m. Friends invited to attend.

 

Messrs. Chance and Verne Langsdon, of Chicago, and Mr. Fred Langsdon, of Jonesboro, Ark., who have been here to attend the funeral of their father, Mr. Dayton Langsdon, returned to their home today.

 


Friday, 16 Mar 1906:
THOMAS’ NEPHEWS WERE PALLBEARERS
Services Conducted This Afternoon by the Reverend Father Gough

Nephews of Judge Charles W. Thomas, of Belleville, were the pallbearers at the funeral this afternoon. They were Malcom and Donald McConaughty, of East St. Louis, Gustavus, Kenton, and William Koerner, of St. Louis, and David O. Thomas, of Belleville. The funeral took place at 2 p.m. from the home at No. 215 Abend Street. Services were conducted in St. Luke’s Church by the Reverend Father James M. Gough.

There were no sessions of the circuit court at Belleville or the city court at East St. Louis because of the funeral.

The St. Clair County Bar Association met in the circuit court room yesterday morning and passed appropriate resolutions on the death of Mr. Thomas.

(Charles W. Thomas married Rhoda E. Bissell on 31 Dec 1866, in St. Clair Co., Ill.  Franklin A. McConaughy married Lucie Thomas on 28 Oct 1875, in St. Clair Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


BURIED TODAY

The funeral of Thomas Lonergan, formerly of this city, who died at Jacksonville, Ill., was held this afternoon at St. Patrick’s Church. The remains were taken to Villa Ridge on a special train. Owing to some misunderstanding, the remains were taken to Mounds instead of Villa Ridge. It was the intention of his relatives to have the remains shipped direct to Villa Ridge, but owing to the mistake mentioned, the remains were forwarded on to Cairo.


MRS. R. L. GREGORY DEAD

Capt. Frank Cassidy received a message from Mr. R. L. Gregory at Sturgis, Ky., today, that Mrs. Gregory died there this morning. Mr. and Mrs. Gregory lived in Cairo until recently, when they removed to Sturgis, their old home.


RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT

Whereas the Almighty in His infinite wisdom has seen fit to call from among us a beloved classmate and sincere friend, Leslie Campbell Atherton, be it therefore

Resolved, That we, the members of the senior class of the Northwestern University school of law, hereby express our most sincere sympathy to the members of his family and to all those who, knowing him, mourn his loss. And be it further

Resolved, That out of respect to his memory that all lectures of the senior class be suspended on this day. And be if further

Resolved, That a picture of our departed classmate be draped and hung in Hurd Hall for thirty days. And be it further

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be spread upon the records of the class and published in The Northwestern.
Charles O. Rundall
William Capron
Andrew A. Martin, Committee

 


Saturday, 17 Mar 1906:
DEATH OF OLD RIVERMAN
William Robinson, Well Known River Man, Passed Away This Morning.

William Robinson, better known as Scottie, an old river man about 75 years of age, was found dead this morning in a cellar on Sixth Street. Robinson came to Cairo during the war. For several years he had charge of a fleet of barges, which were tied up here. He was a hard working and honest Scotchman. For the past five years he has been doing odd jobs around the city and had been living on Sixth Street. His death was due to heart trouble. As he has not any relatives in this country, no arrangements have been made for the funeral.

 


Monday, 19 Mar 1906:
DEATH OF WILLIAM BEMIS
Former Cairoite Passed Away at Shreveport, Miss., Last Night.

Manager John C. Glade, of the Western Union Telegraph Company, received word last night of the death of his uncle, Mr. William Bemis, of Shreveport, Miss. The deceased was a middle-aged man and formerly resided in Cairo. He was at one time a freight conductor on the Illinois Central and was also at one time a conductor on the Cotton Belt.

He left Cairo about fifteen years ago and went to Texas and from there to Shreveport. The deceased was engaged in the wholesale and retail liquor business.

He is survived by two sisters and two brothers, Mrs. John Glade and Mrs. Bob Moore, of this city; Herman Bemis and Mr. Chris Bemis, both of whom reside in the West.

Arrangements for the funeral have not been completed, but the remains may be brought to Cairo for interment at Villa Ridge cemetery.


WELL KNOWN ANNA CITIZEN DIED TODAY
Mr. A. J. Musgrave a Victim of Tuberculosis—Relative of D. E. Little, of Cairo

Mr. D. E. Little, of Twentieth Street, received a message today stating that A. J. Musgrave, a well known citizen, of Anna, died this morning.

The deceased is well known in this city, having visited here frequently and his many friends will regret to hear of his death. Mr. Little, who is a relative of the deceased, left today to attend the funeral, which will be held tomorrow.

(Andrew J. Musgrave married Amanda E. Grace on 8 Jul 1869, in Union Co., Ill.  His marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Andrew J. Musgrave Born Oct. 5, 1847 Died March 19, 1906.  Amanda E. Musgrave his wife Born Nov. 19, 1853 Died March 10, 1927.—Darrel Dexter)


Murder over a Few Cents

Carmi, Ill., March 19.—During a quarrel over the payment for a bottle of whisky, purchased jointly by them, a negro employee of the Big Four Railroad, was stabbed to death by an Italian, who surrendered.


INFANT CHILD DIED
Two-Month-Old Son of Mr. and Mrs. Harmon Baish

Robert, the two-month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Harmon Baish, of Twenty-sixth Street, died last night.

The funeral was held this morning. A short service was held at the house and the remains were interred at Villa Ridge cemetery.

Mrs. Baish, mother of the child, is very low and her condition is considered serious.

 


Tuesday, 20 Mar 1906:
Funeral of William Bemis—The funeral of William Bemis, mention of whose death was exclusively mentioned in The Citizen last evening, was held yesterday at Shreveport. It was first thought the remains would be shipped here.

 


Wednesday, 21 Mar 1906:
DEATH OF MRS. TERRELL
Mother of Mr. C. C. Terrell, of Cairo, Passed Away at Barlow, Ky.

Mrs. Anne Terrell, the aged mother of Mr. C. C. Terrell, the well-known shoe dealer of this city, passed away at her home in Barlow, Ky., about 9 o’clock last night, after an illness of about three weeks. The deceased was 76 years of age.

The deceased is survived by four sons, Messrs. C. C. Terrell, of Cairo, Thomas Terrell, of Wickliffe, Ky., and Arche and Dodge Terrell, of Kentucky.

The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 3 o’clock. The remains will be interred at Slater, Ky.



Thursday, 22 Mar 1906:
The funeral of Leslie Atherton was attended by a large concourse of friends and relatives.  Two of his college fellows accompanied the family from Chicago with the remains. The floral tributes were numerous and beautiful, one of the most noticeable being in the form of a large book made of carnations with the initial letters of his college and his name wrought out with violets sent by his college mates and teachers. (Unity)


DEATH OF FORMER CAIRO GIRL

Mrs. W. S. Stevenson Passed Away at Home in Port Huron, Mich. 

Friends of Mrs. W. S. Stevenson, formerly Miss Ruth Merryman, were shocked to receive the news of her death, which occurred at her home in Port Huron, Mich., last Sunday. She died of typhoid fever. Her father, Mr. J. W. Merryman, visited Cairo at Christmas, and at that time his daughter was in the best of health. She leaves her husband and two boys.

 


Friday, 23 Mar 1906:
PADUCAH DIVINE DEAD AT WACO
As Result of Strain of Conducting Big Revivals

Louisville, Mar. 23—Rev. John Cheek, pastor of the First Baptist Church of Paducah, died yesterday at Waco, Texas, as a result of a nervous breakdown from the strain of the most remarkable revival ever held in Western Kentucky. Thousands of conversions had resulted when he broke down six weeks ago.


NEGRO HANGED AT POPLAR BLUFF
Curtis Jackson Pays Penalty for Assaulting White Woman

Poplar Bluff, Mo., Mar. 23—In a downpour of rain and in the presence of a large crowd, Curtis Jackson, a negro youth, was hanged today. Last February, Jackson assaulted Mrs. Dan Norman, a white woman. He was arrested the same night and rescued from a mob after a battle. He was tried February 20th and convicted and sentenced three hours after arraignment.

 


Saturday, 24 Mar 1906:

DEATH OF WILLIAM LONERGAN
Old Resident of Cairo Passed Away This Morning.

William Lonergan, one of Cairo’s pioneer citizens, died this morning at 12:50 a.m. at St. Mary’s Infirmary after an illness of three months of a complication of diseases. The deceased was 74 years of age.

Mr. Lonergan was born in Philadelphia, Pa., on May 17, 1833. He came to Cairo in 1852, at which time there were only a few houses here. He spent much of his early life in the river trade and was a mate on the steamer, Uncle Sam, that carried Gen. Grant and other soldiers up and down the river. Mr. Lonergan was an active worker during the yellow fever scare and the floods of Cairo’s early history.

In March 1858, Mr. Lonergan returned to Philadelphia where he married Miss Kate Kennedy. There were ten children from this union, eight of which are now dead.

The deceased followed the steamboat business for several years, after which he engaged in the hay and grain business and opened an office on the levee where the Weaver Dry Goods Company is now. After the fire of 1902, when his place of business, the Bulletin office and other businesses were gutted by fire, Mr. Lonergan discontinued the business. Since that time he has lived a retired life.

He served as park watchman at St. Mary’s Park until he took ill when he resigned. He was at one time a member of the city council.

The deceased’s wife died several years ago. He leaves a son, Frank, who resides at Mound City, and a daughter, Mamie. A brother, John B. Lonergan, is also living and resides at Waterloo, Ill. He is expected to arrive tonight to attend the funeral.

The remains will be taken to Villa Ridge cemetery for interment. The funeral will probably be held tomorrow.

 


Wednesday, 28 Mar 1906:
CAPT. HARRY GREEN DIED LAST NIGHT

Well Known River Pilot Passed Away at 11:45 at U. S. Hospital.

Capt. Harry Green died at the United States Marine Hospital last night at 11:45 o’clock.  The deceased was 40 years of age.

Capt. Green was taken to the hospital Sunday night suffering with a broken ankle.  Yesterday it was found necessary to amputate the limb above the knee, as blood poison had set in.

The patient grew weaker and weaker and, owing to his nervous disposition, was unable to recover from the shock of the operation.

The manner in which Capt. Green was injured, as told by the captain, was in attempting to throw the searchlight, he fell and caught his leg in the pilot wheel, fracturing his knee and badly crushing his ankle.  The accident occurred near the point.  So great was the shock that the captain did not know the extent of his injuries.  He managed to get to his feet and piloted the boat to the landing.  When friends came to his rescue he was very weak.

The deceased was born at Louisville, Ky., in 1865 and came to Cairo eight years ago.  He had been a pilot all his life.  During his record as a pilot, he never had a boat to sink.

Capt. Green was a pilot on the John A. Wood.  He was well known among rivermen and was very popular among his associates.

The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 12:30 o’clock at the family residence on Sixth Street.

The deceased was a member of Ascalon Lodge No. 51, Knight of Pythias, and that lodge will have charge of the funeral.  The remains will be taken to New Madrid, Mo., for interment.  A committee of Ascalon Lodge will accompany the remains to New Madrid on the Cotton Belt.

Capt. Green is survived by his wife, three children, Elise, Harry and Francis Green, and a sister, Mrs. Musa Woodward.

Many of the boats in the Cairo harbor had their flags half-mast today in honor of the deceased.

(Robert K. Woodward married Musie D. Green on 18 May 1882, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


FUNERAL NOTICE

Died, Wednesday, March 28, at 2:30 a.m. Harry S. Green, aged 40 years.

Funeral services will be held at the family residence, No. 227 Sixth Street, at 12:30 p.m. Thursday, March 29th. Remains will be taken on the Cotton Belt train at 2 o’clock p.m. for New Madrid, Mo., where interment will be made.

Friends are invited to attend the services.

 


Thursday, 29 Mar 1906:
FUNERAL OF LATE CAPT. HARRY GREEN
Held This Afternoon from Family Residence with Impressive Services

REMAINS TAKEN TO NEW MADRID, MO.

Death of This Popular Riverman a Great Shock to His Many Friends—Many Beautiful Floral Offerings

             The funeral of Captain Harry Green was held this afternoon at the family residence, No. 227 Sixth Street.  The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Morris, of the First Methodist Church, and were very impressive.

             A large crowd was present and many beautiful floral offerings were given by the many friends of the deceased.  Among these were two very large pieces, one representing the gates of heaven ajar and under it was the inscription “Our Captain.”  This was given by the crew of the tow boat, Fred Hartweg.  The other piece was from Ascalon Lodge K. of P.  Many other large pieces were received from different rivermen and friends of the family.

             The funeral left the house for the train at 1:30 o’clock.  The pallbearers were the following:  A. Wilson, W. S. Dewey, Peter Lind, Sam Richardson, C. C. Haynes, Clarence Nichols, H. S. Antrim, Captain Fred Bennett, and Capt. Faudree.  Ascalon Lodge sent three of their members to accompany the remains to New Madrid.  They were Messrs. Will Smith, John A. Miller and H. S. Blockley.  The remains are to be interred in the family burying grounds two miles from New Madrid.  The relatives and friends of the deceased who accompanied the remains left on the Cotton Belt at 2 o’clock.  Capt. E.L. Faudree also accompanied the remains to New Madrid.

             The death of this well known and popular riverman was a great shock to all the rivermen and others with whom he was acquainted.


Died, Sunday, March 26th, at the home of his sister, Mrs. Nancy Costley, in Dongola, Mr. H. C. Sams, age 56 years. Funeral services at residence Tuesday, March 27, at 9 o’clock a.m. conducted by Rev. Keist. Interment in the Union Cemetery, three miles west of here (Dongola)

 


Friday, 30 Mar 1906:
Miss Elizabeth Smith, teacher of art, received word today of the death of a dear friend at Charleston, Mo., Mrs. Price Howlett. Miss Smith left this afternoon for Charleston to attend the funeral.


MRS. M. A. SNYDER HAS PASSED AWAY
Mother of County Superintendent John Snyder Died at Her Home in Menlo, Ga.

             Word from Mrs. Dr. Tompkins, from Menlo, Ga., to her brother, County Superintendent John Snyder, of this city, announces the death of their mother at Intervale Fruit Farm.

Mrs. M. A. Snyder was born in Virginia in 1818.  She was left a widow more than forty-five years ago and chose the profession of teaching as a means of providing for her family of three daughters and one son, all of whom followed teaching as a life profession.

She not only lived to see her children ______ marry teachers.

She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Dr. Tompkins, of Menlo, Ga., Mrs. A. C. Holding, of Albany, N.Y., and her son, John Snyder, of Cairo, who have the sympathy of many friends here in the city in their bereavement.


MRS. CORNELIA BOZMAN DIED THIS MORNING
Passed Away at Her Home on Sixth Street after Week’s Illness

Mrs. Cornelia Bozman died at her home, No. 327 Sixth Street, this morning about 4 o’clock.  The deceased was nearly 84 years of age.

Mrs. Bozman was born in Pope County, Illinois, and came to Cairo in 1884, residing here ever since.  Her husband died several years ago.  The deceased is survived by three daughters and two sons.  They are Mrs. John F. Rector, Miss Cornelia Bozman, and Mr. Joseph Bozman, of Cairo, and Mrs. W. Y. Smith, of Vienna, Ill., and Mr. Harry Bozman, of Houston, Texas.

Mrs. Bozman was well known in this city and leaves a wide circle of friends to mourn her loss.

The funeral will be held at her residence tonight at 7:30 o’clock, Rev. T. J. Porter, pastor of the Cairo Baptist Church, will conduct the services.  The remains will be taken to Vienna, Ill., tomorrow at 5:40 a.m., where interment will be made.

The deceased had been ill for about a week with a slight attack of pneumonia and also suffered with diseases due to her advanced age.

(Wesley W. Bozman married Cornelia A. Pryor on 2 Nov 1837, in Pope Co., Ill.  John F. Rector married Bettie Bozman on 2 Feb 1868, in Pope Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 


Saturday, 31 Mar 1906:
DEATH OF MRS. MATTOX
Mother of W. N. Mattox, of Cairo, Passed Away at Greenville, Miss.

The many friends in Cairo of Mr. W. N. Mattox will regret to learn of the death of his mother, which occurred at Greenville, Miss., last night.

The deceased was 75 years of age and is survived by a large family.  She had been ill for about two weeks.  Mr. Mattox was called to her bedside Monday.

The news of her death was received in a message to Dr. Morrison and did not give any details.

Mrs. J. J. Nolte, of Mounds, has left for St. Louis to be in attendance with her mother, who is reported to be dying in that city.  (Mounds)

Mr. M. J. Sheehan is reported very low with pneumonia at his home, No. 413 Eighth Street.

Death of Willis Light—Willis Light, a young man of Olive Branch and a half brother of Mr. Arthur Twente, clerk at the Cairo post office, died this week at this home in Olive Branch.  The deceased was 16 years of age.  The remains were interred in the Twente graveyard near Olive Branch.

(His marker in Twente Crossing Cemetery reads:  A. Willis Light Born Sept. 22, 1890 Died May 29, 1906 Aged 15 Yrs., 6 Mos., & 7 Ds.  Dear friends weep not for me, But prepare to meet thy God in peace.—Darrel Dexter)

 

 

Monday, 1 Apr 1906:
M. J. SHEEHAN DIED SUNDAY
Old Citizen Passes Away Suddenly with Severe Attack of Pneumonia
FUNERAL WILL BE HELD TOMORROW
Deceased Resided in Cairo for Fifty Years—Was Ill Only Four Days

Cairo has lost another of its old and well known citizens.  M. J. Sheehan, a resident of Cairo for forty-seven years, died Sunday afternoon at his home, No. 413 Eighth Street, about 3:30 o’clock, after an illness of only a few days of pneumonia.  The deceased was 50 years of age.

Mr. Sheehan was taken ill last Wednesday.  He was out in the heavy rain and took a congestive chill and severe cold which developed into pneumonia and Saturday, while it was realized by his relatives and friends that he was in a precarious condition, his death was not expected and was a great shock to his relatives and to the community.

Mr. Sheehan was born in Danville, Pa., in 1856 and came to Cairo with his parents in 1859 at the age of three years and resided here until his death.

In 1880 he was married to Miss Ellen Cummins, of Mound City, who was a sister of Mrs. Charles Curren, of Mound City.

             The deceased, about twenty-five years ago, associated himself with his brother-in-law, Mr. M. J. Howley, as a collector and overseer for Mr. Howley’s real-estate business.

He is survived by his aged father, Mr. John Sheehan, his daughter, Miss Mollie Sheehan; his son, John Sheehan; and his sister, Mrs. M. J. Howley.  Mr. Sheehan’s wife died six years ago last January and two children have also passed away.

Mr. Sheehan was a man of quiet disposition and was a kind father and a loyal friend.

The deceased was a devout member of St. Patrick’s Church and was also a member of the Catholic Knights of America.

The funeral will be held tomorrow morning at 8 o’clock at St. Patrick’s Church and the remains taken to Villa Ridge cemetery for interment.

(Michael J. Sheehan married Ellen Cummings on 27 Jun 1880, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Michael Joseph Howley married Mary Ann Sheehan on 16 Jun 1872, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Michael J. Sheehan Died April 1, 1906 Aged 50 Yrs.—Darrel Dexter)


SUDDEN DEATH OF MRS. LIZZIE WATKINS

Passed Away This Afternoon at the Home of Her Daughter, Mrs. Arthur Barter

WAS AN OLD RESIDENT OF CAIRO

Death Due to Heart Trouble—Active Member of Parthenia Lodge and W. R. C.

             Mrs. Lizzie Watkins died very suddenly this afternoon at 1:30 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Arthur Barter, of No. 2614 Holbrook Avenue.  Her death was due to heart trouble.

             Mrs. Watkins was 62 years of age.  She has resided in Cairo for twenty-one years.  She was an active member of the Calvary Baptist Church, the Woman’s Relief Corps, Parthenia Rebekah Lodge and the W. C. T. U.

             The deceased is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Alex W. Weldon and Mrs. Arthur Barter, of this city, Mr. John Watkins, of Mt. Carmel, Ill., and Mr. Tom C. Watkins, of this city.  Her husband died about seven years ago.

The deceased is also survived by her aged mother, who resides at Tompkinsville, Ill., a brother, who resides at Tompkinsville, and a sister residing at St. Louis.

The remains will be taken to DuQuoin for interment, but the time of the funeral has not been decided at this time.  Parthenia Rebekah Lodge will have charge of the services.

             Mrs. Watkins was a devoted mother and by her gentle ways had endeared herself to her many friends who will mourn her loss.  Her sudden death is a great shock to her relatives and friends.

             DuQuoin papers are asked to copy.

             (Alex W. Weldon married Maggie Watkins on 6 Aug 1888, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Arthur Barter married Katie B. Watkins on 1 Sep 1891, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


VETERAN STEAMBOAT MAN PASSES AWAY

Captain William Frazier, who for the past five years has been a patient in the United States Marine Hospital, died at noon today.  He was a victim of a stroke of apoplexy.  At 11 o’clock this forenoon he had another attack which carried him off.  Alexander Lodge I. O. O. F. took charge of his remains.


Tuesday, 3 Apr 1906:
FUNERAL OF LIZZIE WATKINS

Will Be Held Tomorrow Morning at 9:00 Services at Calvary Baptist Church

The funeral of Mrs. Lizzie Watkins, who died very suddenly yesterday afternoon of heart trouble, will be held tomorrow morning at 9:00 o’clock.  The services will be held at the Calvary Baptist Church, of which deceased was a member.  Rev. Mahoney will conduct the services.

The deceased was an active member of the Woman’s Relief Corps.  She was an aide to the national president’s staff, was a delegate to the national convention at San Francisco, president of the local lodge for three years and secretary for eight years.

The Woman’s Relief Corps will attend the funeral in a body and will send a beautiful offering in the form of a cross, their national emblem.  It will be made of evergreen, ferns and small flags.


DEATH RELIEVES CHILD’S SUFFERING

Little Son of Harry Safford Candee Passed Away Last Night.

Henry Hamilton Candee, the six-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Safford Candee, of No. 219 Fourth Street, died last night about 10 o’clock after an illness of several weeks of grip, which developed into spinal meningitis, which caused much suffering.  During the six weeks’ illness, every possible effort was put forth by the parents in an effort to save the life of their beloved little son.

The child’s death is a great shock to his parents and relatives, who have the sympathy of the entire community in their hour of bereavement.

The deceased attended the first grade at the Douglas School and was a member of the Sunday school of the Church of the Redeemer.

The funeral services will be private and the remains will be taken in a special car at 7 o’clock tonight to Mt. Greenwood Cemetery, near Chicago, where interment will take place.

The remains will be interred in the cemetery at 9 o’clock.  Rev. C. A. Young, of Christ Church, Woodlawn will conduct the services.


ONLY TWO MEN WERE KILLED
In the Big Four Wreck at Grand Chain.—Track Now Cleared

             Only two men were killed in the wreck on the Big Four Sunday.  The report that a number of hats were found, indicating other bodies were beneath the wreckage, seems to be a mistake.

             The killed were James Powell, of Carrier Mills, and an unknown man, supposed to have been a tramp.  Charles Powell, brother of the dead man, was injured.  The men are coal miners and had been to Cairo and were returning home in a car of lumber when the wreck occurred and the car in which they were riding was caught beneath another car and totally demolished.

             The wreck was caused by the rear cars running up on to a light car in the center of the train.  As a result, of the eleven cars in the train, only one, the last one, was saved and that was derailed.  The cars were loaded with lumber.  The track has been cleared and traffic resumed, but the wreckage still lies piled there, a mile and a quarter south of Grand Chain.


FUNERAL OF LATE M. J. SHEEHAN

Held This Morning at 8 O’clock and Largely Attended

             The funeral of the late M. J. Sheehan was held this morning at St. Patrick’s Church at 8:30 o’clock.  Father Downey conducted the services.

             A large number of friends attended and the floral offerings were large and beautiful.  The Catholic Knights of America, of which the deceased was a member, attended in a body.  The pallbearers were the following:  Messrs. John W. C. Fry, P. T. Langan, John Raggio, P. C. Purcell, Peter Day, Frank Davis, James Barrow and John Sanders.

             The funeral train left the foot of Eighth Street at 10 a.m.  A large number of friends accompanied the remains to the cemetery, where short services were held.


Attention Rebekahs!

All members of Parthenia Rebekah Lodge and Alma Lodge and all visiting Rebekahs in the city are requested to meet at Safford Hall tomorrow morning at 8:30 o’clock to attend the funeral of our late sister, Mrs. Lizzie Watkins.
By order,
Mrs. Mamie Kuykendall, Nobel Grand
Mrs. Carrie McEwen, Secretary


FUNERAL NOTICE

Mrs. Lizzie M. Watkins died Monday, April 2, 1906. Aged 62 years. Cortege will leave home of deceased’s daughter, Mrs. Arthur Barter, tomorrow morning at 9 o’clock for Calvary Baptist Church. Train will leave Illinois Central depot for DuQuoin, Ill., at 11:15 a.m., where interment will be held.


FUNERAL NOTICE

Died, Monday, April 2, 1906, at 10 o’clock p.m., Henry Hamilton Candee, age six years, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Safford Candee.

Interment at Mt. Greenwood Cemetery, Chicago, Wednesday, April 4, 1906, at 9 o’clock a.m.


ALEXANDER LODGE NOTICE

Members of Alexander Lodge No. 224, I. O. O. F. are requested to attend a special meeting at 7:30 o’clock tonight to make arrangements to attend the funeral of our late brother, William Frazier.
George Becker, Noble Grand
Peter Kobler, Secretary

 


Wednesday, 4 Apr 1906:
SLEUTH HAS CAUGHT HIS MAN.

Colored Sherlock Holmes Runs Down Man after Five Years Search.

             After tracking his man for five years, the colored Sherlock Holmes, Frank Walker, today arrested Andrew Johnson, wanted in Wilkinson County, Miss., for killing Jerry Wright.  Walker, assisted by Constables Whit Larry and D. King, shadowed the man all night and this morning arrested him on the stone wall near Fourteenth Street.  He will be taken to Mississippi Thursday.  There is a reward of $250 for the capture of this man.


FUNERAL OF MRS. LIZZIE WATKINS

Held This Morning and Largely Attended

The funeral of Mrs. Lizzie Watkins was held this morning at 9:30 o’clock at the Calvary Baptist Church, Rev. S. P. Mahoney conducting the services.  The funeral was largely attended and many very beautiful floral offerings were given, especially those given by the Woman’s Relief Corps and the Rebekahs.  These two orders attended in a body.

The pallbearers were the following Messrs. W. S. Dewey, Bert Neff, Horace Hannon, Fred Cox, C. R. Stuart, and David Johnson.

The remains were taken to the family burying ground at DuQuoin on the 11:15 train this morning.

PATRICK GALVIN FORMERLY OF CAIRO
Died in Ireland on March 9th—News Just Received Here

The news has reached this city of the death of Patrick Galvin, who resided in Cairo at one time, and who died at Barefield, Ennis, County Clare, Ireland, March 9th.  The deceased was 85 years of age.

The deceased was born in County Clare, Ireland, and came to America in 1854, locating at New Orleans.  Later he went to Louisville, Ky., where he married.  His wife lived but two years after their marriage and after her death, Mr. Galvin came to Cairo and remained here until his departure for Ireland.  Up to his death he resided with a nephew, Michael Galvin, who also resided in this country for several years.

His funeral was held Sunday, March 11th.  Interment was made in Timpley-Maley Cemetery.

Among the surviving relatives are Thomas Galvin, of 2001 Poplar Street, Dennis Galvin, of Portland, Oregon, nephews.  Four nieces and two nephews in Ireland also survive him.


DEATH OF FORMER CAIROITE
C. A. Chandler Passed Away at His Home in Jackson, Tenn., Yesterday.

C. A. Chandler, a former resident of Cairo, died very suddenly yesterday at his home at Jackson, Tenn.  The deceased was 73 years of age.

The news of his death was announced in a letter to Judge A. Comings.

The deceased resided in Cairo for over twenty years, but removed to Jackson about twelve years ago.  He was employed as a clerk on a transfer boat during his residence in this city.  The deceased was a member of Safford Lodge, I. O. O. F., Knights and Ladies of Honor and Knights of Honor, in which organization he was a member at his death.

Mr. Chandler is survived by his wife, three sons and two daughters.  His sons are Messrs. Lee, Paul and Coley Chandler, all well known railroad engineers, residing in Jackson.  His daughters are Mrs. Mary J. Hunt and Mrs. Lily B. Perron, wives of railroad engineers, who are also well known here.

WILL ATTEND FUNERAL OF BROTHER-IN-LAW

Mr. Robert Thornberry, street supervisor, has returned from Eldorado, Ill., where he was called by the death of his brother-in-law, A. C. Weber, a prominent citizen of that city. The deceased was drowned in a pond. He was washing the feet of his horse, when the animal gave a sudden lunge, throwing him down. This frightened the animal and it started to run out into deep water. There were a number of witnesses to the horrible accident, but before they could lend their assistance, Mr. Weber had been dragged out into deep water and drowned. The deceased was 42 years of age and leaves a wife and three children. Mr. Thornberry will return to Eldorado Saturday to attend the funeral.

(Robert F. Thornberry married Lizzie Welch on 3 Apr 1884, in Saline Co., Ill.  Charles C. Weber married Margaret A. Welch on 7 Jul 1873, in Saline Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 


Thursday, 5 Apr 1906:
ARRIVED TOO LATE FOR FUNERAL

Mrs. Rosa Austin, of White City, Kan., who came on to attend the funeral of her uncle, the late Capt. William Frazier, at Villa Ridge, yesterday afternoon, arrived after the funeral was over. The conductor held the train 15 minutes for her at the home, but on her arrival at St. Louis she was just a few minutes too late to make the proper connection and she did not arrive here until 7 o’clock last evening. She will remain to settle up the estate.


Died, last Sunday morning, an infant child of Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Woodard, age 11 days. Funeral services Monday at 2 o’clock at the residence conducted by Rev. Jacob Karraker. Interment in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery (Dongola).

             (William W. Woodard, son of Ardill Woodard and Martha Manning, married Flora J. Clifford, daughter of Joseph W. Clifford and Julia A. Ragsdale, on 31 Oct 1899, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Clifford, of Cairo, were here Monday and attended the funeral of the infant child of their daughter, Mr. W. W. Woodard.


Died Thursday, March 29, at 9 o’clock a.m., at his home in Dongola, Thomas Rinehart, age 72 years. Funeral services Sunday morning at 11 o’clock at the Congregational church under the auspices of the Dongola lodge No. 343 I. O. O. F. Interment in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery.

             (Thomas Rinehart married Sarah A. West on 9 Sep 1860, in Union Co., Ill.  Thomas Rinehart, son of Joseph Rinehart and Elizabeth Barnhart, married 2nd Mrs. Abbie A. McDaniel, daughter of Dallas McCann and Effie Bodine, on 1 Dec 1896, in Union Co., Ill.  His marker in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Thomas Rinehart Born Dec. 23, 1833 Died March 29, 1906.—Darrel Dexter)


Died, Sunday, April 1, at 8 o’clock a.m. at his home in Dongola, Ill., J. D. Benton, age 64 years. Funeral services at the Congregational church Wednesday, April 4th, at 2 o’clock p.m. conducted by Rev. Perdue. Interment in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery. Mr. Benton was president of the Bank of Dongola and was also our county commissioner at the time of his death. He was one of the leading men of Dongola and will be badly missed by all.

             (Jacob D. Benton married Susan J. Crowell on 20 Feb 1868, in Massac Co., Ill.  His marker in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Jacob D. Benton Born Dec. 25, 1841 Died April 1, 1906.—Darrel Dexter)

 


Friday, 6 Apr 1906:
WOMAN MURDERER HELD TO GRAND JURY
Sadie Hardin Alias Pride Held by Coroner’s Jury for Murder of Sam Brown
CRIME THE OUTCOME OF JEALOUSY

Murder Occurred About 10 O’clock Last Night on Commercial Near Thirty-Second.

Sadie Hardin alias Pride, a negress, who is charged with the murder of Sam Brown, also a negro, was held to the grand jury at the May term of circuit court this afternoon by the coroner’s jury.  The inquest was held in the council chamber at 2 o’clock and attracted several hundred negroes.

The jury was composed of R. A. Hatcher, foreman; Frank Fitzgerald, Hal Sullivan, J. M. Mattingly, John Coleman, and J. H. Smith.

Judge Hunter Bird conducted the prosecution in the absence of State’s Attorney Alexander Wilson, who is out of the city.

With a big, ugly looking revolver clutched tightly in her hand and hidden beneath the folds of her skirt, Sadie Hardin, alias Pride, waited in a shadow for her alleged lover, Sam Brown, to make his appearance.

The scene was near Thirty-second and Commercial, the time about 10 o’clock last night.  Brown was in the Corner Saloon and when he came out, the woman approached him and asked:  “Don’t you think I’ll kill you?”  Brown rather thought she meant what she said and he struggled with her in an effort to gain possession of the gun, but the negress was too quick for him and shot him down in the twinkling of an eye.  The bullet took effect a little below the heart.  Brown ran a short distance and then dropped dead.

It is said that Brown was told by two other negroes, while he was in the saloon, that the woman was waiting for him on the outside with blood in her eye, but he went out anyway.

The woman was arrested by Sergeant Cowell and Officers Wade and Bradley.

The crime is supposed to be the outcome of jealousy.

The coroner’s inquest was held this afternoon at 2 o’clock at police headquarters, when witnesses were examined.  J. D. Blackburn, the owner of the saloon in front of which Brown was murdered, testified that the Pride woman passed in front of a crowd of men and said to Brown that she would get a nickel’s worth of cartridges and kill him.  She then passed up the street.  About an hour later, Blackburn heard a shot and running out, saw Brown fall and when he reached him he was dead.  Looking down the street, he saw a woman run in a house and this he recognized as the Pride woman.

Several negroes were then examined and nearly all testified like Blackburn.


Mrs. Henry Worthington died Sunday morning in St. Louis of consumption, aged about thirty-one years. Mrs. Worthington was Miss Nellie Parker, an Alexander County girl, a daughter of the late John Parker, being reared on what is now the county farm, but which was formerly known as the Parker farm about two miles south of here (Unity). She was married to Henry Worthington, about fourteen years ago and has lived here and at Willard, Ill., until about six months ago, when they removed to St. Louis. The deceased is survived by her husband and three young children, also by two sisters and one brother, namely, Mrs. Nina Pearl Stevens, of Willard, Mrs. W. S. Disherbach, of St. Louis, and Charles Parker, of Vienna, Ill. The bereaved family have the deepest sympathy of their many friends. The remains were laid to rest Monday, April 2, in the family cemetery near the old Parker homestead.

(John Hamilton Parker married Charlotte Isabel Blackwell on 1 Nov 1863, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Henry Worthington married Nellie L. Parker on 19 Jul 1891, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Arthur Frederick Stevens married Anna P. Parker on 23 Sep 1889, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Her marker in the Poor Farm or Parker Cemetery reads:  Nellie Lee Worthington 1874-1905.—Darrel Dexter)


Lida Milford was called to her heavenly home at six thirty o’clock Tuesday morning, April 3, after being confined to her bed since the middle of November. She was the beloved daughter and only child of John A. Milford. Her age was 18 years, 7 months, and 21 days. Her uncle, Henry Worthington, arrived at her bedside after putting his wife away, while she was still conscious. She was the child of his only sister, now deceased. Lida was an exceeding bright and lovable girl and there will be many to mourn her untimely death. She was taken about one year ago with consumption, seemingly in the very bloom of health. Everything that human skill could devise or loving care could think of was done, but all was of no avail. Her stricken father has the heartfelt sympathy of all in his great sorrow. Funeral services were held at the house Wednesday afternoon about 2:30 o’clock. Interment in Richwoods Cemetery. (Unity)

             (John A. Milford married Melinda Worthington on 10 Oct 1886, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Her marker in Richwood Cemetery reads:  Minnie Lida Daughter of John A. & Malinda M. Milford Born Aug. 2, 1887 Died April 3, 1906, Aged 18 Yrs., 7 Mos., & 21 Ds.  Weep not for her the bitter tear.  Nor give thine heart to vain regret.  Tis but the casket that lies here.  The gem that filled it sparkles yet.—Darrel Dexter)


FORMER CAIROITE PASSES AWAY
Mr. B. F. Parker, Once City Treasurer, Died in Sanitarium at Milwaukee

Mr. B. F. Parker, once city treasurer of Cairo, and also an alderman here, is dead in Milwaukee, where he went for treatment at a sanitarium.

Old residents of Cairo will remember well the deceased. He came to Cairo in 1857, according to Mr. D. A. Hannon, and remained a citizen of this city until about twenty years ago, when he removed to Chicago. He was in the paint and paper business at Eleventh and Commercial with Mr. B. F. Blake, and lived in the Cannon house on Douglas Street.

His death was the result of paralysis and he was 71 years of age.

Mr. Parker passed through many vicissitudes after leaving Cairo. His second son, Everett, was killed by the kick of a horse. His son, Lonnie, was killed in a railway accident at Hammond, Ind. He also lost his wife two months ago.

One daughter, Mrs. H. L. Mitchell, of Chicago, survives him.

Mr. Parker was formerly a member of Cairo Commandery Knights Templar.

 


Saturday, 7 Apr 1906:
Louis Wise, son of George Wise, yesterday, after protracted illness, formerly of this city, died in Chicago, aged thirty-three years. Charles Cassell, who was a brother-in-law of the deceased, received word to this effect by wire yesterday. The deceased is well known in Cairo, having formerly resided here.


Seeking a Pardon—Lewis Thomas, the one arm negro who was sentenced to be hanged for the murder of a white man on upper Commercial a few years ago, and whose sentence was changed to life imprisonment by the late Governor Tanner, wants to get a pardon for his crime. The matter will come up before the State Board of Pardons next Tuesday. Pardons are generally considered to be the direct cause or foundation of the practice of lynching. Where a heinous crime is committed and the people feel that the criminal will not be duly punished or perhaps may afterward be pardoned for his crime resort to capitol punishment by lynching.


Blew Out the Gas and Died

Belleville, Ill., April 7—John Lennon, a stranger, blew out the gas at the police station and was found dead in his cell next morning.

 


Monday, 9 Apr 1906:
Floater Found Sunday—The body of a white man weighing about 185 pounds and measuring about 5 feet 10 inches, was found yesterday afternoon about 3 o’clock lying between tracks on the Big Four incline. The body was taken to Mrs. M. E. Feith’s undertaking establishment and held until this morning. Coroner McManus held an inquest this morning and as no marks of violence were found on the body the jury found that the man came to his death by ways unknown.


Mrs. William Childers, wife of the well-known superintendent of the county farm, is critically ill and her condition last night caused her relatives and friends great alarm.

 


Wednesday, 11 Apr 1906:
Lou Bedwell and wife suffered the loss of their little ones last week from a malady, which was at once mysterious and alarming, as it was reported to be several different disease, but we understand now that it has been settled by a committee of the board of health to be spotted fever. The bereaved parents have the sympathy of a host of friends. (Olive Branch)


The news of the death of Lida Milford at her home near Unity last Tuesday morning came as a sad blow to her many friends here who knew her for a sweet, lovable girl. A great many of our people attended the funeral Wednesday. (Olive Branch)

 


Thursday, 12 Apr 1906:
Died at Infirmary—Mr. R. W. Turner, a resident of Drawwater, Mo., who has been confined to St. Mary’s Infirmary for several weeks, died this morning. His remains will be shipped to his home tomorrow morning on the Iron Mountain.


BOY KILLED BY FELLOW PLAYMATE
Pistol Figures in Accidental Killing of Sandusky Youth

Thomas McRaven, the 11-year-old son of William McRaven, of Sandusky, Ill., was accidentally shot and killed at Sandusky by a playmate, Fred Brackin, aged 15 years.

The boys were playing with pistols at the McRaven home, when Brackin’s was accidentally discharged, wounding McRaven, who died two hours later.

Coroner McManus went up to Sandusky and held an inquest. The jury found that the deceased came to his death by accidental shooting.


Seriously Ill at Infirmary

Mr. D. P. Martin, of Columbus, Ga., a railroad conductor, who is a brother-in-law of City Clerk Robert A. Hatcher, of this city, is critically ill at St. Mary’s Infirmary. Mr. Martin was taken sick several weeks ago of pneumonia and this caused an abcess, which may result in his death.


L. E. Mowery, who was taken to Cairo Friday, March 30th, to undergo an operation for appendicitis, died at St. Mary’s Hospital Sunday night, April 1, and the remains were brought here (Dongola) Monday. Funeral services at Mt. Pisgah Church Wednesday.

             (Lewis Edwin Mowery, son of Eli Mowery and Amanda Cruse, married Agnes Arlone Murphy on 25 Oct 1899, in Union Co., Ill.  His marker in Mt. Pisgah Cemetery near Wetaug reads:  Lewis E. Mowery Born Oct. 25, 1871 Died April 1, 1906.—Darrel Dexter)


Henry Worthington returned to St. Louis Thursday. (Unity)


The funeral services of the late Miss Lida Milford were held at the house last Wednesday at 3 o’clock conducted by the Rev. W. A. Ridge, of Dongola. Among those who attended from other places were Mesdames Dave Mulcahy, Lizzie and Grace Atherton, of Willard, Mrs. Monroe Colp, Messrs. Paul, Leonard and Robert Colph, of Carterville, T. R. Grace and daughter, Miss Mignon, of Elco, J. E. Milford and Horace Cornell, of Cache, and Mr. Phil Irby, of Cairo.


Mr. and Mrs. Thomas McRaven were called to Diswood Wednesday morning by the sad news of the death of their nephew, who was accidentally shot by a playmate. The old story of a pistol that was not loaded. (Unity)

 


Friday, 13 Apr 1906:
The little son of Mr. and Mrs. Norton, of this city (Mound City), dropped dead Tuesday evening. The body was taken up the Big Four for burial.


DIED AT INFIRMARY
D. P. Martin of Baton Rouge Passed Away This Morning.

Mr. D. P. Martin died at St. Joseph’s Infirmary at 9:30 this morning.

Mr. Martin had a very severe attack of pleura pneumonia over a year ago and that time was confined to his bed about fourteen weeks. Ever since that his health has been failing.

About a week ago he came to Cairo with the view of having an operation performed, his only hope of recovery, but unfortunately the progress of the disease had already been too extensive and he has been in no condition since he came here to admit of such operative procedures as would have been required in his case.

His home was in Baton Rouge, La.  Surviving relatives are a wife and baby, two sisters in Columbus, Ga., and a sister in this city, Mrs. Robert Hatcher. The remains will be taken to Joppa, Ill., tomorrow morning at 6 o’clock.  Mr. and Mrs. Hatcher and the wife and brother will accompany the remains from this city.

 


Saturday, 14 Apr 1906:
DEATH OF FORMER CAIRO MAN
Mr. Frank W. Stophlet Died at Mound City This Morning

Mr. Frank W. Stophlet, formerly of Cairo, died at Mound City at 1 o’clock this morning of consumption.

He was brought up from Memphis three weeks ago and has been steadily failing since.

Funeral services will be held tomorrow and the remains will be buried in Beech Grove Cemetery.
Mr. Stophlet was 46 years of age.

He leaves a widow and eight children, Mrs. Overton Goose, of Memphis, Mrs. William Flannigan, of Carbondale, Elmer, Craig, Wayne, Dwight, Fay and Ruth; besides a brother, Mr. L. D. Stophlet, a merchant at Mound City; and a sister, Mrs. James Capoot.

             (Frank W. Stophlet married Maybelle Hawley on 23 Apr 1879, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  William T. Jaccard married Henrietta Stophlet on 25 Oct 1863, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  James Capoot married Mrs. Henrietta Jaccard on 11 Jun 1872, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 


Monday, 16 Apr 1906:

CENTRAL ENGINEER COMMITS SUICIDE

Carbondale, Ill., April 16—Engineer Dunne, of the St. Louis division of the Illinois Central railroad, swallowed poison Saturday night and died soon afterward. The man had been despondent for several days, following a slight accident, which happened to him about a week ago. He leaves a widow and child residing in St. Louis, where the remains will be buried.

 

Mr. W. H. Gooch died at his home in Mound City Saturday morning, April 14 of pneumonia. Short services were held by the Modern Woodmen of America. His body was taken to Barlow, Ky., for burial.

             (William H. Gooch, 29, of Ballard Co., Ky., son of D. T. Gooch and Josie Hunter, married Ada Wolf on 21 Aug 1896, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

The funeral service of F. W. Stophlet was held at the home of James Capoot, Sunday afternoon. Mr. Stophlet had formerly lived in Mound City moving from there to Cairo, where he lived for several years.  He recently moved to Memphis, where he was taken down with consumption. He was brought to Mound City three weeks ago by his brother, Mr. L. D. Stophlet, where he died. The funeral was preached by Rev. Fidler. There were many out-of-town relatives and friends attended. He leaves a widow and seven children to survive him.

 


Tuesday, 17 Apr 1906:
Sallie Gordon, colored, died in this city (Mound City), Monday, April 16. Remains will be buried Tuesday afternoon.

 
Friday, 20 Apr 1906:
NEGRO DROWNED IN LA BELLE OHIO
John Wilson, an Employee of Singer Company, Meets Watery Grave

John Wilson, a negro employed by the Singer Manufacturing Company, was drowned yesterday morning in the Ohio River. Wilson was working on a barge when he slipped and fell into the river.
Divers were sent in searching for the body, but this far it has not been recovered.

 


Saturday, 21 Apr 1906:
Mr. Hastings, while in an intoxicated condition, tried to board a moving freight train, was thrown under the wheels and had both legs cut off. He was from Detroit, Mich., and had a daughter living there. He was about sixty years old and had been painting for a while in Mounds. His legs were amputated by Dr. Boswell and Dr. Winstead. The loss of blood is so great that he is hardly expected to live. (Mounds)



Monday, 23 Apr 1906:
DEATH OF FORMER CAIRO BOY
Mr. Maurice Meyers Passed Away at Silver City, N.M., Thursday

Mr. F. S. Haas is in receipt of a letter from Mr. Al Meyers at St. Louis, which brings the sad news of the death of his brother, Maurice, at Silver City, New Mexico, last Thursday morning.  His brother Lou was with him when he died and brought the remains on ____ held in New York Wednesday and the remains will be buried beside those of their father.  Mrs. Meyers and son Ed have just returned from a trip abroad and the former is quite ill and it is feared that this new bereavement will go very hard with her.

David Y. Pierce, an old resident of Alexander County and an old soldier, died at Delta last Wednesday.  He was a member of the Brown-Culley G. A. R. post of Thebes.  He is survived by a wife and four children.

(David Y. Pierce, 21, native of Johnson Co., Ill., enlisted as a private in Co. F, 31st Illinois Infantry. David Y. Pearce married Tempy E. Carter on 8 Nov 1866, in Johnson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Tuesday, 24 Apr 1906:

DEATH OF GEORGE ELLIOTT

George Elliott, night watchman at the Chicago Mill, residing at No. 415 Thirty-sixth Street, died last night at 9 o’clock, at his home.  The deceased is a widower and leaves several children all grown, who reside in the city.

The remains of Mr. C. W. Thomas will be taken to Noble, Ill., tomorrow for interment.  Mrs. Thomas arrived this morning from Idlewild, but returned home this afternoon and will return tomorrow to accompany the remains of her husband to Noble.

Mr. Thomas left life insurance amounting to $5,000, besides an accident policy.

DEATH OF OLD RESIDENT OF COUNTY
Samuel Troxell Passed Away in Promised Land on April 18th

Mr. Samuel Troxell, one of the oldest residents of the county, died on April 18th, at his home in the Promised Land.  He is said to have been over 80 years of age.  He leaves two grandchildren by the county court administrator of his estate.

(Samuel Troxell married Elvira Mayho on 22 Jul 1852, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

CAIROITE DIED AT ST. LOUIS YESTERDAY
Mr. Timothy Coyle Passed Away After Ten Days Illness of Erysipelas

Mr. Timothy Coyle, a former resident of Cairo, died at his home in St. Louis yesterday after an illness of ten days of erysipelas.  The deceased was about 55 years old.  He was well known in Cairo.
Mr. Coyle went to St. Louis about six years ago to take a position as bookkeeper in the office of Coyne Bros., plumbers.  During his residence in Cairo he was employed as an express messenger for the American Express Company and was held in the highest esteem by his employers, being a trustworthy and energetic employee.

The deceased was a devoted husband and father and is survived by his wife and five daughters, the Misses Edna, Nellie, Virginia, Rose and Emma, who have the sympathy of their many friends during their hour of bereavement.

DEATH OF OLD CAIROITE.
Mrs. Jane K. Rennie Passed Away at Los Angeles Last Saturday of Heart Trouble.

Mrs. Jane K. Rennie, an old resident of Cairo, died suddenly last Saturday at her home in Los Angeles, Cal., of heart trouble.  The deceased was 76 years of age.  Owing to the rush of telegrams in the west owing to the San Francisco catastrophe, the news did not reach Cairo of Mrs. Rennie’s death until yesterday.

Mrs. Rennie went to Los Angeles about eight months ago for the benefit of her health.

Her husband was the late John T. Rennie, one of Cairo’s early citizens.

She is survived by a large family of stepchildren who are John T. Rennie, Mrs. E. G. Pink, Miss Virginia Rennie, and James E. Rennie, of Cairo; Mrs. David Sutton, of Lexington, Miss.; Mrs. Harry Wilson, of Anna, Ill.; and Frank L. Rennie, of Dallas, Texas.  The late Mrs. Ella E. Slack, of Cairo, was a stepdaughter of the deceased.

Mrs. Edward Pink and Mrs. John T. Rennie were at her bedside at the time of her death.

The remains will be brought to Cairo and the funeral held Thursday afternoon.  Funeral notice will be found elsewhere in this issue.

(John T. Rennie married Mrs. Jane K. Davisson on 11 Jun 1877, in Massac Co., Ill.  Edward Pink married Laura V. Rennie on 6 Mar 1899, in Alexander Co., Ill.  David Sutton married Marguerite Rennie on 14 Apr 1892, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Charles K. Slack married Ellen M. Rennie on 3 Jan 1867, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Her marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Jane K. wife of John T. Rennie Born Nov. 11, 1829 Died April 21, 1906.—Darrel Dexter)

FATALLY INJURED BY BRYAN’S TRAIN
C. M. Thomas, of Diswood, Died at Infirmary Last Night
TRIED TO BOARD MOVING TRAIN
And Was Struck and Hurled to the Ground—Was Manager of Stave Mill at Diswood

C. M. Thomas, manager of the Southern Illinois Stave and Lumber Company, of Diswood, was injured while attempting to board Bryan’s train at Eighth Street shortly after 5 o’clock last evening, and died during the night of his injuries.

Mr. Thomas came to Cairo yesterday afternoon in company with J. L. Vick.  He had some business to transact and call on the Dunbar Lumber Company just before time for his train to leave.  He overstayed there and found when he left that it was then time for his train to leave.  Seeing it coming up the levee he attempted to board it at Eighth Street.  He failed in his attempt and was struck by the train and hurled to the ground.  He fell clear of the wheels, but his back was mashed almost to a pulp by the force of the blow and his hip was badly injured.  The train was quickly stopped and backed up and friends of the injured man who were aboard got off to care for him.  He was taken to St. Mary’s Infirmary and Dr. Grinstead, the company’s physician, attended him, but he died from his injuries at 12:30 a.m.

The deceased was 32 years of age and leaves a wife and two children.  Mrs. Thomas was notified immediately after the accident, but could not reach her husband before his death.  Mr. Thomas was the resident manager of the business at Diswood, the head office being at Newton, Ill.  He was a hard working, industrious man and had built up the business at Diswood by his energy and industry.  He won the confidence of all who had dealing with him for his integrity and great confidence was imposed in him by the company, which he served.

SHERIFF MCMILLIAN KILLED AT MALDEN BALL GAME

Malden, Mo., April 23—At New Madrid Sunday, during the progress of a game of baseball between the Malden and New Madrid clubs, a difficulty ensued between bystanders in which John H. McMillian, city marshall of Malden, was shot dead by some unknown person.  At the time of the shooting, McMillan was talking with friends from Malden and was being partially held by Sheriff Henry of New Madrid County, who was a close personal friend of the marshal.  The shot was fired over the sheriff’s shoulder and the latter’s face was powder burned.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Died at Los Angeles, Cal., Friday, April 20, Mrs. Jane K. Rennie, aged 76 years.  Funeral will take place from the family residence, No. 509 Walnut Street, Thursday afternoon at 2 p.m.  Train will leave foot of Sixth Street for Villa Ridge at 2:45.


Wednesday, 25 Apr 1906:
DEATH OF WELL KNOWN YOUNG MAN
Mr. John T. Hodge Passed Away Early This Morning at Home on Seventeenth Street.
DEATH DUE TO PNEUMONIA
Was Taken Ill Only Last Saturday—Was a Traveling Salesman for Wood & Bennett Company—Funeral Friday

Mr. John T. Hodge, one of Cairo’s well known citizens, died this morning about 4:30 o’clock at his home, No. 216 Seventeenth Street, after an illness of several days of pneumonia.  The deceased was 35 years of age.

Mr. Hodge was born in Cairo on May 5, 1871 and was reared and educated in this city.  For the past seventeen years he has been in the employ of the Wood & Bennett Company as traveling salesman and was held in the highest esteem by his employers and all who knew him.  He was a young man of genial disposition and pleasing personality that won for him many friends.  He was a member of the Traveler’s Protective Association.

The deceased had a severe attack and since then his health has not been its normal condition.  Mr. Hodge was taken ill last Saturday with a hard chill and gradually grew worse until the Grim Reaper claimed the young man as his own this morning.  He was conscious to the last and died peacefully.
Mr. Hodge was a member of the First Presbyterian Church, of this city.  The funeral will be held from the home of his sister, Mrs. Ada Goldsmith, of Seventeenth Street Friday afternoon, conducted by Rev. A. S. Buchanan, pastor of the Presbyterian Church.

The deceased is survived by his sister, Mrs. Goldsmith, two brothers, Messrs. Will and Charles Hodge, and was an uncle of Misses Daisy and Edith Hodge.

 

FUNERAL NOTICE

Died at Los Angeles, Cal., Friday, April 20, Mrs. Jane K. Rennie, aged 76 years.  Funeral will take place from the family residence, No. 509 Walnut Street, Thursday afternoon at 2 p.m.  Train will leave foot of Sixth Street for Villa Ridge at 2:45.


Thursday, 26 Apr 1906:
LAST RITES WERE HELD
Over Remains of Mrs. Jane K. Rennie This Afternoon.

The funeral of Mrs. Jane K. Rennie was held this afternoon, services having been held at the family residence on lower Walnut Street.  Here neighbors and friends of the deceased gathered to pay a last tribute to her memory.  Funeral services were conducted by Rev. A. S. Buchanan, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, and the choir of that church sang the hymns.  The remains were taken to Villa Ridge Cemetery for burial, and there they were laid away under a load of beautiful floral pieces.  The honorary pallbearers were the following old friends of the family:  Maj. E. W. Halliday, Judge John H. Robinson, Capt. John F. Rector, Judge A. Comings, Hon. John M. Lansden, Mr. Charles Pink, Mr. J. W. D. Hatcher, Mr. Paul G. Schuh, and Mr. Daniel Hartman.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Died at his home on Seventeenth Street, Wednesday, April 24, 1906, John T. Hodges, age 34 years.  Funeral will be held from the Presbyterian Church Friday afternoon, at 1:45. Train will leave foot of Eighteenth Street at 2:45 p.m. for Beech Ridge.  Friends of the family are invited to attend.

Charlie and Lee Worthington, the little sons of Henry Worthington, of St. Louis, having lost their mother, have come to make their home with Mr. John Milford.  (Unity)

The funeral of Mr. Sam Troxel was conducted in the M. E. church by Rev. Dewese on April 20.  The remains were interred in the Olive Branch Cemetery.  The deceased was a citizen of this county for fifty or more years.


Friday, 27 Apr 1906:
FUNERAL OF THE LATE JOHN T. HODGE
Held at Presbyterian Church This Afternoon, Attended by Large Number of Friends.

The funeral services over the remains of the late John T. Hodge were held at the Presbyterian church this afternoon, conducted by the pastor, Rev. A. S. Buchanan, and the church was filled with the friends of the young man.  The remains were taken to Beech Grove Cemetery for interment.


Saturday, 28 Apr 1906:
Death of Colored Woman—Mollie Bibbs, a colored woman, aged about 37 years, industrious and respected by those who knew her, died yesterday at her home at Third and Washington.  She was employed at the American Steam Laundry.

Mr. Zeb Haskel, who got his legs cut off at Mounds last week by a moving freight, died at this place (Mounds).  He was buried in potter’s field.

Word was received Wednesday that B. Camp had been seriously injured and died in Jackson.  He was the son of Mrs. Camp, of the Commercial Hotel at this place (Mounds).  He used to live in Mounds and worked on the railroad, being an engineer from Mounds to Memphis.  Humphrey left Thursday for Jackson to see after his brother’s body.

 
Tuesday, 1 May 1906:
RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT
Resolutions adopted out of respect to the memory of M. J. Sheehan

That whereas in the working of His providence it has pleased Almighty God, to whose wisdom we all humbly bow, to take from our midst our esteemed fellow director, Michael J. Sheehan, who died at his residence in this city Sunday, April 1st, 1906.

Therefore, resolved that in his untimely death this board has lost a valued member, the community an honored and useful citizen and his children a loving and ______ father.

And be it further resolved that out of respect to his cherished memory these resolutions be spread upon the records of the Citizen’s B. & L. Association also published in the city papers.
John W. Fry
Charles Feuchter, Jr.
C. P. Crabtree
Committee Citizen’s B. & L. Association


Wednesday, 2 May 1906:
Died, Monday, April 30th, at his home three and one half miles west of Dongola, Mr. Henry McLane.  Interment in the St. John’s Cemetery Tuesday, May 1.  (Dongola)

Mrs. Ophelia A. Chatham, wife of Dr. Chatham, died at her home in this city, April 29, after a long and lingering illness of several weeks.  The remains were taken to Mill Creek, Ill. and the funeral was preached at the Baptist church of that city, of which deceased was a member, Rev. Edmondson, of Jonesboro, officiating.  The funeral was largely attended.  The Royal Neighbors of that city and of Olive Branch took charge of the body.  Deceased was an active member of the Baptist Church of Mill Creek and was a faithful worker in the church.  She was born at Xenia, Ill., March 22, 1851.  She was a faithful and devoted wife and a loving mother.  She leaves an aged husband and four children and a host of friends to mourn her departure.  They have the tenderest sympathy of the people.  (Olive Branch)

(John R. Chatham married Ophelia A. Thomas on 29 Apr 1877, in Clay Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank the people of Olive Branch and Mill Creek who so kindly assisted us in the sickness and death of our dear wife and mother. We especially feel grateful to the Royal Neighbors and Modern Woodmen who took charge of the remains.
Dr. J. R. Chatham and Children


Thursday, 3 May 1906:
WELL KNOWN VILLA RIDGE FARMER DIES

Mr. Robert Welson, one of the best known and most prosperous farmers of Southern Illinois, died yesterday afternoon at his home at Villa Ridge.  The deceased had been ill for some time, having suffered from a tumor at the base of the brain.

The deceased is survived by his wife, two daughters, Misses Flo and Emma Welson; and his son, Mr. John Welson, who is the cashier of the First National Bank of Mound City.

Mr. Frank Spencer, assistant cashier of the Alexander County National Bank of this city, was related to Mr. Welson.

Mr. and Mrs. Spencer went up to attend the funeral, which will be held tomorrow afternoon.

(His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Robert Welson 1832-1906.—Darrel Dexter)

FORMER CAIROITE DIED YESTERDAY

Mr. Fred Barter, a former resident of this city, passed away at the home of his wife’s parents, at Harrisburg, Ill., yesterday afternoon.

He is survived by his wife, his father, John H. Barter, of Mt. Vernon, Ind.; his brothers, Arthur and Festus of Cairo, Lester, of Evansville, Ind., Will and Charles of Mt. Vernon, Ind., and John, who resides in Montana.  A sister, Miss Ella Barter, also survives him, whose home is in Kalamazoo, Mich.

Mrs. Barter is a niece of Mrs. J. W. Spies, of this city.

The funeral was held today.

Connie Sullivan, aged about sixteen years, died Saturday night at the home of Michael Lynch, about two _______ of the heart.  The deceased was a brother of E. J. Sullivan, of Sandusky, and of Miss Maggie Sullivan, of Chicago.  His illness was of some months’ duration and his recovery considered doubtful for some time, but for two weeks previous to his death, he was thought to be getting well and was able to go two miles to church on Sunday, April 2.  His loss is to the Lynch family almost the same as the loss of a son, for he had been a beloved member of their household since his mother’s death some eight or nine years ago.  Connie was an exceedingly winsome boy with a pleasant word and bright smile for all and he will be greatly missed by his schoolmates and friends.  The bereaved family has the sympathy of all in their sorrow.  The funeral occurred Tuesday.  The remains were laid to rest in the Catholic cemetery at Villa Ridge.


Friday, 4 May 1906:
Well Known Colored Man Dead—James Douglas, the well known colored painter, died last evening at 6:30 o’clock at his home, No. 309 Twenty-fifth Street.  The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 10 a.m. from the Twelfth Street Baptist Church.  Rev. Allison will conduct the services.

REMAINS OF JEFF ALLEN FOUND NEAR INCLINE
Body of Negro Who Was Drowned Off Wharfboat Several Weeks Ago Found This Morning

The remains of a negro, supposed to be the body of Jeff Allen, who was drowned several weeks ago, were found this morning at the Big Four incline about 9 o’clock.  The body was taken to Feith’s undertaking establishment where the inquest was held.

It was found upon examination that the remains were those of Jeff Allen, the alias “Bad Eye,” who formerly worked at Mrs. Walsh’s grocery store.  The body was identified.


Saturday, 5 May 1906:
Mr. H. C. Steinel left today for South Bend, Ind., where he was called by the death of his niece.


Monday, 7 May 1906:
DIED AT OLIVE BRANCH

Mrs. Martha Hutson died at Olive Branch Sunday after a long illness.  She leaves five children, the oldest 10 years of age.  Her husband, W. R. Hudson, died two years ago.

MURDER STILL A DEEP MYSTERY
Body of Young White Man Found Lying Beside Tracks Early This Morning
IDENTIFIED AS WEBB WHITE
A Young Man Residing at Sikeston, Mo.—Body Identified by Sikeston Parties—Met with Foul Play—Police Working on Clues

The body of the young white man, which was found lying beside the tracks in the Illinois Central railroad yards near the stone depot during the early hours of the morning, was identified today by parties living in the neighborhood of Sikeston, Mo., who claim the deceased to be Webb White, a young man about 19 years of age, who resides at Sikeston.

Two men were arrested on the suspicion of knowing something of the murder, as it was found upon close examination that the young man had met with foul play and probably been murdered.

The body was discovered by railroad men about 12:30 a.m., who notified the police.  Sergeant Cowell in company with officers rushed to the scene and Coroner McManus was also notified.

They found that the deceased had a broken neck, his left arm was broken at the elbow and a bullet wound in the abdomen.  The railroad men stated that the man could not have been struck and killed by a passing train, for there had been no train to pass the depot since early in the evening and the body had not been there very long before the time when it was discovered.

The broken neck and arm indicated a fall.  There was some abrasion of the nose and upper lip, but not such as would have been made by a blow sufficiently hard to break his neck.

The clothing was searched for marks of identification.  In one of the pockets of the trousers were found a white handkerchief, a white collar, a package containing a new white tie bought from N. Sandler, whose name appeared on the paper, a tooth brush, which was freshly broken off short, both pieces being in the pocket, showing it was broke in the fall, two business cards of Uncle Joe’s Hotel, a 50-cent piece and a 10-cent piece was all the money found.

One of the cards bore the address of Eliza Mitchell, 518 Douglas Street, which is a negro dive, and this may prove an important clue.

A white shabby felt hat was found near the place where the body was found by Officer Nichols.  The hat was not that of the murdered man.  Whether or not it will be of aid in solving the mystery is hard to tell.

The young man who identified the body, stated to a Citizen representative that they had come over from Sikeston together last Wednesday.  He said that he had been in company with White the greater part of Sunday.  That White borrowed some money from him and the last he saw of him White had been drinking and was somewhat under the influence of liquor.

The party said that White’s father was a butcher at Sikeston and that the murdered man worked at the trade with his father sometimes.

Jeff Mayfield and Will Marr, two young white men, who claim Sikeston as their home, are being held by the police awaiting developments.  Marr claims that he came over from Sikeston last Wednesday with White, and Mayfield claims to have come over Saturday.

They claim that the murdered man was with them Sunday and last night until 10 o’clock.  They were all at O’Donnelly’s saloon at Thirteenth and Commercial.  White is said to have left the place, saying that he would return in a short time. Nothing more was seen of him by Marr or Mayfield, according to their story.

As he failed to return and they heard that a man had been found murdered, they appeared this morning to view the remains and identified the body as that of White.  They were then questioned by the police and held in custody as stated above.

The parties above mentioned say that two men were in O’Donnelly’s Saloon during the night and that one of them wore a soft white hat similar to the one that was found near the dead body.  Whether these parties are implicated in the murder cannot be told at this time.

The negress, whose name was found on the card in the murdered man’s pocket, was questioned by the police.  She said that last night shortly after dark, she went to Doud’s grocery store at Twelfth and Walnut, after some buttermilk.  On her way back she said that a tall white man accosted her and asked her where she lived.  She gave him her name and address, which she says he wrote on the card.  She claims she saw nothing more of the man.  To make the mystery deeper, she claims that White was not the man after she had viewed the remains.

The police are working on every clue they have, but the mystery which hangs over the murder is a deep one and it may be days or weeks before it can be solved.  If it is ever solved at all.

FELL FROM TRAIN AND FATALLY INJURED
Henry Day of Herrin, Ill., Received Injuries That Resulted in His Death

Henry Day, of Herrin, Ill., one of the passengers on the Illinois Central excursion yesterday, fell from the train at Cache Bridge and was fatally injured.

Day, who was intoxicated, had been warned by the conductor to stay in the coach and not to hang on the railings, but he would not take heed.

As the train passed on Cache Bridge, Day leaned far out on the steps and losing his hold, was hurled against the iron works of the bridge.  He fell and struck the iron rafters below.  He caught his foot in the last rafter, this saving him from falling into the stream below.  The train was stopped and the injured man was picked up and taken to Mounds by Trainmaster Brown and Dr. C. J. Boswell, of Mounds, where medical aid was given him.  Later in the day, he was brought to Cairo and sent to St. Mary’s Infirmary, where he died at 2 o’clock this morning.

Day was badly injured, his car being torn off and his skull fractured and several bones broken.
The deceased was employed as a section hand on the Coal Belt railroad at Herrin and was 23 years old.


Tuesday, 8 May 1906:
POLICE HAVE IMPORTANT CLUES
And May Land Murderer of Sikeston Man Within 48 Hours
HAT MAY UNRAVEL THE MYSTERY
Which Surrounds Death of Web White, Whose Body Was Found in Illinois Central Yards.

The police have some important clues, which they think will solve the stone depot murder mystery.  What those clues are the police refuse to make public.  The hat, which was found near the body of the murdered man, will probably be an important factor in the mystery, as will also the address of the negro woman, which was found on a card in a pocket of the murdered man.  If the clues which the police are working on at present are the right ones, Chief Egan says he thinks the guilty parties will be in jail in less than 48 hours.


Wednesday, 9 May 1906:
WELL KNOWN YOUNG MAN BADLY INJURED
Arthur Hoffman, a Flagman on Mobile & Ohio, Knocked Off From Top of Car.

Mr. Arthur Hoffman, a well-known young railroad man, was seriously injured Monday at Union City, Tenn.  Mr. Hoffman, who is a flagman on the M. & O. freight train, which runs between Union City and Cairo, was on top of one of the boxcars when he was knocked off and badly injured.  He was taken to the hospital at Union City, where it was found that he was in a very serious condition, being injured internally.  He remains unconscious for the next twenty-four hours, and the doctors have little hope for his recovery.

Mr. Hoffman is well known in this city having resided here for several years.

Mrs. John Mulvihill received the sad news yesterday of the sudden death of her mother, Mrs. Maria Davidson, of Pinckneyville, Ill.  The deceased was 70 years old.  The deceased visited Cairo recently.

OBITUARY
Robert Welson

Robert Welson was born at Drisden, Germany, February 28, 1832.  He left home at the age of 16.  After spending a little time in England, he came to America, located at New Albany, Ind., was there married to Miss Margaret Vogle April 20th, 1855.  They came to Southern Illinois in 1857 and lived at Mound City until the year 1871, when they removed to Villa Ridge, where they lived until the time of his death.  After a protracted illness he passed away Wednesday, May 2nd, 1906, age 74 years, 2 months and 4 days.  The tenderest care and most efficient skill could no longer stay the messenger of death.  He lived a quiet and industrious life, respected by all who knew him.  Four children were born to them, three of whom are now living, Mr. J. F. Welson, of Mound City, and Misses Emma and Flora Welson, of Villa Ridge.  Fifty-one years as husband and wife they journeyed together.  The morning to them was bright.  The day of this life had its clouds, but there was brightness, courage and hope within and now at eventime it is light.  He has gone a little way before.  These are left to cherish the fond memory of a devoted husband and father remaining yet while to comfort and help each other, a blessing to society and to their friend. Mr. Welson was brought up in the Lutheran Church.  To his early training he remained thus faithful, unto the end.  Far removed from his childhood home and kindred in that house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens.

A large number of friends and neighbors attended the funeral.  Among these from Cairo were Mr. and Mrs. Frank Spencer, Mr. Leo Kleb and sisters, Mrs. W. H. Sherrick, Centralia, Mr. and Mrs. Hefler, Mrs. A. A. Safig, Anna, Mr. W. P. Minnich, of St. Louis, besides many relatives and friends from Mound City, Grand Chain and Anna.

The funeral was conducted from the residence by Rev. A. R. Bosworth, pastor of the Congregational Church. Interment in Villa Ridge cemetery.


Thursday, 10 May 1906:
MRS. H. L. WEDDING DIED LAST NIGHT
Passed Away at St. Mary’s Infirmary as Result of Operation

Mrs. H. L. Wedding, wife of Capt. Wedding, of Fire Station No. 2, died last night at St. Mary’s Infirmary about 10:40 o’clock.  Her death is thought to have been the result of an operation.  The deceased was 36 years of age.

Mrs. Wedding was born in Essex County, Illinois, in 1870, but has resided in Cairo for the past fifteen years.

The deceased is survived by her husband and one daughter.  She is also survived by her mother, Mrs. J. F. Kennedy, formerly of this city, but a resident of Aquaka, Ill., besides a brother and two sisters.

She was a devout member of St. Joseph’s Church.  The funeral will be held tomorrow morning from the church and the remains taken to Villa Ridge cemetery for interment.

Mrs. Martha Hutson, of this city (Olive Branch), died at her home Sunday morning at 10 o’clock, was buried Monday afternoon at the Olive Branch Cemetery.  Rev. Rose conducting the funeral.  She leaves a host of friends, also five little children.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Died at 10:40 p.m. Wednesday May 9th, Mrs. H. L. Wedding.

Funeral services will be held at St. Joseph’s Church Friday morning, May 11th.  The remains will leave the family residence, No. 413, 27th Street, at 8 a.m. for the church.  Special train will leave Eighteenth Street at 9:45 a.m. for Beech Grove Cemetery.

Friends of the family are invited to attend.


Friday, 11 May 1906:
STONE DEPOT MURDER MYSTERY IS SOLVED
Chief Egan Unravels Thread That Led to the Guilty Party
“WHITE HAT” BELONGED TO J. F. CANNADAY
Of Charleston, Mo., Who Fired the Shots—Webb White Killed in Plot to Rob Cannaday.

The Stone depot murder mystery in which Webb White, a young white man residing at Sikeston, Mo., was killed, has been solved.

Chief of Police Egan has been working quietly but diligently on important clues which he had and as stated in The Citizen a few days ago, hoped to solve the murder mystery in a few days.

J. F. Cannady, a white man residing in Charleston, Mo., is the man who fired the shots that wounded White and to whom belonged the “white hat,” which was found near the body of the murdered man.

The story of the affair is as follows:

Three Charleston men, giving the names of Joseph Bowmar, Delbert Bogard, and J. F. Cannaday, were in Cairo Sunday.  Bowmar and Bogard arrived in Cairo last Saturday and Cannaday arrived on Sunday.

The three men met at Uncle Joe’s saloon and after having a round of drinks went out to walk around town.

They finally stopped at O’Donnelly’s Saloon at the corner of Thirteenth and Commercial, where they spent the great part of the evening.

About 1 o’clock the three men left the saloon and stepped out in front to talk.

Cannaday made the remark that he wished he could find a house where he would not have to pay a dollar for a bottle of beer.

A stranger hearing the remark approached them and replied that he could take them to a house where they would not have to buy beer at all if they did not want to.

The three men consented to join the stranger (who was Webb White) and go to the place he mentioned.

White led the way and took them up to the stone depot.  He led them to the depot platform and to the platform shed.  The men became suspicious that something was wrong and that White was leading them into a trap.

Bowmar turned to Bogard and Canaday and said that White was not taking them to a sporting house, and suggested that all go back to town.

White then grabbed Cannaday and with an oath demanded Cannaday to give up his money, at the same time threatening to blow out the brains of Bowmar and Bogard if they did not “hike.”

Bowmar and Bogard left as ordered and ran down to Fourteenth and the levee.  They heard Cannaday and White scuffling and then heard two shots fired.

A minute later Cannaday overtook them and said that White didn’t get his money, but had got his hat and that he had got White’s hat.  Canaday told them he thought he had the best of the bargain.  He said that he fired two shots at White, but didn’t know whether or not he hit him, but that he thought he fell off the platform onto the tracks.

The men went down to Phelp’s Hotel on Ohio near Fourth Street.  Cannaday remained there until morning, when he took a train for Vincennes, Ind.  Bowmar went up to Hubbard’s Saloon at Twelfth and Commercial, where he spent the night and Bogard went back to O’Donnelly’s saloon at Thirteenth and Commercial.

The men were located by Chief Egan at Charleston, brought over to Cairo yesterday.  They made a full statement last night to the chief and returned to their home today.

As White was killed while attempting to commit the act of highway robbery, it is not likely that Cannaday will be prosecuted.

He identified the “white hat” as his own.

Webb White, the murdered man, was a notorious character and bore a bad reputation.  He served a ninety-day sentence for being implicated in a robbery case and just recently served out his time.  He has a brother who possesses a like reputation. Chief Egan is to be congratulated upon his success in solving the mysterious murder, and which many officers would have given up as a bad job.

Former Cairo Lawyer Dead—Judge F. E. Albright, a former resident of Cairo and one of the most prominent lawyers of Southern Illinois, died at his home at Fort Worth, Texas, Monday.

Former Cairoite Dead—T. J. Fitzgerald, a former resident of Cairo, died at his home in St. Mary’s Kansas, on May 3rd.  The deceased built some of the first sidewalks constructed in Cairo.

FUNERAL OF MRS. WEDDING
Held at 8 O’clock This Morning at St. Joseph’s Church.

The funeral of Mrs. H. L. Wedding was held this morning at St. Joseph’s Church at 8 o’clock.  A large number of the friends of the deceased attending the funeral and many very beautiful floral offerings were given.  The remains were taken to Villa Ridge on a special train leaving the foot of Eighteenth Street.  The pallbearers were:  Messrs. Richard Jones, Jack Haggerty, Abe Houghlin, M. Lutz, John C. Gholson and Thomas Larkin.

DEATH OF PROMINENT MOUND CITY RESIDENT
Charles Huckleberry Passed Away Last Evening at His Home.

Charles Huckleberry, one of Mound City’s most prominent young men, died at 5:30 last evening of cirrhosis of the liver and Bright’s disease.

The deceased was a native of Mound City, where he was born 36 years ago last December.  For sixteen years he has been connected with the Mound City Ways and was widely known among rivermen.  Previous to his connection with the ways he worked for the Peoria Cooperage Co., at Mound City, and T. P. Keefe, in Chicago.

Mr. Huckleberry is survived by his mother, Mrs. Mary Friganza; a brother, Ira Huckleberry; a stepbrother, Willis T. Friganza; and a sister, Mrs. W. N. McCartney, of Vienna.  Miss Trixie Friganza is his niece.

The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon, conducted by the Knights of Pythias and the remains will be taken to Beech Grove Cemetery for interment.

Mr. Huckleberry was confined to his bed only three weeks.  Even to the end, his business duties were constantly on his mind.  Only last Monday he signed the payroll and directed certain details of office work that were being performed for him, and the morning of his death, he went through the mail as usual, giving directions about its disposal.
             (Romeo Friganza married Mrs. Mary A.
Huckleberry on 22 Sep 1878, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Saturday, 12 May 1906:
FORMER SCHOOL TEACHER DEAD

Jailer Riggle received word yesterday of the death of William J. Finch, at Unity.  He was 60 years of age and was for many years a teacher in the county schools.  He leaves a wife and five children, nearly all grown.  The funeral occurred this afternoon.


Monday, 14 May 1906:
DEATH OF FORMER CAIROITE

The Centralia Sentinel states that Miss Nellie Howie, sister of George Howie, of that place, died last Friday.  She and her brother were formerly residents of Cairo.

UNKNOWN MAN STRUCK BY TRAIN
And Fatally Injured—Died at Infirmary Last Evening

A man supposed to be one of the employees of the Cosmopolitan Carnival Company, which played in this city last week, was struck by Billy Bryan’s train about 2:30 o’clock yesterday afternoon at the subway.  The man was fatally injured and died last evening about 7:30 o’clock.

The man was walking along the track over the subway.  He heard the train coming and ran to escape it, but the train was coming very fast and he was run down before he could reach a place of safety.

The pilot of the engine struck him in the back and in the head, hurling him down a steep embankment.  He was picked up and placed on the baggage car and brought to Cairo, where he was sent to the St. Mary’s Infirmary, where he died as stated above, of concussion of the brain, without gaining consciousness.

The man was carrying a small bundle of fancy clothes such as are worn in shows, and this is why he is thought to belong to some show.  The Cosmopolitan Company was wired this afternoon at Carbondale where they are now showing to see if this is one of their men.  No arrangements will be made until they are heard from.


Wednesday, 16 May 1906:
DEATH OF J. W. HASTINGS
Passed Away in New Orleans—Remains to Be Brought to Cairo

A dispatch, which arrived today, brought the news of the death of Mr. J. W. Hastings, whose serious illness at New Orleans has already been noted.  Mrs. Samuel Hastings and Mr. Ira Hastings were called to his bedside.  The remains will be brought here, arriving tomorrow afternoon and will be interred in Beech Grove Cemetery.  Friends who desire to attend the funeral can go up on the 2:35 train in the afternoon.  Mr. Hastings was formerly in business in Cairo with his brother, Mr. Samuel Hastings, and later removed to New Orleans where he went into business for himself.

Miss Mattie Mulvihill, who attended the funeral of her grandmother, Mrs. Mariah Davidson, departed last evening for her home in Cairo.  She was accompanied by her cousin, Miss Pearl Davison, who will be her guest for a week.  Mrs. John Mulvihill and little daughter Emma will remain here for a more extended visit with relatives.—DuQuoin Call

(John Mulvihill married Emma Davison on 10 Aug 1882, in Perry Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Thursday, 17 May 1906:
Mrs. Ezekiel Barnes, a well-known colored woman, died Monday of consumption. (Unity)

William Joseph Finch died at his home one mile north of here Friday morning, May 11th, after a lingering and painful illness with cancer of the eye.  The deceased was born in Perry County, Ind., Nov. 7th, 1843, but came to Alexander County when quite a young man and had resided here for the past forty years.  He was a member of the Unity Baptist Church and was highly respected as a citizen, was one of the veteran schoolteachers of this county and of later years a successful farmer.  He is survived by his wife and five children, to whom he was a kind husband and father.

One son, William Joseph, of St. Paul, and a daughter, Mrs. Rae McAnally, of San Francisco, were not with him at his death nor burial, being too far way to be summoned in time.  Mrs. McAnnally barely escaped death in the San Francisco earthquake.  The other children are a son, Thomas, and two daughters, Misses Elma and Mary.  The many friends of the bereaved family sympathize deeply with them in this time of sorrow.  The funeral services were held at the house at 3 o’clock Saturday, conducted by the Rev. J. H. Albright, of Sandusky.  The remains were laid to rest in the Richwoods Cemetery.  Among those who attended the funeral from other place, were Mr. and Mrs. Carson Martin, of Beech Ridge, Mesdames John Atherton, and Prindley, Mr. and Mrs. Green Bishop, of Sandusky, Mr. Peterson, a near relatives (address unknown to the writer) and Mr. Carr and family of Olive Branch.


Friday, 18 May 1906:
WALTERS MURDER CASE ON TRIAL
Trial Progressing Rapidly Today in the Circuit Court
LAWYER ARRESTED FOR FORGERY
On Warrant Issued in Hardin County—Other Cases Disposed of by the Court

The Frank Walter murder case was on trial in the circuit court today and made rapid progress, nearly all of the testimony having been presented this afternoon.

The jury was secured as follows:  G. W. Felts, George Dougherty, Scott Hazlewood, Ben Dexter, William Cunningham, Alfred Brown, James Coleman, Sr., Ed Abernathie, L. E. Sackberger, Smith Billingsley, H. M. Dickmeyer, and N. S. Kelley.


Saturday, 19 May 1906:
Infant Child Dies—The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Steele, of Seventeenth Street, died yesterday afternoon at 5:30 o’clock after an illness of several days.  The funeral services were held this morning at the home, conducted by Rev. Armstrong.  The remains were taken to Villa Ridge for burial.

The trial of Frank Walter for murder came to a conclusion last evening when the case went to the jury without argument, and a verdict of not guilty was promptly returned.


Tuesday, 22 May 1906:
SIXTEEN YEARS FOR MURDER
Sadie Hardin, Who Shot Her Lover in April, Pleaded Guilty.

Sadie Hardin, the negro woman who shot and killed her love, Hump Brown, on April 6th, on upper Commercial, was sentenced to a term of sixteen years in the penitentiary by Judge Duncan this morning.  She pleaded guilty to the charge and threw herself on the mercy of the court.  In passing sentence Judge Duncan told her that he might give a much more severe sentence from the evidence, and that if she behaved herself she could reduce her terms by good behavior to nine years and three months.  Attorneys Walter Warder and Miles S. Gilbert were appointed by the court to defend her.

DEATH OF FORMER RESIDENT OF COUNTY
Mr. W. T. Smithey Passed Away at His Home in Kearney, Neb.

Mr. W. T. Smithey, formerly a resident of Elco, died at Kearney, Neb., on May 5th, at the age of 72 years.

The deceased had been ill for nearly two years as the result of a stroke of paralysis and his death was expected for some time before the end came.

He was born in Henry County, Tenn., Feb. 20, 1834, and was married to Miss Elizabeth Whitaker on Aug. 19, 1859.  To this union were born ten children, five of whom are now living.  They are James H. Smithy, Maggie Walker, Augusta Allmeier, Charley Smithy, and Finley Smithey.  All of them are now living at Kearney except Mrs. Allemier, of Elco.  Mr. Smithey had been a member of the Methodist Church from his young manhood and he was superintendent of the Elco Sunday school for twelve or thirteen years.  At Kearney he was a member of the First Methodist Church at his death. He leaves a widow besides the children already named.  Twenty-two grandchildren are left with a host of friends to mourn his death.  The funeral was held at his home Monday, May 7th, Rev. Abbott officiating.

(William T. Smitha married Elizabeth A. Whitaker on 23 Aug 1859, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Monday, 28 May 1906:
Received Fatal Injuries—Hugh Asa, a carpenter employed on the roof of the M. & O. roundhouse, fell from the top of the roundhouse Saturday afternoon and received injuries, which resulted in his death Saturday night.  The remains were taken to Murphysboro, Ill., where the deceased had relatives.  He was 41 years of age.

Not Expected to Live—Steve Bradley, the well-known negro, is critically ill at his home and not expected to live.

KILLED BY LIGHTNING NEAR SEDALIA, MO.
Mr. Will Edwards Met Terrible Death Saturday—Son-in-Law of Mr. W. E. Batty

Mr. W. E. Batty received the sad news of the death of his son-in-law, Mr. William H. Edwards, who was instantly killed by lightning at Sedalia, Mo., Saturday.

Mr. Edwards was a Missouri Pacific brakeman, running out of Sedalia.  He was riding on top of a freight train when he was struck by the electric bolt and hurled from the train.  The accident occurred near Osage.  Silver coins in his pocket were melted into a mass, a gold ring on his finger was destroyed and his clothing was set on fire.

The deceased was about 30 years of age and is survived by his wife, formerly Miss Mable Batty, and two children.

The sad news was a great shock to Mr. and Mrs. Batty.  The latter was gone to Sedalia.


Tuesday, 29 May 1906:
OHIO RIVER GIVES UP ITS DEAD
Body of Leo Mueller Found by Two Fishermen This Morning Near Coal Fleet
MUELLER DROWNED ON DECEMBER 30th
Was in Company with Three Other Boys Who Started on Hunting Expedition

The body of Leo Mueller, who was drowned in the Ohio River on December 30th, was found this morning about 10 o’clock floating in the Ohio River near the coal fleet below the city.  The discovery was made by two fishermen who were rowing across the river.  The body was badly decomposed and nearly all of the clothes were missing, as was also the hair.

Capt. Joseph E. Mueller, father of the drowned boy and Logan Mueller, his brother, were notified, and upon viewing the body, Capt. Mueller identified it as the body of his youngest son, Leo.

The remains were taken to M. E. Feith’s undertaking establishment, where the inquest will be held.

The place where the body was found has been watched for some time, as that was where the boys were drowned and, as they were loaded with ammunition preparatory to going hunting, it was thought that they could not float very far, on account of the excessive weight.

Mueller and Walter Jocelyn, with Charles Wood and Charlie Hatcher, left Cairo on the 30th day of December, for a several days’ fishing and hunting trip down the Mississippi River.  The boys were going on a little gasoline launch owned by Mueller.  The boys had not been out long when the launch began to give them trouble and they soon lost all control of it.

The night was dark and a strong wind was blowing and the little craft was tossed about at the wave’s mercy.

The engine of the launch was disabled and gave the boys trouble.  The current was so swift that the boys lost all control of the launch.  The Combine’s fleet was lying near the Big Four incline and the Wash Honshell had dropped a tow of empties at the upper end of the fleet.  It was against these empty barges that the launch was being carried and finally dashed to pieces.

One of the boys made an effort to change the launch’s course, but his efforts were in vain and when they next attempted to use the oars, only one could be found.  Woods and Hatcher were fortunate enough to reach the Wash Honshell, where they were pulled on board and their lives saved.

Jocelyn, it was thought, remained in the launch and was never seen by the boys, after the rest had jumped into the water.  Mueller, who passed beneath the barges, was thrown a rope from the Wash Honshell, but was too weak to reach it.

A diligent search was made for weeks to recover the bodies, but without success.

The accident occurred on a Saturday evening about 5:45 o’clock.

An inquest was held this afternoon and the body was identified as that of Mueller.

The names of the fishermen who found the body were Malvin Rogers and John Layman.  They were paid $50, which was offered as a reward.


Wednesday, 30 May 1906:
Well Known Negro Dead—Steve Bradley, a well known negro, died last night shortly after 10 o’clock, after an illness of several weeks.  The deceased was about 50 years old.  He had resided in Cairo for many years and formerly conducted a coal and wood yard.  He has been conducting a grocery store at No. 614 Jefferson Avenue of late years.  He is survived by a wife, Mrs. H. L. Bradley, who conducts the hairdressing establishment on Eighth Street.  The funeral will be held Friday morning at the home of the deceased, No. 710 Railroad Street, conducted by Rev. Sides, pastor of the A. M. E. Church on Seventeenth Street.

(Stephen Bradley married Henrietta Myers on 23 Jul 1873, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Stephen Bradley Born July 4, 1848 Died May 29, 1906.—Darrel Dexter)

Negro Minstrel Fatally Injured—Henry McDade, a negro and a member of the A. G. Allen’s minstrels which shows in Cairo tonight, was run over by a Mobile & Ohio train at Wickliffe, about 8 o’clock last night and fatally injured.  He was brought to Cairo and placed in St. Mary’s Infirmary, where he died later.  McDade attempted to board the train and slipped and fell under the wheels.  Both legs were badly crushed.  The home of the deceased is at Knoxville, Tenn.


Thursday, 31 May 1906:
GUY SMITH CASE NOW ON TRIAL
Work of Securing a Jury Began This Morning

The trial of Guy Smith, charged with the killing of Otto Boerschel on March 2d, last, began in the circuit court this morning.  A motion to quash the indictment was arraigned and was sustained as to the first count and overruled as to the others.  Four jurors had been secured this afternoon as follows:  D. V. Frost, George Staten, Ben Dexter, and A. J. Lolless.

MRS. ELIZABETH JOHNS DIED YESTERDAY
Remains Will Be Taken to DuQuoin, Ill., Former Home of Deceased.

Mrs. Elizabeth Johns died yesterday afternoon at her home, No. 3206 Sycamore Street, about 1:30 o’clock of consumption.

The deceased was 45 years of age and had resided in Cairo for the past five years, coming here from DuQuoin where she was born.  She has been ill for the past few months.

She leaves two sisters, Miss Barbara Johns, of this city, and Mrs. W. Browlee, of Pine Bluff, Ark., and two brothers, both of Cairo, Will and David Johns.

(William B. Brownlee married Jane Johns on 16 Nov 1876, in Perry Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Friday, 1 Jun 1906:
GUY SMITH MURDER CASE
Eight Jurors Had Been Secured at 3 O’clock—May Have Full Jury by Tonight

Today has been spent in examining jurors for the Guy Smith murder case and at 3 o’clock eight had been secured.  They are as follows:  George W. Staten, D. V. Frost, Ben Dexter, A. J. Lolless, J. W. Hancock, William Scott, Thomas White, and Jesse Fields.

Over 120 persons have been examined by jurymen in this case.

It is possible that a full jury may be secured by tonight and the hearing of testimony may be commenced tomorrow morning.

CAIRO MAN FATALLY SHOT AT DEXTER, MO.
Newton Riddle, Saloonkeeper, Shot by Ned Jones, Alleged Gambler at Dexter
SCANDAL RESULT OF AN OLD FEUD
Jones Said to Have Been Intimate with Riddle’s Daughter—Released on $5,000 Bond

Newton Riddle, who conducts a saloon at No. 714 Commercial Avenue, this city, was shot this morning at Dexter Mo., by Ned Jones, a gambler of that town.  Riddle’s wounds are not considered fatal.  Jones was arrested and later released on $5,000 bond.  The trouble is said to have arisen over Mr. Riddle’s daughter, with whom it is charged Jones has been intimate.

Jones is a son-in-law of J. N. Miller.

The story of the shooting as learned by The Citizen is as follows:

Jones was in a bank when he fired the first shot.  Seeing Riddle across the street, Jones fired through the window.  His aim was accurate and the charge struck Riddle.  Jones then went out on the street and fired another charge at Riddle.  Jones had a shotgun.  Riddle also had a shotgun, but didn’t have time to use it.

Jones was arrested and was released on bond.  His bail was $5,000.  He is married man, having a wife and child.  It is charged that Jones had been intimate with Riddle’s daughter, which was the cause of the trouble.  The young lady is about 20 years of age.

Mr. Riddle’s wounds are not considered fatal.  He was taken to his home after the shooting, where he was attended by physicians.

The shooting took place from the Citizen’s Bank.  The shotgun contained two loads of number two shot.  Both loads took effect in Riddle’s side.

The shooting is the result of a scandal between Jones and Riddle’s daughter, of some months ago.

Latest reports state that Riddle is not expected to live many days. At first it was thought his wounds would not prove fatal.

Well Known Negro Drops Dead—Clark Waite, one of the oldest negro residents of Cairo, well known throughout the city, dropped dead yesterday morning at his home on Cedar Street near Fourteenth.  The deceased was a carpenter by trade and had resided in Cairo for over 40 years.  His death is thought to have been the result of old age.  The remains will be taken to Villa Ridge tomorrow for interment.


Saturday, 2 Jun 1906:
SMITH MURDER CASE NOW ON TRIAL
Twelfth Juror Secured After Court Convened This Morning
PROSECUTION RESISTS ITS CASE
Case Will Go to the Jury Before Court Adjourns Tonight

More time was spent in securing a jury in the Guy Smith murder case than will be spent on the trial, for the case will be concluded tonight, if a night session was necessary.

The last juror secured soon after court convened this morning. He was the second man examined. The last panel of four were as follows:  Ben Jones, John Swanzer, W. W. Jackson, and C. J. Edmunds.

About 160 persons were examined before the jury was secured and the prosecution exhausted 19 of their preemptory challenges, while the defense exhausted 18.

All of the evidence for the prosecution was in shortly after court convened this afternoon, and the defense placed its witnesses on the stand.


Monday, 4 Jun 1906:
GUY SMITH GETS FOURTEEN YEARS
Jury Brought in Verdict of Guilty at 3:30 This Afternoon
WAS SAME AS PREVIOUS VERDICT
Usual Motion for a New Trial Was Made and Will Be Argued Tomorrow.

At 3:30 this afternoon the jury in the Guy Smith case brought in a verdict of guilty and fixed the punishment at 14 years in the penitentiary.  This is the same verdict that was reached Sunday afternoon.

The usual motion for a new trial was made and will be argued tomorrow.

The jury in the Guy Smith case was still out this afternoon, being unable to agree after their sensational entry into court Sunday afternoon.

The case went to them about 8 o’clock Saturday night.  Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock they sent word to Judge Butler that they had agreed upon a verdict.  The judge accordingly went to the courthouse to receive it, and it was handed up and read, finding the defendant guilty and fixing his punishment at 14 years in the penitentiary.

When the jury was polled to ascertain if the verdict was agreeable to all, Thomas White stated that he was not satisfied with it.  Judge Butler thereupon sent the jury back to complete its work.


Tuesday, 5 Jun 1906:
SPENT FOUR MONTHS IN JAIL
Without a Trial and Now Demands That He Be Given His Discharge
INTERESTING CASE IS PRESENTED
In the Circuit Court and Will Be Passed upon Tomorrow.—Pink Christian Pleads Guilty to Manslaughter.

An interesting argument was made in the circuit court this morning in the case of the People vs. Henry Green alias Henry Hill.  Green was indicted for murder at the February term of court.  He had been discharged by the coroner’s jury at the time the crime was committed, but was re-arrested.  But he was not tried at the February term of court and now his counsel is seeking to have the cause dismissed.  Under the statute he is entitled to a discharge, as four months have elapsed since his incarceration in jail without a trial.  The record shows that he was put in jail on January 13, and the May term of court opened on May 14th, so that he just comes under this provision.  The court will pass upon the matter tomorrow.

Pink Christian pleaded guilty to manslaughter and was sentenced to the penitentiary.


Negro Dropped Dead—Alex Moss, a well-known negro, dropped dead last night while sitting in a chair at his home on Twenty-ninth and Poplar streets.  Moss appeared to be in the best of spirits and health at the time of his death.



Wednesday, 6 Jun 1906:
Dr. I. M. Neely, of Evanston, Ill., formerly of DuQuoin, died Monday.  He was the father of Judge Charles G. Neely and Dr. John Neely, of Chicago.


Thursday, 7 Jun 1906:
Death of Infant—Joseph Frank, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Kelly, of No. 2501 Poplar Street, died last Saturday evening at 7 o’clock.  The funeral was held at the residence Sunday morning at 10 o’clock.  The remains were taken to Villa Ridge cemetery for interment.  The deceased was one month old.

JURY OUT ONLY NINE MINUTES
In the Henry Green Alias Hill Murder Case Which Went to Jury at 3:30
VERDICT WAS “NOT GUILTY.”
Motion for New Trial in Guy Smith Murder Case Will Come Up in the Morning.

After being out only about nine minutes, the jury in the Henry Green alias Hill murder case brought in a verdict this afternoon finding the defendant not guilty.  The case went to the jury at 3:30 o’clock.  The jury was composed of the following:  N. S. Kelly, Smith Billingsly, L. E. Sackberger, George Staten, Scott Hazlewood, James Coleman, Sr., Harry Serbian, Ben Jones, J. W. Hancock, and Henry Salzner.

Green is a negro, about 18 years old, who shot his stepfather on January 12th last.  Green has been incarcerated in the county jail since the crime.  He was exonerated by the coroner’s jury and re-arrested on a warrant sworn out by the father of the murdered man.

Attorney O’Shea was assisted in the defense by Attorney Thorp, of Wickliffe Ky.

A motion for a new trial in the Guy Smith murder case, who was found guilty by jury and sentenced to 14 years in the penitentiary, was introduced by the defendant’s attorneys, Lansden & Leek.  Ten reasons were stated in the motion why the defendant should have a new trial.  An affidavit was made in which Ben Jones, one of the jurors, was charged with having made a statement after the murder that he believed Smith was guilty.  State’s Attorney Wilson introduced a counter affidavit signed by Mr. Jones in which he denied having made such a statement.

The case will be acted upon in the morning by Judge Butler.  If he decides to grant a new trial, it will probably come up at the July term of court, if not, the judge will pass sentence on Smith.  This case was one of the hardest fought cases ever held in the circuit court here and, if a new trial is not granted to Smith, State’s Attorney Wilson scores a great victory.  It was a bitter fight every inch of the way.

Court adjourned about 4 o’clock for the term, which has been an unusually long one, lasting for four weeks.

SUDDEN DEATH OF THEOBALD LIND
Father of Jacob and Peter Lind, of Cairo, Dropped Dead at Cape Girardeau Today

Messrs. Jacob and Peter Lind received the sad news of the death of their father, Mr. Theobald Lind, of Cape Girardeau, Mo.

The message stated that he had been well, but this morning, about 7 o’clock, as he was walking across the room, he fell dead.

The deceased was 76 years of age and was one of the oldest residents of Cape Girardeau.

Mr. Peter Lind left this afternoon for Cape Girardeau, where arrangements will be made for the funeral.

CARD OF THANKS

We desire to thank all who assisted us during the illness and death of our infant son, Frank.
J. J. Kelly and family


Friday, 8 Jun 1906:
ILLINOIS CENTRAL TRAIN IS WRECKED
Engineer Is Killed. Accident Occurred Near Benton

Benton, Ill., June 8.—An Illinois Central train was wrecked near here.  The engine rolled over an embankment killing Engineer Gent and injuring the fireman.  Six coal cars were piled in a heap.

CAIRO POLICE CAPTURE NEGRO MURDERER
And Will Be Taken Back to Hickman, Where He Is Wanted for Murder

Andy Walker, a negro, who is wanted at Hickman, Ky., on a charge of murder, was arrested today by Officers Davidge, Wade, Lipe and Bradley.  He will be taken back to Hickman.

GUY SMITH SENTENCED TO PENITENTIARY
Motion for New Trial Overruled by Judge Butler

The motion for a new trial in the Guy Smith murder case was overruled this morning in the circuit court by Judge Butler.  After several other minor matters, court adjourned for the term.

SKULL CRUSHED BY HOLLOW TREE
Which High Wind Blew Onto John W. Willard at McClure Yesterday
WILLARD WAS FISHING ON CLEAR CREEK BANK
When Tree Blew Down Upon Him.—Coroner McManus Held Inquest.

John W. Willard, an old soldier living at McClure, was killed in a peculiar manner yesterday afternoon.  While sitting on the bank of Clear Creek fishing, a hollow tree was blown onto Mr. Willard by the high wind.  His skull was crushed and his body mangled almost beyond recognition.  Coroner McManus was notified and he left immediately for McClure, where he held an inquest.  The coroner’s jury rendered a verdict in accordance with the facts as stated above.

Mr. Willard was an old and highly respected citizen of McClure and his distressing death has brought sorrow to the entire community.

(John W. Willard, 18, of Sulphur Springs, Williamson Co., Ill., enlisted as a private in Co. H, 81st Illinois Infantry in December 1863 at Carbondale, Ill.  He was transferred to Co. E, 58th Illinois Infantry and was mustered out 1 Apr 1866, in Montgomery, Ala.  John W. Willard married Mary Jane Cummins.  His marker in Cummins Cemetery reads:  John Willard Born May 15, 1845 Died June 7, 1906.  James E. Willard Born Dec. 26, 1867 Died Nov. 11, 1917.—Darrel Dexter)


Saturday, 9 Jun 1906:
UNKNOWN MAN KILLED AT MOUNDS
Body Found with Skull Crushed—May Have Been Stuck by Train.

The body of a young man was found in the lower end of the Illinois Central yards at Mounds yesterday.  His skull was mashed in and it was believed for a time that murder had been committed.  Deputy Coroner Wes Davis held an inquest and the jury found that he came to his death by being struck in the head.  It is presumed that this was done by a passing train.  There was nothing on the body to identify it.

DEATH OF WELL KNOWN MOUNDS GIRL
Miss Flora Titus, Niece of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Spence, of This City

Miss Flora Titus, the fifteen year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Titus, of Mounds, died very suddenly this morning of a congestive chill after a few hours’ illness.  Miss Titus is a niece of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Spencer, of this city.

The funeral arrangements have not been completed.
(John W. Titus married Ella Spencer on 20 Apr 1881, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

MRS. W. R. McDOUGAL DIED THIS AFTERNOON.
Passed Away at Her Home on Walnut Street of Tuberculosis of the Throat

Mrs. W. R. McDougal died this afternoon about 1:10 o’clock at her home, No. 1603 Walnut Street, of tuberculosis of the throat.

The deceased has been ill for several months and her death was not unexpected to her relatives and friends.

She is survived by two daughters and three sons, all of who reside in this city.

The deceased was 46 years of age and had resided in Cairo for the past 22 years.

She was born in Grand Junction, Tenn., and was a member of the Baptist Church, but had not joined the church in this city.

No arrangements for the funeral have been made.


Monday, 11 Jun 1906:
BROTHER OF DR. JOCELYN
Died at His Home at St. Louis Sunday at Ripe Old Age.

Dr. W. C. Jocelyn, of this city, received the sad news yesterday of the death of his brother, Dr. Dana I. Jocelyn, of St. Louis. The St. Louis Globe-Democrat says concerning him:

“Dr. Dana I. Jocelyn, one of the oldest dentists in St. Louis, died yesterday morning at his home, 6216 Columbia Avenue, aged 75. Dr. Jocelyn was born in Georgia, Vt., and came to St. Louis in 1866. He opened dental rooms at 517 Olive Street and continued in business at that place until he retired in1891.

“Dr. Jocelyn is accredited with having been the first dentist in the city to introduce nitrous oxide gas in the use of teeth extraction, a palliative of pain, which is said to have been discovered by his uncle, Gardner Q. Colton. Dr. Jocelyn was one of the oldest members of the Pilgrim Congregational Church, and was closely identified with its work. He was the first superintendent of a Chinese Sunday school in this city. His wife survives him. The funeral probably will be held tomorrow.”


WILL BE TAKEN TO SUPREME COURT
Effort Will Be Made Before That Tribunal in Behalf of Guy Smith

In the murder case of Guy E. Smith, after the motion for a new trial had been overruled by Judge Butler and Smith had been sentenced to the penitentiary, attorney Leek took an appeal to the Supreme Court. We are authoritatively informed that the appeal will be pushed on its merits. Smith’s attorneys are Angus Leek, of this city, and George E. Martin, of Mound City.

 


Tuesday, 12 Jun 1906:
DEATH FOLLOWED HEMORRHAGE OF LUNGS
Frank Gill, Conductor for Traction Company, Victim of Tuberculosis

Frank Gill, who has been in the employ of the Cairo Electric & Traction Company for several years, as conductor on the Poplar Street line, was found dead in bed early Monday morning in his room at Mrs. Stites’ boarding house on Seventh Street.

The deceased was a victim of tuberculosis and his sudden death was due to a hemorrhage of the lungs, according to the verdict rendered by the jury at the coroner’s inquest, conducted by Coroner James McManus.

The body was found lying beside the bed where the young man had fallen. A washbowl, filled with blood was on the floor beside the bed.

Several months Gill went to Silver City, Mexico, in hopes that his health might be benefited. He remained there several months and recently returned to Cairo and resumed his duties as conductor.

He was a young man of quiet disposition and was a general favorite among his fellow employees and his employers.

The deceased was married, but on account of his ill health, he sent his wife to her father’s home to reside.

The remains were taken to Mrs. Falconer’s undertaking apartments and prepared for burial.
The remains were shipped to New Burnside, Ill., the former home of the deceased, where interment will take place.

 


Wednesday, 13 Jun 1906:
RIVERMAN KILLED BY A FALL
Mike Sullivan, One of the Crew of the Towboat Hermann Paepcke, Died Last Night
FELL FROM PORCH TO GROUND BELOW

Distance of 40 Feet—Said to Have Been Under Influence of Liquor—Night Bartender’s Story

Mike Sullivan, one of the crew of the towboat Herman Paepke, was found dead this morning in the yard in the rear of Ed Maley’s saloon on Ohio Street.

Coroner McManus held the inquest this morning and the jury returned a verdict that the deceased came to his death by an accident.

Sullivan came in on the Hermann Paepcke yesterday morning and after being paid off, he and a party of other bargemen bought a keg of beer and took it down in the cottonwoods below the city.  All were pretty well under the influence of the liquor when they returned to the city.

Sullivan, who has been in the habit of sleeping on the back porch of Ed Maley’s saloon, when he was in the city, went there last night.  The porch is 40 feet from the ground and as the railing is very low, it is thought that he rolled off and was killed by the fall.

The night operator told the following story to a Citizen reporter:

“Last night about 11 o’clock, several of us were in the saloon.  We heard a noise that sounded like someone had fallen, but as the I. C. train gets in about that time and as there is always a great deal of noise, we thought that it was the trainmen handling the baggage.  Later in the night we heard several groans but as some of the roomers had complained of having the tooth ache we didn’t think much about this either.  After that we were not disturbed again.”

Sullivan, when found, was lying in the same position that he was in when he fell.  Owing to the way in which his head was injured, it was thought at first that he had met with foul play.  His skull was fractured upon the ground, which is covered with cinders and rocks.

Sullivan is well known in river circles, being a very good bargeman.

Messages have been sent to Peoria, Ill., where it is thought Sullivan has relatives and the body will be held until a reply is received.


Mrs. O’Donnell, one of the oldest residents of Mound City, died Monday, at the age of 75 years.  She came to Mound City in 1856.  She leaves two sons, Sam O’Donnell, of Memphis, Tenn., and Harry O’Donnell, of Washington, D.C., both of who arrived to attend the funeral. Other relatives are three brothers and two sisters, James Capoot, of Mound City, John Capoot, of Allendale, Mrs. Laura Disner, of Alliance, Neb., Mrs. Baxter, of Grand Tower, Ill., and a brother in Texas.  The funeral will be held tomorrow and the remains will be interred in Beech Grove Cemetery.

             (Patrick O’Donald married Mary Jane Capoot on 2 May 1857, in Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Thursday, 14 Jun 1906:
Word from the bedside of Mr. H. C. Derrington is that he continues very low with very little hope of his recovery.

CARD OF THANKS

We desire to express our most sincere gratitude and thanks to the public and to all who so kindly gave their help and sympathy to us in the death of our loved one.
J. W. Titus and Family

The sudden death of Miss Flora Titus Saturday morning shocked and saddened the whole community.  It is supposed that when she retired, she went to sleep in a draft and took a congestive chill.  When found next morning she was in a dying condition.  Medical help was summoned at once, but it was too late.  The funeral took place Monday morning and the interment made at Beech Grove Cemetery.  The pallbearers were young people of her own age, including twelve girls dressed in white, bearing flowers.  Rev. Bosworth conducted the services, which took place at the residence and was aided in the singing by the choir of the Mounds Congregational Church.  (Villa Ridge)

Miss Ellen Curry was called from Carbondale before her term was finished on account of her mother’s serious illness.  (Curry)

OBITUARY

Flora C. Titus, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Titus, born January 24th, 1891, departed this life June 9th, 1906, aged 15 years, 4 months and 12 days.  She united with the Mounds Congregational Church a year ago last September.  Death came like an untimely frost upon the fairest flower in all the field.  Her sudden death was a shock to everyone, just the age where it seemed most hard to give her up.  She was a universal favorite, beloved by all who knew her.  The fond parents, sister and brothers have the sympathy of all in their sad bereavement.

Funeral at the home last Monday at 10 o’clock, conducted by Rev. A. R. Bosworth.  Interment in Mounds cemetery.


Friday, 15 Jun 1906:
H. C. DERRINGTON DIED TODAY
Cairo Merchant Passed Away at St. Mary’s Infirmary This Morning
BLOOD POISONING CAUSED DEMISE
Deceased Conducted Store in Howe Building on Commercial Avenue

H. C. Derrington, who conducted the store in the Howe building on Commercial Avenue near Eleventh Street, died at St. Mary’s Infirmary this morning.

Ed Derrington was born in Paducah 34 years ago and came to Cairo with B. Michael & Co., in 1898.  After working for this company for over five years, he embarked in business for himself.  Later he sold out the model on the corner of Eighteenth and Commercial to Rosenberg & Gould and removed to Danville, Ill., where he has lived until several months ago, when he came back to this city and opened up the store in the Howe building on Commercial Avenue.

He was taken with gangrene for several days and blood poisoning set in causing his death at 4:30 o’clock this morning at St. Mary’s Infirmary.

Mr. Derrington leaves a brother and one sister, both residing out of the city.  His brother arrived today and will take charge of the body.

The deceased was well liked in Cairo and his many friends regret very much to hear of his death.
He was a member of the Modern Woodman of America.

A delegation of Modern Woodmen will accompany the remains of the deceased to Mayfield, Ky., leaving at 3 o’clock in the morning, where interment will take place.

MRS. ELIZA DEAN DEAD
Passed Away This Afternoon at St. Mary’s Infirmary

Mrs. Eliza Dean died at 12:25 this afternoon at St. Mary’s Infirmary after an illness of several months of blood poison.  The deceased was 38 years of age.

She is survived by her husband, William Dean, and six children, Stephen, Peter, William, John, Julia and Sarah, besides a brother, Patrick O’Laughlin, also of this city.

The funeral arrangements have not yet been made.  The remains will be taken to the home of the deceased’s brother, Patrick O’Laughlin on Twenty-first Street.

The ____ is an unusually sad one. Mrs. Dean has been ill for several months with blood poison and a short time ago it was found necessary to perform an operation, removing one of her limbs.

Her husband, through a fit of despondency, made an unsuccessful attempt at suicide sometime ago and was recently adjudged insane and taken to the asylum in Anna.

The six little children are practically orphans; two of them are inmates of the Children’s Home on Twenty-fifth Street.

(William Dean married Elizabeth O’Laughlin on 27 Jan 1885, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

DEATH OF MRS. CRAIN
Passed Away Yesterday at the Home of Her Brother, Mr. George Fischer, on Holbrook Avenue.

Mrs. J. C. Crain, a former Cairo girl and a daughter of Mrs. and Mrs. F. F. Fischer, of this city, died yesterday at 12:45 at the home of her brother, Mr. George F. Fischer, of No. 2202 Holbrook Avenue.

Her death was not unexpected as the deceased had been seriously ill for the past six week of typhoid fever.  She was brought to Cairo several weeks ago and had been ill ever since.

The deceased was born in Cincinnati 38 years ago and had resided in Cairo until her marriage, when she removed to East St. Louis, Ill.  The deceased is survived by a husband, two brothers, George and Jake Fischer, both residing in this city, two sisters, Miss Jesse Fischer, who is in California, and Mrs. John Ehlman.

The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon from the home at 1:30 o’clock.  Rev. Armstrong will conduct the services.  The remains will be interred at Beech Ridge Cemetery.

Mrs. Crain was formerly Miss Phena Fischer and has many friends in this city who will deeply regret her untimely death.


Monday, 18 Jun 1906:
YOUNG MAN MET WATERY GRAVE
Helsey Glodgo, Young White Man, Fell Off Dredge Boat and Drowned.
BODY WAS RECOVERED SOON AFTER ACCIDENT.
Inquest Held by Coroner McManus—Was Employed by Halliday Sand Company

Helsey Glodgo, a shanty boat man who has been employed as fireman on the Halliday sand boat, fell into the river this morning and was drowned.

Glodgo had only been working for the Halliday Sand Co. a week.  This morning while walking along the side of the boat, which is several hundred yards above the bridge, it is thought that he stepped on a coil of rope and fell in.  No one was on the boat except the wife of the engineer and she was in the house when the accident happened.

Glodgo was a boy about 17 or 18 years of age and has resided on a shanty boat about Cairo for a year or so.

As soon as possible after the accident, a crew of fishermen were set to work dragging for the body and it was found this afternoon at about 1:45 at the foot of the boat.

The coroner was notified and the inquest was held this afternoon.


Wednesday, 20 Jun 1906:
FLOATER FOUND IN RIVER AT THEBES

The body of an aged negro woman was found in the Mississippi River at Thebes Monday.  It was found on the rocks near the bridge by some boys.  The body was small in size and bore evidences of having been in the water for a long time, as the arms and limbs below the knee were gone.  Deputy Coroner Pellett held an inquest and the body was buried.


Thursday, 21 Jun 1906:
DIED IN DOGTOOTH BEND

Henry Milbourne, a prominent colored farmer, of the Smith settlement in Dogtooth Bend, died recently.  He leaves a widow and three children to mourn his death.  He was a cousin of Matt Johnson, of Willard.  The deceased was a member of the Free Baptist Church.

DIED AT BARLOW

Moses W. Proffer died at Barlow, Ky., June 16th and was buried the day following, in the presence of a large company of relatives and friends.  He leaves a widowed mother and three sisters, besides a large circle of friends.  The deceased went to Arizona in the hope of regaining his lost health, but he gained no permanent benefit and returned to pass his last days with his own people.  His mother resides in Cairo, where she has a position at the American Steam Laundry.


Saturday, 23 Jun 1906:
Funeral of Richard Ruffin—The funeral of Richard Ruffin, who died Thursday, was held this afternoon.  He was quite a prominent colored man and quite active politically.  He took sick right after the judicial election on June 4th.

ULLIN MAN MURDERED AND ROBBED

Mr. A. S. Kennedy, a prosperous citizen of Ullin, was found by two negroes robbed and unconscious Wednesday evening about 9 o’clock.  He had been to town and on his way back some person unknown hit him a fatal blow in the head three inches above the left ear.  He lived till 6:30 Thursday morning, but was not conscious.  He leaves a wife and nine children.  He was employed by the Ullin Charcoal Company and has lived here for some time.—Ullin News

NATIVE OF ITALY DIED THIS MORNING
Charles Parrizzo, Watchman at the Halliday Coal Dump, Died of Appendicitis

Charles Parrizzo, the well known watchman at the Halliday coal dump, died this morning at 12 a.m. after an illness of several days.

The deceased was taken ill with appendicitis on Monday and grew worse until yesterday, when he was taken to St. Mary’s Infirmary, where an operation was performed upon him.  The operation was not successful and he died shortly after.

He was born in Italy 42 years ago and came to this city when he was 12 years of age and has resided here all of his life.  He has been employed as day watchman at the coal dump for years.  He leaves a wife and son.

The funeral will leave the home, No. 412 Thirty-third Street, tomorrow afternoon at 1:30 for St. Joseph’s Church.  The remains will be taken to Villa Ridge for interment.

ANOTHER SOLDIER GONE
John S. Young Passed Away at Thebes Tuesday

Another Civil War veteran responded to the last call when John S. Young, aged 62 years, passed away at his home in this city Tuesday morning at 5 o’clock says the Thebes Star.  Death was very sudden and was due to dropsy of the heart.

The deceased had been ill since February, during which time he had been treated by two physicians and had been under the constant care of two daughters from St. Louis, who are trained nurses.  He was thought to be improving and Monday was the most encouraging day of his illness.  He went to bed feeling better than usual, but was aroused Tuesday morning by a violent attack of cough.

The deceased was born at Paris, Tenn., but moved with his parents to Independence, Ark., where at the beginning of the Civil War he enlisted in Co. A, 1st Ark. Vol.  He was furloughed from the service in 1863 on account of sickness and after leaving St. Louis Jefferson Barracks Hospital, he located in Union County, near Jonesboro, and married Eliza M. Miller.  In 1894 he moved to Delta and last August came to Thebes.

The deceased was a man of kind disposition and lived a true Christian life.  He was a member of the Methodist Church and of Dongola G. A. R. Post.  He is survived by his wife, four sons, and four daughters.  The sons are A. Vard, J. W. and H. O. Young, of Delta, and J. A. Young, of Thebes.  The daughters are Mrs. A. T. Allen, of Cape Girardeau, Mrs. B. F. Bass, of Elco, Misses Charlotte and Sarah P. Young, of St. Louis.

The Brown-Culley G. A. R. post of Thebes conducted services over the remains at the residence Wednesday and the body was taken to Cache on Bryan’s train and then north on the M. & O. to Jonesboro.  Funeral services were conducted Thursday at 11 o’clock at St. John’s Church near Jonesboro, where interment was made.  Rev. Lamar of Thebes, assisted by Rev. Kirkman, of Elco, conducted the services.

(John S. Young married Eliza M. Miller on 24 Dec 1863, in Union Co., Ill.  His marker in St. John’s Cemetery reads: John S. Young Born April 22, 1842 Died June 19, 1906.  Eliza M. Young his wife Born Sept. 24, 1844 Died Dec. 29, 1921.—Darrel Dexter)

A funeral party was transferred from the I. C. to the M & O Railroad Wednesday.  The deceased was a Mr. Young.  He was from Cape Girardeau and was an uncle of Mr. J. H. Albright.  The remains were taken to Mill Creek for interment.  (Cache)

(Jacob Albright married Annie C. Miller on 8 Jun 1854, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Monday, 25 Jun 1906:
FRANK ASHLOCK DIED SUNDAY
Passed Away at His Home in Future City at the Age of 38 Years

Frank Ashlock, a resident of Future City, died at his home Sunday morning about 11 o’clock after an illness of nine months of tuberculosis. The deceased was 38 years of age.

Mr. Ashlock is survived by a wife, but no children. He was employed prior to his illness by the Chicago Mill and Lumber Company.

He was a member of the Order of Ben Hur, which organization will have charge of the remains. The funeral will be held tomorrow morning. A service will be held at the house at 9:30 after which the remains will be taken to the Southern Methodist Church where services will be held, conducted by Rev. O. C. Coppage.


Well Known Negro Dead—Richard Ruffin, a well-known negro politician and peddler, died Saturday. He was a middle-aged man.


MARTIN BROWN, SR. PASSED AWAY
Death Claims One of the Foremost Citizens of Alexander County
LIVED WHOLE LIFE IN THEBES PRECINCT
Deceased Was Large Property Owner, Ardent Republican and Prominent in Affairs of the County

Martin Brown, Sr., one of the most prominent residents of the county, as well as one of its oldest citizens, passed away at his home near Thebes this morning. Death came suddenly for Cairo relatives and friends had no warning that the end was approaching, and he paid Cairo a visit as late as a week ago last Saturday.

Mr. Brown has always been an active, hard-working man. Of late years his health has not been good. He had considerable trouble with his eyes, which prevented him from reading much and which took from him much of his enjoyment of life. He had other ailments and a year ago went to Hot Springs, in the effort to regain his health. He was also subject to attacks, the nature of which the family did not know, but they were fearful that should one come on he could not survive, so the news of his death, while a shock, was not a surprise.

Martin Brown, Sr., was probably the oldest native born resident in Thebes Precinct. He was born September 9, 1834, in this county, the fourth of thirteen children. He was a son of David and Rebecca Brown, who were among the earliest settlers in that section of the county, coming to Alexander County about 1830. The father died in 1865 at an advanced age. Mr. Brown received his education in the schools of this county. He helped his father at home until his twentieth birthday and then commenced life on a track of Congress land in section 7, township 15, range 2. On that farm he lived until 1876, and then came to his present location of 160 acres in section 15, township 15, range 3. Besides the home farm, he also had large holdings. Mr. Brown was married April 30, 1851, to Elizabeth Durham, a native of this county, and a daughter of John Durham, also one of the pioneers of that section. She survives him with seven children: Alfred, William, Martha (wife of William Bracken of Thebes Precinct), Henry, Ulysses S., Martin, and Thomas L.

Mr. Brown was county commissioner from 1876 to 1879, and has also served as township treasurer and trustee, school director and county surveyor.

Besides his widow and children, four brothers survive him. They are B. F. and A. J. of Thebes, John Brown, of Mill Creek, and George Brown of Sacramento, Calif.

Of his children, all live at Thebes except Alfred Brown, of Cairo, and William Brown, who lives at Creal Springs. His youngest sons, Martin and Thomas, lived with him upon the home place and managed the farm.

Mr. Brown was a large owner of land in Thebes Precinct. His holding probably exceeding 500 acres.

A few years ago Mr. Brown prepared and published a map of Alexander County. The knowledge he had of the county gained through his ____ his ___ as county surveyor, making it possible for him to complete this task.

Politically he was an ardent Republican. He was the first Republican nominated for the office of sheriff in this county, making the race against the late A. H. Irvin.

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Brown and daughters, Misses Bertha and Bessie, and son Harrison and Postmaster Sidney B. Miller, went out to Thebes this evening to attend the funeral.

C. C. Miller, Wiley Clutts, and U. S. Brown, the latter a son of the deceased, came down from Thebes this afternoon. They say that Mr. Brown’s death occurred last evening about 7 or 8 o’clock.
He had been feeling extra well, but was taken suddenly ill and rapidly grew worse until death came.
The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon and the remains will be buried in the Thebes Cemetery.

(David Brown Jr. married Rebecca Ellis on 29 Jun 1829, in Union Co., Ill.  Martin Brown married Elizabeth Durham on 30 Apr 1854, in Alexander Co., Ill.  William Bracken married Martha Brown on 13 Aug 1878, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Old Thebes Cemetery reads:  Martin Brown Born Sept. 9, 1834 Died June 24, 1906.  Elizabeth Brown Born Jan. 22, 1827 Died April 15, 1909.—Darrel Dexter)


Miss Ella Hogan, a teacher in the Cairo public schools, was called to Hammond, Ind., Sunday by a message announcing the serious illness of her sister’s husband, Mr. B. Sayles. A message has since been received by friends here, announcing Mr. Sayles’ death, which occurred Sunday evening.


Reports from the bedside of Mr. W. E. Gholson, who lies at the point of death at the Ozark Hotel, at Creal Springs, afflicted with hemorrhage of the brain, state that there is no hope for his recovery. His death is expected at any time. Mr. John C. Gholson, his brother, is at his bedside. Dr. J. J. Rendleman left yesterday afternoon to attend Mr. Gholson.

 


Wednesday, 27 Jun 1906:
Mr. James Miller returned this afternoon from a visit to Thebes and took the Fowler for his home in Metropolis. He attended the funeral of Martin Brown Sr., at Thebes Tuesday.


Mr. Cal Brown received a telegram stating that his son Oliver was in the St. Louis hospital and wished to be brought home. Mrs. Brown went up to Anna, Ill., where she was joined by her brother, Joe Lyerle. When she arrived at the hospital, he recognized his mother and uncle, but was unable to converse. The physicians would not consent to his removal, as he is suffering with partial paralysis with hemorrhages. His recovery is doubtful. The young man is about twenty-five years of age. He was educated at Unity, studied telegraphy and was in the employ of the Western Union. He was brought from Kansas City, Mo., to St. Louis. His grandfather, Oliver Brown, is ill in Anna with cancer of stomach. His father, of this place (Unity), is slightly improved.


Allison Steele, an old and well known citizen of this city, who has been in poor health for the past several years, is reported to be growing worse. He resides on upper Poplar Street and formerly conducted a photograph gallery.

 


Thursday, 28 Jun 1906:
The death of Mrs. George W. Endicott last Friday was a sorrowful surprise to this community (Villa Ridge). It has been known that she was an invalid for several months, but she was not considered dangerously ill. The funeral services were held at her home and the burial took pace at the country home on Sunday afternoon.


OBITUARY

Martha Endicott, wife of George W. Endicott, was born in Wayne County, Illinois, April 9th, 1841, died at her home three miles east of Villa Ridge June 23rd, 1906, aged 65 years. Forty years they lived happily together. Ten children were born to them, six of whom are living. These with the husband and father are left to mourn the loss of an affectionate wife and a loving and devoted mother. Mr. and Mrs. Endicott were among the early settlers in this part of the county. For thirty-nine years they had lived on the place, which their careful industry had beautified and made comfortable. She was perhaps not widely known, because her home was her castle. And to her home and loved ones she gave her life’s best gifts. The neighbors and friends extend their sympathy, not as a form, but with the warmest regards for the bereaved husband and children. Funeral was held at the residence conducted by Rev. A. R. Bosworth, interment in Villa Ridge Cemetery.

Three brothers and two sisters survive her. They are N. W. Galbraith and Alfred Galbraith, of Wayne County, Ill., James H. G. Galbraith, of Carthage, Mo., Mrs. Henry Wheeler, of Springfield, Ill., and Mrs. Linda Clark, Johnsonville, Ill.

(William C. Clark married Malinda J. Galbraith on 14 Jun 1891, in Wayne Co., Ill.  Her marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Martha Endicott Born April 9, 1841 Died June 23, 1906.—Darrel Dexter)

 

A funeral party was transferred from the I. C. to the M. & O. railroad Wednesday. The deceased was a Mr. Young. He was from Cape Girardeau and was an uncle of Mr J. H. Albright. The remains were taken to Mill Creek for interment. (Cache)


DEATH CLAIMS WILLIAM E. GHOLSON
Prominent Citizen of Cairo Passed Away at Creal Springs Last Night
DEATH DUE TO BRAIN TROUBLE
Remains to Be Brought to Cairo Tonight and Funeral Will Occur Tomorrow Afternoon

William E. Gholson, director in the Alexander County National Bank, large property owner and an old time citizen of Cairo, died at Creal Springs, Ill., last night, of hemorrhage of the brain, after an illness of five days.

His remains will be brought to Cairo at 6:35 o’clock tonight on the Illinois Central train, and the funeral will be held from the home of his brother, John C. Gholson, tomorrow afternoon.

William E. Gholson was born at Lovelaceville, Ky., in 1849. He attended school at Evansville, Ind., and then came to Cairo as a young man to make his fortune. He entered the dry goods store of R. H. Cunningham, but like most young men he soon desired to have a store of his own, and in 1873 he embarked in business with Mr. C. R. Stuart, who was also in Mr. Cunningham’s employ. The firm was Stuart & Gholson. It continued for three of four years and Mr. Stuart sold out to his partner and embarked in business for himself and Mr. Gholson continued the business alone.

Later he branched out into the jobbing business, which was still later on made a separate company, known as Gholson Dry Goods Company. In 1890 he erected the fine three-story building on Eighth Street, which was occupied by the business, both wholesale and retail. It was in 1898 when the stock was ruined by fire that the retail business was closed out and the wholesale business was continued until 1902, when it was sold to the Marx-Denison Dry Goods Company.

During his years of business activity, Mr. Gholson acquired considerable property in Cairo, and he was a director of the Alexander County National Bank. Since his retirement from active business he was occupied his time by looking after his property. A few years ago he purchased the Ozark Hotel at Creal Springs and acquired other property there also, and that has been his home.

About ten years ago, Mr. Gholson received a stroke of paralysis. Since then he has been broken in health and physical strength.

Besides his wife and two daughters, Mr. Gholson leaves four brothers, John C. Gholson, of Cairo, and L. T. Gholson, F. F. Gholson and R. L. Gholson, all of Ballard County, Kentucky. Roy P. Gholson, of the Marx-Denison Dry Goods Company, is a nephew and John W. Gholson a cousin of the deceased.


THOUGHT TO HAVE BEEN MURDERED

Mr. T. F. White, of this city, is in receipt of a letter from Mr. Otis Smith, of Metalbound, Mo., stating that the remains of a white man were found there on the shore. It is the belief that he was murdered. The man was about 5 feet 9 inches in height, appeared to be about 45 or 50 years old, and weighed about 160 pounds.

His suspenders had been taken off and tied to a rock weighing about 15 or 20 pounds, which was tied around his neck.

The inquest was held by Coroner Howell, of Charleston, Mo. Nothing was found on the body to lead to identification, but there was strong proof that death had resulted from a murderous assault. The body was bruised in many places and the skull was crushed, apparently by a blow from a club.

Mr. and Mrs. Levi Clutts received the sad news this morning of the death of their little granddaughter, Leona Sams, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Sams, of Oklahoma City, Okla., formerly of McClure. She was sick only a few days with scarlet fever. Another little daughter is seriously ill with the same disease.

             (Levi Clutts married Elvira Hunsaker on 23 Mar 1854, in Union Co., Ill.  Clarence Sams married Cora Clutts on 17 Aug 1893, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 


Friday, 29 Jun 1906:
REMAINS OF WILLIAM E. GHOLSON
Were Laid to Rest This Afternoon at Beech Grove Cemetery.

The funeral of the late William E. Gholson was held this afternoon at the Cairo Baptist church, Rev. T. J. Porter conducted the services. The funeral was attended by only the relatives and the most intimate friends. The funeral cortege left at 3:00 o’clock for Beech Grove Cemetery, where the remains were laid to rest.

 

 
Monday 2 Jul 1906:
Died in New Mexico—Mr. Edward Maley received the sad news Saturday announcing the death of his brother, Patrick Maley, who died at Fort Stanton, New Mexico, where he was been sojourning for some time for the benefit of his health. His death was the result of tuberculosis. The remains will arrive in Cairo Wednesday and the remains will be buried at Villa Ridge cemetery.


A man was riding in a coal car on the Big Four line Saturday evening near some heavy iron sheets. The train jerked which caused the iron to fall over, killing the man instantly. A negro who was riding in the same car reported the accident to the trainmen who brought him on to Mound City. The accident occurred at America. He was taken from the car and carried to the town hall where the inquest was held. The man had in his possession a bundle of clothes, $1.65 in money and a woman’s picture, which was recognized as being the likeness of a woman living at Metropolis. Nothing more was found to identify the man, but that he was a painter and was on his way to Mounds. The negro states that he boarded the train at Grayville. Inquiry at that place revealed the fact that the stranger’s name was Mr. Everton. (Mound City)

 


Tuesday, 3 Jul 1906:
ANOTHER WIFE MURDERER SUICIDES
Cuts Wife’s Throat and Blows His Head Off

Carterville, Ill., July 3—George Bond, after cutting his wife’s throat, gashed his own neck and failing to kill himself ran eight blocks to the home of his brother. He returned with a shot gun and stepped off a rear porch and blew the top of his head off.


NOTICE A. O. U. W.

All members of the Degree of Honor No. 42 of the A. O. U. W. are requested to meet at the Safford Hall tonight at 7:15 to make arrangements for the funeral of our deceased member, Mrs. Fannie Wallace.
A. Glauber, C. of H.


DEATH OF AN OLD RESIDENT OF THE COUNTY

Abram Brown, living a few miles east of Thebes, died yesterday of dropsy of the heart. The deceased was a cousin of the late Martin Brown and was about 65 years of age. His widow is a sister of Wiley Clutts, of Thebes.


DEATH OF MRS. WALLACE
Passed Away at 10 O’clock Last Night at St. Mary’s Infirmary

Mrs. Fannie Wallace, wife of Officer H. H. Wallace, of the Cairo police force, passed away last night about 10 o’clock at St. Mary’s Infirmary after an illness of about a week’s duration.

The deceased is survived by her husband and two sisters, Mrs. W. W. Copeland, of Tenth Street, and another sister, who resides at Casey, Ky.

She was a member of the A. O. U. W., which organization will have charge of the funeral.

The deceased had been a resident of Cairo for the past eighteen years and came to this city from Florida.

The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon and the remains will be taken to Villa Ridge cemetery for interment.

             (H. H. Wallace married Fannie Lillon Harper on 8 May 1884, in Massac Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 


Thursday, 5 Jul 1906:

CARD OF THANKS

I desire to publicly express my gratitude and heartfelt thanks to the kind friends and neighbors and especially to the Degree of Honor, A. O. U. W., for their ministrations during the illness and on the death of my wife.
H. H. Wallace


FUNERAL NOTICE

Died, Saturday, June 30, at Fort Stanton, N.M., Patrick Maley, aged 31 years.

Funeral services will be held at St. Patrick’s Church Friday afternoon, July 6th, at 1:30 o’clock p.m. and remains will be taken to Villa Ridge cemetery for burial, special train leaving foot of Eighth Street at 2:40 p.m.

Friends are invited to attend.


REMAINS BROUGHT HOME FROM NEW MEXICO
Burial of Patrick Maley to Occur Tomorrow Afternoon

The remains of Patrick Maley, who died of quick consumption at Fort Stanton, N.M., arrived this afternoon on the Mobile & Ohio. The funeral will occur tomorrow afternoon from St. Patrick’s’ Church and the interment will be at Villa Ridge cemetery.

Patrick Maley steamboated out of Cairo for a number of years. Last April he went to New Mexico in the effort to regain his health. He was a patient in the government sanitarium for marines there, and died last Saturday at 11 a.m.

The deceased was 31 years old. He leaves his mother, Mrs. Bridget O’Connor, who has been here from Cincinnati for several weeks awaiting the result of what appeared for some time to have been a hopeless battle with tuberculosis, two sisters, Misses Julia and Nannie Maley, also of Cincinnati, and one brother, Ed Maley, of this city, who made a trip to New Mexico in June to be with his brother.

A trained nurse, W. Reese, accompanied the remains to Cairo.

Notice of the funeral appears elsewhere in this paper today.

 


Friday, 6 Jul 1906:
DREW BEASLEY KILLED AT ELCO
Killed Last Monday and Harrison Lentz Held for the Act
GEORGE SCHILLINGS HELD AS ACCESSORY
Young Men Brought to County Jail Last Night—Made No Effort to Escape Arrest

The village of Elco was started Wednesday evening when the dead body of Drew Beasley, a well known citizen of that locality, was discovered with a number of bullet holes in it, showing that he had been shot to death.

The body was found in a field about 300 yards east of the home of Joseph Lentz, and about an eighth of a mile off the road, on the north side of it, near the edge of the woods. It was lying in the sun and was found about 5 or 6 o’clock in the evening by Rev. Cecil, who was one of a searching party that was out looking for the missing man.

Coroner McManus was notified and he went out and held an inquest, as the result of which, Harris Lentz, son of Joseph Lentz, and George Schiller, were held to answer to the grand jury. The young men were brought down to Cairo by Deputy Sheriff Croft Braddy last night. They made no effort to escape. In fact, young Lentz had started to Cairo, it is said, before Mr. Braddy took him into custody.

Coroner McManus stated to The Citizen that the jury seemed ready to return a verdict before any evidence was heard. They examined one witness, John White, son of W. W. White, who testified that Harrison Lentz said to him, “I shot at him three times and he was close to my house when I shot at him.” White said that Young Lentz made no effort to conceal the fact that he shot Beasley and had boasted several times that he would shoot him.

The coroner’s jury was composed of Charles E. Jenkins, Curtus H. Grace, George W. Thompson, Samuel A. Cecil, Thomas R. Grace, and Charles W. Elden.

Their verdict was that the deceased came to his death from bullet wounds in the left part of the head, face and neck, and left thigh caused by bullets from a shotgun held in the hands of Harrison Lentz, and they further found George Schilling an accessory to the act, and that they were not justified in the act and recommended that they be arrested and held until discharged by due process of law.

Coroner McManus says that the belief is that the shooting occurred last Monday morning. He says that Beasley was last seen at Ullin, that morning and that he started for Elco. He says that a family living on the hill south of the Moses Lentz place in plain sight of the spot where the body was found, claimed to have seen the shooting Monday morning.

When found, the body was in a bad state of mortification. Dr. McManus stated that the wound appeared to have been made by a shotgun. The left side of the face and neck were almost shot away. The wound in the left thigh appeared to have been made by a pistol or rifle ball.

Schilling was seen near the place where the body was found Wednesday with a double barrel shotgun, as though guarding the body, and for this and from the fact that he was known to have a grudge against Beasley, he was held in connection with the affair. He was a farm hand on the Lentz farm.

The cause of the shooting is said to be the defense of his mother’s honor by Lentz against Beasley, who is said to have been boasting of his unlawful relations toward her. The people of the community are said to have expected that this tragedy would occur sooner or later, and they uphold Lentz in his deed, only wanting the law to take its course in investigating the affair.

(Joseph Henry Lentz married Mary Prudence Whitaker on 18 Mar 1888, in Alexander Co., Ill.  The Saturday, 6 Jul 1901, issue reported the following, copied from the Anna Talk:  “A shooting scrape occurred near Elco, Alexander County, last Sunday.  The report has it that Henry Whitaker, a prominent farmer, emptied the contents of a shotgun into the person of Drew Beasley because of alleged attention paid by Beasley to Mrs. Joe Lence a married daughter of Whitaker.  Our informant stated that Beasley and Mrs. Lence had left for parts unknown.  Whether they left together or not was not stated.  Mr. Whitaker, who did the shooting, is a respectable and well-to-do farmer.”—Darrel Dexter)


DEATH OF INFANT CHILD

The two-month-old baby girl of Mr. and Mrs. T. P. Donovan died at 1:30 o’clock this morning at their home, No. 316 Division Street. Funeral services will be held at St. Joseph’s Church at 9 o’clock tomorrow morning and the remains will be taken to Villa Ridge cemetery, where interment will be made. The funeral party will go to the cemetery in carriages.

 


Tuesday, 10 Jul 1906:
MANY WITNESSES CALLED FROM ELCO
To Testify as to the Shooting of Drew Beasley

The grand jury exonerated Harrison Lentz and George Schiller this afternoon. No bill was returned against them.

Twenty-three witnesses were examined as to their knowledge of the Elco shooting, and an indictment against Harrison Lentz and George Schilling was expected when the grand jury made their final report this evening.

 


Wednesday, 11 Jul 1906:

Three Young Nimrods—The three sons of the late Attress Horrell, of Beech Ridge, applied for hunters’ licenses at the county clerk’s office this afternoon. They are 16, 15 and 11 years of age respectively. Each boy secured his license.

 


Thursday, 12 Jul 1906:
Infant Son Died—The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. J.N. Moxley, of Little Rock, Ark., which was born on last Sunday, died Tuesday evening. Mrs. Moxely was formerly Miss Anna Robertson, of this city. Her mother, Mrs. H. O. Farrow, has gone to Little Rock to attend the funeral.

 

Paid Death Benefit—The local lodge of Knights of Honor just received and delivered to Mrs. Mary E. Chandler, of Jackson, Tenn., a warrant for two thousand dollars ($2,000), the amount of the death benefit of her late husband, Mr. Carroll E. Chandler, a former resident of this city. This lodge was organized in Cairo, February 24, 1879. This is the thirty-fourth death in its membership and the beneficiaries have received the large sum of $67,000 all in amounts of $2,000 each, except in one case, where the benefit was only half rate.

 

Dolphus Dunn, better known to his friends as “Doc,” has returned from Missouri, where he was called by the death of his brother, Clay Dunn, a prosperous farmer, residing opposite Hickman, Ky. Mr. Dunn was shot and killed by a neighbor with whom he had trouble.


Saturday, 14 Jul 1906:
MOTHER OF JUDGE BUTLER IS DEAD
Mrs. Celestia Butler Passed Away at Her Home in St. Petersburg, Fla.
DECEASED WAS 73 YEARS OLD
Was the Mother of Five Children and Survived by Fifteen Grandchildren

Mrs. Celestia A. Carter Butler, mother of Judge W. N. Butler, of this city, died at her home in St. Petersburg, Fla., yesterday morning at the age of 73 years. The deceased had been in poor health for some time and her death was not unexpected. A message was received last evening containing the sad news.
Mrs. Butler was the widow of Comfort E. Butler and was the mother of five children. She was born in Canandaigua, N.Y., and during her lifetime had resided in New York state, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Texas, Illinois and Florida.

The surviving members of her family are Cyrus Butler, residing in Florida, Judge W. N. Butler, of Cairo, Mrs. Genevieve M. Lyons, of New Mexico, and Mrs. Olive D. Myers, residing in Florida.
The deceased is survived by fifteen grandchildren.

For many years the deceased resided at Anna, Ill., to which place the remains will betaken for interment.

The remains will be taken to Anna Monday morning and interred at 9 o’clock.

(Her marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Celestia A. Butler 1833-1906.—Darrel Dexter)

 


Monday, 16 Jul 1906:
MRS. AMANDA WILSON DIED THIS MORNING
Funeral Will Be Held Tomorrow Afternoon and Remains Interred at Beech Grove Cemetery

Mrs. Amanda Wilson died early this morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Lizzie Hubbard, of No. 3405 Sycamore Street. The deceased was 70 years of age. Her death was very sudden as she had been seemingly in good health last night at supper time. Death was due, however, to infirmities of old age.

The deceased was born in Muskingum County, Ohio, on December 16, 1826. She came to Cairo in 1857 and resided here ever since.

Her husband died thirteen years ago. She is survived by two children. Mr. George Wilson and Mrs. Lizzie Hubbard, both of this city.

The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the home of deceased’s daughter, Mrs. Hubbard, No. 3405 Sycamore Street, conducted by Rev. Carpenter, pastor of the Christian Church. The remains will be taken to Beech Grove, Ill., for interment. Friends will kindly omit flowers.

(George W. Hubbard married Lizzie A. Wilson on 3 Oct 1877, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Paducah Loses Three Prominent Citizens

Paducah suffered the loss last week of three of her leading citizens, Judge D. J. Sanders, police judge, died Sunday afternoon; Col. Ed P. Noble died Tuesday morning; and Haskell Hughes died Monday night. Mr. Hughes was a retired capitalist, who built up his fortune in Paducah. Col. Ed Noble was a financier, a merchant and a public officer during his lifetime and few men were better known by the outside world. He was 59 years old and was married the second time in life last fall to Miss Emma Reid, daughter of Col. Charles Reid, for years the genial host of the Palmer House.


PROMINENT JACKSON CITIZEN DEAD
A. K. Jobe, Leading Tennessee Jeweler, Passes Away

Jackson, Tenn., July 16—A. K. Jobe, one of Jackson’s leading businessmen, is dead, at the age of 40 years.

Mr. Jobe came to Jackson about twenty years ago and began business in a modest way. Since then his business has grown until he was a leader in the jewelry line in Tennessee, and in addition to his prosperous Jackson House has large branch stores at Birmingham, Ala., and Water Valley, Miss. He was vice president and a director of the Second National Bank and a stockholder in a number of enterprises that meant the unbridling of Jackson.

 


Tuesday, 17 Jul 1906:
DEATH OF MRS. STONE
Passed Away at Her Home in Milbourn, Ky., Yesterday

Mrs. Samuel Stone, of Milbourn, Ky., died yesterday morning at her home after a brief illness.
Mrs. Stone is well known in this city, having visited her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Thomas, of Thirty-Fourth Street, quite often. The deceased had been ill but one week, but serious complications set in which resulted in her death. The remains will be interred at Milbourn.


FORMER CAIROITE HAS PASSED AWAY
Mrs. Alexander Smith Died at His Home in Chicago—Father of Mrs. Edward Buder, Jr.

A message was received yesterday by Mr. Edward Buder, Jr., announcing the death of Mrs. Buder’s father, Mr. Alexander Smith, formerly of this city, but now residing in Chicago.

His death came after a lingering illness of several months and as due to heart trouble and other complications, Mr. Buder has been at his bedside for the past three months. The deceased was 72 years of age and is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Buder, of this city, and Miss Anne Smith, who resided with him, and also a brother and sister, who live at Toronto, Canada.

Mr. Smith was born at Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and the remains were shipped there today from Chicago. Mrs. Buder and Miss Smith accompanied the remains there where the funeral will take place.
Mr. Smith was well known in this city, having resided here for several years.  He moved to Chicago six years ago.

(Edward A. Buder, Jr., married Ella Tunis Smith on 17 Nov 1897, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Miss Midge Burbridge, of this city, who recently underwent an operation for appendicitis in St. Mary’s Hospital at Cairo, is reported to have grown worse and relatives have been summoned to her bedside. Mrs. J. H. Hayden of Cairo, is a sister of the young lady.—DuQuoin Call


Funeral of Mrs. Amanda Wilson—The funeral of Mrs. Amanda Wilson was held this afternoon at 1:30 p.m. from the home of the deceased’s sister, Mrs. Hubbard, of 3405 Sycamore Street. The services were conducted by Rev. Carpenter of the Christian Church. The funeral was largely attended. The remains were taken to Beech Grove Cemetery for interment.


Funeral of Mrs. Butler—The funeral of Mrs. Celestia Butler, mother of Judge W. N. Butler, of this city, was held yesterday morning at Anna, Ill. The remains were shipped direct to Anna from St. Petersburg, Fla. Judge Butler and family went up to Anna to attend the funeral returning last night.


Thursday, 19 Jul 1906:
OLD RIVER ENGINEER DIED SUDDENLY
Benjamin Fitchner Passed Away at U. S. Marine Hospital Last Night.

Benjamin Fitchner, a well known river engineer, died last night at St. Mary’s Infirmary, at 11 p.m. of a complication of diseases.

The deceased was 70 years old and had been running on the river for over thirty years. He began his river career when he was 20 years of age and has run on the Ohio and Mississippi ever since. He made his last trip on the Herman Paepcke about a week ago.

The deceased was ill but a week at the hospital and his death was a great surprise to his friends.
He had made his home with his brother, Capt. Mat Fitchner, who resided at Highland Avenue and Thirty-fourth Street.

The deceased was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1836.

The funeral will be held tomorrow morning at 8:30 o’clock at Mrs. Feith’s undertaking establishment at Eleventh and Washington. Rev. T. J. Porter, of the Cairo Baptist Church, will conduct the services. The remains will be interred at Beech Grove Cemetery.


FUNERAL NOTICE
Died—Benjamin Fitchner, Wednesday, July 18, 1906, 11:04 p.m. at St. Mary’s Infirmary. Age 70 years. Funeral services will be held at Mrs. Feith’s undertaking establishment, Eleventh and Washington Friday morning at 8:30 o’clock. Train will leave foot of Eighth Street at 9:45 a.m. for Beech Grove Cemetery, where interment will take place. Friends of deceased invited to attend.


Saturday, 21 Jul 1906:
DEATH OF PROMINENT UNION COUNTY FARMER

Al Chester, a prominent farmer of Mill Creek, died Tuesday, and the remains were buried Thursday. Mr. Caster left a wife and several children. He was about 55 years of age and had acquired considerable property. His death was the result of congestion of the bowels.

(Sidney Cruse married Sarah E. Meisenheimer on 23 May 1862, in Union Co., Ill.  His marker in St. John’s Cemetery near Mill Creek reads:  Alfred A. Caster Born May 26, 1850 Died July 17, 1906.  Sarah U. Caster, his wife, former wife of Sidney Cruse Born July 27, 1844 Died May 21, 1916.—Darrel Dexter)


DONGOLA MAN KILLED AT DUQUOIN

John B. Richardson, a son of the late J. F. Richardson, of Dongola, was killed Wednesday evening in DuQuoin by being hit on the head with a club. Richardson has a wife living in Belknap, from whom he has been separated for several years.

 


Monday, 23 Jul 1906:
DEAD MAN FOUND ON TRACK
AN OPEN KNIFE NEAR BODY

Mounds, Ill., July 23—The body of Granville Bell, aged 28, section hand, was found north of this city Sunday morning with both legs cut off and otherwise injured. The body was found on the Illinois Central railroad track. An open knife was found near the body. Some believe he was killed and placed on the track, but general belief is that he was killed by a passenger train.


CRUSHED IN MINE FIRE

Harrisburg, Ill., July 22—William Evans, a mine inspector, was probably fatally crushed in O’Gara’s mine here last night by falling slate. He was called upon to lead in the fight against a fire, which had started in one of the shafts, and a boulder fell upon him.


Uncle Joe Steagala passed a very bad night and there is no improvement in his condition today. His death is expected at any time.

 


Wednesday, 25 Jul 1906:
WAS NOT KNOWN AT MOUNDS
W. H. Pickard, Diver, Who Lost Life at St. Louis

W. H. Pickard, the diver, who lost his life at St. Louis yesterday, was not known at Mounds. In an account of the accident in today’s St. Louis Globe Democrat, it was stated that the dead man had a mother living at Mounds, Ill. Inquiry at Mounds over the telephone brought the information that the only Pickard that was ever at Mounds was a banana messenger.

Pickard had gone down in a diving suit to clear out an intake at the plant of the Union Electric Company. In some way the life line parted. A force of men kept pumping fresh air to him, but it was not until nearly 6 o’clock, four hours after he made the descent, that another diver could be secured and the helpless body brought to the surface. When the helmet was unscrewed, it was found that he was dead. As no water was found in the diving suit, it was thought he died of fright.


Died Suddenly—John Jackson, who has been watchman at the Chicago Mill and Lumber Company’s plant for the past nine years, died yesterday morning after an illness of only two days. He leaves a wife and two sons, the latter about 17 and 19 years old. Services were held today over the remains by the Rev. Mr. Coppage, pastor of the Southern Methodist Church. The remains were shipped to Sikeston for interment.


Died, Thursday, July 19th, 1906, at DuQuoin, Ill., John B. Richardson, age 36 years, 6 months and 7 days. Funeral services were held at the residence of his mother in this city (Dongola), Friday, July 20th, at 2 o’clock p.m. Interment in I. O. O. F. Cemetery, Dongola.

             (His marker in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  John B. Richardson 1870-1906.—Darrel Dexter)


Died, at her home three miles west of Dongola, Sunday, July 22, 1906, at 10 o’clock p.m., Mrs. Malinda Jenkins, age 86 years, 6 months and 13 days. Funeral services at St. John’s Church Wednesday, July 25th. Interment in St. John’s Cemetery.

             (Her marker in St. John’s Cemetery reads:  Malinda J. wife of Daniel Jenkins Born Jan. 9, 1820 Died July 10, 1906.—Darrel Dexter)


Mr. A. J. Daisy received a telegram Friday that his grandfather was dead. The old gentleman was a resident of Fairfield, Ill. (Cache)


Buried at Sikeston—The remains of Edward Jackson, watchman at the Chicago Mill, whose death occurred Monday, was buried at Sikeston, Mo., this morning.  Jackson was employed on one of the log roads of the company and lost a leg while in the discharge of his duty.  They then gave him a position as watchman, which he held for many years until his death Monday.  He leaves a widow and several children.

 


Thursday, 26 Jul 1906:
Died This Afternoon—Mrs. A. A. Jones died this afternoon about 3:30 o’clock at her home, No. 411 Thirty-third Street.

             (The 27 Jul 1906, issue stated that she had not died.—Darrel Dexter)


OLD SOLDIER PASSED AWAY
Daniel Franklin Died at His Home in Drainage District.

Daniel Franklin, an old soldier and a member of Company C, Eighteenth Illinois, died at his home yesterday morning in the drainage district. The deceased was 70 years of age and is survived by a wife, two sons and a daughter. His death was due to typhoid pneumonia.

The funeral was held this afternoon and the remains buried in the National Cemetery at Mound City.
Two sons, William and George Franklin, survive him.

(Daniel Franklin is not listed in the muster rolls of the 18th Illinois.  This may be the same person as Daniel F. Franklin, 29, of Nashville, Washington Co., Ill., who enlisted as a private in Co. D, 48th Illinois Infantry on 25 Feb 1864, and was mustered out 15 Aug 1865, at Little Rock, Ark.   D. F. Franklin, Private, U. S. Army, died 24 Jul 1906, and was buried in Section F, Grave 4730A in Mound City National Cemetery.—Darrel Dexter)


HOUSEBOAT WRECKED
OWNERS MISSING
Who May Have Been Drowned—Information Lacking

The John S. Summers ran onto a houseboat in the Mississippi yesterday opposite Thirty-fourth Street and demolished it.

The owners of the boat are missing, which leads to the belief that they may have been drowned.
Three young students of the Chicago Art Institute left Chicago several weeks ago. They floated down the Illinois River and had intended going down the Mississippi to New Orleans. They are on a vacation and sketching tour. They were well known by the writer, who is much concerned as to whether or not it was their boat which was wrecked.

It was impossible to learn details connected with the affair or to whom the boat belonged.

 


Friday, 27 Jul 1906:

HERMAN GANDER DIED THIS MORNING
Well Known Butcher Passed Away at Home on Eighteenth Street

Herman Gander, a well known citizen of this city, died this morning at his home on Eighteenth Street after an illness of several months.

He was afflicted with a cancer of the throat and for the last three months has been seriously ill. His death came this morning at 4 o’clock.

He was 38 years of age and has resided in this city for the past fifteen years, having come from Cincinnati, Ohio. He is a native of Germany and is survived by a wife, who is a Cairo girl and three brothers and one sister, who live in Germany. He also has a brother and sister in Cincinnati.

He has conducted a butcher shop for the past few years at the corner of Eighteenth and Poplar Street and is a member of the Cairo Casino Maennerchor.

No arrangements for the funeral have been made.


BODY RECOVERED FROM THE OHIO
Corpse of Negro Boy Who Was Drowned Came to Surface

The body of the negro boy who was drowned in the Ohio came to the surface this afternoon near the Singer factory and was recovered.

Coroner McManus was notified and went up to hold an inquest.

The body was that of Fred Guinn, who was drowned Wednesday evening while in swimming near the coal dump. The body was found floating near the Singer works by a party of boys who were in swimming.


Mr. Jerry Pecord of Willard, Ill., has returned from Pawnee, Indian Territory, where he was called by the death of his brother.


GIRL COMMITTED SUICIDE AT HERRIN
Miss Delia Miles, of Grand Tower, Ends Life—Man Mixed Up in Affair

Miss Delia Miles, of Grand Tower, shot and killed herself at Herrin today.

The young lady was a passenger on the Illinois Central train to Herrin this morning. It was noticed that she was met by a man, said to be a gambler, on her arrival there and together they went to the fair grounds. The next thing that was known was that the man was hunting the marshal. He said that she had shot herself.


WELL KNOWN CARPENTER DIED YESTERDAY
D. A. Jones Passed Away at His Home on Thirty-third Street

The death of Mr. D. A. Jones, who has been seriously ill at his home on Thirty-third Street, occurred yesterday afternoon at 1:50 after an illness of eight weeks.

He was an old Cairoite having resided here for over 23 years. He was a carpenter and had done a great deal of work in this city.

He was 49 years of age and is survived by a wife and one married daughter, who has been residing with them.

He was an active member of the Carpenters’ Union and was well liked by everyone. His death although not unexpected, was a great blow to his many friends.

No arrangements for his funeral have been made.

The report that his wife had died, which was published in this paper last evening, proved to be incorrect.

 


Saturday, 28 Jul 1906:
NEGRO KILLED AT MOUND CITY
Shotgun Was Accidentally Discharged When Negro Climbed Out of a Wagon

Bert Ralph, a negro, met a sudden death this afternoon at Mound City by the accidental discharge of a shotgun.

The negro had been out berry picking with his wife and three children. On their return to Mound City, Ralph was climbing out of the wagon and as he did so his shotgun was accidentally discharged. The negro was killed almost instantly.

 


Monday, 30 Jul 1906:
Mr. Homer Harris, who was well known in Mound City and Mounds, was shot and instantly killed at Ullin Saturday evening. Mr. Harris was running a merry-go-round at that place where there was a negro picnic going on. A negro refusing to pay for riding was put off the swing, who instantly shot and killed Harris and wounding a small boy who was on the swing beside Harris. He formerly lived in this city and Mounds and has two brothers, Mr. Norman Harris, of this place, and Warder Harris, of Mounds. He also leaves a wife and child. His body was brought to Mounds Sunday morning.

 

Bert Ralph, the negro who was accidentally shot last Saturday evening was buried at Beech Grove Cemetery Sunday afternoon.

 

LAST SAD RITES WERE HELD
Over the remains of Mrs. Charlotte Halliday This Afternoon
REMAINS BURIED AT BEECH GROVE
Death of Mrs. Halliday Saturday a Surprise and Shock to the People of Cairo

Mrs. Charlotte Josephine Halliday, widow of the late Thomas W. Halliday, former mayor of this city, died at her home on upper Washington Avenue, Saturday afternoon at 4:40 o’clock. The deceased was 58 years of age.

The news of Mrs. Halliday’s death was a surprise to her relatives and many friends, and was a great shock to the entire community. While realizing that she was seriously ill, her death was unexpected at that time.

The deceased was born in Chicago on April 3, 1848. She came to Cairo with her parents in 1852 at the age of four years and has resided in this city ever since. Her father was the late Col. S. S. Taylor, one of Cairo’s most prominent and influential citizens. On May 1st, 1866, she was married to Thomas W. Halliday. Thirteen children resulted from this union, nine of whom are living and all were at her bedside at the time of her death. Those surviving her are S. Staats Halliday, Edwin Parsons Halliday, Mrs. E. J. Mut, of Dallas, Texas, Parker B. Halliday, Wyatt Halliday, Camilla Halliday, Alexander M. Halliday, Henry L. Halliday, and Thomas Halliday.

The immediate cause of death was typhoid fever from which the deceased has been confined to her bed since July 17th. She was not considered dangerously ill until last Tuesday when she was taken worse.
Mrs. Halliday went to Dallas last winter and visited her daughter, Mrs. Mut, for several weeks. She returned to Cairo in March and was enjoying good health at that time. She complained of feeling badly about three months ago and was taken to her bed two weeks ago.

Her husband, the late Thomas W. Halliday, died on September 18, 1892, and was mayor of Cairo at the time of his death. He was one of Cairo’s foremost citizens and much progress was made in the city’s welfare during his administration.

Mrs. Halliday was born of Revolutionary stock. Her father, the late Col. S. Staats Taylor, served in the Civil War. His grandfather on his father’s side was Gen. John Taylor, and his grandfather on his mother’s side was Col. John Neilson, both of whom served in the Revolutionary War.

The deceased’s mother was the only child of Capt. Joseph Bambridge, who served in the War of 1812.

The funeral services were held this afternoon at 2 o’clock at the family residence. Father E. L. Roland, rector of the Church of the Redeemer, conducted the services. A quartet composed of Mrs. W. L. Holt, Mrs. C. T. Calhoun, Mr. C. N. Buchanan, Prof. Herbert Hutchison, led by Mr. George Parsons, sang a number of favorite hymns of the deceased, “Abide with Me,” and “Lead Kindly Light.”

There were a large number of very handsome floral offerings, including several very handsome pieces.

The remains were taken to Beech Grove Cemetery and interred in the family lot beside her husband and four children.

The pallbearers were Charles Cunningham, C. Frederick Galigher, M. J. Howley, George T. Carnes, Frank Thomas, E. A. Burke, Fred Nordman, C. B. S. Pennebaker, Charles Wenger, Sidney R. Miller, W. S. Dewey, George Parsons, and W. P. June.

The funeral was largely attended by the many friends of the family.

             (Thomas Wyatt Halliday married Charlotte Josephine Taylor on 1 May 1866, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 


Tuesday, 31 Jul 1906:
ALL QUIET AT MOUND CITY
No Fear Entertained of Trouble—Murderer of Homer Harris Still at Large

Everything was quiet at Mound City today and no fears are entertained by the officers that a mob will wreak its vengeance upon Sam McDonald, the negro arrested at Perks and taken to the Pulaski County jail last night for connection with the murder of Homer Harris at Ullin.

The negro who did the shooting, Travis, is still at large. The report that he was arrested at Cypress is declared by the officers to be false.


DEATH OF POPULAR YOUNG LADY
Miss Lucy Layton Passed Away Last Night of Stomach Trouble

Miss Lucy Layton, the 18-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Layton, of No. 220 Twenty-eighth Street, died last night at her home at 10:15 o’clock after an illness of several months.

Miss Layton was formerly employed as saleslady at Kaufman Brothers, dry goods store and was beloved by everyone who knew her. She has been suffering for the last three months of stomach complications, which finally caused her death.

The deceased is survived by her father and mother, two brothers and fours sisters, all of which reside in this city.

The funeral will be held tonight at the residence. The services will be conducted by Rev. O. C. Coppage, pastor of the Southern Methodist Church. The services will be held at 7 o’clock. The remains will be taken to Wickliffe, Ky., tomorrow morning for burial on the 10 o’clock ferry.

All friends of the family are invited to attend.

 


Wednesday, 1 Aug 1906:
Death of an Infant—Josephene Mable, the 3-month-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Kelly, died this morning at the home of its parents, No. 2501 Poplar Street. The child has been ill but a few days. Its death occurred this morning at 8 o’clock. Mr. Kelly is the well known fireman at Station No. 2.


Benjamin Barker, the oldest son of Thomas Barker, of Perks, aged about 18 years of age, died Tuesday morning of dropsy of the heart.


A young son of Mr. Henner, of near Olmstead, stepped on a nail one day last week and blood poison followed, of which he died Saturday. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery here (Wetaug) Sunday.

             (His marker in St. Joseph’s Cemetery at Wetaug reads:  Albert W. son of W. M. & Caroline Hannon Born Sept. 19, 1894 Died July 28, 1906 Aged 11 Yrs., 10 Mos., & 5 Ds.


Three years ago, Eli Bugg, of Mounds, furnished a pistol to another negro at a dance here (Wetaug) to kill a man with whom he had had a fight, and later was hung for it at Mound City. Saturday night, McDonald, of Perks, did the same thing at Ullin in the killing of Harris, and may suffer a like penalty.

 

Thursday, 2 Aug 1906:
MRS. HARRIET GOODALL DEAD

Mrs. Harriet E. Goodall, of Marion, Ill., widow of Hardin Goodall, a prominent citizen and former sheriff of Williamson County, died today. She was the mother of Mrs. Ella Duncan, wife of Judge W. W. Duncan, and of Mrs. Meta Warder, wife of Hon. William H. Warder.

(Webster W. Duncan married Ella Goodall on 20 Nov 1890, in Williamson Co., Ill.  William H. Warder married Meta Duncan on 26 Apr 1882, in Williamson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 

Henry Hill, the negro boy who killed his stepfather several months ago because the latter was beating his wife (Hill’s mother) and who was acquitted in the circuit court, was arrested by Officers Wade and Lipe for carrying concealed weapons. Hill was fined $25 and costs and placed in the city jail.


Died, Wednesday morning, July 25, 1906, Herman, little son of Mr. and Mrs. George Meisenheimer, age about 3 years. The little fellow was only sick about 24 hours before he died. Funeral services at 2 o’clock p.m. Thursday. Interment in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery. (Dongola)

             (George Meisenheimer married Nora Wright on 4 Jul 1896, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Herman Meisenheimer 1903-1906.—Darrel Dexter)


George Crumbaugh, aged 62, died July 2nd, about 3 p.m. after an illness of three weeks. He was a volunteer Co. B, 20th Illinois Regiment. (Gale)

             (George Crambaugh, 18, native of Ohio, of New Meade, Jasper Co., Ill., enlisted as a private in Co. B, 20th Illinois on 1 Nov 1864, and was sick in the hospital at Fortress Monroe at muster out.—Darrel Dexter)


About two weeks ago, the oldest boy of Mr. and Mrs. Will Hannon, (Albert, aged 12 years) in going about his home barefooted, stepped on a big rusty nail, which was in a board. The nail going almost through his foot. The wound of course, was very painful, the first few hours, but after applying some home remedies it healed and was apparently well till about 10 days after the accident his foot again got sore, his tongue and neck became stiff and Dr. Whiteaker was summoned and on examination found a malignant case of tetanus (lock jaw). The doctor immediately opened the wound and removed a great deal of pus, but all the medical skill and assistance of many loving hands could not stay the ravages of the disease that had so much the start and, early Saturday morning, death relieved the little fellow of his suffering. Albert was a bright little boy and bore his intense suffering with patience. The sympathy of the entire community is with the heart-broken parents. (Olmstead)


On last Friday, at the early hour of 1 o’clock, the happy home of Mr. and Mrs. William Albright, as well as the entire village, was made sad by the death of little Buerel, the only child of the Albright home, whose age was near two years. The little flower was stricken with the dreaded and almost ever fatal disease, cholera infantum, suffering almost two weeks, outdoing all skill from a scientific and nursing standpoint. Enduring the intense pains equal to an adult, conscious till almost the last, awaking something like an hour before her journey heavenward, calling mamma, mamma. It is sad indeed for parents to stand by the bedside of their dear one and realize at the same time that she is in the throes of death and sadder yet to see the pains of death as they entwine the little one beyond human help. But could the stricken ones behold the scene and the rejoicing in heaven, as her little spirit enters the pearly portals, they might have seen the earthly loss here be overwhelmed by the gain of such a spotless white and rare jewel that is placed on earth to brighten the way to eternal happiness. What a consolation to our aching hearts to know that the innocents have an abode in the arms of Jesus. The Bible says that a child’s inheritance is a home in Glory. Our only hope then is to live for the final and great reunion where parting is no more. Little Buerel was buried at Creal Springs Saturday the 28th. The heartbroken parents have the sympathy of all. (Olmsted)


Mr. Cal Brown has been summoned to the sick bed of his father in Anna, whose demise is hourly expected.  His daughter, Mrs. Albert Lily, accompanied him. (Unity)


Minnie Sanders (colored) died Sunday of consumption, aged about twenty. She was the daughter of Church Sanders and Gustine Sanders, old residents of this place (Unity), all having been born and raised here.


Saturday, 4 Aug 1906:
MRS. MINNIE ALBA HAS PASSED AWAY.
Died Last Evening at 6:30 O’clock at Her Home, No. 604 Commercial Ave.

DECEASED WAS A NATIVE OF GERMANY.
Came to This County in 1857 and Located at Cairo in 1858—71 Years Old

Mrs. Minnie Alba, widow of the late William Alba, passed away at her home, No. 604 Commercial Avenue, last evening, about 6:30 o’clock. The deceased was 71 years of age.

Mrs. Alba had been in poor health for some time and her death was due to the infirmities of old age.
The deceased was a native of Germany, having been born at Minden, Westphalia, Prussia, May 15, 1835. Her parents died when she was a mere child. With four sisters she came to this country and located at St. Louis in 1857. The year following, she was married and removed with her husband to Cairo, where she has resided ever since.

Five children resulted from this union, four of whom are living. They are Mrs. P. W. Kobler, Misses Matilda and Ida Alba, and Benjamin W. Alba. All reside in this city.

Mrs. Alba was a member of the German Lutheran Church but had never joined any secret organizations.

By her kind and sweet disposition, the deceased won many friends, who always held her in the highest esteem. She was a faithful wife and a loving mother and her death will be greatly deplored by her relatives and friends.

The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon. The remains will be buried at Beech Grove Cemetery, beside her husband and child.

(Peter H. Koebler married Bertha C. Alba on 15 Oct 1884, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 


Monday, 6 Aug 1906:

HOMCIDE IN DRAINAGE DISTRICT
Clem Armstrong Shot and Killed by Henry Williamham Last Evening
DOMESTIC TROUBLE CAUSED TRAGEDY.
Defendant Gave Himself Up and Was Released by Coroner’s Jury.

Clem Armstrong, a colored man living on Mayor Parson’s farm in the drainage district, shot and killed Henry Williamham, another negro, about 6:30 last evening.

Domestic trouble is said to have caused the tragedy.

After the shooting, Armstrong came to Cairo and surrendered to Sheriff Roche.  He was taken back to the scene of the shooting this morning, when an inquest was held by Coroner McManus.  The jury found the shooting justifiable and Armstrong was released.

It is stated that Williamham has had improper relations with members of Armstrong’s family.  He came to Armstrong’s house Sunday evening while drunk and wanted to whip Armstrong’s daughter.  The shooting followed, Armstrong using a 38 Bull Dog revolver. Williamham was found to be unarmed after the shooting.

(The 20 Aug 1906, issue refers to the deceased as Henry Willingham.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Sheerer left Sunday for Pulaski, Ill., to attend the funeral of a relative.  (Mound City)
 
 
Tuesday, 7 Aug 1906:
UNCLE JOE STEAGALA HAS PASSED AWAY.
Death Claimed Him at One O’clock This Afternoon, After Long Illness
OPERATION FAILED TO PROLONG LIFE.
Funeral to Occur Thursday Afternoon—Sketch of His Life, Which Was a Busy One.

“Uncle Joe” Steagala is no more.  Death claimed him at 1 o’clock today.

For two weeks his life has hung by a thread and at one time the report spread over the city that he was dead.

The illness which resulted fatally today began on July 10th.  He contracted a cold while a member of an outing party, and went to bed on his return.  Two weeks later, he was at the point of death, but he rallied and one day was able to leave his bed.  He was taken down again and last Saturday his right leg was amputated in the hope of saving his life.  He never gained consciousness after the operation.
His trouble was the forming of a clot of blood in an artery in his right leg, which caused the life to gradually leave that member.

“Uncle Joe” as everyone knew him, left a widow and four children, one son, William C., and three daughters, Mrs. Bertha Connell, wife of Frank Connell; Mrs. Jorena Bambrick, wife of Edward Bambrick; and Miss Marguerite Steagala.  He also leaves two brothers, Frank and William C., both of Cairo, and three sisters, Mrs. Fanny Curry, of Philadelphia, Mrs. Lou Fieck, of St. Louis, and Mrs. Rosa Fritschler, of St. Louis.  All of them had been called to his bedside, except the sister in Philadelphia.
The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon, with burial at Villa Ridge.  Arrangements have not been fully completed.

Besides the saloon at Sixth and Commerical Avenue, “Uncle Joe” conducted the saloon at Sixth and Ohio streets, known as the “Glad Hand.”  He also conducted a mail order liquor business and owned “Uncle Joe’s” Hotel.  He was also interested in the Andrew Lohr Bottle Company, and other business enterprises here.

The following is taken from a volume recently published and is an authorized sketch of his life.

Joseph Steagala, the proprietor of Uncle Joe’s hotel, restaurant and saloon was born in New Orleans, La., Feb. 13, 1830, and came to Cairo with his parents in 1854, having previously worked as a river man for three years.  In 1857, Joe Steagala helped to organize the first fire department in Cairo, a volunteer relief department, which continued until 1865, when he became a charter member of the “Rough and Ready” Fire Company and from that day to this he has been a member of the company.  During the period of nine years that Mr. Steagala served as chief, the department was handled more ably and economically than it had been handled before or has been handled since.  When the position became a salaried one, he promptly resigned.  This is one of Uncle Joe’s traits.  Whatever he did for the community, he did for the pure love of the town and not for pay.  In 1866, Mr. Steagala moved to Hickman, Ky., where he resided for thirteen years.  During these years he paid his dues and was a member in good standing of the “Rough and Ready” Fire Company of Cairo.  In 1879, he returned to Cairo and opened up his present place of business at the corner of Sixth Street and Commercial Avenue.  He was first elected justice of the peace in 1885 and was still serving at the time of his death.  He served the first ward as alderman in 1894 and has two or three times been brought out by his friends and admirers as an independent candidate for mayor.  Mr. Steagala was at all times identified with every movement which had for its object the bringing of people to Cairo and of keeping them.  He was a member in good standing of nineteen secret societies, to each of which he gave more of his time and money than did any other member.  He was a director of the Cairo Baseball Club and was one of the active promoters of the Kitty League.  Among the various business enterprises that Mr. Steagala has been connected with can be mentioned the broom factory on Tenth Street, operated by him two years, a sewing machine store on Commercial Avenue managed by Mr. Steagala for three years and the widely popular “Uncle Joe’s Hotel” on the levee, which opened in 1889 and in which he himself placed the electric light plant.  Without any display or any notoriety, Joe Steagala quietly and unobtrusively dispensed thousands of dollars in Cairo in worthy charity.  Personally he was a quiet, unassuming gentleman, with whom it was a pleasure to have business and social relations. He was known by every man, woman and child in the town, and while he may have enemies, we doubt if there was any other man in town who had more or warmer friends than had Uncle Joe Steagala.

(Published with the obituary is a photograph of Joseph Steagala.  Edward J. Bambrick married Jenna R. Steagala on 17 May 1897, in Alexander Co., Ill. His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Joseph Steagala Born Feb. 13, 1839 Died Aug. 7, 1906.  Hulda Steagala Born Aug. 16, 1850 Died Feb. 12, 1920.—Darrel Dexter)
 
BOY DISAPPEARS, MAY HAVE DROWNED.
Charles Hopps, Eight Years Old, Probably Met Watery Grave in Mississippi.
HAT WAS FOUND FLOATING IN RIVER.
Was Playing with Several Other Boys Yesterday Afternoon and Suddenly Disappeared

Charles Hopps, the eight-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Hopps, who reside on a houseboat on the Mississippi levee near Twenty-eighth Street, disappeared from home very mysteriously yesterday afternoon and has not been seen since.  It is thought that he fell into the river and was drowned.

Young Hopps was playing on the river bank with a number of other small boys when the storm came up about 3 o’clock.  It rained quite hard in the upper part of the city and when the rain began to fall, the boys scattered for their homes.

It is understood that Hopps went to the houseboat and assisted in closing the windows and preparing for the storm.

He left the houseboat and that was the last seen of him.  It is almost certain he fell into the river and was drowned.

There are several eddies in the Mississippi near that locality and it is thought that his little body was caught in one of these and whirled to its destruction.

The boy’s father is away from home on business and his mother, who is a frail little woman, is nearly prostrated with grief.  Mr. Hopps conducts a photograph gallery on the boat, known as the Novelty Photo Company.  They are quite well known in Cairo.

Since the boy’s mysterious disappearance, his hat was found floating in the river, which adds to the belief that he met a watery grave.

Chief of Police Egan was notified this morning and had two officers make a search for the boy with no success.

The boy’s father has been telegraphed to return home at once.  A search for the boy’s body is being made today.

Mr. and Mrs. Hopps came to Cairo about a year ago.
 


Wednesday, 8 Aug 1906:
NO TRACE HAS BEEN FOUND OF YOUNG HOPPS
And It Is Probable That He Was Drowned

No trace has yet been found of Charles Hopps, the 8-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Hopps who reside on the houseboat on the Mississippi levee near Twenty-eighth Street, and it is probably that the little fellow was drowned Monday.

A diligent search has been made to recover his body, but so far without success.
 
SI MOORE SUCCUMBS TO PARALYSIS.
Well Known Pulaski Citizen Passes Away—Burial Tuesday

Mr. Si Moore, who was stricken with paralysis, died last Friday morning at his home in Pulaski.  The body was embalmed to await the arrival of his daughter, Mrs. Ida Sewell, of Idaho.  Mrs. Sewell arrived Monday evening and the funeral was held Tuesday afternoon.  Services were conducted by the pastor at the M. E. Church.  Interment at Villa Ridge.  Mr. Moore was an old and respected citizen of Pulaski County.  He leaves a wife and large family to mourn his loss.

(His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Silas J. Moore Born June 3, 1836 Died Aug. 3, 1906—Darrel Dexter)
 
REMAINS ARE LYING IN STATE
Burial of Joseph Steagala Will Occur Tomorrow Afternoon

In Union Hall, adjoining his late residence, the remains of the late Joseph Steagala are lying in state, and tomorrow afternoon the funeral will be held.  In order that the crowd which will desire to attend the services can be accommodated, the funeral service will be held in this hall.  There will be seats for all the ladies who desire to attend the funeral.  The entrance to the hall is on Commercial Avenue, the first stairway north of Sixth Street.

Because he had done so much for them, the Mound City Bank have offered their services at the funeral and they have been accepted.

Arrangements for the burial will be completed tonight, when the various lodges meet to appoint representatives to a joint meeting of all of the lodges.  At this meeting the active pall bearers will be selected, taken from all of the lodges, of which the deceased was a member.  Among these lodges are the Alexander Lodge of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Eagles, the Knight and Ladies of Honor, the K. M. K. C., the Germania Maennerchor, etc.

The funeral will be held at 2 o’clock p.m. conducted by Rev. Charles H. Armstrong, pastor of the Lutheran Church, and the remains will be taken by special train to Villa Ridge for interment.
 
NOTICE I. O. O. F.

Members of Alexander Lodge No. 2245 I. O. O. F. are instructed to meet at their hall Thursday at 1:30 p.m. sharp to attend the funeral of our late Bro. Joseph Steagala.  Members of Safford Lodge and all other Odd Fellows are invited to be present.

George J. Becker, N. F.
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

Died, Tuesday, Aug. 7th, 1906, Joseph Steagala, aged 67 years.

Funeral services will be held at the family residence, No. 600 Commercial Avenue, Thursday, Aug. 8th, at 2 o’clock p.m., Rev. Charles H. Armstrong officiating.  Remains will be taken by special train to Villa Ridge cemetery.

All friends of the family are invited.
 
Mrs. H. Wiedman, who was called here by the death of her aunt, Mrs. Minnie Alba, and who has been visiting her father, Mr. P. W. Kobler, returned today to her home in Maplewood, Mo.
 
 
Thursday, 9 Aug 1906:
FUNERAL OF JOSEPH STEAGALA
Held This Afternoon at Union Hall and Attended by Hundred of Cairo Citizens
CEREMONIES WERE VERY IMPRESSIVE
Conducted by the Rev. Charles H. Armstrong—Remains Taken to Villa Ridge—Many Floral Offerings

The last sad rites over the remains of Joseph Steagala were held at 2 o’clock this afternoon in Union Hall, when a large representation of the many lodges and organizations of which he was a member, and citizens of Cairo, turned out en masse to pay their last respects to “Uncle Joe,” as the deceased was commonly called by those who knew him.  The fuernal was one of the largest ever held in Cairo, despite the inclement weather.

The services were conducted by the Rev. Mr. Armstrong, pastor of the Immanuel Lutheran Church and were very solemn and impressive.  Several hymns were sweetly sung by the Germania Maennerchor.
The funeral procession was headed by the Mound City Band and include the following organizations: 

Alexander Lodge No. 224 I. O. O. F., Alma Rebekah Lodge No. 163, members of the Old Rough and Ready Fire Company, Cairo Lodge No. 173 and Ascalon Lodge No. 51, Knights of Pythias, K. M. K. C., Germania Maennerchor, members of the G. A. R., Culver’s Egyptian Band, Eagles, American Home Circle, Knights and Ladies of Honor.

Following the hearse were seven carriages filled with relatives of the deceased.

The following were pallbearers:
Active

Odd Fellows—William Schaatz, R. A. Hewitt

Knights of Pythias—John Wilbourne, Frank Adams

K. M. K. C.—Reed Green, Fred S. Haas

Eagles—M. S. Egan, Sam West

Knights of Honor—Charles Cunningham, C. B. S. Pennebaker

Knights and Ladies of Honor—Charles Feuchter, Jr., William Jones

American Home Circle—H. W. Mitchell, Fred Crisp

Grand Army—C. R. Stuart, N. B. Thistlewood

Maennerchor—Peter Day, Joseph Bucher
Honorary

Peter Saup, J. S. Aisthorpe, Maj. E. W. Halliday, E. C. Allen, Henry Hasenjaeger, A. Botto, William Oehler, Fred Teichman, Daniel Hartman, Conrad Alba, Capt. Frank Cassidy, and G. H. Jackson

The floral offerings were profuse and very beautiful.  The funeral was held under the direction of Mrs. Falconer, the undertaker, and the remains taken to Villa Ridge for interment.

A large number of citizens went up to the cemetery.
 
HARRIS’ SLAYER STILL AT LARGE
Seen Monday Night in Woods Between Ullin and Perks
SHOT AT WHEN TWENTY FEET AWAY
But Either Escaped Unhurt or But Slightly Injured—Forages at Night

Wetaug, Aug. 8—The negro who murdered Harris is still in the woods between Ullin and Perks and has been seen by several parties during the last week.  Monday night a party from here and Ullin was organized to hunt for him and went out and spent the night trying to locate him.  He or someone answering his description was seen twice during the night, the last time about 4 o’clock in the morning and was shot at point blank range only twenty feet away with a double barreled shotgun both loads, but either was not hit or escaped not much disabled.  He sleeps day time in the jungles and forages at night.
 
Mr. Arthur Faulkner spent a very bad night and is very low today.  His death is only a matter of day’s time, it is thought.
 
STRUCK BY TRAIN ON CENTRAL
James Malone Seriously Injured at McClure Today

James Malone, of Gray’s Point, Mo., was seriously injured at McClure today.  He was struck by fast freight No. 52 on the Illinois Central.  He was taken to Thebes on Bryan’s train and from there to his home.  He was selling tombstones at McClure when injured.
 
 
Friday, 10 Aug 1906:
CARD OF THANKS

To all who ministered to our need during the recent illness and at the death of our husband and father, Joseph Steagala, we desire to express our heartfelt thanks and gratitude.  Especially do we wish to extend our appreciation of their thoughtfulness to the Mound City Band, Culver’s Egyptian Band the various lodges of the city, Rev. Charles H. Armstrong, and others for their kind remembrances.
Mrs. Joseph Steagala and Family
 
 
Saturday, 11 Aug 1906:
BURNETT’S DEATH REGRETTED HERE
Senator Had Many Friends in Cairo and Alexander County

The news of the death of Senator O. H. Burnett was received with much sorrow in Cairo.  Senator Burnett had many warm friends in this county.  He was regarded here as one of the most promising young Republicans in this end of the state.

Richard E. Powers, who was in Marion yesterday, says that the death of Senator Burnett cast a gloom over the whole place.  No one suspected that he was seriously ill.

The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock and it is likely that it will be very largely attended, for the senator has a very wide acquaintance over the state.
 
BODY OF BOY FOUND AT O’BRIEN’S LANDING
Thought to Be the Remains of Young Charles Hopps Who Disappeared from Home Last Monday
FATHER HAS GONE TO VIEW THE BODY.
Feels Confident from Description That It Is His Son—Young Girl also Missing

The body of a boy between the ages of 8 and 12 years of age was found floating in the Mississippi River near O’Brien’s Landing last Wednesday and it is thought to be the remains of Charles Hopps, the 8-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Hopps, who conduct the photograph gallery on a houseboat at Twenty-eighth and Mississippi levee.

The boy was dressed in overalls and jumper, had light hair and was barefooted.  Young Hopps disappeared from home very mysteriously several days ago and as he failed to return home, it was thought by his parents that he was drowned.

Mr. Hopps feels confident from the description that the remains were those of his son and, accompanied by Mr. Wood Rittenhouse, left in a launch for O’Brien’s Landing this morning.

Mrs. Hopps is nearly prostrated with grief over the loss of her son.

A rather strange coincidence in connection with the disappearance of the boy is the disappearance of Mina Boyd, the 12-year-old daughter of Mrs. G. D. French, of No. 903 Ohio Street.

Mrs. French was seen by a Citizen representative today and stated that her daughter had been out on the Mississippi levee on the day that the little Hopps boy had disappeared, which was last Monday, and that she had not been seen since that day.

The police have made a careful search for the missing girl with no success.

On the day that the Hopps boy disappeared, a number of children, including Charlie Hopps and Mina Boyd, were playing near the houseboat.  When the storm came up, the children scattered and since that time the boy and the girl have been missing.

The girl is large for her age, weighing 95 pounds.  She has dark brown hair, brown eyes and a dark complexion, with a round scar on the left side of her face.  Her hair had fallen out some time ago and had grown again irregularly, says Mr. French.  She wore white stockings, high heeled white slippers, a white blouse, waist and dress.

It is hardly thought by the girls’ mother that she has run away from home, but it is feared that she has met with some accident.
 
Katherine Thorp, little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Thorp, of this city (Mound City) died after an illness of a few days.  The child was three years and six months old.
 
SENATOR BURNETT HAS PASSED AWAY
Death Suddenly Overtook Him at His Home in Marion
HAD BEEN AILING LESS THAN A WEEK
Stricken Down in the Prime of His Brilliant Young Manhood

Marion Post:  State Senator Otis Herman Burnett died at his home on West Main Street, in this city, at 5:40 Friday morning.

No greater gloom was ever cast over the city of Marion than that which came with the dawn of this morning, when the heart sickening news was broken to the citizens that Senator Burnett was dead.

His death would have been a terrible blow to the people of Marion under any circumstances, but coming as it did when scarcely anybody in the city even knew that he was sick, the news of it was a staggering blow.

Senator Burnett was sick just a week.  He arose on the morning of Friday, August 3, at about 4 o’clock and complained of feeling bad.  But he didn’t regard the illness as anything serious and after breakfast he came up to his office.

Soon after arriving at his office, he became worse and went into an adjoining doctor’s office.  Here he received treatment and remained until 1 o’clock in the afternoon, when he was taken to his home on West Main Street.

The announcement that Senator Burnett was ill and could not get up town was made Saturday, but the people scarcely gave it a second thought, as there was a great deal of illness from summer complaints, etc.

By Monday the senator was so much improved that his doctor told him he was all right and all that was necessary for his full recovery in a few days was a sufficient amount of care regarding what he ate.  It having been thus understood that Senator Burnett was getting well, his friends, thought but little more about his case and were knocked speechless by the terrible news of his death this morning.  Senator Burnett was in fact in a good way to recovery up until the time his family retired last night, but took worse some time in the night.  No real serious turn for the worse came until about 4 o’clock this morning, when his condition became alarming and a doctor was sent for.  In an hour and forty minutes Senator Burnett was dead.

Congestion of the bowels is said to have been the immediate cause of Senator Burnett’s death.  His first attack was pronounced impaction of the bowels, a violent form of constipation.  This it is presumed caused an inflammation resulting in congestion.

The death of this excellent young man, this brilliant young statesman, is awful to contemplate.  It is hard to realize. It is awful, awful!
Biographical

Otis Herman Burnett, son of John H. and Mary A. Burnett, was born in Rock Creek Precinct, Williamson County, Illinois, January 17, 1872, and was therefore just thirty-four years of age last January.

In 1886, when Mr. Burnett, father of deceased was elected to the office of sheriff of Williamson County, he moved his family to Marion and Herman, as deceased was known, made his home in this city, from that time until his death.

After the usual amount of training in the public schools, he took a course in the Northern Indiana State Normal University, graduating there from in 1892.  He afterwards took a course at Yale College, graduating from that famous institution in 1899.

He was for several years cashier of the Bank of Marion, but resigned that position in 1896 to take up the study of law and was admitted to the bar in due time.  Soon after his admission to the bar, he formed a law partnership with Judge W. F. Slater, which firm was in existence until Senator Burnett’s death.

The law partnership was formed in 1899 and in 1900 Mr. Burnett was elected to the state senate from this, the Fiftieth Senatorial District, by a majority of 600 votes in a Democratic district with a normal majority of 400.  He was re-elected to the same body in 1904, having been renominated by acclamation and was still serving in that capacity when the reaper Death cut short his brilliant career.

Senator Burnett leaves a wife and one child.  Mrs. Burnett was Miss Lizzie Hargon, of Canton, Miss., before her marriage to Mr. Burnett in April 1905.  The child, a son named John, is now about nine years old.

Herman was always a good boy.  When growing up on the farm, his life was an example of obedient and good behavior to his neighbor boys.  He professed religion at an early age and joined the Missionary Baptist Church at Coal Bank Springs.

After coming to Marion, he became a member of the Knights of Pythias and Elks lodges, in both of which he was in good standing at the time of his death.  These lodges will conduct his funeral services, but the time for them has not been set.
 
 
Monday, 13 Aug 1906:
IDENTIFIED BODY AS THAT OF HIS SON

Feeling sure from the description that the body of the boy found at O’Brien’s Landing by men in the employ of O. L. Bartlett at Mound City, was that of his son, Charles Hopps, accompanied by Wood Rittenhouse, went down in a launch and had the body taken up which he identified at once as that of his little boy.

The body was buried again and he will have it transferred to some other place.
 
PASSED AWAY AFTER LONG ILLNESS
Mrs. J. W. Hunsacker, Formerly of Cairo, Died at Anna

Mrs. J. Willis Hunsacker, died Saturday at her home in Anna, Ill., the funeral being held Sunday afternoon.  The deceased was formerly Miss Carrie Hawkins, of this city.  She was born and raised in Cairo and was a graduate of the Cairo High School.  Her prolonged illness which resulted in her death extended through several months.

Mrs. Hunsacker is survived by her husband, her mother, Mrs. C. H. Hawkins, of Twenty-second Street, three daughters, two sons, seven sisters and three brothers.  Her sisters, Mrs. Lucy Lynn, of St. Louis, Mo., Miss Mary Hawkins and Mrs. C. C. Marshall, of this city, and her nephew, Mr. Herbert Marshall, attended the funeral.

(John W. Hunsaker married Carrie Cutter Hawkins, 21, born in Pulaski Co., Ill., daughter of J. S. Hawkins and Miss Cutter, on 9 Nov 1882, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
WOUNDED CHILDREN BROUGHT TO CAIRO
Little Victims of Accident Now at St. Mary’s Infirmary

Mr. A. B. Fletcher, a prominent farmer of East Prairie, Mo., and two children were quite painfully wounded Friday evening at their home by the accidental discharge of a shotgun.  Mr. Fletcher upon returning home with the loaded gun put it under a bed.  One of the children, who was playing on the floor, crawled under the bed and discharged the gun in some manner, the shot striking two of the little ones. 

The children were brought to Cairo by their father Saturday morning and taken to the Planters Hotel, where they were given medical attention by Dr. A. A. Bondurant.  While the father was only slightly injured in the leg, the wounds of the two children are quite painful although not serious.  All three patients were taken to St. Mary’s Infirmary and were reported to be doing nicely today.
 
 
Tuesday, 14 Aug 1906:
GIRL IS TIRED OF RUNNING AWAY
Mina Boyd Says Now She Has Had Enough
WAS FOUND IN FAMILY OF FERRYMAN
Who Runs the Skiff Ferry to Bird’s Point—Will Be Sent to Geneva

Mina Boyd, the 12-year-old girl who has been missing for several days, was found Sunday night and taken back to her home on Ohio Street.

The girl is the daughter of Mrs. J. D. French and has had a mania for running away for a long time and this was her fourth or fifth trip.  She left home about a week ago and started on her last trip.  She went to Charleston, Mo., with the only clothes which she had on and there assumed the role of a poor orphan and worked upon the sympathy of a well-to-do farmer, who with his wife took her into their home.  She stayed there several days and then disappeared only to turn up at Bird’s Point, where she met the ferry boat man named Wilcox, who took her to his home on this side of the river.  She lived there with his wife until she was found by her father.

Her father, who is a railroader, learned of her whereabouts, and he and his wife sent down through the cottonwoods late Sunday night and after considerable trouble with the ferryboat man found her and took her home.  It was wrongly stated in the morning paper that the commotion which was caused last night on Eighth Street was caused by this girl as she has remained quietly at home ever since her return.  The trouble last night was caused by the refusal of her companion who also has a bad record as a runaway to come home after being away for several days.

The girl stated to a Citizen reporter this morning that she was perfectly willing to remain at home in the future, as she was tired of bumming.

The parents of both the girls are making arrangements to send them to the home for girls at Geneva.
 
DROWNED IN LAKE AT PADUCAH

Paducah, Ky., Aug. 14.—Cooper P. Drake, a popular young insurance agent, was seized with a cramp and drowned while swimming in the lake at Wallace Park at 3 o’clock Sunday afternoon.  George H. Holliday, his friend and companion, make two unsuccessful attempts to save the young man’s life but grew exhausted and had to leave the unfortunate youth to his fate.  The body was recovered, but life could not be restored.
 
 
Thursday, 16 Aug 1906:
DEATH CLAIMS ARTHUR FAULKNER
Passed Away Early This Afternoon after Several Month’s Illness

Arthur Faulkner, after months of suffering, died at 11:30 this forenoon at the home of his father-in-law, Mr. John Glade.  He was taken ill about six months ago, while living in St. Louis, to which place he had been transferred by the Western Union Telegraph Company.  After a month’s illness, he was brought to Cairo and has been here since, the recipient of the tender care of his wife and her family, and of the best medical attention that could be obtained.  Death was the result of cerebro embolism.

Arthur Hedge Faulkner was born in Kansas July 10, 1882.  After receiving a high school education, he studied telegraphy and soon became most proficient as an operator.  In 1904 he came to Cairo to take the press report in the Western Union office here.  During his residence here he met and formed the acquaintance of Miss Lena Glade, sister of Manager John Glade, and a year ago they were married.
Besides her, he leaves his parents and several brothers and sisters.

During his illness, Mr. Faulkner displayed great bravery and fortitude during all of his suffering, which was very great at times.  He sank peacefully to rest at the end.  Recently he was baptized into the Episcopal Church.

Private services will be held at the family residence on West Twenty-first Street, tomorrow afternoon and the remains will be taken home to Abilene, Kan., for interment, beside those of two of his sisters.
 
AGED CITIZEN OF WICKLIFFE DEAD

Bith Starks, an old and highly respected citizen of Wickliffe, died last night at the age of 74 years.  He had been ailing only a few days.  He is well known here.
 
 
Friday, 17 Aug 1906:
KILLED AT DAVIS BY M. & O. CARS
Body of Unknown White Man Found by Train Crew
BODY LITERALLY CUT IN TWO
Supposed to Have Been Oliver W. Reep, of Cutler County, Pennsylvania

The body of an unknown white man, apparently seven years of age, was found by the crew of a Mobile & Ohio freight train about 3 o’clock this morning.  The crew in dropping off some cars before going on over the bridge discovered the body lying beside the track of a siding.  It is supposed that he crawled under the cars sometime during the early part of the night to sleep, supposing that the cars would not be moved during the night and that a number of cars were kicked down by a switch engine against those under which he was sleeping, moving them so as to run over him.

The train crew notified the night operator at Davis, who in turn notified Coroner James McManus.  Dr. McManus drove out there this morning and held an inquest.  Nothing was found on the body to prove his identify, although a memorandum book was found which contained the names and addresses of fifty or sixty people.  The name of Oliver W. Reep was found in several places in the book and from this was drawn the supposition that it was the name of the dead man.  From appearances and from notes in the book, showing that he had been in California, Texas, Minnesota and many other places, it would appear that he was a wanderer.

While he was dressed quite shabbily and a telescope found near the track containing an old greasy suit of clothes, it would appear from old checks and drafts found in his clothing that at one time he had been quite prosperous, and from correspondence that he had not been to Pennsylvania for some years.
The coroner’s jury selected by Dr. McManus was composed of the following:

John B. English, Edwin Abell, Peter Kessler, Joseph Kessler, Harry Garth and Earnest Lacy.
The remains will be buried at the expense of the county.
 
Taken to Geneva—Sheriff and Mrs. Roche went to Geneva last night with Mina Boyd and Maude Ragsdale, the two wayward girls sent to that institution by order of Judge Dewey.
 
FAULKNER FUNERAL HELD THIS AFTERNOON

The funeral of the late Arthur Faulkner was held today at 1:30 o’clock.  A short service was held at the residence of Mr. John Glade.  The services were conducted by Rev. Roland of the Episcopal Church.  The remains were taken to his home in Abilene, Kan., for interment.  The pallbearers were Tom Boyd, Alvin Lynch, Morris Tripp, Herbert Marshall, George Lippett, and Horace Conant.
 
 
Saturday, 18 Aug 1906:
Injured Child Died—Cornelius Fletcher, the 2-year-old child that was shot accidentally several days ago at New Madrid, Mo., died this afternoon at the St. Mary’s Infirmary.  The little girl with several other companions was playing when a gun which one of her brothers had accidentally exploded and shot her.
 
 
Monday, 20 Aug 1906:
Died Yesterday—John Goaty, age 14 years, a nephew to Mr. Frank Fry, died yesterday afternoon at 1:15 o’clock at the home of his uncle, No. 2211 Walnut Street, after an illness of several weeks.  The boy’s death was due to blood poisoning superseded by salvation.  The funeral will be held tomorrow at St. Joseph’s Church at 8 o’clock.  The remains will be taken to Villa Ridge for interment.

(Frank W. Fry married Mary A. Goatey on 6 Jul 1891, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Johnny Goatey 1891-1906.—Darrel Dexter)
 
JURY EXONERATES OFFICER WADE
Finds Him Guiltless of Crime in Killing Lenn Armstrong
‘TWAS A CASE OF SHOOT OR BE SHOT
Negro Objected to Being Searched and Tried to Draw and Fire When Killed.

Lenn Armstrong, the negro who killed Henry Willingham in the drainage district two weeks ago, was shot and instantly killed by Officer Wade Saturday night.

It was a case of shooting or being shot, and Wade was the quickest in bringing his gun into action.
Officer Wade and Officer Bradley were on their way to arrest Henry Decker, a watchman at the bridge.  On Sycamore Street between Thirty-eight and Fortieth streets, they met two negroes who proved to be Armstrong and Tom Johnson.  They halted them and inquired what they were doing.  The answers were not satisfactory and the officers started to search the men.

As Wade walked up to Armstrong he stepped back and drew a 38 Colt and attempted to fire at Wade, but the officer was too quick for him and fired twice, both bullets taking effect killing him instantly.  Officers Bradley then covered the other man, Tom Johnson, and after searching him found a big gun on him.  After the coroner had been notified, the officers then proceeded up to the bridge where they served their warrant on Decker.

An inquest was held this morning at Feith’s undertaking establishment by Coroner McManus.  Four witnesses were examined.  W. C. Charles, the first witness, identified the revolver found on Armstrong as the one he had used when he shot Willingham. Mr. Charles stated that he had served on the jury which examined into the death of WillinghamArmstrong, he stated, was formerly in is employ.

Thomas Johnson, the negro who was in company with Armstrong at the time he was killed, was the next to testify.  He gave his age as 19 years, and residence as Future City, that he had been living there about five months, coming here from Belmont, Mo.  The following is as testified by him:

“I was not acquainted with the deceased, but met up with him on the outside of the bridge.  We were met near Fortieth Street on Sycamore by two policemen who asked us where we were going and if we had any guns.  I said, ‘No, I ain’t got any gun.’  My partner, the deceased, began backing back in the dark and as I was facing the officers I didn’t see what he was doing.  The only remark I heard the deceased make was that he was going down town.  There were three shots fired and they war fired by Officer Wade.”

Officer George Bradley, who was in company with Officer Wade at the time of the shooting, testified as follows:

“John Wade, a police officer, and myself, had a warrant for one Henry Decker, who was watching on the bridge and as we were going up Sycamore Street we met two negroes coming toward us.  We stopped them and asked where they were going and from their suspicious actions we thought they were armed.  Neither one could give a creditable account of himself and we started to search them, when the deceased began backing and fumbling something in his left front pocket, and pulled out a gun.  As he did this, Officer Wade fired two shots in quick succession at the deceased Lenn Armstrong.  Thomas Johnson who was with the deceased, was then searched and I found a 38 Iver Johnson revolver in his right hip pocket.”

Officer John Wade, who did the shooting, then testified:

“I was told by Officer Lutz that the chief of police wished Officer Bradley and I to go and serve a warrant and arrest one Henry Decker, who was working on the I. C. R. R. Bridge.  We got off the street car at Thirty-fourth and Sycamore and were walking up the street toward the bridge when we met two strange negroes.  I said to Officer Bradley, ‘Those fellows have got something on them’ and on questioning them, which was very unsatisfactory, we told them they would have to stand a search. The deceased was trying to switch something from his right front pocket and was walking around the same time, edging away from me, when he finally pulled a gun from his left front picket and as he did this I fired two shots in quick succession at him, and when he fell, a gun was found at his feet.  Officer Bradley searched the partner of the deceased and found in his right hip pocket a 38 Iver Johnson revolver.”

The jury returned the following verdict:

“We the undersigned jurors sworn to inquire into the death of Lenn Armstrong, on oath do find that he came to his death by gun shot wounds in the chest through the sternum bone and in the left chest along the border of the ribs, caused by bullets fired from a revolver held in the hands of Police Officer John Wade.  We further find the said John Wade was justified in the act and we therefore recommend that he be exonerated from all blame.  The said shooting took place at Thirty-eighth and Sycamore streets in Cairo, Alexander County, Illinois, on August 18th, 1906.
Signed:
H. M. Sullivan
R. Laurant
Albert Kratky
August Bode
Otto J. Fahr
W. P. Fraser
 


Tuesday, 21 Aug 1906:
DEATH OF MRS. FANNIE KIRK

Mrs. Francis I. Kirk, sister of Edward W. Abernathie, of McClure, Ill., died at Arkansas City, Ark., on Aug. 12, and the remains were brought to McClure, where they were buried in the Lindza Cemetery last Thursday.  The deceased was 34 years of age.

(Warren C. Kirk, 21, son of John Kirk and Jane Melton, married Frances Irene Abernathie, 15, daughter of John A. Abernathie and Mary McRaven, on 16 Mar 1887, in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker in Lindsey Cemetery near McClure reads:  Francis I. wife of W. G. Kirk Died Aug. 12, 1906 Aged 34 Yrs., 4 Mos., & 23 Dys.  Gone but not forgotten.—Darrel Dexter)
 
On the Hunt for a Murderer

Carterville, Ill., Aug. 21—Posses are searching for Drew, the negro alleged to have slain three men at Zeigler in the swamps north of here.  The city marshal of Harrisburg came through here with bloodhounds to bring the hunt to a speedy close.  Drew is heavily armed and may hold the posses at bay for some time.  The reward for his capture has been increased to $1,000.
 
 
Wednesday, 22 Aug 1906:
Child Died at Willard—The infant child of Charles Ryal, of Willard, died Sunday and was buried Monday.
 
CARD OF THANKS

On behalf of myself and family I wish to express our appreciation for the assistance rendered and many kind words spoken during the last sad rites appertaining to the obsequies of our sister, Mrs. Francis I. Kirk.
Edward W. Abernathie
McClure, Ill., Aug. 18, 1906
 
 
Thursday, 23 Aug 1906:
The remains of Mrs. George Minnich, mother of Mr. W. P. Minnich, of St. Louis, were brought to Villa Ridge for interment last week.  The funeral party had been expected on the 10:17 train, but did not arrive until an hour later.  A large number of friends had assembled to meet the first train, but heavy rain kept most of them away at the time of arrival.

Mrs. Galbraith, sister of Mrs. Minnich, was taken very ill after the funeral and for a time her case was considered serious.  She is better now, however.  She is at the home of her sister, Mrs. Miller.

(A marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Martha A. B. Minnich 1829-1906.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Rudy Laurant is at the bedside of her mother, who is seriously ill at her home in Carbondale.
 
 
Friday, 24 Aug 1906:
PERKINS CASE ON SECOND TRIAL
Murder Trial in Progress at Vienna This Week

The murder trial of Fred Perkins for the killing of John Betts at an ice cream supper at the home of Nelson Canada, three miles west to Vienna, on the night of July 15, 1905, is now being heard.  This is the second hearing of the case, the jury at that time failing to agree.  The regular term of circuit court convened Monday morning with Judge Butler of Cairo presiding.  The case of Perkins was the first one announced ready for trial and as soon as dates for certain other cases were set, the work of getting a jury in the Perkins case was begun.  The regular panel was exhausted Monday and the court gave orders for the summoning of a hundred as talesmen to report on Tuesday morning. Late Tuesday after ninety-nine men had been examined, the twelve jurors were accepted and sworn to try the case and a true verdict render, according to the law and evidence and were placed in charge of bailiff.  The same attorneys are in the case this time that took part at the previous hearing.  State’s Attorney Cowan, being assisted in the prosecution by Thomas H. Sheridan, while the defendant has Hon. W. A. Spann and Thomas E. Gillespie of this city, and George W. Pillow, of Marion, to look after his welfare.

 
JACOB BAUER DEAD
Well Known Jeweler Passed Away This Afternoon

Jacob Bauer, the jeweler, died at St. Mary’s Infirmary at 2:30 this afternoon.
 
DEATH OF WELL KNOWN CONDUCTOR

Conductor E. D. Minor, who died Tuesday morning, was one of the oldest freight conductors in point of service, on the Cairo division, says the Mt. Carmel Register.  Except when ill, he had been in the service of that line for nearly two decades.  He was a sober man, and enjoyed the respect of his fellow workers and the confidence of his superior officers.  He was a sufferer for nearly a year.

Mr. Minor was a native of Ohio and his body was taken to Delaware, that state, for his burial.  Accompanying it were his widow and four children.  The O. R. C. of which he was a member, will have representatives at his funeral.
 
Mr. Oliver Brown, age seventy-four years, died in Anna at his daughter’s, Mrs. Joe Lyerle.  He has been confined to his bed for a number of weeks. His death has been daily expected.  His son, Cal Brown, of this place (Unity), has been at his bedside for ten days.  The interment will be in the Anna Cemetery Tuesday.  His three grandchildren and two great-grandchildren left today for Anna to attend the funeral of their dearly beloved grandparent, who enjoyed the esteem of this entire community.  He is an old resident of Union County, where he was highly respected.  His wife died some years since.

(Oliver C. Brown married Lucinda Sumner on 5 Aug 1855, in Union Co., Ill.  Their markers in Anna City Cemetery read:  Oliver C. Brown Died Aug. 20, 1906 Aged 75 Yrs., 2 Mos., & 16 Ds.  Lucinda wife of Oliver C. Brown Died Feb. 17, 1896 Aged 61 Yrs., 5 Mos., & 17 Ds.—Darrel Dexter)
 
 
Saturday, 25 Aug 1906:
BODY AT PADUCAH NOT CARL WATSON
At Least the Description of the “Find” There Does Not Tally
YOUNG WATSON IS STILL MISSING.
Jesse Mulvihill Left Him in Marked Tree, Ark., Two Weeks Ago.

Lee Watson, residing on upper Walnut Street, an employee of the Butcher Woodford Packing Company, is in great anxiety over the whereabouts of his son Carl, who has been absent from his home for almost a month.  Mr. Watson learned where his son was, but a story from Paducah relating to the finding of the body of a young man who had not been identified caused him much uneasiness as to his son’s welfare.  Mr. Watson got in communication with parties at Paducah, who gave him a description of the body.  They described the body found as having sandy hair, with a strong tendency to red, which led him to believe the body found was not that of his son, as his hair was not rather, but rather light.  They also described the body as being medium built with small hands and wearing number six shoes.  Watson, while he is not much more than sixteen, is exceedingly large for his age and looks to be at least nineteen.  His hands are unusually large for a body and he wore number seven or eight shoes.

Carl Watson and Jesse Mulvihill, a boy of about his age, let Cairo a month ago next Wednesday.  Their whereabouts were unknown to their parents until Mulvihill returned in about two weeks.  They had been to points in Missouri and had at least reached Marked Tree, Ark., where they went to work in a box factory.  Mulvihill upon his return sent word to Watson’s father that he had left him working in Malden, Mo.  It seems that Watson had asked him not to tell where he was and that he had told Mrs. Watson that they were in Malden, instead of Marked Tree.  Mulvihill says he left him in Marked Tree, however.
Mr. Watson, knowing that there is not a box factory in Malden, Mo., believed that Mulvihill was deceiving him.  He told his story to Chief Egan yesterday and Mulvihill was brought to headquarters and questioned.  He admitted he had left Watson in Marked Tree and not in Malden.  His statement that he had left him in Malden seemed to be simply to shield Watson’s whereabouts.

Mr. Watson yesterday talked with parties at the box factory in Marked Tree, who stated to him that the two boys had left together.  In talking with them again last night they stated that Mulvihill had left a few days before Watson.

Mulvihill says he left Watson in Marked Tree and knows nothing further as to his whereabouts.  He states that he wrote to Watson after returning home and will send for the letter if it remains in the post office there, to prove his statement that he left him there and that he knows nothing further about him.
Carl Watson had planned several times to leave home, not that he had had trouble at home, but that he wanted to be his own boss and wanted to see things.  He had attempted to go to Memphis with a gentleman that was boarding with his family, but had failed as the man had told of his intentions.  He later planned to run off and had asked Mulvihill to go with him.  Mulvihill finally consenting, as he had been to Marked Tree before and had worked at the box factory, making good wages and having a good place to board.  Mulvihill does not like the idea that Mr. Watson had that he knows more about Carl’s whereabouts and is keeping it back. He states that he has told all he knows.
 
MALEY’S FATE IN JURY’S HANDS
Witnesses Testified before Coroner’s Jury in Fay Homicide Case.
MALEY SAYS HE ACTED IN SELF DEFENSE.
Inquest Occupied Great Part of Day and Witnesses Were Rigidly Cross Examined.

Paddy Fay, a river man, was shot in Edward Maley’s saloon, on lower Ohio Street, last evening.  He tottered into W. C. Steagala’s saloon at the corner of Fourth and Ohio streets, exclaiming that he had been shot by Ed Maley, and expired.  Maley went to police headquarters and gave himself up and was locked up waiting the coroner’s inquest.

The ball which ended Fay’s life was from a 38-calibre pistol.  It entered his left breast and passed through his body.

The only witness to the tragedy was the barkeeper, George Bush.

Coroner McManus held an inquest today and examined six or eight witnesses.  The jury was composed of S. A. Potter, E. L. Gilbert, Ted Cochran, Max Kaufman, Hal Sullivan and Oscar Gasklin.

The inquest began at 11 o’clock and State’s Attorney Wilson and M. J. O’Shea appeared respectively for the People and the defense.

The first witness was the bartender at Maley’s saloon, the only eye witnesses to the shooting. His name is George Bush.  He stated that he was at one end of the bar and that he could not hear all that they were saying, but that he knew that they were quarreling.  It was about 7:50 o’clock last evening.  All of a sudden Pat Fay with an oath threw his hat down on a stack of beer cases and said he would kill Maley, drawing his hand back to his hip pocket as he did so.  Maley, who was on the other side of the bar, about three feet distant, drew his revolver, and fired, the ball entering his left side.  Fay then ran out and up to the corner.

The witnesses who were in Steagala’s saloon were then examined.  They were Sam Wamble, the bartender, Herbert Hilburn, Harry Foster, W. J. Painieau, and Hickman Ashbrook, of Smithland, Ky.  Their stories were to the effect that Fay came running in with shirt ablaze and run to the bar and asked the bartender to telephone a doctor, as Maley had shot him for nothing.  He then staggered over to a chair and sat down and they came over and tore away his shirt to see how badly he was hurt.  He was very pale and was sinking rapidly, so they laid him down on the floor and put his coat under his head for a pillow.  They could not get the doctor at once and when he arrived the man was dead.  He died 15 minutes after the shooting occurred.

Fred Haas, a river man, James Hagel, bartender, at the Halliday, formerly in Maley’s employ, Jim Wallace, employed in Maley’s lunch room, testified that they had repeatedly warned Maley of the fact that Fay was threatening Maley because Maley had forbidden him to enter the place, as he (Fay) had robbed Maley’s bartender, Cairo Bill.  They testified that Fay kept hanging around the place.

Edward Maley was the last witness to be examined this afternoon.  He testified that he had repeatedly warned Fay to keep out of his saloon and restaurant, as Fay was a perfect brute when intoxicated and was regarded as a dangerous man.

Maley stated that he had kept Fay for months, giving him board and drinks, and never charging him a cent.  Last night, Maley entered the saloon to get his money out of the drawer and that he took his money back into the restaurant and returned when Fay, who was in the saloon, called to him, saying that he would straighten out the matter right then.  Maley said that he told Fay to behave, as he did not want to have any trouble.  After a few words Fay threatened to kill him and went back to his pocket after a gun and he drew his gun and shot him.

Hickman Ashbrook was eating supper in Maley’s restaurant.  The restaurant and the saloon were connected by a door which was ajar.  Ashboook said that he saw a man standing with a gun in his hands, which he was holding by his side.  He heard the quarreling and when the shot was fired he ran to go into the saloon, but was prevented by one of the waiters.

The cross examination was most thorough.  Maley appeared cool throughout his testimony.  He said that it was a case of kill or be killed.

(The deceased’s name was recorded as Patrick Vhey, alias Paddy Fay in the 27 Aug 1906, issue.—Darrel Dexter)
 
SKETCH OF LATE JACOB BAUER
Came to Cairo in 1881 from Rage, Switzerland

Jacob Bauer, whose death occurred yesterday afternoon, was born in Rage, Switzerland, Aug. 6, 1844.  He married Miss Adele Rieber on March 9, 1869.  In 1881 they came to America, locating in Cairo in that year, and Mr. Bauer entered the employ of E. A. Buder as a jeweler.  He remained in his employ until 1897, when he engaged in the jewelry business for himself, first on Washington, then at 913 Commercial and then at 2705 Commercial, where his store is now located.

Mr. Bauer was a member of the Casino, of the Germania Maennerchor, and of the A. O. U. W.

He leaves a widow, one daughter, Mrs. Otto Tauber, and two sons, Carl and Paul.

Mr. Bauer’s death was the result of abscess of the brain.  Taken ill last Wednesday, Thursday, his condition was so alarming that he was taken to the hospital and a surgical operation was deemed imperative.  This was performed by Drs. Rendleman and Fields, Thursday night and it relived the patient of his intense agony.  It did not however, save his life and he passed away without gaining consciousness.

(Otto Tauber married Adele Bauer on 2 Feb 1888, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery reads:  Jacob Bauer 1844-1906.—Darrel Dexter)
 
DROWNED IN RIVER AT FAYVILLE
Charley Everhart, Aged 14, Lost His Life Wednesday

Charley Everhart, son of Riley Everhart, was drowned Wednesday morning in the Mississippi River here.  Young Everhart, who was about 14 years old, was wading in the river close to the bank with his older brother, aged about 17.  They got beyond their depth, and as neither of the boys could swim, they were soon struggling for their lives.  The youngest boy sunk from sight and his body was not recovered for some time.  Every known means of resuscitation was employed without avail.  The older boy narrowly escapade the fate of his brother and was rescued by Mr. Thompson just as he was sinking.—Santa Fe correspondence Thebes Star
 
NEGRO BABY BURNED

The infant son of Mrs. Alvina Jones, colored, living at Sixteenth Street and Jefferson Avenue, was seriously burned in a fire which occurred at 2:30 this afternoon.  The mother had left the little one lying on a bed and gone to the home of a neighbor.  Fire was seen issuing from the window and when neighbors rushed in, the bed on which the child was lying was found to be ablaze.

The child, when rescued, was found to be badly burned about the body.  Both fire companies responded to the alarm and the flames were quickly subdued.  The origin of the fire is unknown.
 
 
Monday, 27 Aug 1906:
Death of Mrs. Mary C. Vaughn—Mrs. Mary C. Vaughn, of Paducah, died at her home in that city at the age of 59 years.  She was the mother of Messrs. Horace and Edward Vaughn, both well known in Cairo.
 
Death of Baby—Lizette Lauerne Foster, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry H. Foster, of No. 511 Center Street, born June 22nd, died August 26th, at 10 o’clock p.m. after an illness of two weeks.  The remains will be interred at Willard tomorrow afternoon.
 
The body of Patrick Vhey, alias Paddy Fay, who was killed in Maley’s saloon by Edward Maley Friday night, was shipped Saturday by Adams Express to relatives in Aurora, Ind., by way of Vincennes.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank the friends and neighbors and especially the members of the Cairo Casino, A. O. U. S. and the German Maennerchor, for the many kindnesses shown us at the time of the death of our husband and father.

Mrs. Jacob Bauer and Family
 
THIRTY YEARS FOR PERKINS
Slayer of John Betts at Vienna Found Guilty Saturday Afternoon
JURY DISAGREED ON FIRST TRIAL
Motion for a New Trial to Be Argued Next Week Tuesday

Vienna, Ill., Aug. 27.—After being out for nearly 24 hours, the jury in the Perkins murder case returned a verdict Saturday evening, sentencing Fred Perkins to thirty years in the penitentiary.  Attorneys for the defense immediately made a motion for a new trial and it will be argued on Tuesday of next week.

Fred Perkins, son of A. J. Perkins, proprietor of the Perkins House, is charged with the killing of John Bets at an ice cream supper at the home of Nelson Canada, three miles west of Vienna, on the night of July 15, 1905.  On the first trial, the jury failed to agree and were discharged.

Ninety-nine men were examined before a jury was secured, so thorough were the attorneys in the cross examination and so wide spread was the knowledge of the tragedy.  State’s Attorney Cowan was assisted in the prosecution by Thomas H. Sheridan, while the defendant had Hon. W. A. Spann, and Thomas T. Gillespie of this city, and George W. Pillow, of Marion, to look after his welfare.


Died at Charleston—News was received yesterday by Mrs. George Dewey of Tenth Street, of the death of her cousin, Miss Pearl Clarkson, a well known young lady of Charleston, Mo.  Her death came after a lingering illness and was due to consumption.  She was well known in this city, having frequently been the guest of Mrs. Dewey.
 
MALEY RELEASED BY CORONER’S JURY
Brought in Verdict after Four Hours of Self Defense

Edward Maley was released by the coroner’s jury Saturday night at 7:30 o’clock after they had deliberated upon the verdict for four hours.  The verdict was as follows.

We the undersigned jurors sworn to inquire into the death of Patty Fay, on oath do say that he came to his death by a bullet fired from a weapon held in the hands of Edward Maley.  We further find from evidence presented to us that the said Edward Maley acted in self defense and we therefore recommend that he be discharged from custody.

The jury was composed of Adolph Kauffman, E. B. Cochran, Edward L. Gilbert, Edward J. Kolb, J. O. Gaskins, and H. M. Sullivan.
 
 
Tuesday, 28 Aug 1906:
MASSAC OFFICIAL SHOOTS HIMSELF
County Clerk William Atwell of Metropolis Commits Suicide

Metropolis, Ill., Aug. 28.—William Atwell, county clerk of Massac County, shot himself over the heart at 8 o’clock last night at his home in this city.  He was the son of the late Samuel Atwell and who was county clerk for thirty years.  William Atwell was appointed to succeed his father and finished the unexpired term.  Last April he was elected by a large majority.

He is not expected to survive.
 
BAGGAGEMAN KILLED IN WRECK
E. J. McDonald Met Sudden Death in Central Yards This Morning
BAGGAGE CAR JUMPED THE TRACK
And Ran into Freight Cars on a Siding—Deceased Was Brother-in-Law of Supt. Ewing.

Standing in the side door of his car, ready to quit his run for the night on the arrival of Illinois Central passenger train No. 203 at Central Union Station, Baggageman E. J. McDonald suddenly had his life blotted out about 3 o’clock this morning.

The baggage car of the train left the track in the yards just above the stone depot at Fourteenth Street and struck a car of merchandise standing on a siding.  The velocity of the train carried the car for a considerable distance and the entire side was torn out clean.  The car of merchandise was badly crushed by the blow it received.  No other car in the passenger train left the track and no one else on the train was killed.  John Thomas, a colored porter, was severely cut and bruised and his arm was broken.

Passenger train No. 203 is the train from St. Louis.  It runs down into the city, arriving at Central station at 2:58 a.m.  What caused the baggage car to leave the track at that point cannot be ascertained.  The rail was not broken and everything appears to have been all right.  Other trains had passed there without leaving the track.

The baggage car was preceded by the engine and express car, both of which passed in safety the point where the wrecked car left the track.

Twenty-five or thirty trunks were in the baggage car.  Many of them were broken open and their contents were strewn along the track.  In the mass of wreckage the lifeless and mangled body of the baggageman was found.  The heavy sample trunks of the traveling men stood the shock without damage, but the lighter trunks, many of them containing ladies’ wearing apparel, had their contents pitched helter skelter.

The conductor of No. 203 was J. O. Zimmerman and the engineer was Ike Sweet with engine No. 241.

The remains of the dead baggageman were taken to Mrs. Feith’s undertaking establishment, where the inquest was held.

The dead man was a brother-in-law of Superintendent C. L. Ewing.  He was 35 years of age and leaves a wife and child living at Iowa City, Ia., to which point his remains will be taken on No. 8 tonight.  McDonald took up railroading from choice and assumed the duties of baggagemaster in order to be thoroughly posted.  He was a capable young man, with means of his own and could have held a better position, but it was his desire to begin at the bottom and work up and Mr. Ewing gave him this job.  He had been working for the company in this section for about two years.  Had he lived, he would have been heard from in railroad circles.

Superintendent Ewing, Trainmaster J. D. Brennan, Roadmaster George E. Boyd, and Assistant Trainmaster O. W. Brown came down today to investigate the wreck and care for the remains of McDonald.

Examination showed that the baggage car left the rails some distance from the point where it struck the car.  The forward truck on the west side of the car broke down, throwing the car off the track.  It ran along the ties until it struck the freight car on the siding and then probably 200 feet farther before it stopped.  When it jumped the track it broke loose from the express car ahead and this cut off the air and applied the brakes, checking the speed of the cars which were behind.  The blow to the freight car set in motion the entire string of cars on the siding there.  They ran south and as the switch at Fourteenth Street was closed, the forward car left the train and when it stopped was in the middle of the street nearly in front of the saloon on the corner.  The engine and express car beat the moving freight cars to the switch and only the rear end of the express car was struck by the forward freight car.  Had the engine been checked sooner, there would have been a worse wreck.

The coroner’s inquest was held at Feith’s Undertaking establishment this morning at 11 o’clock.  Evidence was heard until noon when the jury adjourned until 1:30, at which time they went to the scene of the wreck.

             Conductor J. O. Zimmerman, who was in charge of the wrecked train, was the first to testify.  Engineer I. R. Sweets, Flagman J. J. Barry and Fireman J. S. Hendry were the other witnesses.

             The jury was composed of the following:  Tobe L. Pulley, Pete Zimmerman, August Bode, Otto Fahr, Oscar Gaskins, and Oberly Gossman.

             Conductor Zimmerman and the other witnesses testified that they were running from fifteen to twenty-five miles an hour at the most.

             The evidence was to the effect that the baggage car left the track about 18 feet from the switch and ran along on the ties for thirty or forty feet, jumping over several rails and not touching the ties for six feet.  After the baggage car struck the freight cars on the side track, the engine and express car ran on past the Fourteenth Street crossing, while the baggage car ran about a car length and a half up to the crossing before turning over against the freight carts.

             Conductor Zimmerman testified that he saw something pass the window and that he thought it was McDonald and that he had jumped.  McDonald’s body was found on the embankment between the tracks with his head near the passenger track and covered with splinters and clothing scattered from the trunks, but with no trunks piled upon it.

             Several of the freight cars bore marks showing that the baggage car ran along against them before turning over against others.

             The coroner’s jury this afternoon found that the wreck was caused by a defective switch point and that the train was exceeding the speed limit.

 
Arrested a Murderer—Chief Egan made quite an important arrest Sunday in the person of William Curren, who was arrested in one of the saloons in the lower part of the city.  It later developed that he was one of the men who assisted in killing the Miller boys in a lumber camp opposite Mound City.  The Kentucky officials have been notified and will come after Curren in a few days.
 
KILLED BY TRAIN ON ILLINOIS CENTRAL

Illinois Central passenger train No. 206 in charge of Conductor Blaney, struck a man just out of Carbondale Sunday evening.  The man was walking on the track.  He was hard of hearing and failed to notice the approach of the train.  His name was Ves Thetford, a resident of Carbondale.  He was 30 years of age. Conductor Blaney was on his last run before taking his vacation.
 
FARMER KILLED NEAR CHARLESTON
Mutilated Body Discovered—No Clue to the Murder

Arthur Barker, a farmer living near Charleston, Mo., was found murdered in the woods near his home yesterday.  His head was almost shot away with a charge of buckshot and his body was cut and bruised.  Barker left home Saturday to go squirrel shooting.  When he did not return at night or Sunday, search was made for him and the ghastly find was made.  Ben Ghormborough, a farm hand, who was seen in the vicinity Saturday, was arrested, but he protested his innocence.  The authorities have no evidence against him.
 
 
Wednesday, 29 Aug 1906:
The funeral of Hiram Wright’s child will be preached at Mt. Zion Church the first Sunday in September.  (Wetaug)

(Hiram Wright, 21, born in Wetaug, Pulaski Co., Ill., son of Fairfax Wright and Delila McIntosh, married Polly A. B. B. Davis, 20, born in Kentucky, daughter of Jesse Davis and Elizabeth Dover, on 25 Aug 1895, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

 
Mr. D. H. Wildy, who lives three miles southwest of Villa Ridge, received a letter from the Philippines last week bearing sad news.  It stated that his son, Robert Devon Wildy, sergeant of Troop K, 4th U. S. Cavalry, died August 5th of acute dysentery.  On June 22 last, Sergeant Wildy was 26 years old and he enlisted April 28, 1903.  The letter gave no other particulars.

(Daniel H. Weldy married Julia A. Baumgard on 6 Aug 1876, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Died, on the 24th inst., at her home at Curry, Julia, beloved wife of James Scruggs.  Mr. Scruggs suffered long and intensely until death released her from her terrible pain.  She united with the M. E. Church when very young and lived a consistent Christian life.  She leaves six daughters, one son, a husband and scores of relatives to mourn her untimely loss.
 
Charley Everhart, son of Riley Everhart, was drowned at Santa Fe in the Mississippi River Wednesday morning, Aug. 22, about 9:30 o’clock.  He and his older brother, age about 18 years, went in shallow water trying to swim and got in a place where the water was over eight feet deep, where they met the sad fate.  Charley saw he couldn’t get out and called his brother Will and when he got to him he pulled him out in the deep water and grabbed around his neck and as Will came up the third time, Ben Thompson plunged in and rescued him.  He was apparently dead, but by the help of those many friends he was saved.  Charley was in the water about two hours before they could get him and all was done that could be done for him, but life was gone.  Charley was 14 years old and leaves a father and mother, two brothers, George and Will Everhart and two sisters, Mrs. Addie Frazure, of McClure, Ill., and Mrs. Nora Johnston, and Mrs. Ella Lovel, of Santa Fe, and a host of friends and playmates to mourn his absence.

(William Everhard married Mary I. Gotney on 25 Sep 1872, in Alexander Co., Ill.  David J. Lovell married Ella Everhart on 4 Jul 1893, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Benjamin R. Johnston married Nora A. Everhart, born in Santa Fe, Alexander Co., Ill., daughter of W. R. Everhart and Mary Gohney, on 6 Jul 1898, in Union Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)
 
BLOODY STICK FURNISHES CLUE

Paducah, Ky., Aug. 29—Covered with blood and brains, a leaded stick was found wrapped in a quilt in a drawer of the bureau in room 36 at the New Richmond House.  It has been turned over to the police, who think it undoubtedly was used in murdering Claude Bass, who was found on North Sixth Street last Wednesday morning with his skull crushed.  While this theory may be true, yet it might have been placed there to mislead the police.  Police Chief James Collins believes that no novice did the work.  He has a great deal of evidence, all of which will go to the grand jury next Monday.  It is known who occupied the room the night of the murder.
 
News of the death of the father of A. F. Staehle, of this city, has been received from Joliet, Ill.  Mr. Steahle went to Joliet last Saturday and was at the bedside when the end came.
 
 
Thursday, 30 Aug 1906:
KILLED AT BIG FOUR CROSSING
Body of Ben Pettigrew, Negro Plasterer, Found by Fireman Hudson
SKULL BADLY CRUSHED BY BLOW
Thought to Have Been Murdered with Coupling Pin in Hands of Unknown Assailant

The body of a colored man about fifty-five years of age was found by Fireman O. V. Hudson and Engineer John Weber about 5:45 o’clock this morning directly under the bridge at the Big Four crossing.  His skull was crushed in as if by a heavy blow and the brains were partially knocked out.  He was found lying some distance from the tracks near a stationary engine used to hoist things up to the bridge.  Police headquarters was notified of the find and they notified Coroner James McManus, who went up on the suburban at 6:20.

Without doubt the man was murdered, as a train could hardly affect such an injury, and the body was found too far from the tracks to make that possible.  A coupling pin was found beside the body, one end of which was covered with blood and which leads to the belief that he was murdered and that this was the weapon with which he was killed.  A sledge handle, a shovel and everything around was covered with blood.

The dead man was identified by the foreman of the Rogers-Bates Construction Company, of Chicago, who are removing the iron work at the bridge, as their watchman, Ben Pettigrew, a negro plasterer who had been employed by William H. Meed, the plasterer, and who resided at No. 603 Douglas Street.

The fact that he had not cleaned out the ashes in the engine as was his duty every night, leads to the belief that he had met his death early in the night.  The foreman of the construction was in the habit of lending his revolver to Pettigrew every night, which he kept locked in a chest.  Pettigrew carried a key to it, but the gun had not been taken from there.  This also leads to the belief that he was killed early in the night.  The keys were still on the body and nothing appeared to have been taken.  It is believed that his assailant thought he had a revolver and murdered him to obtain it.

The police thought they had a clue to the murder this morning, but it came to naught.

Coroner McManus held an inquest over the remains this afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at Feith’s undertaking establishment.


CAPT. GEORGE WOODWARD DEAD
Well Known River Man Died Suddenly at Macinac Island
WAS MASTER OF TOWBOAT BEAVER
Left Cairo Last Sunday for Visit with His Wife—Funeral at St. Louis

Capt. George Woodward, pilot and master of the towboat Beaver, died very suddenly today at Macinac Island, Mich., were he went to spend two weeks with his wife, who was visiting relatives there.
This was the news received today by Capt. A. J. Powell, agent for the Barrett line here.

Capt. Woodward left Cairo last Sunday.

The deceased was master and pilot of the towboat Beaver.  He had been steam boating in these waters for nearly twenty years and was formerly in the employ of the Valley line and at one time was master of a Lee liner.

He was held in high esteem by his associates and his death is very deeply regretted.

The funeral will be held in St. Louis.

Capt Woodward leaves a widow, but no children.
 
CARD OF THANKS

We desire to extend our gratitude to the kind people who lent us assistance on the death of our beloved son, who was drowned and to those who helped share our sorrow on that occasion.
Riley Everhart and family
 
 
Friday, 31 Aug 1906:
CORONER’S JURY RETURNS VERDICT
On Death of Ben Pettigrew, Murdered Wednesday Night

An inquest was held this afternoon at 2 o’clock at Feith’s undertaking establishment, to inquire into the death of Ben Pettigrew, the negro watchman employed by the Rogers Bates Construction Company at the bridge, who was killed Wednesday night by an unknown party or parties, as was published at length in last night’s Citizen.

The jury was chosen:  John J. Coleman, as foreman; George Welden, Charles Quinn, Ed Koehler, Gus Winter, and H. M. Sullivan.

They returned the following verdict:

“We, the undersigned jurors, sworn to inquire of the death of Ben Pettigrew, on oath do find that he came to his death by a fractured skull and other injuries to the face and head, caused by being struck by the blunt instrument (an iron knickle pin and a sledge handle) found near the deceased’s body, held in the hands of a party or parties unknown to us.

This inquest by no means concludes this case, as the police will work for clues in hopes of bringing the guilty party or parties to justice.
 
Mrs. D. M. Mulcahy received a cablegram stating her brother, Robert Weldy, had died in the Philippines Islands.  Mr. Weldy was an officer in the United States Army. (Willard)
 
FORMER CAIRO LADY PASSES AWAY
Mrs. Herman Meyers Dies at Summer Resort in New York

Mr. Frederick Hoar yesterday received the sad news of the death of Mrs. Herman Meyers, who was a former resident of Cairo, which occurred yesterday at a summer resort in New York State.  Mrs. Meyers was about 55 years of age and leaves a family of six children, all grown.  They are her daughter, Mrs. Edward Keller, and sons, Messrs. Samuel, Albert, Julius, Robert and Edward Meyers.

Mrs. Meyers had been in poor health for about a year since the death of her husband, having never recovered from the shock and grief of his demise.  She returned from Europe about two months after an extended visit with her relatives in Germany, since which time she has been at a summer resort in the Catskill Mountains.

Mrs. Meyers was very prominent in social circles here for many years and was an honorary member of the Cairo Woman’s Club and the Schiller Club.  She was a woman of many admirable qualities and held in high esteem for her many virtues.

The news was received by the numerous friends of the deceased with great sorrow, all of whom sympathize with the family in their great bereavement.
 
Death from Sunstroke

Mrs. Brown, a colored woman of Cairo, whose husband rents a small farm near George Bride’s place one mile northeast of Villa Ridge, died last Friday afternoon at their farm home of supposed sunstroke.  She was engaged in picking beans in the cornfield when taken and died in an hour and a half.  Cases of this kind are very rare in this locality.—Mound City Enterprise
 
Death of Charles C. Keeler

Charles C. Keeler, a well known and highly esteemed resident of Mound City, died at his home here Friday, August 24, at the age of 40 years, 8 months and 19 days and was buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery at Mounds, August 26th.  Mr. Keeler was born in McGregory, Iowa, and came to Mound City in 1889 and since then up to the time of his death was a steamboat pilot by occupation.  He was pilot master and owner of the steam tug O. F. Keeler.  A lingering illness during the past year kept him much of the time from active duties.  He was one of the progressive young men of the city, believed in a good future for Mound City, and was always active to secure industries that would help the city in growth and thrift.  A wife and one only child of tender years preceded him by a few years to the great beyond.  A father, mother, sister and two brothers, all residents of Mound City, are the survivors of the family.
 
RETURN VERDICT OF ACCIDENTAL DEATH
In Case of Death of Infant Daughter of Bertha Wilson, a Negress.

Coroner McManus, held an inquest of the remains of the infant daughter of Bertha Wilson, a negress, residing at Dick Taylor’s old place at No. 3015 Commercial Avenue, who was found dead yesterday morning about 7 o’clock by the mother.  The child’s head was crushed, probably by being stepped on.  The supposition came out from the evidence that someone in passing through the dark room during the night to a rear room in the house stepped on the baby’s head accidentally and crushed it.  The mother was cast off by her family before the birth of the child and was given shelter by Minnie Evans, the woman in whose house the accident happened.
 
A. F. Staehler has returned from Joliet, where he was called by the serious illness and death of his father.
 
 
Saturday, 1 Sep 1906:
CAPT. GEORGE WOODWARD BURIED AT ST. LOUIS

Today’s St. Louis Globe-Democrat contained the following death notice of Capt. Woodward:

Woodward—Suddenly, on Wednesday, August 29, 1906, on Mackinac Island, Mich., Capt. George G. Woodward, beloved husband of Emma B. Woodward, aged 41 years.

Funeral from residence of his brother-in-law, E. W. Rawlings, 4439 West Pine Boulevard, Saturday, September 1, at 2 p.m..  Interment private.


Monday, 3 Sep 1906:
DEATH OF WILLIAM GARREN

William Garren, probably one of the oldest citizens of Cairo, died last night at the home of his son-in-law, Ex-Mayor Claud Winter, at Tenth and Walnut streets.  The deceased was a native of Ireland and was 90 years of age.  In his young days he was one of Cairo’s most progressive citizens.  He was highly esteemed by all who knew him.  He had been suffering from the infirmities of old age for the last three years and his death, which came shortly after 7 o’clock, was the natural result of his advanced years.  He is survived by no nearer relatives than his grandchildren, who are Claud, William, Ethel, Joe and Margaret Winter, and his son-in-law, Claud Winter Sr.

The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon from the Catholic church and the remains will be interred at Villa Ridge.

(Claude Winter married Hannah Garrin on 12 Jul 1884, in St. Clair Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

DEATH LOVES A SHINING MARK
Sudden Summons of Mrs. Pink Proves the Familiar Adage.
END CAME EARLY SUNDAY MORNING.
Heart Failure Brought on by Anxiety Over the Illness of Her Husband Caused Demise.

Mrs. Mary Jane Pink, wife of Mr. Charles Pink, died very suddenly Sunday morning.  She had just arisen and dressed and had gone down stairs when she was suddenly stricken with heart trouble.  Conscious that her end was near, she called to her sister, Miss Annie Gaverick, to call the nurse, Charles Arter, and Dr. Strong and her son Ed and his wife and then she expired.

The news of her sudden demise was a great shock to the people of Cairo, everyone of whom who knew her feeling a personal loss in her death.  Mrs. Pink had been most devoted in her attentions to her husband, who has been so very ill, and it is thought that the strain of his care and the anxiety over his condition was too much of a burden upon her heart.  That she should have been taken so suddenly when she appeared so strong and well, made it hard for her friends to believe that the report was really true.

Mrs. Pink was born in Torquay, England, in February, 1836, and was accordingly in her 71st year.  She was married to Mr. Pink in England on June 21, 1853, and it was three years ago that they celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniversary, an event that proved how warm were the friendships that held them to their Cairo friends, for it was the signal for a great outpouring of people.  In 1868, Mr. and Mrs. Pink came to Cairo, and they have resided here since.  Mrs. Pink was one of the most active workers in the Children’s Home Society, was a member of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union and was a most devoted member of the Church of the Redeemer.  She was a woman who was known for her good works.  She had a large heart, which was full of love for all and her bright, cheerful manner won everyone.  Truly she had not an enemy, but more than this, everyone who knew her felt that in her they had a warm, personal friend.

Mrs. Pink left a family consisting of her husband and three sons, A. C. Pink, general agent for the American Express Company, of Milwaukee, and W. A. Pink and E. G. Pink, of Cairo.  Her only sister, Miss Annie Gaverick, was a member of her household.  Besides these, she left three grandchildren, Mrs. Dot Shanklin, wife of R. L. Shanklin, of Tacoma, Wash., daughter of A. C. Pink, and Miss Sarah and Edward Pink, daughter and son of W. A. Pink.

Funeral services will be held tomorrow afternoon from the Church of the Redeemer and the remains will be taken to Beech Grove Cemetery for interment.  No gathering will be held at the house before the services, on account of the condition of Mr. Pink, but friends will go direct to the church.

Either Rev. E. L. Roland, rector of the Church of the Redeemer, who is away on vacation, or Rev. F. P. Davenport, who was formerly the rector here, will officiate.

Mr. A. C. Pink will arrive tonight to attend the funeral.

Mr. Pink, who has been the recipient of her most tender devotion during his long illness, is standing this great affliction better than his friends feared he would.  He is showing great fortitude in this ordeal.

DEAF MUTE RUN DOWN BY CAR
Texas Bend Negro Killed on Sycamore Street Line Sunday
FAILED TO HEAR CAR APPROACH
Car Unprotected by Fender and Negro Was Caught under It and Crushed to Death

Because he was deaf and could not hear the approach of the car, John Lawton, a colored man of Texas Bend, Mo., was run over and killed on the Sycamore Street electric car line about 5 o’clock Sunday evening.

Lawton, who was deaf and dumb, was walking on the car track going up to Future City, when car No. 1 approached.  This is not the regular Sycamore Street car, and it is unprovided with a fender at both ends.  It was running backwards when it struck Lawton.

The car was in charge of Motorman Ira Kennedy and Conductor G. R. Prince.  The sounding of the gong failed to warn the negro of the danger he was in and the motorman shouted, but when he saw the car he jumped the wrong way and the car caught him and crushed him under it in such a manner that it had to be raised off his crushed body before it could be released.

The remains were taken to Mrs. Feith’s undertaking establishment where they were viewed by the coroner’s jury, and this afternoon they were shipped to Texas Bend.

Coroner McManus empanelled a jury and the inquest was held this afternoon.  The jury was as follows:  John Coleman, Louis Koehler, John Lattner, J. P. Shaunnessy, Albert E. Boerschel and H.M. Sullivan.

At the inquest Dacres, the watchman at the Chicago Mill, the first witness to be examined, testified that he was sitting at the end of the track, when he heard the bell on the streetcar ringing and looking around he saw two women and a colored man walking up the track.  The women heard the bell and got off the track, but the man continued walking slowly up the track.  The motorman and conductor yelled to the man, while they were making the greatest efforts to stop the car.  The car struck the negro and knocked the body between the rails.  The passengers and a large crowd which had collected there then had the motorman to back the car off of the body, but in doing this the car left the rails and the full weight of the car rested on the body, crushing out the life.  Mr. Dacres was sitting within a few hundred feet of where the accident happened and was therefore one of the principal witnesses.  The accident happened at about 5 o’clock.  Mrs. Tena Wilson and her mother were then examined and testified to the same thing as also did Walter Myers, E. Robertson, W. Gosen, and E. Shevel, who were all eye witnesses to the accident.  All of them stated that the motorman on the car made every effort to warn the man and also to stop the car, and that the car was going at a moderate rate of speed.  The negro, when knocked under the car, was struck by the back end which did not have a fender on it.  He was found all doubled up under the car which was resting on him.  A number of other witnesses were examined, but their testimony was about the same as the others.

The jury had not returned a verdict at 4:30 o’clock.

Mrs. John Davis, of Marion, was struck by a stray bullet fired by some unknown person Friday afternoon and died Saturday.  She was walking on the street near her home when the bullet struck her in the head.  The affair caused a great sensation.

(The 11 Sep 1906, issue reports her name as Mrs. Amanda C. Davis.—Darrel Dexter)

FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—Sunday, Sept. 2, William Garren, aged 90 years.

Funeral party will leave the residence of Mr. Claud Winter, Tenth and Walnut streets, tomorrow afternoon at 2 o’clock for St. Patrick’s Church where services will be held.  Funeral train will leave foot of Eighth Street at 2:45 p.m. for Villa Ridge cemetery, where interment will be made.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—Mrs. Mary Jane Pink, wife of Charles Pink, at 6 a.m. Sunday, Sept., 2, aged 79 years.  The funeral will take place at the Church of the Redeemer at 2 o’clock p.m. Thursday, Sept. 4.  Train will leave foot of Sixth Street at 2:45 p.m. for Beech Grove Cemetery.  Friends of the family are requested to go direct to the church.


Tuesday, 4 Sep 1906:
LAST SAD RITES WERE HELD TODAY
Over the Remains of Mrs. M. J. Pink and Mrs. William Garren

At the Church of the Redeemer this afternoon, services were held over the remains of Mrs. M. J. Pink, wife of Charles Pink.  The attendance of friends was very large and the floral offerings were in profusion, and were a beautiful type of the life, just ended that was fragrant with good deeds and kindly sympathy.  Rev. E. L. Roland, rector of the church, officiated.  The pallbearers were:

Honorary—E. W. Halliday, Paul G. Schuh, Frank Howe, E. A. Smith, J. J. Jennelle, M. F. Gilbert, W. B. Gilbert, W. M. Williams.

Active—J. B. Magee, H. S. Candee, J. D. Ladd, C. L. Keaton, W. H. Wood, and E. K. Brown, of Freeport, Ill.

The remains were taken to Villa Ridge cemetery for interment.


Funeral of William Garren

The funeral of William Garren, father-in-law of Claud Winter, was held this afternoon from St. Patrick’s Church and was attended by a large number of friends.  The remains were taken by special train to Villa Ridge cemetery.  The pallbearers were:

Honorary—Robert Cunningham, Peter Saup, A. Comings, James Coleman, L. H. Meyers, James Meehan, M. O’Donald, John B. Shea.

Active—T. J. Kerth, H. C. Schuh, Thomas W. Gannon, James Galigan,  John P. Glynn, John Sanders, Patrick Purcell, Frank E. Davis.

CONSUMPTION CLAIMS ANOTHER VICTIM

Mrs. Rose Herbert, wife of Albert Herbert, foreman at the Chicago Mill, died this morning at her home on Thirty-sixth street.

Her death came after a lingering illness of several months and was due to consumption.  She had been home but a few days from Ashville, N.C., where she had been spending several months for the benefit of her health.  She died at 1:20 a.m.  She was 21 years of age and is survived by a husband and a six-month-old baby.

She was Miss Rosa Barth before her marriage and was the daughter of the late Serbian Barth.

Ven. E. L. Roland, rector of the Church of the Redeemer, arrived here last evening from Neshota, Wis., where he had been spending his vacation.  He was called here to conduct the funeral services of the late Mrs. Charles Pink.

DEATH DUE TO LACK OF FENDER
Coroner’s Jury Finds Traction Company Responsible for Lawton’s Death

The coroner’s jury late last evening found that the Cairo Electric and Traction Company was responsible for the death of the deaf mute, John Lawton, Sunday, in not having a fender upon its car.  The verdict of the jury was as follows:

“We the undersigned jurors sworn to inquire into the death of John Lawton, colored, on oath do find that he came to his death by being run over and crushed by Cairo Electric and Traction Company’s street car No. 1 on said company’s track on Sycamore Streets about 100 feet south of the end of the Sycamore street line, in Cairo, Alexander County, Illinois, about 5 p.m. September 2, 1906.

“We the jury further find that the said Cairo Electric and Traction Company violated city ordinance No. 819 of the city of Cairo, Ill., by not having the street car properly equipped with fenders.”


DEGREE OF HONOR NOTICE

The Degree of Honor, A. O. U. W. are requested to meet at Mrs. Feith’s at 7:30 tonight sharp to make arrangements for attending the funeral of our deceased sister Mrs. Rose Herbert.
Mrs. O. Tauber, chief of honor

The testimony at the coroner’s inquest yesterday over the remains of John Lawton was taken by Stenographer A. B. Comings.

Mrs. Charley Walker and children, of Cairo, came up some two or three weeks ago to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry J. Hileman.  While here (Olmsted) her baby boy (one year old) was taken seriously ill with dysentery and after some two weeks of suffering, death relieved the little fellow.  Funeral services were conducted at the home of Mr. Hileman by Rev. E. W. Murray, of Vienna, and the remains were laid to rest at the Concord Cemetery Saturday, Sept. 1.  The grief of the parents is almost more than they can bear and the sympathy of their many friends is with them.

(Henry J. Hileman married Alice J. Bagby on 16 Apr 1876, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  Charles Walker married Dazie Hileman on 19 Jun 1897, in Pulaski Co., Ill.  His marker in Concord Cemetery near Olmsted reads:  Herschel son of C. & D. Walker Born Aug. 31, 1901 Died Aug. 31, 1906.—Darrel Dexter)


Wednesday, 5 Sep 1906:
MET HIS DEATH HOPPING CARS
Lad Run Over by Mobile & Ohio Train at Unity Last Evening
DIED SHORT TIME AFTER ACCIDENT
Which Occurred about 7 O’clock—Boy Son of Kip Boles and 12 Years Old

Everett Boles, the 12-year-old son of Kip Boles, was fatally injured while attempting to hop a Mobile & Ohio train last evening and died within an hour and a half after the accident.

The lad was a son of Kip Boles, living at Unity.  Like most boys in a country town, he was hopping on and off the northbound Mobile & Ohio local about 7 o’clock when his foot caught and he fell under the wheels.  They passed over his limbs and body, crushing him terribly.  Nothing could be done to save his life and he died in about an hour and a half.

LITTLE LIFE CRUSHED OUT UNDER WHEELS
Five-Year-Old Morris Dunker Ran Over on Central

Morris, the five-year-old son of William Dunker, was probably fatally injured at 4 o’clock this afternoon.  The little fellow attempted to jump onto an Illinois Central freight train near the bridge.  He missed his hold and fell under the wheels.  His left leg was cut off below the knee, his right leg was crushed and the left arm was crushed from the elbow down.  He was still alive at 4:15, but little hopes are held for his recovery.

His parents live in the Feucher and Lansden addition and he is a grandson of Officer Dunker.

Miss Florence Pelley, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Pelley, of Illmo, died Tuesday and was brought to Thebes for interment Wednesday.

(Her marker in Thebes Cemetery reads:  Florence Daughter of Joe & Maude Pelley Died Aug. 29, 1906, Aged 10 Years.  Grateful love, she was but given to an angel band to blossom in heaven.—Darrel Dexter)

Elder Phillips’ mother was buried Saturday at Pomona.  He brought his aged father home with him.  His father and mother had been married nearly fifty years.  Her death was the second that had occurred in their family.  A grandchild was claimed by death in infancy.  (Unity)

Alonzo Farmer is Dead Now.

Chicago, Sept. 5—Johnson Hubbs, of Bush, Ill., shot and killed Alonzo Farmer, when the latter, saying he wanted to kill somebody, and that Hubbs would do as well as anyone else, attempted to shoot Hubbs.

Died at Construction Camp—The remains of Miss Cecil McDermott, who died at one of the construction camps above the city, was brought here yesterday and shipped to her home in Kansas City.  She was a sister of Mr. Thomas McDermott, who is one of the Cairo and Thebes contractors and with two other sisters was visiting her brother.  She had been ill but a few days.


Thursday, 6 Sep 1906:
Accidentally Killed Himself

Harrisburg, Ill., Sept. 6.—Frank Ivans, a young man of Carrier, Mills, accidentally shot and killed himself here.  He went to the home of Henry Bacon, flourishing a revolver, which was accidentally discharged, killing him instantly.  Another pistol and a bottle of whisky were found on his person.

CARD OF THANKS

We desire to extend our deep gratitude and thanks to the friends who were so kind to us during our recent great bereavement.
Charles Pink and family

LITTLE DUNKER BOY DIED LAST NIGHT
Strayed Away from Home While Mother Was Busy and Was Run Over

Morris Dunker, the five-year-old boy who was run over yesterday afternoon, died last night at the infirmary at 11:30 o’clock.

The little fellow’s parents were moving from one house to another on Fortieth street and as the mother was busy, the little fellow had nothing to do and wandered to the Illinois Central railroad tracks, where he was playing on the tracks.  The train which caused his death was the Illinois Central transfer train and was pulled by engine No. 430 and was in charge of Engineer Jake Fisher and Conductor William Johnson.  The train struck him about 100 feet southeast of the Big Four crossing.  The child was conscious until a few minutes before his death and stated that he was playing and did not see the train coming.  His body was horribly mangled.

Tip Bowle’s boy, of Unity, age 16, had his legs cut off by the train last Tuesday night.  He died in a few minutes after the accident.

Hirschel Walker, the youngest son of Charles and Daisy Hileman Walker, of 412 Twenty-fifth Street, departed this life on his fifth birthday, August 31.  Little Hirschel was a member of the Calvary Baptist Sunday School. The funeral was conducted by Rev. Murray of Vienna, Ill., and the remains were interred in family lot in Concord Cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Pink, summoned here by the death of Mr. Pink’s mother, Mrs. Charles Pink, have returned to their home in Milwaukee.


Friday, 7 Sep 1906:
Mrs. Henry Watwood Dead—Mrs. Henry Watwood, of Wickliffe, Ky., died at the home of her mother, Mrs. Henry O’Donnelly, at Hinkleville, Ky., last night.  The deceased was very prominent and is well known in Wickliffe and Cairo, where she had many friends.  The funeral was held this afternoon.

CAME AFTER FATHER’S REMAINS
Daughters of Capt. H. W. Bradford Take His Body Away for Burial.

The remains of Capt. H. W. Bradford, who died at the United States Marine Hospital last Saturday, will be taken to Minneapolis for burial.  His daughters, Mrs. T. G. Fowler, of Minneapolis, and Mrs. F. B. Kreidler, of Polo, Ill., arrived in the city Wednesday to arrange for the disinterring of the body.  They went from here to New Madrid, where Capt. Bradford owned several steamboats.

Capt. Bradford had been ailing for a month, but came up to Cairo a week ago and was admitted to the hospital.  Within ten hours he was dead, his ailment having been too long neglected.

TRAVELING MAN COMMITTED SUICIDE
J. F. Martin, of Martin, Tenn., Found Dead in His Room at No. 217 Ohio Street
CARBOLIC ACID MEANS OF DESTRUCTION
Deceased Represented a Chattanooga Hardware Firm—Left Three Letters—Son Arrived in City

J. F. Roberts, of Martin, Tenn., took carbolic acid last night to end his life.  His dead body, still warm, was found early this morning.

Roberts came in last night on the Iron Mountain.  Going to No. 217 Ohio Street, he engaged a room for the night, leaving a call for 6 o’clock this morning.  When the porter rapped on his door this morning there was no response.  Entrance was gained and only the dead body of the man was found.  An ounce vial, which had contained carbolic acid, told how he had ended his life.  Three letters were also found, one addressed to Mrs. J. F. Roberts, his wife, at Martin, another to a brother at Martin, and the third to a party in Paris, Tenn.

The envelopes bore the printed address of the Kendrick Hotel at Charleston, Mo., and the vial was from a Charleston drug store, showing that the suicide was premeditated.

When the body was discovered, Dr. W.  C. Clarke was immediately notified, but he could do nothing, as life was gone.

Roberts was a frequent visitor to Cairo.  He was a man of about 50 to 55 years of age and is said to have been a whiskey drummer.

The coroner’s inquest over the remains of Roberts, was held this morning in the parlors of Mrs. M. E. Feith’s undertaking establishment at Eleventh and Washington at 11 o’clock.  The jury found from the evidence that the suicide was premeditated.

Dr. W. C. Clarke was the only witness examined.  Dr. Clarke stated that he was called to examine the deceased and found him dead when he arrived at the hotel.  A whiskey flask and a vial which had contained the carbolic acid, were found in the room, showing that suicide was the cause of death.
The deceased left the following note, poorly written, but as near as it could be made out, it reads as follows:

“These letters I have, will do.  I have saved and prepared. Wire W. D. Roberts, Martin, Tenn.”
From the writing it is evident that the note was written after Roberts had drank the deadly poison.
Three other letters were found, which had been written on the stationery of a Charleston, Mo., hotel.  These were sealed and were addressed to the following parties:

Mrs. J. R. Roberts, Martin, Tenn., deceased’s wife; W. D. Roberts and others, Martin, Tenn., and A. B. White, Paris, Tenn.

Coroner McManus thought it best not to open these letters as long as they were sealed and it was unnecessary, as it was found from the evidence that death was the result of suicidal intent.

A pocketbook was also found on the person of the deceased containing $1.16.

W. D. Roberts, son of the deceased, residing at Martin, Tenn., was wired of the affair and Coroner McManus received an answer stating that he would come to Cairo on the first train.  He was expected this afternoon.

Mr. P. C. Scullin stated that he had seen Roberts enter his restaurant yesterday.  Roberts walked the length of the lunch counter, when he turned around and walked out of the building.  He seemed to be muttering something to himself.

W. D. Roberts, son of the deceased and J. G. Norman, a friend, arrived in the city this afternoon to take charge of the remains.  They will leave tonight for Fulton, Ky., where they will make connections for Martin, arriving there early tomorrow morning.

Mr. Roberts was seen by a Citizen representative and questioned as to the former’s father.

The deceased was 58 years of age, married, and is survived by his wife and six children.  The family home is at Martin.  Deceased is also survived by a brother and two sisters.  Mr. Roberts was a traveling man and represented a hardware firm of Chattanooga.  In his room was found a machine or instrument for stretching wire.  He was a very ambitious man, but had been disappointed over the plans which had failed to materialize as he had hoped they would.  His son said that the deceased had been in good spirits, but that he had poor health and was subject to heart trouble.

Mr. W. D. Roberts refused to make public the contents of the letters, stating that the preferred to keep them private.

The following is the verdict of the coroner’s jury:

“In the matter of the inquisition of the body of J. F. Roberts, deceased, held at Cairo, Ill., on the 7th day of September, A. D. 1906, we, the undersigned jurors, sworn to inquire of the death of J. F. Roberts, on oath, do find that he came to his death by carbolic acid poisoining admninistered by his own hands with suicidal intent.  The deceased was found in Cairo, Alexander County, Illinois, September 7, 1906.”

Signed:
P. C. Scullin, Foreman
John Coleman
H. J. Sullivan
T. G. Winter
Charles F. Cain
August Bode


Saturday, 8 Sep 1906:
Baby Died This Morning—The 18-month-old baby of Mr. and Mrs. George W. Cassler died this morning at the home of its parents, No. 215 Thirty-second street.  The child had been ill several weeks and its death was due to summer complaint.

MOTION FOR NEW TRIAL DENIED
Judge Butler Sentences Fred Perkins for Thirty Years

Judge W. N. Butler heard the motion argued at Vienna Thursday afternoon for a new trial in the Perkins murder case, and at the conclusion of the arguments overruled the motion and sentenced Perkins to thirty years in the penitentiary.  Argument were made by W. A. Spann, George W. Pillow and George B. Gillespie for the defense and by State’s Attorney Cowan and Thomas F. Sheridan for the People.

Fred Perkins, who is a son of A. J. Perkins of the Perkins House at Vienna, killed John Betts on the night of July 15, 1905, at a gathering in the country near Vienna.  Whiskey is said to be the cause of the tragedy.


Monday, 10 Sep 1906:
Mrs. Sharp was in town (Ullin) Sunday from the Lime Kiln Hill.  She has been greatly annoyed lately by two negroes acting strangely near her place.  They would come out of the dense woods into the public roads and look around and disappear again into the woods.  She says on one occasion a woman called for a bucket of water and took it to the woods where those negroes are in hiding.  Mrs. Tharp is of the opinion that those parties are the murderers of Homer Harris and are being cared by for relatives or companions of theirs.


Tuesday, 11 Sep 1906:

UNABLE TO FIND A CLUE

Marion, Ill., Sept. 11—The jury selected to inquire into the death of Mrs. Amanda C. Davis, who was mysteriously shot and killed upon the streets of this city on Aug. 31st, have been uanble to find a single clue to the homicide.  Coroner Roberts has exhausted every effort to unravel the mystery.

(The 3 Sep 1906, issue reports her name as Mrs. John Davis.   John M. Davis married Amanda C. Keaster on 15 Jan 1879, in Williamson Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Wednesday, 12 Sep 1906:
Mrs. Ellery, of Perks, a daughter of Louis Lentz, of that place, died Monday.  She was a remarkably large woman and at fourteen years of age weighed over 200 pounds.

THIRTY-EIGHT ENGINEERS ATTENDED FUNERAL

Thirty-eight Big Four engineers attended the funeral of Engineer Frank Irwin, at Mt. Carmel, Monday and marched in a body to the grave.  Irwin was killed in the wreck at Norris City last Saturday.  Engineer J. H. Cook, who went up from Cairo, says that the funeral was a very large one and that the flowers were very profuse.  The engineers had a part in the service at the grave also.  Irwin was known to his friends as “Frenchy.”  He leaves a widow, but no children.

TOOK CHANGE OF VENUE

In the trial of the Stout murder case in Saline County circuit court a change of venue was taken from Judge Duncan to Judge Butler.  Judge Butler accordingly left for Harrisburg this morning to being the trial of the case.

Died of Typhoid Fever—
William Ward, Jr., the seven-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. William Ward, of Metropolis, Ill., died yesterday of typhoid fever.  Mrs. Ward was formerly Miss Maggie Mulkey, daughter of William Mulkey, a former Cairo lawyer.  The boy was well known in Cairo, having visited here often with his mother as guest of the family of Mr. H. Blom, of Seventh Street.

(William A. Ward married Maggie A. Mulkey on 27 Dec 1893, in Madison Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

FUNERAL NOTICE

Died, Thursday, Sept. 13th, at 8:05 p.m. A. H. Steele.

Funeral party will leave the late residence of the deceased, No. 2701 Poplar Street, at 2 o’clock sharp Sunday afternoon.  Special train will leave foot of Fourteenth Street for Beech Grove Cemetery where services will be held under the auspices of Safford Lodge No. 67 I. O. O. F.

Friends of the family are invited.

Baby Died—The young daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Andrews, of Fourth Street, which was born yesterday, died last night.  The remains were taken to Mounds this morning t 11 o’clock for burial.

OLD CAIROITE PASSED AWAY
Allison H. Steele Died Last Night after Illness of Several Months.

Allison H. Steele, an old Cairoite, died last night at 8:10 o’clock at his home at No. 2701 Poplar Street, of paralysis, after an illness of several months.  He was 63 years old and came to Cairo in 1875 from his home in Indiana.  He was in the photographing business for years, but three years ago he was forced to retire, owing to his bad health.  He was a member of the Odd Fellows and the funeral which will be held Sunday will be in charge of Safford lodge.

He is survived by his wife Mrs. Eliza Steele.  The remains will be taken to Beech Grove for burial.

CAIRO MAN’S FATHER DIED AT PADUCAH
Philip S. Hisey, Father of Fred Hisey, of this City, Passed Away Wednesday

The many friends of Mr. Fred Hisey, of this city, will regret to learn of the death of his father, which occurred at Paducah, Ky., Wednesday.

The Paducah Register contained the following account of Mr. Hisey’s death:

In peaceful sleep Wednesday morning at 3:30 o’clock the life of one of Paducah’s worthy citizens came to an end.  Mr. Philip Storer Hisey, who had for thirty years been an honored and valued resident, at the hour named succumbed to the ravages of paralysis, from which he had suffered for about a year.  Mr. Hisey died at the residence of his son-in-.law, Dr. Lillard Sanders, 318 South Sixth, where he made his home.  The interment was held in Oak Grove Cemetery beside the body of his beloved wife.  Services were conducted by Rev. T. J. Newell of the Broadway Methodist Church and the interment was under the auspices of the Confederate Veterans, James Walbert Camp, of which he was a member.

Mr. Hisey was a native of Edinburgh, Shenandoah County, Va., where he was born February 1, 1832.  He was a son of Rev. Frederick Hisey, a Moravian minister, and the youngest of nine children. His home was continued in Virginia until the War Between the States, when he joined the Confederate Army and came west.  After the war he located in Missouri and subsequently came here and on the 17th of February 1876, he was united in marriage to Miss Laura Hand.

He is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Dr. Lillard Sanders and Miss Hattie Hisey, and one son, Fred Hisey, the latter a resident of Cairo.

The deceased was a gentleman of the old school and was a man held in the highest esteem by all friends.  In all his walks in life, he deported himself with a credit and was a true friend, a good citizen and a fond father.  His death, though at a ripe age and after much usefulness, causes regret.

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hisey went up to Paducah to attend the funeral.

Mrs. Fred Hisey was formerly Miss Hazel Johns.


Friday, 15 Sep 1906:
Funeral of A. H. Steele—The funeral of the late A. H. Steele will be held Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the home of the deceased, No. 2701 Poplar Street.  The services will be in charge of Safford Lodge No. 67 I. O. O. F.  The remains will be interred at Beech Grove Cemetery.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Died Thursday, Sept. 13th, at 8:05 p.m. A. H. Steele.

Funeral party will leave the late residence of the deceased, No. 2701 Poplar Street, at 2 o’clock sharp Sunday afternoon.  Special train will leave foot of Fourteenth Street for Beech Grove Cemetery where services will be held under the auspices of Safford Lodge No. 67, I. O. O. F.

Friends of the family are invited.

ATTENTION ODD FELLOWS

All members of Safford Lodge No. 67, I. O. O. F., are requested to meet at Safford Hall at 1 p.m. sharp, Sunday, September 16, 1906, for the purpose of attending the funeral of our deceased brother, A. H. Steele.  Alexander and Alma lodges and all visiting Odd Fellows and Rebekahs are invited to attend.  Train will leave foot of Fourteenth Street at 2:45 p.m. for Beech Grove Cemetery.
C. B. McKnight, Noble Grand
J. E. Neff, Secretary

The negro that shot and killed Homer Harris a short time ago was captured Thursday some place down south.  He was brought to Mound City Friday morning, where he was placed in jail.

CLAIMED THAT ROSE HAD A GUN
Defense Sprung a Surprise to Prove Their Contention

Paducah, Ky., Sept. 15—The H. H. Loving murder case went to the jury today.  The principal speeches made yesterday were by Congressman Ollie James for the defense and County Judge R. T. Lightfoot for the Commonwealth.

A surprise was sprung by the defense when J. W. Farmer, the well known tobacco man, was introduced and testified that twenty minutes before the killing, he saw Rose in the hall of the fraternity building with a blue-barreled gun, which he was wrapping in as handkerchief.  This testimony is in harmony with the contention that Loving shot Rose in self defense and it’s the strongest evidence yet introduced in his behalf.


Monday, 17 Sep 1906:
P. J. THISTLEWOOD MEETS TRAGIC DEATH
Instantly Killed in Alighting from a Train Early this Morning
WAS EN ROUTE TO CHATTANNOOGA WITH HIS BROTHER
Boarded North Bound Train by Mistake and Tried to Get off at the Water Works
Body Fell into a Coal Bin Where It Lay Four Hours Before It Was Found

In jumping off of an Illinois Central passenger train, which he had boarded by mistake this morning, P. J. Thistlewood, one of Cairo’s oldest and best citizens, was killed, while his brother, Capt. N. B. Thistlewood, who was with him, jumped off and escaped injury.

Mr. P. J. Thistlewood and the Captain were going to Chattanooga, Tenn., to attend a soldiers’ reunion and had prepared to leave a few days ahead of time so as to get settled comfortably before the reunion opened.  On this occasion, the Captain had persuaded his brother to accompany him on the trip and Mr. P. J. Thistlewood was looking forward to the event with great interest.

The train to Chattanooga No. 203 is due to leave Cairo at 3:05 a.m.

While they were waiting for their train, one rolled into the station and the Captain asked a brakeman if that was the train from St. Louis.  The brakeman replied that it was, evidently misunderstanding Captain Thistlewood and thinking he asked if it was the train for St. Louis.

The Captain and his brother boarded the train and when they had reached Sixth Street the Captain, seeing Mrs. Brackett on the train, asked her if the train wasn’t going to St. Louis.  She replied that it was.
Capt. Thistlewood then called the brakemen and asked him to let them off, as they had boarded the wrong train.  The brakeman replied that he could not stop the train without seeing the conductor and on his return said that they could not stop until they reached the Big Four crossing.

When the train finally reached the crossing, it failed to stop, according to Capt. Thistlewood, and didn’t check its speed very much.  The Captain went out on the platform and was standing on the step ready to alight when the train stopped.  The Captain said they were near the waterworks when the brakeman told him to jump off, as the train was going faster.  The Captain was on the west side of the train and made the jump in safety, but realizing that the train was gaining speed, he shouted to his brother:  “Stay on the train!  Stay on the train!  Do not jump!”

The Captain did not see his brother jump, nor did he hear any sound, so he supposed that his brother had heeded his warning and remained on the train.

Seeing the night fireman of the waterworks standing in the door, Capt. Thistlewood stepped down the embankment and inquired whether he had seen anyone jump off the train.  The fireman replied that he had seen only one man get off the train and that was the Captain himself.

Capt. Thistlewood then walked down to the Blue Front Restaurant and thought he would wait there until the suburban returned from Mounds, supposing that his brother had left the train at Mounds and would return on the suburban.

As time went by, he received no word from his brother and the latter failing to return on the suburban, the Captain became anxious as to his whereabouts and within a few minutes a telephone message brought the shocking news that P. J. Thistlewood had been killed in jumping off the train.

The terrible accident occurred about 3 o’clock this morning.  The train, which is due to leave at 2:20 a.m., was a few minutes late.  Capt. Thistlewood reached the Blue Front Restaurant about 4 o’clock and it was between 6:30 and 7 o’clock when the sad news reached him.

The body was found shortly before 7 o’clock by Seth Washum, one of the employees of the waterworks plant.

A Citizen representative visited the spot this morning where Mr. Thistlewood was killed.  A short distance below the water works plant is a switch track, which branches off the west side of the main track.  A cattle car was standing on this switch and a little farther north a distance of about fifty or sixty feet is a trestle.  On the south end of this trestle a coal car was standing.  Capt. Thistlewood jumped off the train a few feet below the cattle car and lighted upon solid ground.  He shouted to his brother not to jump, as he realized the train was gaining speed.

It was quite dark and as the cattle car hid the view up the track, Capt. Thistlewood did not see his brother, when he too, jumped off the train.  It is thought that the deceased remained on the train long enough to pass the cattle car and then jumped when he saw the open space between the cattle car and the coal car.  Owing to the rate of speed the train was going, the deceased was unable to check his speed and ran right off the embankment and fell into the coal bin below, striking his head on the timbers of the bin.  His neck was not broken, as was reported, but his skull was fractured and his face badly bruised by the fall.  Death was probably instantaneous.  His body was found lying in the coal bin about four hours after the accident had occurred.  His hand satchel was found only a few feet from him.  The distance which Mr. Thistlewood fell from the switch track to the bin below is probably twelve or fifteen feet.
Capt. Thistlewood and his brother were looking forward to their visit at Chattanooga with great pleasure, as the Captain once fought over the ground where the reunion was to be held.

The accident was a great shock to the entire community.  The deceased had always been a very conservative man and had always been very cautious about getting on and off a train and that he should have met death in an accident of this kind, was a surprise to all who were well acquainted with him.

No. 204 left Cairo at 2:56 a.m.  It was in charge of Conductor Zimmerman and Engineer Sweet.
The coroner’s jury visited the spot where the accident occurred and viewed the remains which were then taken to Mrs. Falconer’s undertaking establishment on Sixth Street.  The jury then adjourned until tomorrow morning at 10 o’clock, at which time witnesses will be examined, including Capt. Thistlewood, Conductor Zimmerman, the brakeman and possibly others.

The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at the family residence on upper Washington Avenue.  Rev. J. A. Scarritt, formerly pastor of the First Methodist Church here, will probably conduct the services.  Interment will take place at Beech Grove Cemetery.

Mrs. May Ericson, who resides at Park Ridge, Ill., a suburb of Chicago, and Miss Leila Thistlewood, daughters of the deceased, are expected to arrive tonight to attend the funeral.  Other relatives were notified of Mr. Thistlewood’s death.

John Thistlewood was born in Kent County, Delaware, in July 1842, and was therefore in his 65th year.  He spent his boyhood and manhood there.  In the spring of 1886 he was imbued with the gold excitement, which had broken out in Montana, and with a companion made the trip to that state and for about two years was engaged in the gold mines or quartz mills there.  In 1868 he returned east as far as Illinois and settled at Mason, where he was engaged with Capt. Thistlewood and another brother in the dry goods and clothing business.  In 1872 he came to Cairo and established the firm of Thistlewood & Co., dealers in grain and hay.  His brother, Capt. Thistlewood was the company.  Having started off his new venture well, he returned to Mason that year and married Miss Hattie Barney, returning with her as his bride.

In 1877, Capt. Thistlewood retired from the firm and until 1884 he conducted it alone.  Then Samuel Hastings became associated with him and they remained together for several years, when Mr. Hastings retired and Mr. Thistlewood was then the sole owner of the business.  Since then Mr. Thistlewood and his sons have conducted the business.

Besides his widow, Mrs. Thistlewood leaves a family of five children, Wilbur, John, Arthur, Mrs. Mary Erickson, of Evanston, Ill., and Miss Leila Thistlewood.  He also left one brother, Capt. N. B. Thistlewood, two sisters, Mrs. Henry Vineyard and Mrs. Mary M. Vineyard, and two half sisters, Mrs. Nelson and Mrs. Jacobs, and two half brothers, Theodore and Albert Thistlewood.  All of them live in Delaware, within a few miles of Mr. Thistlewood’s birthplace, except Capt. Thistlewood.

Mr. Thistlewood acquired considerable property.  He owned considerable real estate in Cairo, was a stockholder and a director of the City National Bank, and also owned some real estate in Delaware.  

Among other Cairoites he became interested in Wichita, Kan., property during the boom there, and was one of the very few who came out whole.  He was also interested in Kansas farm lands, but some time ago closed out all these investments.

(Julius F. Ericson married Anne May Thistlewood on 8 Nov 1900, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Killed at Olive Branch—James Mache, one of the Macedonian worker men employed by the railroad at Olive Branch, was killed yesterday morning.  Mache fell off of a car and was coming.  Coroner McManus held the inquest yesterday afternoon.

 

Switchman Killed—William Biggles, a switchman employed by the Cotton Belt railroad, was killed in the yards at Wyatt, Mo., Friday.  His home was near Villa Ridge, Ill., where he has relatives.  The deceased was about 30 years of age and unmarried.  He was formerly a blacksmith at Mounds.

(The 20 Sep 1906, issue reported his name as William Biggers.—Darrel Dexter)

NEGROES QUARREL OVER A WOMAN
And as a Result, Bruce Hardin Is Fatally Shot by John Williams.
WILLIAMS ESCAPED AFTER THE SHOOTING.
Tragedy Took Place on Lower Commercial Avenue Sunday Evening.

John Williams, a negro, shot and killed Bruce Hardin, another negro, Sunday night in front of Richard Taylor’s Saloon on lower Commercial Avenue.  The shooting occurred about 7 o’clock.

The trouble between the two men arose over a quarrel which they had over a woman.  Both of the men had made threats against each other and last night they were noticed to be talking in very loud tones for some time before the shooting took place.  Hardin was seated in front of Evans’ barber shop, which is two doors north of Taylor’s saloon, when Williams came up and started to swear at Hardin.  Several other negroes attempted to quiet them, but could do no good.  After some hot words, Hardin was heard to say:  “Go get your gun and see if I care,” whereupon Williams drew his revolver, which was a 41-calibre, and fired five shots in rapid succession, two of the balls taking effect.

Hardin then ran up to the second story of Taylor’s place where he fell on the floor, where he died about five minutes later.

Williams immediately took to his heels running out Fourth Street and down in the cottonwoods.
The remains of Hardin were taken to Mrs. Feith’s undertaking establishment.

The inquest was held this morning at police headquarters.

At the inquest over nine witnesses were examined, all of who testified, according to the story above.
Hardin was a well known negro and was popular with his race.  He was a paroled convict from the Chester penitentiary, having been sent up there several years ago for stealing.

Williams has been here but two or three years and has been employed on steamboats, until several months ago when he went to work for Louis Herbert.

The two balls taking effect entered the left side and penetrated his heart and left lung.  He did not make any statement to anyone after receiving the wound.

The jury held Williams on a charge of murder.

Williams is still at large.


DYNAMITE EXPLOSION KILLS TWO MEN
Premature Discharge Blows Them to Atoms Saturday Afternoon

The premature explosion of dynamite at the quarry at Bloomfield Saturday afternoon resulted in the instant death of two workmen.  They were George Peterson and John Dunsworth.  The men were tamping the explosive into a hole when it discharged prematurely.  The men were regarded as careful men and how the accident could have happened is a mystery.  Their bodies were literally blown to atoms.  They were married and leave families living at Bloomfield.  The men were about 35 years of age.


Tuesday, 18 Sep 1906:
NEGLIGENCE OF TRAIN CREW
Responsible for Death of P. J. Thistlewood, Say Coroner’s Jury
TRAIN CREW SWORE TRAIN STOPPED
In Testimony Taken This Morning—Scene of Accident Visited This Afternoon

P. J. Thistlewood met his death through the negligence of the employees of the Illinois Central Railroad Company.

This in substance was the verdict of the coroner’s jury this afternoon.

The jury visited the scene of the disaster this afternoon, measured the distance to the crossing, measured the distance from the point where the deceased jumped from the train to the coal bin and came to the conclusion that if the train had come to a full stop there, that Mr. Thistlewood would not have been carried by the momentum of the train into the coal bin.

While the jury was there, No. 6 passed and did not stop at the crossing.  It slowed up, but did not come to a full stop and the fact was noticed and commented upon by the jury.

The coroner’s inquest held to inquire into the death of the late P. J. Thistlewood, who met a tragic death about 3 o’clock Monday morning, was held this morning at 10 o’clock in the parlors of Mrs. Falconer’s undertaking establishment on Sixth Street.

As is still fresh in the minds of Citizen readers, Mr. Thistlewood in company with his brother, Capt. N. B. Thistlewood, boarded the wrong Illinois Central train.  They boarded train No. 204 northbound, going to St. Louis instead of Train No. 203 southbound, going to Chattanooga.  The two men found their mistake soon after boarding the train.  The Captain requested the porter to let them off.  The porter saw the conductor and upon his return told the captain the train would stop at the Big Four crossing.  On reaching the water works, the two men went out upon the platform to the car.  According to the Captain’s testimony, the train did not stop, but merely slowed up a little and the porter told him that he had better get off as the train was going faster.  The Captain did so and alighted in safety, but realizing that it was dangerous, shouted to his brother to stay on the train.  Not seeing his brother get off, the Captain supposed that he went on to Mounds and would return on the suburban.  Capt. Thistlewood then returned to the Blue Front Restaurant and later received word that the body of this brother had been found in the coal bin in front of the waterworks and that he had been killed.

Capt. Thistlewood was the first to testify.  He stated that he and his brother had boarded the wrong train by mistake and upon seeing their mistake, asked the colored porter to stop and let them off.  The porter after seeing the conductor told the Captain that the train would stop at the Big Four crossing.  When the waterworks was reached, the Captain stated that he and his brother went out on the platform ready to get off, when the train stopped.  Capt. Thistlewood testified that the train slowed up but did not stop whereupon the porter told him to get off, if he was going to, as the train was going faster.  He jumped off and after doing so realized that the train was going too fast to do such a risky thing and shouted to his brother to stay on the train, not to jump.  The Captain did not see his brother jump off and thinking he remained on the train, walked back down to the Blue Front restaurant.  He later heard the news and went up and saw the dead body of his brother.  The Captain stated he felt pretty sure that the train did not stop at the crossing.

Seth Washum, colored head fireman at night at the waterworks, was next to testify.  He stated that he heard the train whistle for the crossing, but was inside of the plant at the time and could not state whether it stopped or not.  He heard someone calling and stepped out and saw Capt. Thistlewood, who asked Washum if he had seen anyone get off the train.  Washum stated that he had only seen one, which was the Captain.  Washum stated that about 5:15 o’clock, about two hours after he had seen the Captain, just as the day was breaking, he had occasion to go to the coal bin, where he found the lifeless body of P.J. Thistlewood, whom he did not recognize at the time.  He telephoned police headquarters.  Washum stated that the body was lying with the head facing south.  Washum was asked if during his employment at the waterworks, if he had noticed whether or not all the trains stopped at the crossing of the Big Four.  The witness replied that he had known many of them to slow up, but not to come to a full stop.  He had seen both passenger and freight trains do this.  He couldn’t tell whether No. 204 stopped Monday or not, as he was inside the plant at the time.

Conductor J. O. Zimmerman, who was in charge of the train, was the next witness to testify.  He stated that his train, which is due to leave Cairo at 2:20 a.m. was late and did not leave until 2:58 a.m.  He stated that he didn’t know either Capt. Thistewood or the deceased were on the train.  He said his train, No. 204, was on the first track when it came in.  As soon as No. 203 rolled into the depot, his train departed.  When asked the number of cars in the train and the approximate length of the train, Mr. Zimmerman stated that there were seven cars and the approximate length of the train including the engine was about 420 feet.  When asked if all trains were supposed to come to a full stop at the Big Four crossing, he stated that they were.  When asked if his train stopped on the morning in question, he stated that it did.  Then Mr. Zimmerman explained that sometimes the engineer pulls his train up nearer the crossing than at other times, according to the existing conditions.  There is a sharp curve just before reaching the crossing and switch tracks on either side, so that sometimes a view of the Big Four track from the 800 foot board, is not to be had.  Mr. Zimmerman was asked if the porter told him that Capt. Thistlewood and his brother were on the train and wanted to get off.  The conductor stated the porter told him and he instructed the porter to help them off when the train stopped at the crossing.  Mr. Zimmerman stated that the train stopped and the porter never said anything more about the matter to him, and that he did not know the accident had happened until last night when he read an account of it in the St. Louis papers.  Mr. Zimmerman was asked if it was not the conductor’s duty to assist passengers on and off trains.  The latter replied that it was part of his duty, but that he could not look after the whole train at once and that it was the porter’s duty to assist him.  He replied to the questions, that he did not go back and help the passengers off.

             Engineer Sweet was the next witness to testify.  He stated that his train came to a full stop at the Big Four crossing and that he had crept around the curve very slowly because it was rather foggy and a string of box cars hid his view of the Big Four tracks.  When asked if it was not the rule to stop at the 800 foot board, he stated that they could stop any distance between the board and the crossing.  He stated that he stopped on this occasion, 100 feet south of the crossing.  He stated that he did not know who was on the train in answer to the question.

             It was figured that if the train was 400 feet in length and stopped 100 feet from the crossing, that the rear end would have been 300 feet north of the 800-foot board.

             Fireman J. S. Henry was the next to testify.  His testimony was practically the same as the engineer’s.  He stated, however, that when the train passed the 800-foot board, it was running about 10 or 12 miles per hour and that it slowed down to about 6 or 8 miles when it passed the waterworks, ran slowly around the curve and came to a full stop before reaching the crossing.

             Sol Hicks, the colored porter, was the next to testify and his testimony was entirely different from Capt. Thistlewood’s or the fireman’s.  Capt. Thistlewood and the fireman both stated that the train was running about 6 miles an hour when it passed the waterworks, while the porter claimed that it came to a full stop when the Captain got off, and as the Captain got off near the waterworks, it will readily be seen that the testimony of these three witnesses do not harmonize.  Hicks stated that when he told Conductor Zimmerman of the two men’s presence on the train, the latter told him to tell them they could get off at the crossing.  When asked if it wasn’t his duty to get off the train and help passengers on or off, he stated that it was at stations, but did not seem to think it was at crossings.  Hicks stated that he saw both the Captain and his brother get off the train.  He said the train was at a full stop when the Captain got off, but had started up when the deceased got off.  He saw him run a few steps after alighting, but did not see him fall into the coal bin, as the train had moved on and the coal car hid the view.

             Capt. Thistlewood was granted permission to ask the porter a few questions.  On being asked if he did not remember telling the Captain to “Jump that the train was going faster,” the porter replied that he did not remember of saying such a thing.

             J. J. Barry, flagman, was examined, but did not know anything of the accident.

             J. I. Stanton, train baggage man, was also placed on the stand, but knew nothing of the affair.

             Dr. S. W. Lindsey, a veterinary surgeon, who was on the train at the time stated that the train did not come to a full stop at the crossing, to the best of his knowledge.  He stated that he was looking out of an open window on his side of the train.  He said the engine whistled the speed was checked, but he did not think the train came to a full stop.  Mr. J. D. Ladd was given permission to question the witness and on being asked whether or not he could swear that the train did not stop, Mr. Lindsey said that he could not.  He was then excused.

             The jury adjourned at noon to meet at the place of the accident at 2 o’clock.

A. B. Comings, the well known stenographer, was present at the inquest and took down the testimony of the witnesses.

The jury is composed of the following representative citizens:  C. C. Terrell, foreman; Casper Sander, F. S. Haas, E. C. Allen, Arthur Mattingly, and Frank E. Davis.


NOT GUILTY IS VERDICT
H. H. Loving Acquitted of the Murder of H. C. Rose after Long Jury Session
JURY OUT FIFTY-ONE HOURS
First Nine Men Stand for Acquittal, One for Manslaughter and Two for Conviction

Paducah News Democrat:  H. H. Loving is not guilty.

That was the verdict of the jury of “twelve good men and true” at 2:45 o’clock Monday afternoon.
Ever since noon on Saturday these men have been considering the evidence submitted and deliberating on the case.  During that period they have had no intercourse with the outside world and their deliberations have been secret.

The first vote is said by one of the jurymen, stood nine for acquittal, one for manslaughter and two blanks.  No material change in this vote was recorded until this afternoon, when the three men came over in a bunch, the entire twelve voting for acquittal.

Twice during their deliberations the jurymen tried to report a disagreement, but they could would not hear them and both times they were sent back to their room.

The first of these times, it is said, was Saturday afternoon and the second this morning at 8:30 o’clock when court opened.

Judge Reed had nothing to say to the jurymen except that a hasty disagreement would not be considered by the court, and back they went to finally reach a unanimous decision.

The defendant was in the courtroom when the jury came in and although he was shown very little mental perturbation during the trial, the look that came over his face when the words “not guilty” were spoken gave eloquent testimony of the relief he felt.  He was soon the center of a group of friends and as soon as he could get away from them, he hastened to express his thanks to the jury and to his attorneys.
This was the second trial of the Loving case, the first one resulting in a verdict and a sentence of five years in the penitentiary.  This judgment was afterwards reversed on error by the court of appeals and the case was sent back for trial.

The defendant was charged with the murder of H. A. Rose, whom he shot in his own (Loving’) office in the fraternity building more than one year ago.

Mr. Loving acknowledged the shooting and put up a plea of self defense, declaring that Rose had made threats against him and had come to his office to attack him at the time of the killing.

Ordinarily, a charge of murder means the gallows, but the first jury recognized the extenuating circumstances in the case and made the sentence only five years in prison.

In the second trial new testimony substantiating Mr. Loving’s claim of self defense was presented and the jury finally brought in a verdict completely exonerating him from all responsibility for the death of Mr. Rose.

FUNERAL OF MR. THISTLEWOOD

The funeral of Mr. P. J. Thistlewood will be held tomorrow afternoon at the residence on Upper Washington Avenue, at 1:30 o’clock.  The funeral services will be conducted by Rev. J. A. Scaritt, of Alton, Ill.  A special train will leave the foot of Eighteenth Street for the cemetery at Beech Grove.


Wednesday, 19 Sep 1906:
FELL FROM CAR

INJURIES FATAL
Emile Koch Fell from Walnut Street Car Last Night in Attempt to Change Seat
CONCUSSION OF BRAIN RESULTED
Deceased was a Shoemaker and Was 46 Years of Age

An Old Resident

Emile Koch, a shoemaker, in attempting to change his seat on a Walnut Street car last evening, while the car was in motion lost his balance and fell to the ground.  His head hit the ground with great force and caused concussion of the brain.  The deceased was 46 years of age.

Koch was sitting in about the middle of the car.  He was engaged in talking to a friend two seats in front of him and in an attempt to change his seat to next to his friend, he fell from the side platform to the ground.  The car was late and was running quite fast.  The accident happened on Commercial Avenue between Twenty-fifth and Twenty-sixth.

Koch was placed on the car and taken to Dr. McNemer’s office.  He was then taken to St. Mary’s Infirmary, where he died about 5 o’clock this morning.

The deceased was born in Cairo and had lived here all of his life.  He was a shoemaker by trade and conducted a shop on Sixth Street between Commercial and Washington.  He resided on Eighteenth Street.

He is survived by a wife, a mother and five brothers, two of whom reside in this city.

He was not a member of any lodge or organization.

The funeral arrangements have not been completed.  Coroner McManus did not hold an inquest over the remains, the members of the deceased’s family desiring that none be held, as the cause of death was known.
 
FUNERAL OF LATE P. J. THISTLEWOOD
Held This Afternoon at Family Residence, No. 2515 Washington Avenue

The funeral of the late P. J. Thistlewood, was held this afternoon at the family residence No. 2515 Washington Avenue.  The funeral was very largely attended, owing to the prominence of the deceased.

The Rev. Mr. Scarritt, of Alton, Ill., formerly pastor of the First Methodist Church, of this city, conducted the services, which were very solemn and impressive.  The music was furnished by a quartet composed of Mrs. C. T. Calhoun, Mrs. W. L. Holt, C. N. Buchanan and Thomas Haynes.  The quartet sung three hymns, “It Is Well with My Soul,” “Lead Kindly Light,” and “Nearer My God to Thee.”

The floral offerings were very beautiful and filled four large clothes baskets.

The pall bearers were the following:

Active—Norton Renfro, W. H. Wood, Charles Wenger, J. H. Morehead, Henry Gilhofer, Herbert Steinel, W. J. Johnston, G. P. Eichenberger, E. G. Pink, H. H. Halliday, G. W. Logan, and W. P. Pink.

Honorary—J. S. Aisthorpe, H. S. Candee, John Tiernan, Andrew Lohr, George F. Ort, Paul G. Schuh, George Parsons, P. T. Langan, Frank M. Howe, H. A. Cushman, H. _. Halliday, Bruce Magee, W. H. Sutherland.


CORONER McMANUS HAS BEEN KEPT BUSY

             Coroner James McManus has been one of the busiest officials in Alexander County for the last three months, having held twenty-two inquests in the last three and a half months.  Some of these were in surrounding towns, but the greater number were in the city of Cairo.  This week was an especially busy one for the doctor.  One morning an inquest was held over the remains of the negro who was shot Sunday night by John Williams.  In the afternoon another inquest was held over the body of James Murphy, the negro who was found dead at No. 2501 Commercial Avenue.

             That night the jury in the case of P.J. Thistlewood was empanelled by the coroner, the inquest having been held the next day.

             The coroner was also called to Olive Branch Sunday to inquire into the death of James Nache, the Macedonian laborer who was killed by a train, as was stated in Monday evening’s paper.

FELL FROM POLE AND BROKE HIS NECK
Ed Allison, Superintendent of Mound City Electric Plant, Loses Life

Receiving a shock which caused him to lose his balance, Ed Allison, superintendent of the Mound City electric light plant, fell from the top of a pole to the ground, a distance of about 15 feet last evening, and struck on the back of his neck, which was broken, causing instant death.

The accident happened about 8:30 o’clock.  Allison had climbed to the top of the pole to replace a burned-out fuse.  A street fair is in progress and the street was thronged with people.  The place where the sad event occurred was just south of the Illinois Central, on Main Street, and it caused great excitement, and threw a damper upon the festivities of the week.

Dr. Hall Whiteaker attempted to revive the lifeless body, but it was past the aid of medical science.  The coroner’s jury this morning investigated the death and found that it was due to an accident.

Allison was 35 years of age and leaves a wife and one child. 

The remains were taken to Barlow, Ky., this morning for interment.

Saturday evening as the work train was pulling into Olive Branch, an Italian laborer fell upon the track and a car load of gravel passed over his neck, completely decapitating him.

(His name was reported as James Mache in the 17 Sep 1906, issue.—Darrel Dexter)

William Anglen, of Clank, lost one of his children from some disease that could not be named by anyone that saw it.  It resembled a very bad case of blood poisoning.

ELDERLY MAN INJURED AT TAMMS
Brought Down to Cairo and Placed in St. Mary’s Infirmary—Right Leg Amputated

Samuel Wallace, an elderly man residing at Tamms, Ill., was brought down to Cairo Saturday by Dr. Duncan, of Tamms, and placed in St. Mary’s Infirmary.  Mr. Wallace, while doing some carpenter work, fell from a scaffold and fractured his right leg.  Gangrene set in and Drs. McNemer and Duggan, in whose care he was placed, found it necessary to amputate the limb below the knee.  The operation was performed Monday.

Mr. Wallace is an old soldier and was for many years a professor in the high school at South St. Louis.  He was a member of the same class in college of the famous Dr. Bernays and is a highly educated man.

He is getting along nicely.


Thursday, 20 Sep 1906:
NEGRO SHOT WHILE DODGING OFFICERS
Sheriff Weaver and Deputies of Pulaski County Capture Their Man

Millard Thomas, a negro, was shot yesterday near Beech Ridge, Ill., while fleeing from Sheriff Weaver and several of the latter’s deputies.  Thomas resisted arrest and opened fire on them, but the officers returned the compliment and a bullet from one of the guns lodged in the negro’s lung.  The wound will not likely prove fatal.

Millard and Jim Thomas, brothers, had a quarrel with another negro named Owens over a tract of land situated west of Mounds.  The men were related.  Owens had been operating a gravel pit on the land and the Thomas brothers determined to stop the work and with guns drove the men away.  The latter reported the matter to the sheriff.

Mr. Weaver with his deputies went out yesterday and found the Thomas brothers with guns at the pit as reported.  The negroes ran when the officers approached and the latter gave chase.

Millard opened fire and all officers returned the fire, one bullet taking effect in Thomas’ lung.

He was captured and taken to Mound City and placed in jail.  Dr. Whitaker attended him.  He may be brought down to Cairo and placed in the county jail here.

(This may be the same person as Miller Thomas, who married Bettie Leary on 18 Dec 1895, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


DEATH OF JOHN DAVENPORT
Pioneer Coal Man Of Saline County Has Passed Away
Heard of Davenport Coal Company Died Sunday—Funeral Tuesday

Harrisburg, Ill., Sept. 20—John Davenport, the man who might be called the pioneer coal man of Saline County, died suddenly at his home in Harrisburg on Sunday night.  His death closed an active life, a life in which several fortunes have been made and given in turn away.  At home he was only a common citizen, meeting his friends on every hand, talking to the rich and poor alike, giving to those who needed and deserved assistance, lending to those who were honest.  As a businessman in a business world, he had but few equals.  Starting into life’s battle while a young man, toiling faithfully and diligently, taking risks and losing none, keeping in mind the one thought, “honesty above all” and in using judgment in all cases he made his thousands.

He was the first man to take out coal from Saline County and for years was the only coal making man in that section.  He has always been recognized as one of the best practical miners in the south end of the state.

Of late years he has owned and controlled the Davenport Coal Co. mines and always personally superintended the works.  It is said of him that often through the day he would pitch in on some heavy job about the mines and work the entire shift of several hours right side by side with the men employed by him.  In his way, he was a rough man, but none knew better than did the men in his employ that the heart within Jack Davenport’s breast was always on the right side.  For his many little acts of kindness and charity his loss will be greatly felt by all who know him.

He leaves a wife and a large family of children, most of whom are married.  His funeral took place Tuesday afternoon in Harrisburg and the burial was conducted by the Masonic order, of which he was an old member with high degree of rank.

The remains of William Biggers, whose death by accident in Missouri was published in the Citizen, were buried at Shiloh on Sunday afternoon.  (Villa Ridge)

(The 17 Sep 1906, issue reported his name as William Biggles.—Darrel Dexter)

Homer Travis, the negro who shot and killed a Mr. Harris at Ullin a couple ago, has been captured in Tennessee and lodged in the Mound City jail.  Lee Walton, a colored man of Ullin, affected the capture.


Friday, 21 Sep 1906:
Funeral of Emile Koch—Emile Koch, the well known shoemaker who died from injuries sustained in falling from a street car Tuesday night, was held yesterday afternoon from the home of the deceased on Fifteenth Street.  The remains were interred at Beech Grove Cemetery.  Mrs. Feith conducted the funeral.


Saturday, 22 Sep 1906:
STOUT NOT GULTY OF MURDER
Jury Finds Him Innocent of Intention to Kill Ernie Price

Harrisburg Chronicle:  James Stout, charged with the killing of Ernie Price, in this city, on the night of February 17, is again a free man.  The jury got the case Tuesday night at 11 o’clock and at 3 o’clock Wednesday afternoon they brought in a verdict of “not guilty.”

The trial consumed about a week’s time and every step in its progress was watched with deep interest, the courtroom being packed each day.  Not for several years has a case been tried in this county in which so much interest was manifested.  The verdict meets with general approval.

State’s Attorney Lewis was assisted in the prosecution by Parish, Parish & Stilwell, while the defense was conducted by Whitley & Somers, W. S. Morris and S. F. Williford and from the character of these attorneys one may safely judge that it was a hard fought case.

Immediately after the verdict was announced Judge Butler adjourned court until “court in course,” and left that evening for Murphysboro, where he had adjourned court to come here.

NEGRO DROPPED DEAD AT BEECH RIDGE
Joe Williams Fell Dead While Working at Lumber Yard

Coroner McManus was called to Beech Ridge, Ill., yesterday afternoon by the death of Joe Williams, a negro, who dropped dead while working on a lumber pile.  The deceased was about 65 years old.

Just before noon, while Williams was handling lumber, it came his turn to pick up one end of a plank.  When he stooped to pick it up, he fell down.  He was taken into the mill nearby, where he died in a few minutes.

Death was due to natural causes.


Monday, 24 Sep 1906:
CORONER HELD ANOTHER INQUEST
In Case of Millard Thomas, the Negro Shot by Sheriff Weaver Wednesday
THOMAS SHOT WHILE RESISTING ARREST
And Died from Wounds Sunday—Sheriff Weaver and Others Here to Attend Inquest.

Millard Thomas, the negro who was shot at Beech Ridge by Sheriff Weaver, of Pulaski County, died Sunday at 10 a.m.  The inquest was held at the courthouse this afternoon.

Sheriff Weaver, County Clerk McClelland, Judge W. A. Wall and others were down as witnesses before the coroner’s jury.

The jury was composed as follows:  Sam Abell, George Wilson, Otto Fahr, Abe Morrison, P. H. Hubbard, and Ed Hamer.

The jury was still hearing testimony at 4 o’clock this afternoon.

DROWNED IN RIVER AT MOUND CITY
Joseph Gray, Aged 16, Lost His Life There Sunday Afternoon
SLIPPED FROM THE GOVERNMENT DYKE
While Attempting to Drag a Skiff through a Narrow Opening—Body Recovered

Joseph Gray, aged 16, lost his life in the Ohio River opposite Mound City Sunday evening while taking a small boat up the river.

Gray was employed by the Pope Canning Company.  About noon Supt. Fix with a crew of men left for Kentucky to pick tomatoes.  The boy accompanied them and was to take the skiff up the river a few hundred yards.  As he was on the Kentucky side, a large dyke was in his way.  In this dyke was a small gap through which the water ran with great force.  The boy was not strong enough to pull the skiff through this opening and did not want to go all the way around, so he landed and tried to push the boat by force through the gap while he stood on the dyke.  It is supposed that he slipped into the water.

When it was time for him to be back and he did not return, search was made for him, and his boat and hat were found at the opening of the dyke.

Dynamite was used in the attempt to raise the body, but without success.  About 7 o’clock the ferryman with a 14-foot pike pole, discovered the body and brought it to the surface.

The remains were brought to Mound City and the inquest was held and a verdict of accidental drowning.

The lad leaves a father and mother and brother and sister.

Miss Leila Thistlewood, who was called home by the sudden death of her father, the late P. J. Thistlewood, who was killed by jumping off a moving Illinois Central train last Monday morning, has returned to Park Ridge, Ill., a suburb of Chicago, where she is a teacher in the public schools of that place.


Tuesday, 25 Sep 1906:
PREFERRED DEATH TO DISGRACE
A. E. Warrendorf Committed Suicide Last Night by Drinking Carbolic Acid
WANTED AT MEMPHIS FOR FORGERY
Was Staying at Illinois Hotel—Drank Poison When Officer Started to Arrest Him

Preferring to face death rather than arrest, A. E. Warrendorf, alias Charles W. Bentzan, of Memphis, Tenn., drank the contents of a bottle containing carbolic acid last night about half past eight o’clock.  The affair happened on Commercial Avenue, a short distance below the Illinois Hotel.  The deceased was the former manager of the Memphis Realty System and editor of the Real Estate Bulletin.

Warrendorf has been staying at the Illinois Hotel since his arrival in Cairo on Sept. 16th.  He paid for his board and lodging by the day.  He registered as Charles W. Bentzan, of New York.

Last evening Chief of Police M. S. Egan received a long distance telephone message from Memphis, asking the chief to arrest one A. E. Warrendorf, who was wanted at Memphis for forgery and robbery.  The details were not given, but a full description of Warrendorf was given Chief Egan, who at once detailed night Sergeant Cowell to investigate the case.  Sergeant Cowell went down to the Illinois Hotel about 8:15 p.m. at which hostelry it was understood that a man answering Warrendorf’s description had been seen.

Sergeant Cowell inquired of the proprietor E. C. Allen, if any man by the name of Warrendorf was staying at the hotel.  An examination of the register revealed the fact that no person had registered under that name.

While Sergeant Cowell and Mr. Allen were engaged in talking about the matter, Warrendorf, alias Bentzan, walked up to the door and looked in.  Seeing the officer, he turned around and started down the street.  Officer Cowell started out after the man, who was headed down Commercial.  The faster the officer walked, the faster Warrendorf walked, until he realized that it was of no use for him to make any attempt to escape the officer.

Finally, the Sergeant called to the man to wait a minute, that he wanted to speak to him, whereupon Warrensdorf stopped and taking the bottle from his pocket drank the deadly poison.  He threw the bottle into the gutter and stood on the edge of the sidewalk looking out into the street, when Sergeant Cowell reached him.

The officer took hold of Warrendorf’s arm and led him back to the hotel.  Warrendorf did not speak and made no attempt to resist the officer.

Dr. McNemer was summoned, being told that a man had taken poison.  The doctor advised Mr. Allen to give Warrendorf some alcohol to drink.  Mr. Allen rushed into the saloon adjoining the hotel and not being able to get any alcohol ran across the street to Paul G. Schuh’s drug store.  Upon his return he endeavored to make Warrendorf swallow the fluid, but when he took a mouthful, he let it pass out of his mouth back into the glass.  Thinking that Warrendorf did not want to take the fluid, Mr. Allen held Warrendorf’s nose while someone attempted to pour the alcohol into his mouth with no success.

By this time, Dr. McNemer had arrived and took the man in charge.  The patient was placed in a rocking chair which was tipped back.  The doctor managed to force several tablespoonfuls of alcohol down Warrendorf’s throat.

He was then taken to his room, where he died in a few minutes.

Warrendorf did not speak after drinking the poison, nor did he show any signs of distress or pain until just before his death, when he groaned and then passed away.

Just after supper, last evening, Warrendorf had asked Mr. Charles Carlen, superintendent of construction of the Singer Company, who is a patron of the hotel, if he did not want to take a walk.  Mr. Corlen replied that there was no special place of interest to go and suggested that they walk up towards the river, which they did, later returning to the hotel.  Mr. Corlen sat down in one of the chairs in front of the hostelry, when Warrendorf glancing in, saw Officer Cowell looking over the register and presuming that it was he for whom the officer was looking, Warrendorf started down the street, followed by Cowell, who had seen Warrendorf and noticed that he answered the description of the man wanted.

It is stated that Warrendorf purchased the carbolic acid several days ago from a local drug store, and by this it is presumed that he had planned to take his own life, if odds were against him,.

It had been noticed that the deceased was very nervous, and would turn around suddenly whenever approached from behind.  On one occasion when walking out of the dining room, Warrendorf was followed by one of the guests of the hotel, when he turned suddenly around to see who was behind him.
Mr. Allen stated to a Citizen representative that Warrendorf had acted a perfect gentleman while a guest at the hotel and had always paid his bills.  He was found to have told one fabrication, however.  While walking with Mr. Corlen, Warrendorf said that he was a traveling man, but had just recovered from a case of appendicitis, for which he had received an operation and was still weak.  He said that when he regained his strength, he would either go back on the road or take a position in Cairo.

An examination of the remains showed that no operation had been performed.

The remains were taken to Mrs. Feith’s undertaking establishment where the inquest was held today.
The deceased was about 38 years of age, five feet, ten inches in height, weighed about 150 pounds, had light hair and blue eyes.  He was well dressed, having a gold watch and a diamond charm.

In his pockets were several business letters, one of which was from a Memphis attorney addressed to Charles W. Bentzan in which the attorney represented a client who was indebted to Warrendorf and who evidently had a claim against the client.

Chief of Police Egan telephoned to Memphis last night and learned that Warrendorf was connected with a trust company of that city and that he had fled with $3,000 to $5,000 of other people’s money.  Chief Egan notified the chief of police there that the coroner had charge of Warrendorf’s body and asked him to notify relatives.

Indictments charging Warrendorf with larceny and forgery were found by the grand jury two weeks ago.  Warrendorf fled before process was served and a reward was offered for his apprehension.  The indictments charge him with appropriating a check drawn by C. P. Fitzgerald on the north Memphis Savings Bank in favor of the Realty System and with endorsing another check on the same bank with the name of C. P. Fitzgerald.  It is also claimed that Warrendorf floated numerous other checks which he had forged before leaving Memphis aggregating $2,000.  He came here last January and had always been reticent as to the details of his past life.
 
DEATH OF GEORGE STEINHOUSE
Passes Away after Four Months’ Illness from Consumption

After battling for four months with that dread disease, consumption, George P. W. Steinhouse passed away at 1:50 o’clock this morning at his home, No. 530 Tenth Street.

On the first of June last he was taken sick and had to give up all active work.  He grew steadily worse and for twelve weeks was confined to his bed.  The careful nursing of his devoted wife with the help of his mother, brothers, and sisters, failed to stay the progress of the disease.  Two years ago he went to Colorado Springs and spent three months, returning looking well and strong and it was hoped then that he was permanently cured, but it was no so.

George Steinhouse was born in Cairo on March 8th, 39 years ago.  He learned the trade of his father, that of barbering, and worked in his mother’s shop, after his father’s death, until 11 years ago, when he secured a shop of his own, on the north side of Eighth Street.  He conducted that shop ever since.

On Jan. 1, 1893, he was married to Miss Mary Jackson, who is now left a widow with four children, two boys and two girls, the youngest 6 and the oldest 12 years of age.  Besides his immediate family, his mother survives him, as do also his sisters, Mrs. R. D. Stapleton, and Misses Louise and Gussie Steinhouse, and his four brothers, Ed, Fred, Harry and Leroy.

The deceased was a member of K. of P. Lodge No. 173 and that organization will have charge of his funeral, which will be held from the home tomorrow afternoon.  The remains will be taken to Villa Ridge cemetery for interment.

(George P. N. Steinhouse married Mary Jackson on 1 Jan 1894, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Robert D. Stapleton married Bertha Steinhouse on 2 Oct 1895, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  George P. Steinhouse Boen March 8, 1868 Died Sept. 25, 1906.—Darrel Dexter) 
 
CORONER’S JURY EXONERATED OFFICERS
Who Shot Millard Thomas, a Negro Prisoner Who Resisted Arrest.

The coroner’s jury called to inquire into the death of Millard Thomas, the negro who was shot by Pulaski County officers, when resisting arrest, exonerated the officers from all blame.  They found that the offices had acted in pursuance of their duty, when the negro resisted arrest.

The inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the courthouse.  Testimony was taken, which bore out the facts published in the Citizen at the time.

Thomas had a dispute over the possession of a forty-acre tract of land west of Mounds with another negro, R. C. Owens. He and his brother took possession of a gravel pit on the land and drove Owens’ workmen and teams from the place.

The Pulaski County officers were notified and Thomas, learning of this, fled toward Beech Ridge.  Sheriff J. R. Weaver, Deputy Sheriff R. J. Caster, City Marshal William Powell and Squire W. G. Davis went in pursuit of him and found Thomas walking along the railroad track.  Sheriff Weaver went to arrest him and Thomas fired several times.  The officers all fired in return and Thomas sank down fatally wounded.  He lingered until yesterday morning when he died at 11 o’clock at the Mound City jail, where he was taken by the officers after the shooting.

Among those in attendance at the inquest were Judge W. A. Wall, Sheriff James R. Weaver, Deputy Sheriff Robert J. Caster, County Clerk E. W. McClelland, City Marshal Wes Powell, all of Mound City; City Marshal Fred Spurleigh and Hickman Holderfield, of Mounds.

The jury was composed of the following persons:  Samuel Abell, George Wilson, Otto Fahr, Abe Morrison, P. H. Hubbard, and Edward Hamer.
 
Colored Woman Died—Ada Washington, a respected negress, died yesterday morning at 7:30 o’clock at her home, 426 Fifteenth Street.  Her remains will be taken to Columbus, Ky., for interment.  The deceased had been employed as cook at the residence of Dr. G. H. McNemer and was a faithful servant.
 
NOTICE KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS

All members of the Cairo Lodge No. 173 Knights of Pythias are requested to meet tonight at 8 o’clock at their castle hall to make arrangements for the funeral of our late brother, George Steinhouse.
Frank Youch, C. C.
Attest:  J. Y. Turner, K. of R. & S.
 
 
Wednesday, 26 Sep 1906:
DEATH CLAIMS ANOTHER CAIROITE
Louis Herbert Passed Away This Morning in St. Louis from Acute Bright’s Disease.
END CAME SOON AFTER ARRIVING THERE
Returned from Colorado Tuesday and Was Taken to Baptist Hospital—Grew Worse Last Night

Louis Herbert, another of Cairo’s wealthy citizens, has passed away.  He died at the Baptist Hospital in St. Louis at 11:48 o’clock this afternoon.

Mr. Herbert went to Colorado a few weeks ago, in company with Dr. Gordon, in the effort to restore his health.  It is evident that the change did not agree with him, for he was brought back, arriving in St. Louis yesterday.  The first news that he was in an alarming condition was received by Mr. Harry Cushman last night.  He departed at once for St. Louis.

This noon came the news of his death.  His ailment was acute Bright’s disease.

Mr. Herbert was born in Overfladungen, Bavaria, in 1840 and was therefore 66 years of age.  He came to Cairo in 1862 or ‘63, three or four years after his arrival in America, and engaged in the hotel business.  He followed it for 17 or 18 years, for a long time conducting the European Hotel next to the City National Bank.  In 1880 he embarked in his present business, that of wholesale liquor dealer.

Mr. Herbert acquired considerable wealth and was ranked as one of the richest men in Cairo.  He owned a large amount of real estate.

He leaves a family consisting of one daughter, Mrs. Peter Day, and three sons, Ben, Oscar and Byron.  His sister, Mrs. Ebert, also survives him here and he has one brother in the West, and a brother and a sister in the old country.

His wife is an inmate of the hospital at Anna.

Mr. Day and Mrs. Ebert went to St. Louis this afternoon.

The remains will probably be brought to Cairo for interment.
 
WARRENDORF BURIED AS A PAUPER
Memphis Defaulter Who Committed Suicide Monday Night Buried at Villa Ridge
ONCE LIVED IN ST. LOUIS IN TROUBLE THERE
Skipped Out with Several Hundred Dollars Belonging to J. Edward Reid—Had No Relatives in America

The remains of A. E. Warrendorf, the Memphis defaulter who committed suicide Monday night near the Illinois Hotel, by drinking carbolic acid, were interred this afternoon in the burial ground for paupers at Villa Ridge.  Warrendorf had no relatives or friends in America, that were known of, so it fell to the lot of Alexander County to stand the expense of the burial.

The coroner’s inquest was held over the remains of Warrendorf this morning at Mrs. M. E. Feith’s undertaking establishment, No. 1101 Washington Avenue.  The jury found that Warrendorf came to his death by carbolic acid poisoning, which he had taken with suicidal intent.

Coroner McManus received a letter today from J. Edward Reid, of the firm of Reid Bros., general agent for the Huber Manufacturing Company’s threshing machinery of St. Louis.  Mr. Reid stated in his letter that he had seen an account of Warrendorf’s death in the St. Louis Globe Democrat and wanted to inquire more about him.  He stated that Warrendorf had lived in St. Louis about eight or ten years ago.  About a year before he left St. Louis, he received some money from Germany, for which he had Reid appointed as trustee to handle the estate, but there never was established that Reid had an estate.  Reid was therefore caught for several hundred dollars. Warrendorf then skipped out and Reid lost all trace of him.  Mr. Reid stated that Warrendorf had told him and others that he (Warrendorf) had taken out $2,000 life insurance in Reid’s name.  Mr. Reid stated that he had been looking for Warrendorf ever since.

Coroner McManus received a telegram from Chief of Police George T. O’Haver, of Memphis, stating that Warrendorf had no relatives at Memphis or in this country.

Warrendorf had no trunk with him while in Cairo, but on his key ring was a trunk key.  It is thought that if the trunk, if he had one, can be located, more definite information concerning Warrendorf’s past life may be learned.

On his person, Warrendorf had a gold watch and chain and a charm studded with diamonds.  The outfit was taken to a local jeweler, who pronounced the outfit of little value and stated that when new, the whole thing might have been worth $13.

Warrendorf had been employed for two or three days before his death at the clothing store at No. 1801 Commercial Avenue.

A letter was received this morning addressed to Warrendorf which was opened by Coroner McManus.  It was an answer to a letter written by the deceased to the McAllister Cooman Company of Chicago, wholesale jewelers.  It is thought by this that Warrendorf had written for a position as traveling salesman.
 
Lacey Stewart, a young man living on George Otrich’s farm, was taken with a congestive chill Monday and is dangerously ill.  (Wetaug)
 
Mrs. Rudy Laurant was called to Carbondale yesterday by the serious illness of her mother and sister.  She also received word that a niece was injured at Murphysboro in an automobile accident.
 
Funeral of George Steinhouse—The funeral of the late George Steinhouse was held this afternoon and largely attended, despite the inclement weather.  The remains were taken to Villa Ridge cemetery for interment.  The floral offerings were profuse and very beautiful.  Cairo Lodge No. 173 Knights of Pythias of which the deceased was a member, had charge of the services.
 
 
Thursday, 27 Sep 1906:
REMAINS BROUGHT BACK TO CAIRO
Funeral of Late Louis Herbert to Be Held Saturday Afternoon

The remains of the late Louis Herbert were brought home from St. Louis, arriving on the Illinois Central passenger train at 2 o’clock this afternoon.  A number of old friends of the deceased were at the station to pay him a last honor and they escorted the body from the depot to the home of Peter Day, on Washington Avenue.  Among them were E. A. Smith, Daniel Hartman, E. G. Pink, J. B. Magee, C. R. Stuart, Maj. E. W. Halliday, and E. P. Fitzgerald.

Peter Day, Harry Cushman and Mrs. Ebert returned home with the body.

The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon, but the details of the funeral had not been fully decided upon this afternoon.
 
MEMORIAL IN BEHALF OF MRS. CHARLES PINK

The late Mrs. Charles Pink was one of the most earnest workers of the Church of the Redeemer of this city.  The Guild of which she was a member, accordingly prepared the following memorial as a fitting tribute to her worth.

God in his infinite power, wisdom and mercy, having taken from our midst Mrs. Charles Pink, one of our noble and earnest workers in our Guild, of the St. Mary’s Branch of the Woman’s Auxiliary of the Church of the Redeemer, this Guild, in affectionate regard for her memory present and make record this memorial.

She was indeed a noble Christian woman, distinguished for her charity, benevolence, and good works among all classes of people.  Her kind and sympathizing nature was such that those who appealed to her in distress always found in her a willing and helping hand.  Her happy, cheerful, disposition, her zeal and earnestness in church work, her many charitable deeds, her strong and attractive personality, combined to endear her to all who knew her.  As a devoted wife and mother, as a faithful Christian woman, as one among the most active and beloved members of our Guild, she will be greatly missed by all.  And we tender to her bereaved husband, sister and children, our loving sympathy and direct the secretary of our Guild to furnish a copy of this memorial to the family of the deceased.
Mrs. William B. Gilbert, Chairman
Isabella L. Candee
Adelia A. Galigher
Anna E. Safford, Committee
Mary Baker Galigher, Secretary
 
Frank Sitton went out after a load of logs Tuesday and in some way got hurt and was there all day until 4 o’clock, when he was found unconscious.  Wednesday the report was that he was not expected to recover.  Dr. E. J. Duncan is attending him.  (Diswood)
 
Died, Saturday, September 22, at her home in Dongola, Mrs. Sarah Dale, wife of J. R. Dale, age about 40 years.  Interment in the Friendship Cemetery five miles northeast of Dongola Sunday.

(Her marker in Friendship Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Sarah L. wife of J. R. Dale Born May 4, 1867 Died Sept. 22, 1906.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Died, Tuesday morning, Sept. 19, at New Castle, Colo., Roy Elliott, age 5 years.  Funeral services held at the family residence in this city (Dongola), Sunday, Sept. 23, at 2 p.m.  Interment in the I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola.  Roy was a son of Mr. and Mrs. William Elliott, of this place, and Mrs. Elliott was at New Castle, Colo., visiting relatives at the time of Roy’s death.  The little fellow was riding on horseback and was thrown off and killed almost instantly.

(His marker in I. O. O. F. Cemetery at Dongola reads:  Roy son of W. A. & C. V. Elliott Died Sept. 18, 1906 Aged 5 Yrs., 1 Mo., & 26 Ds.  We can safely leave our boy, Our darling, in thy trust.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Isaac Farnbaker is reported very ill of the infirmities of age.  He is far advanced in age and was one of the early settlers of this city.  His relatives and friend are much concerned over his condition.
 
 
Friday, 28 Sep 1906:
FUNERAL NOTICE

Died, at St. Louis, Mo., Wednesday, September 26, Louis Herbert.

Funeral services will be held at the residence of Peter Day, No. 1405 Washington Avenue, Saturday afternoon, Sept. 29, at 1:30 o’clock.  Remains will be taken by special train, leaving foot of Eighth Street at 2:45 p.m. for Beech Grove Cemetery, where interment will be made.

Friends are invited to attend.
 
 
Saturday, 29 Sep 1906:
Died While on Train—Martin Murry, a laborer employed by the Big Four Railroad at Gossett, Ill., died on a Big Four train yesterday morning while en route to Cairo.  The deceased had been ill for several days with a malarial attack and the effects of alcoholism.  The railroad company sent him to Cairo for treatment at St. Mary’s Infirmary and he was placed in a baggage car on a cot, but he died about an hour before the train reached this city.  The remains were buried at Villa Ridge cemetery today.
 
Looking for Husband—Mrs. M. M. Rogers, of Grand Chain, Ill., was in the city yesterday inquiring about her husband, Jacob Rogers, who disappeared from home about a year ago.  She has two children and was left without finances.  Her husband is a tie maker and she thinks he is employed in some railroad camp.  She will appreciate any information concerning her husband.
 
FUNERAL OF LATE LOUIS HERBERT
Held this Afternoon From Residence of Mrs. Peter Day, Daughter of Deceased
FUNERAL WAS LARGELY ATTENDED
Many Beautiful Floral Offerings Covered Casket—Remains Interred at Villa Ridge

The funeral of the late Louis Herbert was held this afternoon at 1:30 o’clock from the residence of deceased’s daughter, Mrs. Peter Day, 1405 Washington Avenue.  Father James Gillen of St. Joseph’s Church officiating.

Despite the bad weather, the funeral was largely attended, owing to the prominence of the deceased.
The floral offerings were very beautiful and were numerous, filling several large baskets.  Among the number were some very beautiful pieces.  A large piece, known as a casket pall, was perhaps the most beautiful of the floral pieces and completely covered the top of the casket.  This was a remembrance from the family.

The active pall bearers were Charles Young, Rudolph Brown, R. Rothenberger, O. Talbert, John Lattner, Casper Kusener, Herman Gunther, and Frank E. Davis.

The active pall bearers were chosen from the Casino Lodge and Germanic Maennerchor, of which deceased was a member.

Following are the honorary pall bearers:

T. J. Sloo, L. H. Myers, A. Comings, Thomas Keller, John Hodges, E. Smith, Peter Saup, A. Botto, John Aisthorpe, Maj. E. W. Halliday, Claude Winter, J. W. Wenger, Daniel Hartman, H. F. Potter, W. M. Williams, F. Teichman, Samuel Orr, E. A. Buder, William Kluge, Calvin V. Neff, Henry Hasenjaeger, John Hogan, George J. Baker, M. C. Wright, G. F. Ort, Paul G. Schuh, Walter H. Wood, Charles Feutchert, Sr., Angus Leek, John M. Lansden, Herman C. Schuh, Reed Green, M. F. Gilbert, Andrew Lohr, Sidney B. Miller, Patrick Mahoney, E. S. Dewey, George Parsons, Hank Goetelle, Frank Gazzola, John H. Robinson, M. J. Howeley, C. H. Bracken, P. W. Barclay, C. R. Stuart.

The funeral arrived at the foot of Eighth Street on time, but had to wait for some time in the rain for the funeral train to arrive, which shows the poor accommodations which the Illinois Central offers to the people of Cairo.
 
ANOTHER OLD RESIDENT PASSED AWAY
Mrs. Caroline Van Brocklin Died Yesterday at the Age of 76 Years

Another old resident of Cairo has passed away, Mrs. Caroline Van Brocklin, of No. 3203 Commercial Avenue, died yesterday.

The deceased was 76 years of age and had resided in this city since 1858.  She is survived by her husband, George Van Brocklin, but had no other relatives.

The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 1 o’clock at St. Joseph’s Church.  The remains will be taken to Villa Ridge cemetery where interment will take place.
 
Old, Old Story Again

Nashville, Ill., Sept. 29—Elizabeth Kurwicki, aged 8, was shot and almost instantly killed through the accidental discharge of a revolver in the hands of her 17-year-old brother, Steven.  It was the same old story of not knowing it was loaded.  Young Kurwicki disappeared immediately after the shooting and is hiding in the woods.
 
AH FONG, WEALTHY CELESTIAL, DEAD
Father-in-Law of Mound City Boy Passes Away in China
THIRTEEN DAUGHTERS FAMOUS IN AMERICA
Each Given a Million Dollar Dowry—They Married Prominent American Officers and Civilians

Ah Fong, the Chinese capitalist whose thirteen beautiful daughters have been the talk of America for years, died in China, on Sept. 25, according to press dispatches.

One of these daughters is the wife of Lieut. A. J. Dougherty, U. S. A., son of Mr. Andrew J. Dougherty, of Mound City.

How “Pink” Dougherty won his bride in a short but sharp engagement while the army transport upon which he was en route to Manila lay over at Honolulu is familiar to all of his friends in southern Illinois.
The story of Ah Fong is related as follows:

Wing Ah Fong, a Chinese coolie, landed at Honolulu in 1858.  While his companion immigrants went out to work on the plantations, Ah Fong set up as a Chinese merchant.  He imported from China opium and other luxuries, which he sold to his countrymen at prices that enabled him soon to become the foremost Chinese man of business in the Hawaiian Islands.

Ah Fong’s place of business was on the water front.  For a neighbor he had a half English, half Portuguese ex-sailor named Fayerweather, who had married a native Kanaka beauty and like Ah Fong, was struggling to build up a fortune.  Fayerweather had one daughter whom he had placed as a companion in one of the missionary families.
Mixture of Four Bloods

This daughter, when barely 14 years old—which means maturity in that balmy climate—had a wild and luxuriant beauty, uniting the chief charms of the women of the three countries represented in her ancestry—England, Portugal and Hawaii.  Ah Fong made this girl his wife.

Ah Fong became the confidant of old King Kalakaua.  He became a great importer.  He controlled the coolie market and the opium trade.  He made large investments in real estate and piled million on million.
Thirteen Beautiful Daughters.

Meantime his wife had presented him with fifteen children, thirteen girls and two boys.  The girls became famous the world around.  They were educated in the United States and in Europe.  They wore Parisian frocks. Seven of them were black-eyed raven haired girls.  The other six were blond, with blue eyes and dark eyelashes and hair.  Seven of the sisters have their father’s tall stature, but the rest are petite figures.  They have a pronounced suggestion of Chinese almond shaped eyes and nearly every one of them has the mother’s olive complexion and soft, easy mode of speech.
Social Center of Honolulu

Mrs. Ah Fong had social aspirations and her husband humored them.  He changed his name to Afong to please her and built the finest mansion in Honolulu.

The Afong mansion became the mecca of young men and old, ambitious to win an oriental beauty for a wife and to get the $1,000,000 dowry that went with each one.

Nine of the Afong girls married well.  Four are unmarried.  The nine sons-in-law of the old Chinese merchant are men of prominence in business or profession.  One of them is Rear Admiral Whiting of the United States Navy.
List of the Afong Girls

Here is a list of the Afong girls, with the names of the men they are married to:

Marie, wife of H. G. Humphrey, one of the leading lawyers of Honolulu

Carrie, now Mrs. Arthur Johnston, a Honolulu merchant

Helen, married to W. A. Henshall, who lost his life in the wreck of the steamer Rio Janeiro in Golden Gate, near San Francisco

Harriet, now the wife of Rear Admiral Whiting, U. S. N.

Alice married to F. V. Stokes, collector of the port of Honolulu

Jessie, wife of Howard G. Morton, a merchant of Honolulu

Nancy, now Mrs. Alfred Magoon, attorney of Honolulu

Murial, wife of Lieut. A. J. Dougherty, United States Army

Melaine, married to James W. W. Brewster, of Elizabeth, N.J.  They make their home in Honolulu

Four of the girls—Bessie, Adelina, Kaminola, and Emilene—as yet are unmarried.
Goes Back to China

There were two sons.  The oldest disappeared with his father in 1892.  The other, Alfred, married Miss Anna Elizabeth Whiting, niece of Rear Admiral Whiting.

Afong never adopted western civilization.  He was a Chinaman and clung to Chinese costume and customs.  Finally, in 1892, he took his eldest son and went to China.  From that day, Honolulu never saw him again.  He left his property behind him in the care of trustees.  The millions he had amassed he left to his wife and his children to do as they pleased with.  Why he went away is a mystery which never is likely to be solved.
 
FORMER CLERK OF THEBES DEAD
W. S. Pellett Passed Away at Murphysboro Thursday

W. S. Pellett, who formerly was in the drug business at Thebes and who was for a time village clerk, died at his home in Murphysboro, last Thursday.  The deceased was 40 years of age and was unmarried.
The engineers surveying for the Thebes bridge and for the railroad terminals roomed over this drug store and showed him the surveys locating the bridge and railroad yards.  Mr. Pellett at once secured an option on twenty acres and with J. P. Lightner, platted and started the town of Illmo, Mo.  Later, John S. Norman, Joseph Van Cloostere, E. A. Wells, W. K. and H. O. Murphy, joined them in the company that extended Illmo and founded Edna, Mo.

Several weeks ago Mr. Pellett made a business trip to Chaffee, Mo., and was taken sick while there.  He was unable to leave for five weeks.  On September 20 he came to the house of his parents in Murphysboro, but had a relapse and died on the afternoon of the 27th.
 
CORONER McMANUS CALLED TO SANDUSKY

Coroner McManus received a message this morning from J. B. McCrite, of Sandusky, asking him to come at once to hold an inquest.  No details were given.

Dr. McManus left on the M. & O. at noon and will return this evening.
 
DIED AT INFIRMARY
Mrs. J. W. Staten Passes Away After Illness of Several Days

Mrs. J. W. Staten, of No. 2904 Walnut Street, died yesterday morning at 2:20 o’clock after an illness of ten days.

The deceased was operated upon several days ago, but the operation was not successful.

The deceased is survived by a husband and six children.

The funeral will be held tomorrow at the home.
 
FUNERAL NOTICE

Van Brocklin—The funeral of the late Mrs. Caroline Van Brocklin will be held at the residence, No. 3203 Commercial Avenue, for St. Joseph’s Church at 1 p.m. Sunday.  Train will leave foot of Eighteen Street at 2:45 p.m.  Interment will take place at Villa Ridge cemetery. Friends of family invited to attend.
 
 
Monday, 1 Oct 1906:
Veteran “Eagle Eye” Dead—Hugh Bailey, of Centralia, the oldest locomotive engineer in Illinois, for 45 years in the service of the Illinois Central, is dead.  He was 80 years of age.
 
MRS. J. M. SHERROD DIED SUNDAY.
Passed Away at Her Home After a Two Weeks’ Illness of Blood Poison

Mrs. J. M. Sherrod, of No. 310 Twentieth Street, died Sunday morning of blood poison after an illness of two weeks.  She is survived by a husband and daughter, Mrs. Louis Woolriedge, and a baby two weeks old, besides a sister who resides at Adams, Tenn.  The remains were sent to Adams, where the funeral will take place.
 
DEATH CLAIMS ISAAC FARNBAKER.
Another Old Citizen of Cairo Passes Away After Prolonged Illness
DECEASED WAS 86 YEARS OLD
Died Sunday Morning at His Home on Seventh Street—Funeral Held This Afternoon

Death claimed another old citizen of Cairo Sunday, when Isaac Farnbaker died after a prolonged illness due to old age, at his home No. 422 Seventh Street.  The deceased was 8_ years of age.  Since 1885 Mr. Farnbaker had lived a retired and quiet life.

On last Monday, Mr. Farnbaker contracted a severe cold, which threatened to develop into pneumonia, but he seemed to have recovered from this disease.  However, he grew little better and gradually grew weaker until death claimed him as its own.  Death came peacefully and without apparent pain.

The wife of the deceased passed away in August 1901, and three sons and two granddaughters survive them.

Solomon and Maurice reside here, but Joseph has been in Memphis for some time, being in the detective service there.  He was telegraphed to yesterday, but a reply from the chief of police of that city stated that he had gone to Charleston, S.C., and would not return till Monday.

The following concerning the deceased appeared in the History of Alexander County published several years ago:

“Isaac Farnbaker was born in Bavaria, Germany, son of Solomon Farnbaker and Zelma Teldhahn. He grew to manhood and received an education in Germany, learning the trade of weaver when young.  In 1839, being then 20 years old, he came to the United States and for four years made his home in the city of New York, though engaged during the time to travel two years in Maine and two years in the south.
Mr. Farnbaker took out naturalization papers in 1844 while a citizen of Boston, Mass.

“He then made a permanent settlement or residence in Mississippi in 1856, at which time he came to Cairo and cast in his lot with the pioneers of that city, which at that time contained but few of the present buildings.  The town of Cairo was in need of just such enterprise as Mr. Farnbaker possessed, the impress of which has been realized and felt for year.  He embarked in the clothing trade in 1856 and has been actively engaged in that line since a portion of the time, having two stores in Cairo and one in Paducah, Ky., besides from 1864 to 1872, he was conducting a wholesale establishment in the city of New York.  In 1862 he paid $10,000 in currency for the lot on the corner of levee and Sixth Street, now occupied by the Glad Hand Saloon.  He was married in 1848 at Natchez, Miss., to Mrs. Eliza A. Flippen.  She was born November 22, 1826.  Their family consists of three sons, viz:  Solomon, Joseph and Maurice.”

The funeral was held this afternoon at the residence on Fourth Street.  Rabbi B. Sadler conducted the services.  The remains were taken to Villa Ridge cemetery for interment.

The pallbearers were the following:

Active—Thomas Gazzolo, Gus Haas, Lee May, W. A. Steagala, Gus Botto, Al Shaehle, E. Kolb, and Frank, E. Davis

Honorary—P. G. Schuh, F. S. Haas, John Fry, M. Hyman, Frank Gazzolo, F. Teichman, W. M. Kluge, Henry Hasenjaeger, and C. C. Terrell.
 
SUDDEN DEATH OF CLEMENS FALLTER
Wagon Maker Dies of Cramps after Illness of Several Hours.

Clemens Fallter, a wagon maker, in the employ of William Oehler, who came to this city several weeks ago from Cobden, Ill., died Saturday at his home on Third Street after an illness of only a few hours.  Fallter had been in good health until about 2 o’clock Saturday, when he was stricken with cramps.  He was removed to his home where he died several hours later.

The deceased is survived by a wife and five children, who were left in sore straits by his sudden death.

The remains were buried yesterday at Beech Grove Cemetery.
 
KILLED AT EAST ST. LOUIS

Joseph Crane, Former Cairoite, Met Death in L. & N. Yards While Performing His Duties as Switchman

Joseph Crane, a former Cairoite, was killed in the Louisville & Nashville railroad yards at East St. Louis, Ill., Saturday afternoon.  The deceased was employed as a switchman and lost his life while pursuing his duties.  He was a son-in-law of Jacob Fischer, of No. 2204 Holbrook Avenue, this city, and a brother-in-law of John Ehlman, who is employed at Fry & Rossman’s clothing store.  Mrs. Craine died last spring.

The remains were brought to Cairo by relatives who went up Saturday night.

The funeral will be held tomorrow from the residence of Jacob Fischer, No. 2204 Holbrook Avenue. 

The remains will be interred at Villa Ridge cemetery beside the remains of his wife.
 
INQUEST HELD OVER DISWOOD MAN
Who Died Friday Night—Death Resulted from Peculiar Accident

Dr. James McManus, coroner of Alexander County, has returned from Diswood, where he was called Saturday, as stated in The Citizen at the time, where he held an inquest over the remains of Frank Sitton, who died Friday evening.

The exact cause of death is a mystery, but it is thought that death resulted from an accident, which happened Tuesday.

Coroner McManus told the following story to The Citizen:  On last Tuesday the deceased and his brother went out into the woods with their log wagon to load logs.  The two spent the day there and about 5 o’clock, when it was time to stop work for the day, the deceased’s brother, who was at work about a quarter of a mile from the deceased, went to join him.  When he reached the spot where the deceased had been working, he was greatly surprised to find his brother lying on the ground in an unconscious state.  The team had broken away from the log wagon and was grazing some distance away.  The injured man was taken to his home, where he lived until Friday evening, when he died.  It was feared by relatives that he had met with foul play and they requested an inquest be held.  After a thorough examination of the body, the grounds where the body was found and a number of witnesses, the coroner’s jury decided that the deceased had come to an accidental death.  It is presumed that Mr. Sitton was hit on the head by a pole used in tightening the chains around logs and that in the loading process while he was drawing the chains tighter around a log, that the pole had slipped, striking him on the head, causing concussion of the brain.  The pole was about seven feet long and one and one half inches thick.

(This may be the same person as Franklin Sitton, who married Maggie Branch on 17 Feb 1895, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Hulen Cemetery reads:  Frank M. Sitton Died Sept. 28, 1906, Aged 34 Yrs., 10 Mos.  A precious one from us is gone.  A voice we loved is stilled.  A place is vacant in our home, which never can be filled.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Mrs. Julia Erickson, who was called here by the death of her father, the late P. J. Thistlewood, returned yesterday to her home in Park Ridge, Ill.
 
 
Tuesday, 2 Oct 1906:
REMARKABLE RECORD OF VETERAN ENGINEER
In Forty-Five Years on the Road He Never Met with an Accident

Mention was made in The Citizen of the death of Hugh Bailey, the veteran Illinois Central engineer.  Concerning him the Centralia Sentinel says:

Hugh Bailey was one of the first citizens of this city, coming here with the Illinois Central fifty-four years ago, when the road was being built into this part of the state and when Centralia was a wilderness of prairie grass and wild deer.  He was one of the young engineers who came from the east with David Oxley, the old-time master mechanic here.  Mr. Bailey has a record of forty-five years active service as a locomotive engineer for the Illinois Central, running in and out of Centralia.  He has a record of never having had a collision and in all of his service he never had an accident sufficient to cause him to leave the cab but once and then nothing happened.  He ran one engine on the Centralia and Champaign run for twenty-five years.  He is known on every division of the Illinois Central system and there are many engineers in the different parts of the county who remember Hugh Bailey when they were firemen and had occasion to work with him and they remember him as a good and kind man who was willing to show them when they needed the judgment of an older head.

The number of railroad people who came here in the 50s is now narrowed down till they are very scarce.  For the past ten years Mr. Bailey has not been in active service, being afflicted with rheumatism.
 
 
Wednesday, 3 Oct 1906:
DEATH OF JUDGE ROBERT BELL

Judge Robert A. Bell, of Mt. Carmel, passed away Sunday, after a brief illness of heart trouble.  The deceased was 78 years of age.
 
 
Thursday, 4 Oct 1906:
Sandusky Camp of the M. W. of A. had their first loss Friday the 7th at 5 o’clock p.m. in the death of Frank Sitton.  Funeral Sunday by the Order of M. W. of A. and friends.  The coroner held an inquest Saturday over the body of Frank Sitton finding that deceased came to his death by accident.
 
A freight train killed a colored woman at Sandusky Tuesday while she was driving a cow across the track.

(The 5 Oct 1906, issue identifies her as Sarah Davis.—Darrel Dexter)
 
Charley McDaniel was buried at Delta Sunday.  He died at Uncle Perry Wilson’s at Delta.
 
Mrs. Mattie Ward died Tuesday at the County Home.  Superintendent Childers says he has a number of sick patients now.  (Cache)
 
 
Friday, 5 Oct 1906:
JUDGE CARTER’S SON DEAD
Harry Carter Victim of Consumption in New Mexico

Harry Carter, aged 32 years, 10 months and 2 days, son of H. G. Carter, of Mound City, died at Fort Bayard, New Mexico, September 29, 1906, of tuberculosis, and at his own request was buried in the military cemetery at Fort Bayard, with military honors.  Harry Carter was born and brought up in Mound City and was assistant postmaster of this city under his father from 1893 to latter part of 1896.  When the Spanish American War broke out, he enlisted and served three years in the Philippines, where he contracted the disease that caused his death.  He was a young man of ability and excellent character, and his many friends all over this country will regret to learn of his death.—Mound City Enterprise
 
OLD RESIDENT OF COUNTY IS DEAD.
Samuel Johnson, Aged About 60 Years, Dropped Dead Yesterday.
WAS WALKING DOWN RAILROAD TRACK
On His Way to Hodges Park to Catch Train for Cairo—Coroner Held Inquest.

Samuel Johnson, an old resident of Alexander County, dropped dead yesterday morning while walking down the railroad track on his way to Hodges Park, where he intended to catch the train for Cairo.

Coroner McManus was called to Hodges Park, where he held an inquest over the remains.  The jury found that the deceased came to his death by natural causes.

The deceased was between 55 and 60 years of age and is survived by his wife.  He has been a resident of Alexander County for many years.  He formerly lived near Dog Tooth Bend and moved to his present home about a quarter of a mile from Scott’s crossing just recently.

He was walking down the track of the Mobile & Ohio Railroad between Scott’s Crossing and Hodges Park when he dropped dead.

Annanias Mason, a section hand, discovered the lifeless body shortly after and after examining it, identified the remains as those of Samuel Johnson, with whom he had been talking just a short time before.

Fortunately no trains had passed while the body lay on the track, so that it was still uninjured.

The deceased was a farmer and well known throughout the county.

(Samuel Johnson married Mary Elizabeth Gilbert on 2 Apr 1879, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Johnson Cemetery reads:  Samuel Johnson Died Oct. 4, 1906 Aged 54 Years.  Emily daughter of Mary E. & S. Johnson, Born Sept. 9, 1895 Died Nov. 11, 1912.—Darrel Dexter)
 
SACRIFICED HER LIFE TO SAVE HER COW
Old Negro Woman of Sandusky Killed by M. & O. Freight Train Tuesday
PUSHED COW OFF TRACK AND SAVED ITS LFIE
But Was Killed Herself Before She Could Get Off Track—Was 50 Years Old

Struggling desperately with her cow, in an attempt to push it off the track in front of a fast approaching freight train, and save its life, Sarah Davis, an old colored woman residing at Sandusky, sacrificed her life last Monday.  She succeeded in shoving the cow off the track just in time to save the animal’s life, but in doing so, she was struck by the train and killed.  The hoof of one of the cow’s hind feet was just grazed by the cow catcher as it dashed by the spot.

The old woman lived in a house that faces on the principal street of the town.  She had tied her cow that morning to a post on the west side of the railroad track, but the rope was long enough so that the bossy could cross the track to the east side and graze there.

The time soon arrived for a fast through freight on the Mobile & Ohio to pass through Sandusky and it went through the little town at a high rate of speed.  The old woman heard the whistle of the approaching train and looking out of the window, saw that her cow was on the east side of the track.

With a scream she rushed out of the house and to the spot where the cow was tied.

She grabbed up the rope and began to pull.  Every second the train grew nearer.

Would she succeed in getting the animal across in time?  This was her only thought.  She tugged away, but the old cow continued its grazing and paid her little attention.

Some neighbors who were taking in the scene shouted to her to get off the track, but her mind was upon her cow and not upon herself.  She paid them no heed.

The old woman pushed and she shoved and finally managed to get the cow nearly across the track to the west side.  With a final desperate lunge, she shoved the cow off the track just in time to save its life, but she was unable to clear the track herself and she was truck by the engine, which sent her into eternity.
When the engineer saw the woman on the track, he applied the air, but the train was running at such a high rate of speed, it could not be stopped in time.  However, the train was stopped as soon as possible, but the woman had been killed.

An examination of the cow’s foot showed that it had only been slightly scratched.

Coroner McManus went to Sandusky to hold the inquest.  The jury held no one to blame for the accident.
 
CAPT. W. G. SLOAN, OF HARRISBURG, ILL., DEAD

Harrisburg, Ill., Oct. 5.—Capt. W. G. Sloan, one of the wealthiest public men in Saline County, died suddenly late yesterday afternoon of neuralgia of the heart, aged 68.  Capt. Sloan was one of the earliest members of the Illinois legislature from this district, afterwards elected sheriff of Saline County and later was mayor of this city for a number of years.  He was captain of a company of Union soldiers in the Civil War.  Two of his sons, Will and John Sloan, reside in St. Louis and are member of the firm of Rosenthal - Sloan Millinery Company, of that city.
 
 
Saturday, 6 Oct 1906:
Death of Augustus Pranks—Mrs. James Kynaston, of upper Sycamore Street, received word yesterday that her uncle, Augustus Pranks, had died at Detroit, Mich., where he had been visiting relatives.  The deceased formerly resided on the Mound City Road near the Half Way House.
 
BRAKEMAN FATALLY INJURED AT MOUNDS
O. J. Zweig Run Over by Train Last Night—Died in Infirmary

O. J. Zweig, a brakeman on the Illinois Central, was fatally injured at Mounds about midnight last night and died from his injuries at St. Mary’s Infirmary.

Zweig was uncoupling some cars when his foot caught in a frog.  The train backed down on him and before he could release himself, he was run over and his right arm and leg cut off and right side crushed.  He was brought down to St. Mary’s Infirmary where he died.

He was a single man, 21 years of age, and lived at Centralia.  The remains were taken to Centralia on Nov. 5 this afternoon.
 
Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Crain, Mrs. W. H. Kochesperger and son William, all of East St. Louis, and Mrs. Charles Hillman and Mrs. George Hillman, of Anna, who were here to attend the funeral of the late Joseph Crain, have returned home.  While here they were guests of Mrs. F. F. Fischer.
 
Mrs. Oscar Herbert, of St. Louis, who came down to attend the funeral of her father, the late Louis Herbert, has returned home.
 


Monday, 8 Oct 1906:

DEATH OF GEORGE SANDER
Passed Away Last Night at Hospital for Insane at Anna, Ill.

George H. Sander, who has been a patient at the Southern Illinois Hospital for the Insane at Anna, Ill., for about two years, died last night about 10 o’clock.

The deceased is a son of Herman Sander, who conducts the grocery store at Seventh and Commercial, where he was employed prior to his mental derangement.

He is survived by his wife and two children, a boy of seven years and a girl of four.

The funeral will be held tomorrow and interment will take place at Villa Ridge cemetery.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—George W. Sander, at Southern Illinois Hospital for the Insane at Anna, Ill., Sunday evening at 6:35 o’clock.  Funeral train will leave foot of Eighth Street for Villa Ridge at 8:45 o’clock.  Friends of the family are invited to attend.

MRS. CLEMENTINE GOATY DIED THIS MORNING
Passed Away at Home of Daughter, Mrs. Frank Fry

Mrs. Clementine Goaty died this morning about 6:30 o’clock at the home of her daughter Mrs. Frank Fry, No. 2211 Walnut Street, where she has been ill for the past three months.  The deceased was 63 years of age.

Mrs. Goaty was born in Germany and came to this country, with her parents when two years of age, and came to Cairo when a young lady and has resided here ever since.

She is survived by five children, Frank, Joseph, Michael and Rose Goaty and Mrs. Frank Fry.  Her husband died several years ago.

The funeral will be held Wednesday morning at St. Joseph’s Church.  The remains will be interred in Villa Ridge cemetery.

(She has a marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge.  Frank W. Fry married Mary A. Goatey on 6 Jul 1891, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

CARD OF THANKS

We desire to thank all those who lent their aid and sympathy during the illness and death of our beloved wife and mother
J. B. Sherrod
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Wooldriege

Mr. and Mrs. Casper Sander left yesterday for St. Louis.  On reaching there, Mr. Sander received the sad news of the death of his brother, George Sander, who died at Anna last night.  Mr. Sander will return home at once.

Miss Rose Goatee arrived Saturday from Ashville, N.C., on account of the illness and death of her mother.


Tuesday, 9 Oct 1906:
Funeral of Late George Sander—The funeral of the late George Sander, who died Sunday at the Southern Illinois Hospital for the Insane at Anna, Ill., was held this morning at 8 o’clock from St. Patrick’s Church.  Father James Downey had charge of the services.  The remains were taken to Villa Ridge cemetery for interment.  The pallbearers were Charles Desmoni, Thomas Gazzola, George Latner, John Lattner, Joseph Raeth, and Arthur Magner.  The funeral was largely attended.

Otto Zweig’s Funeral

Funeral services over the remains of Otto Zweig, the young man who died in a hospital at Cairo at an early hour Saturday morning, a short time after sustaining fatal injuries in an accident on the Illinois Central, were held at the home of his mother, Mrs. Bertha Zweig, at 2 o’clock Sunday afternoon.  Rev. Charles H. Miller, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, conducted the services.  The Presbyterian Church choir rendered a number of beautiful selections.  The funeral was one of the largest attended ever known in the city, which, with the large number of beautiful floral tributes, bore testimony to the high esteem in which the young man was held.—Centralia Democrat

(Charles Zweig married Bertha Schwazkapf on 8 Jul 1880, in Marion Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Wednesday, 10 Oct 1908:
DAUGHTER OF JUDGE O’BRYAN DEAD

Miss Irene O’Bryan, daughter of Judge O’Bryan, of Charleston, Mo., died at a St. Louis hospital on October 1st, where she had been a patient for several months.  She had been a teacher in the schools at New Madrid and Poplar Bluff up to the time her health failed.—Clinton Gazette


Thursday, 11 Oct 1906:
OLD RESIDENT OF MOUND CITY DEAD
Alex Montgomery Died This Morning Very Suddenly of Heart Disease.
LIVED THERE NEARLY HALF CENTURY
And All of the Time Was Engaged in the Undertaking Business—Leaves Widow and Three Children

Alex Montgomery, one of the oldest resident of Mound City, died very suddenly at about 8 o’clock this morning of heart disease.

The deceased was 59 years of age and had been in the undertaking business at Mound City for 45 years.  He leaves a widow and three grown children, William Montgomery, of Mound City, Vivian Montgomery, of St. Louis, and Mrs. Peter Nigren, of Hannibal, Mo.  Also two sisters, Mrs. Bourbon, of Dayton, Ohio, Mrs. Smith, of St. Louis, and a brother, John Montgomery, of Memphis.

Funeral arrangements had not been completed at noon today.

Sad News About Brother—Mrs. George Winter, of No. 307 Twentieth Street, received the sad news of the death of her brother, George Brosius, who committed suicide by shooting himself.  The awful tragedy occurred on September 30th, at Rifle, Colo., a small town near Montrose.  Mr. Winter, brother-in-law of the deceased, is a tinsmith employed by J. W. Morris, of No. 1113 Commercial Avenue.

TWO YOUNG MEN KILLED AT ANNA
Were Walking on Track When Struck by Train

Anna, Ill., Oct. 11.—Isaac Rendleman, aged 22, and Harry Trammel, 18, were instantly killed here yesterday while on their way to work.  They were walking on the northbound track of the Illinois Central Railroad and stopped on a pass track out of the way of an incoming passenger train, but immediately in front of a freight train backing on the sidetrack.  Both young men were horribly mangled.  A coroner’s inquest exonerated the railroad employees from all blame.  Young Rendleman leaves a wife and Trammel was a son of Wesley Trammel, a teamster.  The father of young Trammel was picked up for dead not 200 yards from where his son met death in a railroad accident twenty-five years ago, being struck by a passenger train while hauling ice.

Winnie, the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Marsh Corzine, died Tuesday night.  (Dongola)


Friday, 12 Oct 1906:
MURDER ON HOUSEBOAT
Will Thomas, Fisherman, Shot and Killed This Afternoon
JOHN LEWIS WAS THE ASSAILANT.

Crime Supposed to Be the Result of an Old Grudge Between Them

Will Thomas, a fisherman residing in a houseboat on the Ohio above the Chicago Mill, was shot and killed this afternoon about 2 o’clock by John Lewis, another fisherman.

The cause of the tragedy could not be learned, but it is supposed that the quarrel, which led up to her murder, was the result of an old grudge.

It is said that this morning Lewis went down to Thomas’ houseboat and slapped Thomas’ wife and child.

Later Thomas went downtown and was walking around town with Edward Roof, when they met Lewis.

Lewis spoke to them and said:  “There’s going to be trouble this afternoon and someone is going to be killed.”

This afternoon about 2 o’clock when Thomas and Roof were returning to the former’s houseboat, Lewis who was concealed in a shack nearby made his appearance.

Thomas, seeing his antagonist, said, “If you are going to kill me, do so now,” whereupon Lewis opened fire.  Thomas fired at Lewis and then ran around the shack and into Lewis’ houseboat.  As he entered the door, Lewis fired again, instantly killing Thomas.

After the shooting, Lewis gave himself up and is locked up in the county jail.

Thomas leaves a wife and child.

(The 13 Oct 1906, issue identified Edward Roof as Edward Ross.—Darrel Dexter)

A. G. McKNIGHT DEAD
Father of W. A. McKnight, of Cairo, Passed Away Yesterday at Home in Milton, Tenn.

A. G. McKnight, father of W. A. McKnight, of the McKnight-Keaton wholesale grocery firm, died yesterday morning at 11 o’clock at his home at Milton, Tenn.

The deceased was 73 years old and is survived by two children, a married daughter residing in Murphysboro, Ill., and a son, W. A. McKnight, of this city.

Burial at Liberty Cemetery—The little daughter of George Skyles, employed by the Cotton Belt at Bird’s Point, who died yesterday, was buried in the Liberty Cemetery northeast of Villa Ridge today.  W. A. Spence and Mrs. Reynolds went up to attend the funeral.  Mr. Skyles formerly lived in Cairo.

TWO KILLED IN MINE AT DuQUOIN, ILLINOIS

DuQuoin, Ill., Oct. 12—A fatal mine accident occurred at the Halliday slope mine, northeast of this city, yesterday, in which John Hummel and Gus Lee were killed.  The men were drawing out pillars at the time and were caught unawares under several tons of falling slate.  Hummel was one of the operators of the mine.

PROMINENT CITIZEN OF CHARLESTON DEAD
J. T. Clarkson Passed Away Wednesday of Heart Trouble

J. T. Clarkson, one of the best known and wealthiest citizens of Mississippi County, Missouri, died suddenly Wednesday at 2:30 p.m. of heart trouble at his home in Charleston, Mo.  The deceased was 55 years old and is the father of Mrs. George Dewey, of Tenth Street this city.

The deceased was born in Davis County, Virginia, in 1851 and later came to Charleston where he married.  He is survived by his wife and four children.

The deceased was a member of the order of Odd Fellows.  He served as county clerk of Mississippi County for some fifteen years, after which he engaged in the grocery business.  For the past four years he has led a retired life, owing to his poor health.

The funeral was held yesterday afternoon at Charleston.


Saturday, 13 Oct 1906:
HELD TO THE MERCY OF GRAND JURY
Was John Lewis, Who Is Charged with the Murder of Will Thomas
LEWIS CLAIMS SELF DEFENSE.

Coroner’s Inquest Held This Morning and Large Number of Witnesses Testified in Case

The coroner’s inquest in the Thomas murder case was held at 10 o’clock this morning in the city council chamber.

A large number of witnesses were present to give testimony.  There were two sides to the story, one throwing most of the blame upon Lewis, and the other throwing the blame on Thomas, who was killed.
The substance of the testimony was as follows:

Mrs. Thomas, wife of the murdered man, says that Lewis has tormented her for some time.  Mrs. Thomas testified that he had accused her of keeping a bad house, which she denied.  Mrs. Thomas stated that on yesterday morning, Lewis struck her with a club (the club was a long stick between five and six feet in length and about an inch and a half or two inches in diameter) and knocked her down.  She said that after she was down, that Lewis kicked her on the head and then slapped her little girl, a child about four or five years of age.  She said Lewis called her all sorts of foul names.

Other witnesses testified that Thomas had met Lewis and Edward Ross downtown in the morning and that they had some words, which indicated that there would be further trouble in the afternoon.

After Lewis had assaulted her, Mrs. Thomas came downtown and swore out a warrant for Lewis, charging him with assault and battery.  This warrant was placed in the hands of Deputy Sheriff J. B. Collins, who reached the place just a short time after the murder.  If Mr. Collins had been fifteen or twenty minutes sooner, Lewis would have been arrested and the murder possible would not have occurred, although Mr. Collins is in no way to blame for not reaching the place sooner.

Shortly after dinner Thomas and Ross returned home and it is said were both under the influence of liquor.  Witnesses testified that Thomas began the quarreling and fired the first shots at Lewis and even went into Lewis’ house, whereupon Lewis picked up a double barrel shot gun and shot down his antagonist, after which he went to the court house and gave himself up to the sheriff.

From the evidence, it appeared that Lewis had acted in self-defense when he shot Thomas, although he received no sympathy for his treatment to Mrs. Thomas and the little girl.

Lewis did not make any statement at the inquest.

The coroner’s jury held Lewis on a charge of murder to await the action of the grand jury at the next term of circuit court, which convenes Monday.

The jury was composed of R. A. Hatcher, Sam Abell, Hal Sullivan, Pete Fraser, Guy Morse and George Weldon.

J. T. Clarkson, who died at his home in Charleston, Mo., Wednesday, was an uncle of Mrs. George Dewey of this city and not her father as stated.


Monday, 15 Oct 1906:
FINE MONUMENT WILL BE ERECTED
Over the Grave of the Late Albert Susanka by His Family

The family of the late A. Susanka has one of the most beautiful lots at the Villa Ridge cemetery.  The family, most of whom are residents of this city, have just had completed by the well-known monument firm of J. E. Williamson & Company of Paducah, a very fine monument.  The coping is of Georgia marble as is also the monument.  Surmounting the pedestal of the monument is a statue of the Blessed Mother.  The monument is nine feet in height.  One the two rear corners, are two angels in adoration and on the two front corners are two angels kneeling.  The statues and also the headstones are all made of the purest carrara marble.  The marble steps leading to the lot have heavy buttresses which are surmounted at the top by marble vases, from the steps to the center of the lot and also running right and left is a granatoid walk.

FELL TO HIS DEATH WHILE DRUNK
Aged White Man Found Dead in Vacant Lot on Ohio Street Sunday Morning

At daybreak Sunday, the body of an unknown white man was found in the vacant lot between Guy’s Blue Front restaurant and Ford’s saloon.  It first appeared that it was another “murder mystery,” several of which have occurred in this locality of late.

The remains were taken to Mrs. Feith’s undertaking establishment where Deputy Coroner John Coleman summoned a jury and held the inquest.

The jury found that the stranger came to his death by an accident and it is the belief that while under the influence of liquor the man fell from the high sidewalk and was killed.

The deceased was about 60 years of age.  The man’s clothing was that of the ordinary laborer.  In one of the pockets a letter was found addressed to “J. R. Dowdall, Clinton, Ky.” and some testimony was given to show that the man had been here a number of times and was known as “Uncle Joe.”  He worked several days last week for J. W. Morris, the sheet iron worker on Commercial Avenue and a report brought by a citizen of Clinton Ky., was that he knew the man only as “Uncle Joe,” who had worked for a plumbing firm at Clinton for some time past.  Part of the man’s clothing was saturated with whisky and an empty bottle from which the cork had been drawn was found in one of his pockets.

DEATH OF MRS. ELLEN DUGGAN
Mother of Dr. D. F. and Mail Carrier P. B. Duggan, Died this Afternoon.

Mrs. Ellen Duggan, mother of Dr. D. F. Duggan and Mail Carrier P. B. Duggan, at St. Mary’s Infirmary, where she has been confined by illness for several weeks.  The deceased was 78 years of age and had been ill for some time.  Her death was due to strangulated hernia.

Mrs. Duggan was born in Kilrush, County Clare, Ireland, and came to Cairo in the early 60s, having resided here ever since.  Her husband died during the yellow fever period in 1878.

The deceased is survived by four sons, John D. Duggan, of Seattle, Wash., P. B. Duggan, and Dr. D. F. Duggan, of Cairo, and J. M. Duggan, of Los Angeles, Cal.  She also has a brother residing in St. Louis and sister in Butte, Mont.

The funeral arrangements have not been completed.

(Her marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Michael Duggan Died Oct. 9, 1878.  Father.  Ellen Duggan Died Oct. 15, 1906.  Mother.—Darrel Dexter)

The funeral of Mr. Alex Montgomery which was held Sunday afternoon at 1 o’clock at his home was largely attended.  There were many beautiful floral offerings.  Rev. I. A. Humberd officiated.

LEAVES ESTATE TO ORPHANS

Murphysboro, Ill., Oct. 15—Mrs. Bettie Seeley, who committed suicide Friday in Carbondale, left a will giving her estate valued at $5,000 to the Odd Fellows Orphan Home at Lincoln, Ill.  Her husband committed suicide seven years ago.  They had no children.

TWELVE-YEAR-OLD HELD ON CHARGE OF MURDER

Marion, Ill., Oct. 15—Cline Barham, 12 years old, was brought in by officers charged with taking the life of Harry Davis, 8 years old, his cousin.

The boys were in an apple orchard near Spilltown, two miles north of this city, with Clarence Jones, a few years their senior.  The evidence shows that a 22-caliber target rifle was at hand and that Davis was shot, the ball entering the neck, resulting in death.  The defendant’s claims that all the boys had hold of the gun and that the shot was accidental.  The coroner has the matter under investigation.


Tuesday, 16 Oct 1906:
FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—Mrs. Ellen Duggan, Monday, October 15th, 1906, aged 78 years.  Funeral will leave residence No. 2008 Poplar Street, at 8 a.m. for St. Patrick’s Church.  Train will leave foot of Eighth Street at 9:45 for Villa Ridge cemetery.  Friends of the family invited to attend.


Wednesday, 17 Oct 1906:
Funeral of Mrs. Duggan—The funeral of the late Mrs. Ellen Duggan, mother of Dr. D. F. and Mail Carrier P. B. Duggan, was held this morning at 8 o’clock at St. Patrick’s Church.  The funeral was largely attended.  The remains were taken to Villa Ridge cemetery, where they were buried.  The pallbearers were Patrick Mahoney, Daniel Kelly, Sr., Martin O’Donohue, John Sullivan, Louis Zanone, and Dave Barry.

MRS. GEORGE FEUCHTER DIED THIS MORNING
Passed Away of Tuberculosis at Home of Father on Eighth Street

Mrs. George Feuchter died at 9:50 o’clock this morning at the home of her father, Mrs. Henry Block, of No. 312 Eighth Street.  The deceased was 28 years of age and was formerly Miss Anna Block.

Mrs. Feuchter’s health has been very poor for some time.  She recently returned from a sojourn in Denver, Colo., but received little benefit from her stay there, the altitude being too high.  She had spent ten months in Florida and six in California, but received no permanent benefit to her health.

The deceased is survived by her husband, George Feuchter, of the Feuchter & Johns Bottling Works of Thirteenth and Washington.  She had no children.  She is also survived by her father, Mr. Henry Block, four sisters, Mrs. Carl Mansberger, of Washington (state), Mrs. Joseph Lamber, of Cincinnati, and Misses Louisa and Alma Block, and one brother, Louis Block.

The deceased had been married a little over a year.

The funeral will be held Friday afternoon from the Immanuel Lutheran Church on Douglas Street.  The remains will be buried at Villa Ridge cemetery.


Thursday, 18 Oct 1906:
SISTER ADELE CALLED BY GRIM REAPER
Noble Life Ended Yesterday When Sister Adele Passed Away
WAS SISTER SUPERIOR OF INFIMRARY HERE
Joined Sisterhood in 1855—Nursed Sick and Wounded During Civil War

A noble life came to an end yesterday, when Sister Adele, formerly Sister Superior in charge of St. Army’s infirmary of this city, died at the Mother House at Notre Dame, Ind.

The above news will be received with the deepest regret, for Sister Adele was greatly beloved by all who were fortunate enough to know her.

Sister Adele had been confined at the Mother House since last July, leaving Cairo at that time, after recovering from a serious illness. She went to the Mother House to rest.  She was thought to be getting along nicely and the news of her death came as a surprise to her friends here, who were greatly shocked by the sad news.

Sister Adele’s worldly name was Catherine Moran.  She was born in County Mayo, Ireland, 74 years ago, coming to America in 1850 and making her home in Philadelphia.  She joined the Sisters of the Holy Cross in 1855.  She came to Cairo on October 24, 1861, in company with five other sisters, one of whom was Sister Magdalene, who is still in the infirmary here.  The sisters reported to Gen. Grant, who sent them to Paducah, where they took charge of the military hospital.  They remained in Paducah four months when Sister Adele and some of her companions were detailed to take charge of the sick and wounded on the hospital boat Red Raven, plying in the lower Mississippi.  She remained on this boat during the war and was discharged in the summer of 1865, when she returned to the Mother House at Notre Dame.

In 1870 she came to Cairo, remaining in the infirmary here two years, and returned in 1886, on March 1, to take charge of the hospital here, and it was under her management that Cairo’s great hospital grew to its present magnificent proportions and became noted throughout a vast extent of territory contiguous to this city.

To meet and know Sister Adele was to adore her; no person ever came her way but who was impressed with her kindly manner and superior ability.  She was a member of the Order of the Holy Cross for more than fifty years and during more than half that time was identified with hospital work in and about Cairo.

Both Sister Adele and Sister Magdalene were granted pensions by the government several years ago in recognition of their services to the government and the sick and wounded during the war.

The funeral services will occur early tomorrow morning at Notre Dame and the remains will be interred in the private cemetery of the Order of the place.  Among those in attendance will be Rev. J. J. Downey, of Cairo, and Rev. C. J. Eschman, of Prairie du Rocher, Ill.

Died, Sunday, Oct. 14, at his home three miles east of Dongola, Mr. Zack Groner, age about 63 years.  Interment in the Mt. Olive Cemetery Monday, Oct. 15th.  Mr. Groner was president of the Home Mutual Telephone Company at the time of his death.

(His marker in Mt. Olive Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Zachariah Groner Born March 11, 1843 Died Oct. 14, 1906 Aged 63 Yrs., 7 Mos., & 3 Ds.  God gave, He took, He will restore; God doeth all things well.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. Milton Lochman is still in a very critical condition with but little hope of her recovery.  (Dongola)

(Milton D. Lockman married Minerva Dillow on 4 Nov 1877, in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker in St. John’s Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Minerva D. Lockman 1852-1906.—Darrel Dexter)

FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—Mrs. George Feuchter, Wednesday, October 17th, 1906.  Funeral will be held at Immanuel Lutheran Church on Douglas Street Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Train will leave foot of Fourteenth Street at 2:45 p.m. for Villa Ridge cemetery where interment will take place.  Friends of the family are invited to attend.

Mrs. Lillie Robarts, who has been residing in Carbondale since the death of her husband, the late Judge Joseph P. Robarts, has moved to Murphysboro and is residing in the old Robarts place, 226 South Ninth Street.  Mrs. Robarts had intended to locate in California upon leaving Carbondale, but decided to return to Murphysboro.—Murphysboro Independent


Friday, 19 Oct 1906:

UNKNOWN MAN DIED AT INFIRMARY.
Had Severe Chill Tuesday at Crabtree’s Drug Store and Later Became Delirious

A stranger walked into Crabtree’s Drug Store on Commercial Avenue, last Tuesday and complained of having a severe chill. The man nearly hugged the stove and even went so far as to lay his head down on it. It was finally found that he was in a delirious condition and he was sent to St. Mary’s Infirmary. He never regained consciousness and died last night.

His name was not learned, but in his pocket was found a letter addressed to John Vardell, of Holloway, Ky. The chief of police of that town has been notified and some information of the deceased’s identity was expected today, but none was received and the deceased will probably be buried as a pauper. He was about 43 years of age.


Funeral of Mrs. Feuchter—The funeral of the late Mrs. George Feuchter was held this afternoon at the Immanuel Lutheran Church. The funeral was largely attended. The remains were taken to Villa Ridge cemetery for interment.

 


Saturday, 20 Oct 1906:
Infant Died Yesterday—The six-month-old baby of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph C. Canham, of No. 207 Division Street, died yesterday. The funeral was held last night, conducted by Rev. S. P. Mahoney, pastor of the Calvary Baptist Church.  The remains were taken to Alton, Ill., for interment.

 
Tuesday, 23 Oct 1906:
Buried Saturday—Mrs. Altha Allen, wife of Otis Allen, who died last Wednesday, was buried at Lake Milligan graveyard last Saturday afternoon.

 


Wednesday, 24 Oct 1906:
DIED AT ANNA HOSPITAL

County Clerk Jesse E. Miller today received word from Superintendent Athon of the Anna hospital of the death of Mrs. M. Hornberger, of Willard. The relatives were notified and asked to take charge of the remains.


Wealthy Farmer Murdered

Renault, Ill., Oct. 24—Tony Merlenback, aged 43, a wealthy farmer, was stoned to death by an unknown man while driving from this village to his home. Merlenback did not die instantly, living long enough to tell his family that he knew the man who stoned him and would get him so soon as he revised. But he died four hours later, without revealing the name of his murderer.


Funeral of Sumner School Graduate Held Yesterday

The funeral of Miss Ira Stone, who died Monday after a long illness, was very largely attended. It was held at the Baptist church, corner Nineteenth and Walnut streets, and was conducted by Rev. J. R. Bennett. Miss Stone was an alumnus of Sumner High School, having graduated in the class of 1905. Floral designs were given by her class, by the Sunday school, of which she was a faithful member, and by the Baptist Building Coterie, a literary club to which she belonged.

 


Thursday, 25 Oct 1906:
MERCHANT SHOT BY ROBBERS DIES
Abe Kimmel of Vergennes Succumbs to His Wounds

Tuesday the Citizen gave an account of the shooting of Abe Kimmel at Vergennes, Ill., merchant by a gang of bank robbers. The Carbondale Free Press says: Abe Kimmel, the Vergennes merchant shot by one of the robbers who were attempting to blow open the safe and rob the funds of the Bank of Vergennes early Monday morning, died a few minutes after midnight that night. The man was shot in the side, the bullet passing clear through the body. It was thought from the first that the injury would prove fatal.
The dead man was about 38 years old and, until his removal to Vergennes a year or two ago, had lived at Elkville. He leaves a wife to whom he was married a year ago.

Since daylight Monday morning, posses of citizens and officers were out scouring that whole section of the country in an effort to locate the gang of bold bank burglars. So far it seems there is absolutely no definite clue as to the identity or whereabouts of the members of the gang.

One man was taken in charge by the officers at Murphysboro on suspicion of having been one of the robbers, but he was able to fully explain his whereabouts that night and he was not put under arrest.

It was reported that several mounted men were seen near Oraville early that morning, traveling towards the Mississippi River, but nothing has yet developed from that quarter. The Vergennes correspondent to the city press says:

“The fact that the five robbers have disappeared completely in this thickly populated country leads the officers to believe that they are residents of this county.”

 


Friday, 26 Oct 1906:
Died at Mounds—Tony Boren, a well-known bricklayer, died at Mounds Wednesday. The deceased was well known in this city, coming here from Quincy, Ill. He was a widower and about 29 years of age. The surviving members of the family are his mother and a little child, both living at Quincy. The remains were interred at Beech Grove Cemetery by the local Bricklayers’ Union No. 247. Rev. Mr. Morris held the services over the remains.

             (The 7 Nov 1906, issue reports his name as Tony Boring.—Darrel Dexter)

 
Tuesday, 30 Oct 1906:
George Childers left yesterday for Ullin, Ill., in the interest of the New York Life Insurance Company, where he will settle the death claim of the late A. W. Brown.

 


Wednesday, 31 Oct 1906:
The 6-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Gus Braysacker, of Marked Tree, Ark., died yesterday. Mr. Braysacker was foreman of the Chicago Mill here.


COOK ON FOWLER DIED AT HOSPITAL.

Harry Allen, the cook on the Dick Fowler, died at the marine hospital last night. An effort was made today to find where his folks lived, but the officers on the Fowler knew little about him.

 


Thursday, 1 Nov 1906:
WOUNDS FINALLY PROVE FATAL
W. A. Lawrence, the Man Stabbed at Steagala’s Hotel, Dead

W. A. Lawrence, the white man who was stabbed several weeks ago at Steagala’s lodging house by a stranger, died early this morning at St. Mary’s Infirmary.

The deceased is survived by a wife and three children, who are here from Bird’s Point, Mo. The deceased also has a son, H. Lawrence, who resides at Charleston, who was notified of his father’s death.
As stated in The Citizen at the time, Lawrence occupied a room at Steagala’s Hotel. He was given a bed in a room with some other lodgers. During the night, he was awakened by a man standing over him and threatening to kill him. Lawrence struck the man a blow, but the latter pulled out a huge knife and stabbed Lawrence.

The assailant escaped and has not been heard of since that day, when it was reported he was seen in the lower ends of town with a knife, threatening to kill anyone who interfered with him.

An inquest will be held over the remains.

 

Mrs. Nellie Berry, of Third Street, received the sad news of the death of her sister-in-law, Mrs. John Berry, which occurred at Memphis yesterday. The deceased is well known in Cairo, having visited here frequently.

 


Friday, 2 Nov 1906:
OLD RESIDENT OF ANNA DEAD
Horace L. Eastman Passed Away Last Friday.

Horace L. Eastman, one of the oldest and most prominent citizens of southern Illinois, died at his home in Anna last Friday. Had he lived two hours longer he would have reached his 87th birthday. He was a native of Orleans County, New York, and in 1847 was employed in the Mad River and Sandusky Railroad shops in Sandusky, Ohio, and there constructed the first locomotive pilot from his own plans, his invention taking the place of what was in use at that time and called a “cowbunter.”

Mr. Eastman, during the past summer, made a visit to his old home in New York. The Big Four Railroad on which the Mad River and Sandusky road is now a part, in recognition of his invention of the locomotive pilot, furnished him free transportation over its own and other lines.

In early days, Mr. Eastman was a Whig and voted for William Henry Harrison for President in 1840. When the Whig Party when out, he became an ardent Republican and voted for every Republican candidate for president from Lincoln down to Roosevelt.

Mr. Eastman was a gifted poet, his productions in that line being many and very readable. He had prepared an anniversary poem, which he had intended reading Saturday, his birthday, had he lived. His hope was that he might live to reach his 87th anniversary of his birth.

The writer well remembers Horace Eastman. When we reached Anna, as a traveling printer, in October 1860, he was one of the men who extended the hand of fellowship and bade us welcome. The friendship then made has lasted all through the years since. We thought, when he met him, that he was one of God’s nobleman, and we think so still. He was a man noted for his morality for his activity of both body and mind and for his acts of charity. In the death of Mr. Eastman, Union County has lost a citizen of whom the people may be justly proud.—Carbondale Herald

(His marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Horace T. Eastman Born Oct. 27, 1819 Died Oct. 26, 1906.  Hannah L. Eastman his wife Born Feb. 26, 1828 Died Jan. 19, 1897.  Married Jan. 13, 1849.—Darrel Dexter)


Sam Wheeler, of McKnight-Keaton wholesale firm, was called to Fulton Ky., yesterday on account of the death of his uncle.


MURDERER CAPTURED IN CHICAGO
Richard Buckner Run Down at Last—Officers Go After Him

Richard Buckner, wanted here for the murder of Jesse Speed, has been run down and is under arrest at Chicago, and Officers Dennis and Davidge will bring him back to Cairo. The officers went up after him several days ago, Chief Egan having been advised that Buckner was there.

 


Saturday, 3 Nov 1906:
SKETCH OF AN OLD ULLIN RESIDENT
Ullin News Gives Account of Life of A. W. Brown

             The Ullin News gives the following sketch of the late A. W. Brown, who was well known in Cairo:

A. W. Brown, the subject of this sketch, was born in Wabash County, Indiana, Dec. 26, 1848, and departed this life Thursday, October 28, 1906, aged 57 years.

He was a son of Ephraim and Elizabeth (Burdge) Brown, both natives of Pennsylvania. He was the fifth of twelve children and received but a common school education in the schools of this county.

At the age of fifteen, he started out for himself and went first to Buchanan, Michigan, where he worked on a railroad. After a year’s visit to his hometown, he came to Ullin. Here he first acted as sawyer in Morris, Reed & Company’s mill, remained with them three years, then worked in James Bell’s mill as setter, next he opened a saloon, which he ran about three years, and then embarked in the mercantile business. This he carried on for some time, when he became engaged in buying and selling timber at which occupation he had been engaged more or less up until his death. Mr. Brown was married October 14, 1871, to Alice James, a daughter of Samuel and Eliza (Garner) James. She is the mother of six children, three of whom are living, Berth, Ethel and Harry.

Mr. Brown also leaves a wife, mother, two sisters and a brother, besides a host of friends, to mourn his loss. The remains were laid to rest in the Anna Cemetery. The funeral services were conducted by the Masonic fraternity, of which he was a member.


FUNERAL OF LATE H. F. GOODYEAR
Held at Mattoon Last Tuesday—Tribute to His Memory

George F. Coates, who is staying at the Odd Fellows Home at Mattoon, in a letter, gives the following account of the burial of the late H. F. Goodyear.

“Brother H. F. Goodyear has paid the debt we all must sooner or latter pay. It was about 1 a.m. on Monday that he died. He was buried in that part of Doge Cemetery allotted to the Odd Fellows, a very pretty location, at 10 o’clock Tuesday morning. The first part of the service was in the parlors of the Home, the remaining portion at the grave by our superintendent, Brother C. E. Wyman, and Rev. A. L. T. Ewert, of the Methodist Church. Brother Goodyear was much respected by all, a most willing and faithful worker for the comfort and benefit of all, and every one of his fellow members. We all recognize the fact that we have lost a most worthy and devoted Brother.”


MRS. HEAD TAKES $2,500
In Compromise of Damage Suit Against Cheat Hodges.

The damage case of Mrs. M. E. Head against F. C. Hodges was compromised by Hodges paying Mrs. Head $2,500.

The suit was instituted in the McCracken circuit court while Hodges was living in that county and was for $25,000 damages, the plaintiff charging that defendant killed her husband, Pink Head. The case was tried several terms ago and the jury gave a verdict for plaintiff in the sum of $15,000, but Judge Reid set the verdict aside. After that, Hodges was indicted in that county for the murder of Head, and at the last term of circuit court he was acquitted. The compromise of the damage suit is the closing chapter in the sensational case, for it is not likely that the assassin of Head will ever be brought to bar.

 


Monday, 5 Nov 1906:
JURY TO FIX THE BLAME FOR THE WRECK
Train Crew Tells Jury that Whistle Was Blown for the Crossing
WOMAN’S GRAPHIC STORY OF THE FATAL CRASH
Witnesses Say Electric Car Stopped on Top of Embankment—Verdict Is Not Expected Today

The coroner’s inquest to fix the responsibility for the collision of Big Four freight train No. 99 with electric car No. 5 Saturday night at 6:30 on the Sycamore Street, which resulted in the death of Egbert Stewart, a negro and the slight injury of 19 passengers on the car, is being held this afternoon at the city council hall.

Up to 4 o’clock, only about a dozen of the score of witnesses had been examined and a verdict is not expected before tomorrow.

Coroner McManus, who made a thorough investigation of the wreck Saturday night, impaneled the following jury:

Charles Miller

Dan Williamson

Charles Feuchter

Gus Botto

August Bode

Rudy Laruent

The coroner and the jury viewed the remains of Stewart and then visited the scene of the wreck and made a thorough examination.

The members of the train crew all told practically the same story.  The conductor, engineer, fireman, and brakeman said that the whistle had been blown when about 800 feet from the crossing; that the train was running about six miles an hour; that the engineer did all that was possible to stop his train when he saw the car on the track; the conductor even stating that the train was stopped so suddenly that he was thrown to the floor of his caboose.

Joe Herron, motorman on the electric car, testified that he stopped on the upper side of the crossing and looked out, but did not see any train approaching and that he did not hear the whistle until the moment the train was upon the car.

Mrs. Charles Wilson, of Future City, made a splendid witness.  She told a graphic story of the accident and related even the most minute details.  She was seated on the south side of the car facing the approaching train.  She said that the car came to a stop on the top of the embankment and that at almost the same instant the train crashed into it.  She said that she first heard the motorman holler, then saw him shut the door opening into the car proper from the cab and then leap out the window.  “The next moment,” said Mrs. Wilson, “I saw the engine rushing toward us.  We were so near that I could see the man in the cab working furiously.”

Other witnesses told similar stories, although most of the passengers were so badly frightened that their accounts of the accident, while all practically the same, differ as to some details.

At the time of the accident, the car was coming to Cairo.  Besides the motorman, there were 18 passengers aboard.  That all, except Stewart, escaped death or serious injury is regarded as nothing short of miraculous.  The freight train struck the electric car about two window lengths from the rear cab, hurled and carried it 75 feet down the embankment in a southwesterly direction, turning it completely around and leaving it smashed almost to splinters.  The front part of the car rested on the top of the embankment, while the rear cab lay at the bottom of it.  The wheels of the rear truck were broken to pieces and the track bent in several places.  Motorman Joe Herron was about the first to escape.  He kicked out a cab window and jumped through it.  He says he does not know where he lit, but he got up and went to the rescue of those pinned beneath the wreck.

Stewart is about 50 years of age and is survived by a wife and two children.  He is a resident of Future City and was employed by the Chicago Mill and Lumber Company. Stewart and his family have been here but a short time, having come here from Mississippi.

Charles Stewart, the son of the dead man, who was standing on the rear platform with his father talking and with Vern English (white), escaped with only a few bruises.

The following were injured:
Henry Walker, left leg and face severely cut
Doc Dean, injured in left leg
James Readdick, injured below the knee
Jackson Easly, nose and head skinned
John Mahone, head skinned
Lizzie Mahone, injured on hip
Daisy Walker, body cut and bruised
Edgar Walker, two fingers cut
Mrs. Charles Wilson, bruised about head and body
Mrs. Frankie Alvan, bruised about body
Vern English, injured in back and chin scratched
Jim Cammon, right eye and head cut
Charles Stewart, bruised and slightly cut
Fletcher Haines, left shoulder and right leg injured
Will Allen, head injured

Mrs. Eliza Cammon, body and head bruised

Old Cairoite in Trouble—Ab Grimes, who came into fame through the writings of Mark Twain, and who was one of the early settlers of Cairo, is under arrest in his present home, Bloomfield, Mo., charged with killing a young farmer of that section, who insulted his young wife last week. Grimes lived here with his father during the Civil War. The elder Grimes was a proprietor of the old and then famous Taylor House. One of Twain’s funniest stories tells of the experiences he and Ab Grimes had in running away from home to join the Confederate army. Grimes and his father will be well remembered by the older residents.


Mrs. B. McCander, of 513 Eleventh Street, who has been ill for sometime, was taken suddenly worse today and is not expected to live.


NEGRO IS SLAIN IN A FIGHT OVER MONEY
Luther Davis, Porter in Egan’s Saloon, Shoots John Williams Sunday Morning

Luther Davis, a porter in Egan’s saloon, shot and killed John Williams alias John Kit Sunday morning at 9:30 o’clock in the saloon of Mike Egan, at Thirty-third and Commercial. Davis gave himself up to Officer Wade.

The men quarreled over the loaning of some money. Davis told him he did not want to have any trouble with him and turned around and walked out. Kit followed him into the saloon and, when Davis went behind the bar to do his work, Kit followed and drew a knife. Davis reached over and grabbed a gun off the shelf and shot five times, two taking effect in the forehead and the other in the right hand.

Kit is said to be a desperate character, having killed a man at Mayfield, Ky., about five years ago, while breaking on the south end of the Illinois Central. He was in the employ of Carey Halliday and had worked everyday of the three years he has been here. He has a wife and sister living at Twenty-fourth and Poplar.

The inquest over the body of Williams is being held this afternoon.


OFFICERS ARRESTED THE WRONG NEGRO.
“Sleuths” Dennis and Davidge Go after Buckner, But Bring Back Another.

The flush of pleasure and pride at having captured the man who a few months ago pointed a big revolver at them and made his escape, after he had killed Jesse Speed, another negro, quickly faded from the faces of Officers Dennis and Davidge last night when Sergeant Cowell coolly informed them that the negro they had arrested in Chicago as Richard Buckner, was not Buckner at all.

Last week Chief Egan received a hot tip that Buckner, a genuine bad man with a long record of killings and shootings, to say nothing of countless minor desperations, was camping in Chicago. The police wanted Buckner very bad and the chief detailed Dennis and Davidge to get him. Disguised as “plain clothes men” they journeyed to the windy city and had little trouble in slipping the bracelets over their arms of the man they thought was Buckner. The negro they arrested looked like Buckner and was found around the haunts that were described in the chief’s tip.

The negro under arrest says his name is William Smith and that until he was brought here in shackles last night, had never been in Cairo. He claims to be a stationary engineer and says he has a spotless record. The Cairo police don’t want him and he will be released.

Buckner, several years ago, had a desperate pistol duel with Officer Cowell on Poplar Street, in which both were wounded. Buckner was captured and served a term in the state prison. Upon his release, he returned to Cairo and again recruited among the “gun toters.”

Last winter he killed Speed, a well-known negro, at the corner of Thirteenth and Poplar street, and then, under cover of his ever-ready gun, escaped from a posse of officers. That was the last seen of him, although his capture has been reported in many places since.

Officers Dennis and Davidge are naturally much humiliated over their failure to get the right man.


TERRIBLY SHOT WHILE HUNTING
Harry Brown Loses His Right Hand Sunday Afternoon.

Harry Brown, aged 16, son of U. S. Brown, of Thebes, was terribly shot Sunday afternoon and has lost his right hand as a result. While out hunting, he rested his gun upon a log, when it was discharged and the lad tore away his right hand and terribly wounded the right side of his face. He was quickly taken to a doctor and the right hand amputated.

It is believed that he can recover from his injuries.

 


Tuesday, 6 Nov 1906:

NEGRO WHO SHOT “BAD MAN” IS EXONERATED.
Coroner’s Jury Decides that Luther Davis Killed Williams in Self Defense.

A coroner’s inquest held yesterday to enquire into the death of John Williams alias John Kit, resulted in a verdict completely exonerating Luther Davis, who shot him Sunday morning in Mike Egan’s saloon at Thirty-third Street and Commercial Avenue as a result of a quarrel.

Davis killed Williams in self defense and only after he had warned him that he did not want any more words with him and had been attacked by Williams with a drawn knife.  The quarrel which led to the shooting took place in a building adjoining the saloon.  Davis, who is employed as porter by Egan, left Williams and went into the bar room and behind the bar.  Williams followed him and Davis pulled up a revolver lying on the counter and still retreating fired ___ shots at Williams.  Two of the shots took effect.

Several witnesses were examined and who gave testimony that showed that Davis acted wholly in self-defense.

FIND CASKET IN UPTOWN STREET
Boys Unearth Metallic Coffin Containing Well Preserved Skeleton
WAS COVERED ONLY BY FEW INCHES OF DIRT
Horse Stepped Through Headpiece and Investigation Follows—Thought to Be that of a Soldier

A heavy metallic casket, containing a well-preserved skeleton, was uncovered this afternoon in the center of Thirty-sixth Street, west of Highland Avenue.

The casket was only a few inches below the surface of the street.  Attention was first attracted to it when a horse stepped on the headpiece of the casket and broke it through.  The driver thought is was merely a sink hole in the street and passed on, but some boys investigated and saw a skull at the bottom of the hole.

They called T. A. Davis, 741 Thirty-sixth Street, who pushed aside the loose earth covering the casket.  He notified Coroner McManus, who ordered that it be taken up and removed to Mrs. Feith’s undertaking establishment.  The casket was so heavy that six men were required to lift it out of the street.
The casket was heavily corroded, but aside from the small hole in the headpiece where the horse’s hoof had broken, it was intact.

The skull showed that the skeleton was well preserved.  The fact that the skull was covered with long hair led many who viewed the skeleton to think that it was a woman, but it is generally believed it is that of a soldier, who either died or was killed during the Civil War.

That part of the city was formerly the old fairgrounds and prior to its conversion into a race course, it had been a cemetery and many soldiers were known to have been buried there.

Coroner McManus has ordered that the casket be removed to the county cemetery and interred.

JURY FIXES BLAME JOINTLY FOR WRECK
Verdict Holds Railroad Guilty of Violation of Ordinance and Motorman of Negligence

Both the Cairo Electric and Traction Company and the Big Four Railroad were held responsible by the coroner’s jury for the collision of a freight train and a street car on the Sycamore Street crossing Saturday night, which resulted in the death of Egbert Stuart, colored, and the slight injury to the 19 passengers on the street car.

Contrary to the general belief, the mass of testimony was speedily presented to the jury yesterday afternoon and the verdict was returned after the jurors had been out only 30 minutes.

The majority of the witnesses told practically the same stories of the wreck as did those whose testimony was printed in yesterday’s Citizen.

The verdict follows:

We the undersigned jurors, sworn to enquire into the death of Egbert Stuart, colored, on oath do find that he came to his death from injuries received in a wreck caused by a locomotive on the C. C. C. & St. L. Railway, drawing train No. 99 running into car No. 5 of the Cairo Electric and Traction Company at a point where the respective lines intersect on Sycamore Street in the city of Cairo, County of Alexander, State of Illinois.

The said wreck and the said death occurred at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, November 3, A. D. 1906.
We further find that the said C. C. C. & St. L. railway violated a city ordinance pertaining to speed within the city limits.  Also that the motorman on said street car was negligent.


Wednesday, 7 Nov 1906:
FUNERAL NOTICE

Died, Mrs. Bridget McCander, Tuesday, Nov. 6th, 1906.  Funeral will be held at St. Patrick’s Church Friday morning at 8:30 o’clock.  Train will leave foot of Eighth Street at 9:45 a.m. for Villa Ridge cemetery, where interment will be made.  Friends of the family are invited to attend.

(William McCander married Bridget Foley on 14 Feb 1866, in Alexander Co., Ill.  Her marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Bridget McCander 1842-1906.  Mother—Darrel Dexter)

RAFT IS WRECKED ON ROCKS OF DYKE
Man Said to Have Been Buried Under Pile of Willows
GOVERNMENT BARGES CAUGHT IN UNDERTOW
Workmen Cut Raft and Barges Are Caught After Floating Down River—Accident Causes Great Loss

A huge raft of willows was caught in the undertow in the Mississippi River above the foot of Thirty-sixth Street at 10:30 this morning and was dashed to pieces on the rocks of the dyke near the foot of Fortieth Street.

A man who was standing on the jetty is said to have been killed.  It is reported that when the willows commenced to pile up on the rocks, he started to run and that he was not been seen since.

Attached to the raft were five barges and a work flat. The raft dragged the barges and flat loose from their moorings, but men on the barges managed to cut the ropes and saved them.  They floated down the river three miles, but were picked up late this afternoon by the tug Theseus and returned to their moorings.

The raft and barges are the property of the government, which has been engaged for the past month in cutting willows, preparatory to doing extensive riprap work to hold the channel of the river in that locality.

The willows, it is said, made a pile as high as a two-story house when they were dashed on the rock jetty.  The accident will mean a loss of a considerable amount to the government.

IN MEMORY OF “TONY” BORING

Preamble and resolution adopted by Cairo Union No. 47, B. M. and I. M. at the last regular meeting Friday, November 2, in relation to death of Mr. “Tony” Boring.

Whereas:  God, the Supreme Architect and Builder of the Universe, has in his infinite wisdom seen proper to take from among us our brother and collaborator “Tony” Boring, it is hereby

Resolved:  That in the death of Brother Boring our order has lost a bright and shining light, one who was loyal to the principles of our organization.  Also, that we recognize the fact that what to us is a loss, to him is gain and that we bow our heads in submission to him who “doeth all things well.”

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to his bereaved mother in Quincy, Ill., and that a page of our minutes be set apart as a memorial.  Also that these resolutions be published in the Bricklayer and Mason and two city papers.  Also that the charter of No. 47 be draped in mourning for a period of thirty days.
J. L. Wray
Joe McLaughlin
James Murray, Committee

MRS. McCANDER DIES AFTER LONG WILLNESS
Widow of the Late William McCander and an Old Resident of Cairo, Succumbed Last Night

Mrs. Bridget McCander died last night at 11:40 at her home, 513 Eleventh Street, after an illness of several months.  The deceased was 73 years old and had long been a resident of Cairo.  She was the widow of William McCander, who for many years was employed by the government at the custom house.

The surviving members of the family are six children, three sons and three daughters, Miss Elizabeth McCander, Mrs. Kate Wichert, and Mrs. Mary Hammel, and Joseph, John, and James McCander, all of Cairo, with the exception of Mrs. Hammel, who is expected to arrive from Chicago today.


Thursday, 8 Nov 1906:
DEATH CLAIMS LITTLE HELEN BUTLER
Youngest Daughter of Judge and Mrs. Butler Passes Away

Death last evening claimed little Helen Butler, the youngest daughter of Judge and Mrs. William N. Butler.  The end came at 5:15 o’clock, after she had battled for ten days with diphtheria.  The skill of the physicians and the attentions of the nurse were able to stay the disease, but her heart could not stand the strain and it failed to act, causing her death.

The deceased would have been ten years old on March 12th next.  She was a very sweet, loveable little girl and her death at the beginning of what might have been a life full of love and happiness seems peculiarly sad.  She attended Safford School and was a member of the Presbyterian Sunday School.
The remains will be taken to Anna tomorrow and buried in the family lot there.  There will be no public funeral on account of the nature of the disease, but a simple service will be held at the house by Rev. Mr. Buchanan, pastor of the Presbyterian Church.

Her sister, Mary Butler, who was so very low last week, is now very much improved, and it is believed that the worst is over in her case.  One of the other children have taken the disease.  All have been treated with antitoxin.  How the children were exposed to the disease is a mystery.  So far as the physicians know, there are no other cases of diphtheria here.  Judge and Mrs. Butler are quite worn out from their ten days’ siege, but they now have the assistance of a capable nurse, Miss Young.

Comfort Butler arrived home from the state university at Champaign last evening, called here by the serious condition of his sister.

(William Nichols Butler married Mary Mattoon on 28 Oct 1885, in Livingston Co., Ill.  Her marker in Anna City Cemetery reads:  Helen Butler 1897-1906.—Darrel Dexter)

Funeral Tomorrow Morning—A private service will be held at the residence of Judge Butler at 9:30 tomorrow morning and the remains of his little daughter Helen will be taken to Anna on the 11:15 a.m. train, where the interment will be made.

Old McCracken County Man Dead

M. L. Cornillaud, a resident of McCracken County since 1859, died at his home in Paducah Monday.  Death was caused by catarrh of the stomach, from which trouble he had suffered for several months.  Mr. Cornillaud was born in France in 1828 and, at the age of 20 years, came to America, settling in the midst of the French settlement, four miles from Paducah on the Cairo road.  For many years he was engaged in truck gardening and during the active period of his life succeeded in amassing a competence.  Six years ago he gave up his farming operations and moved to this city, where he has since resided.

Died, Saturday, November 3, a child of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bagley, age about two years. Interment at Mill Creek cemetery Sunday, Nov. 4.  (Dongola)

(Her marker in Bankston Cemetery at Mill Creek reads:  Rosena daughter of Bert & Maud Bagley 1905-1906.—Darrel Dexter)


Friday, 9 Nov 1906:
Aged Negro Woman Buried—Mary Williams, an aged negro woman, who was found dead on the floor beside her bed in her home on West Douglas Street yesterday morning, was buried today.  The coroner’s jury decided that she died from natural causes.

REMEMBERED HIM IN HIS WILL
Englishman Left Union County Farm for Deed of Kindness in Australia

Joseph Dickinson, a native of England, visited Jonesboro last Sunday, looking after some landed interests.  Connected with them is a very interesting story containing romantic features.  Mr. Dickinson is a bricklayer by trade and a man of more than ordinary intelligence.  A few years ago, he, with a party of hunters, made a trip through Africa.  From there he went to New Zealand.  While in Australia he met a sick and stranded American named Rawlins of St Louis.  He aided him financially and otherwise and then forgot the incident.  Later Dickinson came to America and visited the World’s Fair at St. Louis.  Later he joined a party of bricklayers and went to Los Angeles, Cal., where he worked at his trade.  While there, he picked up a paper containing an advertisement wanting to know his whereabouts.  He answered the advertisement and was informed that the man who he had befriended in Australia had died and left to him a deed to 120 acres of land, two miles west of Mountain Glen, in Union County, Ill.  In company with A. V. Cook, he found the land and was highly pleased with it.  He will return shortly and says he will build a complete house on it and sent to England for his father and mother and install them on his property.—Anna Talk

FUNERAL HELD THIS MORNING

Services over the remains of little Helen Butler, daughter of Judge and Mrs. W. N. Butler, were held at the residence this morning, conducted by Rev. A. S. Buchanan, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, assisted by Rev. W. T. Morris, of the Methodist Church.  The remains were taken to Anna at 11:15 where they will be buried in the family burying ground near there.  Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Wenger, Rev. and Mrs. Buchanan, P. C. Barclay, Judge W. S. Dewey, C. B. S. Penebaker, and Dr. Sam Dodds accompanied the family to Anna on their sad mission.  Flowers in great profusion were sent by sympathizing friends who could not attend the funeral on account of the nature of the disease from which she died.

George Childers, of the New York Life Insurance Company, returned from Carterville, Ill., where he settled death claim of William Lockey.  He left today for Cape Girardeau, Mo., to settle the death claim of a prominent man of that city.

MAN IS RUN DOWN BY A FAST TRAIN
Big Four Passenger Strikes and Seriously Injures Brack Shipp
BODY WAS HURLED FIFTY FEET FROM THE TRACK
Both Legs Horribly Crushed and Internal Hurts Are Feared—Passengers Unseated by Quick Stop

Brack Shipp, aged 50 years, was struck by Big Four passenger train No. 3 opposite Thirty-third Street this afternoon at 2:30 o’clock and received injuries from which he may die.

Shipp’s body was thrown fully fifty feet to one side of the right of way.  Both legs were crushed in a horrible manner where the engine had struck him; his face and hands were cut and bruised and it is also thought that he received internal injuries.

Engineer Baldwin saw Shipp walking down the track and blew the whistle repeatedly.  The man paid no heed and when Baldwin saw that he remained on the track, he reversed the engine and applied the emergency brakes.  The train was late and was running fast and, in spite of his efforts, the engine struck Shipp.  The train however, was stopped within 15 feet of where Shipp was hit.

The train was stopped so suddenly that passengers and clerks in the mail and baggage cars were thrown to the floor and out of their seats.

Shipp was picked up and placed on the train and taken to Union Station and from there removed to St. Mary’s Infirmary.

The accident was witnessed by Harry Grimes and Milton Stanley, linemen, who were at work on poles near the scene of the accident.  “It’s a wonder he wasn’t killed instantly,” said Grimes to The Citizen.  “I heard the train whistle and then saw the man walking down the track.  He didn’t appear to hear the whistle.  In a minute the engine hit him and he flew off to one side like a rubber ball.”

Shipp has been employed on the government river fleet at Eliza Towhead.  He is from Lexington, Ky., where his family reside.

(When the 19 Nov 1906, issue reported his death, his name was recorded as Brack Shepherd.—Darrel Dexter)


Saturday, 10 Nov 1906:
Mrs. Catherine Moll died at her home in this city (Mound City) on lower Main Street Wednesday night, after a lingering illness of seven weeks, age 81 years.  The funeral was conducted at the Catholic church this morning.  One son and several grandchildren survive her.

Mrs. Kate Moll and daughters, Misses Jessie and Frankie, of Cairo, are in Mound City to attend the funeral of Mrs. C. Moll.

(Louis J. Moll married Kate Fair on 7 Jan 1879, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)


Monday, 12 Nov 1906:
MISSOURIAN IS KILLED AFTER SPREE IN CAIRO
James Hardin of Charleston Is Ran Over by Train and Horribly Mangled Near Hough

After several days’ spree in Cairo, James Hardin, of Charleston, Mo., while on his way home last Thursday, was run over and killed by a train near Hough, where he had been put off the train the day before for not paying his fare.  He was seen later in the day by persons living near there with a jug of whiskey in his possession and asked them to drink.  He was not seen after that until Friday morning when he was found dead on the railroad track and badly mutilated, pieces of his body scattered about for 60 yards.

Papers found on him from Swoboda & Co., Cairo, Bottenstein & Simpson, Charleston, and near his body a receipt from James A. or James H. Frasher, Hopkinsville, Ky.

He was 25 years old and is known by several persons in Cairo.

RECEIVED $468.00 FOR NINE CENTS
Widow of Man Killed on Electric Car Receives Check

Egbert Stewart, the negro who was killed in the wreck of the Sycamore Street electric car, received an insurance amounting to $468.00 and it only cost him 9 cents.

Stewart had worked three days at the Chicago Mill, being paid at the rate of $1.50 a day.  The company deducts 2 percent of the wages from the men for insurance, and in case of death pays their estate a full year’s wages, or in case of accident, pays half wages and the doctor’s bill while they are in the care of a doctor.

Stewart’s widow accordingly received a year’s wages or $468 from this nine-cent investment of her husband.  And the accident happened after working hours, too, and not while the man was at work at the plant.

The insurance plan is a good one, the amount deducted is so small that the men scarcely miss it, and when they need it, it comes back to them many times over.


Tuesday, 13 Nov 1906:
Paid Life Policy Today—The trustees of Cairo Lodge No. 1412, Knights of Honor, today paid Mrs. Hulda Steagala $2,000 life insurance, upon the policy held by her husband, the late “Uncle Joe” Steagala.


Thursday, 15 Nov 1906:
GEORGE DeBAUN DIES AFTER A LONG ILLNESS.
Well Known Cairo Man, Long a Sufferer from Consumption, Died Last Night.

After an illness of several months, George DeBaun, a well-known young Cairo man, died last night at the home of his mother, Mrs. Etta DeBaun, 209 Twenty-ninth Street.  He had been confined to his home since July with consumption.  The deceased was 32 years old and for many years was employed as machinist by McCarthy & Malinski.  He was born in Ullin, but has lived in Cairo with his widowed mother for the pasty thirty years.

He is survived by his mother, three sisters and two brothers, Lottie, Flora, and Laura, and Paul and Joe, all of this city.

The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at the residence of his mother at 2 o’clock.  Interment will be made at Beech Grove Cemetery.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—George F. DeBaun, Wednesday, Nov. 14th, 1906.  Funeral will be held at the home of his mother, Mrs. Etta DeBaun, No. 209 Twenty-ninth Street, Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Train will leave at 2:45 for Beech Grove Cemetery where the interment will be made.  Friends of the family are invited.


Friday, 16 Nov 1906:
WELL KNOWN PULASKI COUNTY MAN DEAD
Samuel Sheets, Last Member of Shiloh Church, at Villa Ridge, Dies at Advanced Age

Samuel Sheets, one of the oldest and best-known residents of Pulaski County, died at his home near Villa Ridge last week.  The deceased was born in Philadelphia, Penn., Oct. 25, 1833.  At the age of 15 years, he united with the Shiloh Baptist Church, west of Villa Ridge.  In 1879, after all the older members of the church had gone, he joined with the Presbyterians, and two years ago the M. E. Church South, at Pulaski.  Mr. Sheets was twice married, having nine children by the first marriage and seven by the second.  He leaves a widow, seven children and fifteen grandchildren.  The funeral was conducted from the Methodist church in Pulaski by the Rev. Dr. C. W. Campbell, and was attended by a large concourse of his old friends and neighbors, the remains being laid to rest in the cemetery on the bluff above the town.

(Samuel Sheets married Mary E. Stites on 18 Jan 1857, in Rockport, Ind.  A marker in Sheets Cemetery reads:  Mary E. wife of S. Sheets Born Oct. 1, 1837 Died Aug. 2, 1878.  Samuel Sheets married Mrs. Elizabeth “Lizzie” Thurthell nee Olmsted on 4 Feb 1879, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

Child in Serious Condition—Adele, the four-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Weidman, of Twenty-third Street, who was severely burned Tuesday afternoon, when her dress accidentally caught fire, is still in a dangerous condition.  Mrs. Weidman, who received painful burns while extinguishing the flames, is resting easy, but grave fears are still entertained for the recovery of the child.

 
Monday, 19 Nov 1906:
A CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank our many friends for their kindness in our sad trouble during the loss of our dear son and brother.
Mrs. M. F. DeBaun Family
Mr. and Mrs. R. Jones

(Richard Jones Jr. married Lillian DeBaun on 25 Nov 1897, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

RECEIVED $1,000 FOR $2.40

Mary F. Sturdivant, of Buncombe, Johnson County, Illinois, received, on the 16th of this month from E. L. Balz, at Mason City, Iowa, the supreme secretary of the Modern Brotherhood of America, a draft for $1,000 in full payment of policy held by her husband, Stephen D. Sturdivant who was a member of Buncombe, M. B. of A. Lodge No. 1922, he having made only three payments of 80 cents each.
R. D. Burns, Organizer, Cairo, Ill.

MAN STRUCK BY TRAIN DIES

Brack Shepherd, the man hit sometime ago by the Big Four passenger train No. 3 at Nordman’s Mill, died Saturday night about 9 o’clock at St. Mary’s Infirmary from injuries he received in the accident.  Shepherd was employed by the government at Elizabeth Towhead and was coming to this city when he was struck by the train.  He was buried at Villa Ridge yesterday as a pauper.  It is reported that he has relatives at Livingston, Ky.

             (The 9 Nov 1906, issue that reported the accident gave his name as Brack Shipp.—Darrel Dexter)


Tuesday, 20 Nov 1906:
CHARLESTON MEN ARE FOUND DEAD.
Dead Bodies of J. Handy Moore and Dr. White Found Near East Prairie
MEN LEFT YESTERDAY FOR HUNTING TRIP.
Small Son of Mr. Moore Escaped Serious Injury.—Moore President of Mississippi County Bank

The dead bodies of J. Handy Moore, the richest man in Mississippi County, Mo., and president of the Mississippi County Bank, and Dr. White, a dentist, of Charleston, were found this morning near East Prairie, Mo.  Moore was dead when he was found and White breathed a last gasp and expired.

The men left Charleston yesterday for a hunting trip to East Prairie, accompanied by Mr. Moore’s little son, a lad of 13 or 14 years.  This morning a messenger reached Charleston calling for the coroner and stating that the bodies of the two men were found frozen to death.

From Charleston, The Citizen learns that the little son of Mr. Moore brought the first news of the accident.  According to his statement, the men fell out of the wagon into the mud.  All night he stayed with his father and when morning came, almost dead himself with the cold and drenched to the skin by the heavy rain, he made his way to a nearby farmhouse and told of what happened.  His statements were confirmed, when rescuing parties arrived on the scene and found the bodies of the two men lying on the ground, the one stiff in death and the other in a dying condition.

The team was found standing near by, having stopped when the men fell from the wagon.

Mr. Moore was one of the most prominent men in southeast Missouri, and was a brother-in-law to former Governor Lon. V. Stephens.

Mrs. Thorpe, of Ullin, and Mr. and Mrs. Burgess, of America, who were called here to attend the funeral of George DeBaun, have all returned to this homes.  Mr. DeBaun died of malarial poisoning.  The cause of his death was first given as consumption.

Mrs. Fred Comings received word that her mother, Mrs. Julia Tierney, died in St. Louis last night.  She was 69 years old, and made her home with her daughter, Mrs. Joseph Gocking.  Mr. Comings went to St. Louis to attend the funeral, as his wife was unable to make the trip.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—Otto Tauber, Jr., Monday, Nov. 19th, 1906.  Funeral will be held at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Otto Tauber, No. 327 Twenty-eighth Street, Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock.  Train will leave foot of Fourteenth Street at 2:45 for Villa Ridge cemetery, where the interment will be made.  Friends of the family are invited.

(Otto Tauber married Adele Bauer on 2 Feb 1888, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Otto Tauber Jr. 1891-1906.—Darrel Dexter)


Wednesday, 21 Nov 1906:
Moore’s Son May Also Die

The ten-year-old son of J. Handy Moore, the wealthy Charleston, Mo., banker, who with Dr. White, were froze to death Monday night, while on their way from their home to East Prairie, Mo., to join a hunting party, is in a serious condition and according to word from there today, is not expected to live.  After the lad’s father and his companion had been thrown from the buggy in which they were driving, the boy managed to quiet the horses and all night lovingly kept a vigil in hopes that the men would recover.  The night was an extremely wild one and the efforts of the lad to rescue the two men were in vain.

The coroner’s jury last night returned a verdict that the two men had met death as a result of a runaway accident.

J. Handy Moore was about 45 years of age.  He was a member of one of the leading families of southeast Missouri.  He is survived by his wife and four children, two sons and two daughters, his aged parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Moore, and his brother, Paul B. Moore, publisher of the Charleston Enterprise.  Mr. Moore was identified with all the public utilities of Charleston, being president of the telephone, electric light and water companies of the town.  He formerly was president of the Mississippi County Bank and was a man of great wealth, owning thousands of acres of land in southeast Missouri.
Dr. White was a leading dentist of Charleston and occupied a suite of offices over the drugs store of Bondurant & Ogilvie.  He was about 38 years old and is survived by his wife and one child.

Hattie Mae Buckle, the older daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Buckle, age four years, died last Sunday noon, Nov. 18, 1906.  She had been sick only a few days, suffering from a severe attack of laryngitis.  The funeral services were held Monday morning at the home, conducted by Rev. Bosworth, assisted by Rev. Campbell.  The funeral was largely attended considering the very inclement weather.  The floral decorations were beautiful.  Interment at Villa Ridge cemetery.

(A marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Annie Mae Buckles Born Nov. 8, 1902 Died Nov. 18, 1906.—Darrel Dexter)


Thursday, 22 Nov 1906:
KITTY LEAGUE BALL PLAYER WAS KILLED
Newt Atkisson, Well Known to Local Fans, Shot to Death in Alabama—Details Are Lacking

Newt Atkisson, a former Kitty League ball player with a number of friends and acquaintances in Cairo, is dead, the result of a pistol shot wound.  Details of the shooting are lacking and the body is now en route to McKenzie, Tenn., the birthplace of the young man, for burial.

The Paducah Sun of Saturday regarding his death says:  “Mr. Marsh Atkisson, his father, travels for Friedman-Keller & Company, of this city.  He was in Paducah Saturday when a telegram reached him from Opelika, Ala., saying that his son had been shot.  The family is living at St. Louis and immediately the mother and sister left for Alabama to attend the young man’s bedside.  Monday a second telegram reached Paducah to the father, announcing his son’s death.  He is still in Paducah, but will leave on the first train for McKenzie, to attend the funeral.

“Newt Atkisson lived here five years ago.  He made his debut in professional baseball with the ‘Bloomer Girls,’ pitching and playing the infield.  His work attracted attention and he soon joined a semi-professional independent team, winning fame in pitching, but more especially on the infield.  He first did league work with Clarksville the first season of the Kitty League.  He then played in the south in the Delta and other leagues.  This season he signed with Jacksonville, Ill., in the Kitty, but refused to play.  He left St. Louis after the ball season and went south.  Baseball fans all over the circuit will regret to learn of his death.

Atkisson’s love for baseball caused him to be divorced.  In St. Louis he married two years ago.  His wife fell slighted at the interest he took in the national game and secured a divorce on the grounds that he neglected her for baseball.  He leaves his parents, a sister and brother.”


Friday, 23 Nov 1906:
LAST SACRAMENT IS GIVEN TO BISHOP.
Rev. Seymour Is Dying at His Home in Springfield of Pneumonia.
LOVING FRIENDS AND RELATIVES AT BEDSIDE
Condition Is Growing Weaker Each Hour and the End Is Near—Has Been a Bishop for Twenty-seven Years

Special to The Citizen.

Springfield, Ill., Nov. 23—Bishop George F. Seymour, of the Springfield diocese of the Episcopal Church, is dying this afternoon at his residence here from pneumonia.

All hope for his recovery was abandoned last night and his condition is hourly growing weaker.  The end cannot be far off and his death is expected at any moment.

Early this morning Arch Deacon F. A. DeRossett of Springfield, rector of St. Paul’s pro-cathedral, administered the last sacrament.

Bishop Seymour has been conscious the greater part of the day and has shown wonderful vitality and courage.

Loving friends and churchmen from all over the southern part of the state are in attendance at his bedside.

The dying bishop has been ill only a few days.  Pneumonia set in after a cold which he contracted at Alton, where he went to officiate at the wedding of the daughter of Arch Deacon Crittenden.

Bishop Seymour was born in New York in 1829 and was consecrated a priest in that city in 1885 and was made a bishop there in 1879.  He was married in New York in 1893 to Mrs. Aymer.
Deep Sorrow in Cairo

Hon. M. F. Gilbert, of this city, is at Springfield in attendance at the bedside of Bishop Seymour.  Messages containing the news of the bishop’s condition were received here today by members of the Church of the Redeemer and caused profound sorrow.  Bishop Seymour is greatly beloved by the members of the local Episcopal Church and has hosts of other friends and admirers here.

Henry Atherton shot and killed Henry McClellan at Center last Friday night.  They were on their way to church when they stopped to fire at a target.  McClellan stopped just as Atherton fired.  The ball hit McClellan in the side of the head.  (Curry)

Died, at her home out near Cypress, Tuesday, Nov. 20th, Mrs. Jane Hogan, wife of Mr. William Hogan.  Mrs. Hogan was a sister of Messrs. Henry and Will Neibauer.  (Dongola)

(Her marker in Christian Chapel Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Mary J. Hogan Born Oct. 25, 1860 Died Nov. 20, 1906 Aged 46 Yrs., 1 Mo. & 5 Ds.—Darrel Dexter)


Saturday, 24 Nov 1906:
The funeral of Earl Spence was held Friday afternoon at the M. E. church.  Rev. I. A. Humberd preached the funeral which was well attended.  Many beautiful floral designs were brought by his many friends.  Interment was at Beech Grove Cemetery.

TRAGIC STORY OF HIS FATHER’S DEATH

Little Ben Moore Tells Coroner’s Jury How J. Handy Moore Met His Death

The tragic death of J. Handy Moore and Dr. J. H. White at Charleston, Mo., last Tuesday morning is related by the little 12-year-old son of Mr. Moore in his testimony before the coroner’s jury as follows:

Testimony of Ben Bird Moore

             Being duly sworn, testifies:  “I live at Charleston, Mo.  I think I left Charleston yesterday, the 19th (of November) about 2:00 or 2:30 p.m.  J. H. Moore and Dr. White were with me.  We came from Charleston.  I don’t know what time we passed Whiting.  I went to Windyville with them.  We asked at a house, before we got to a sawmill, the way to Kelly Barber’s; we were going there.  We were going to Barber’s and find out where the hunting party was.

             “We were going down the railroad and a boy behind us told us to hurry, the train was coming.  Our team started to run and broke the singletree.  We started again.  We then went to another place and had our buggy fixed, just past the last house on the schoolhouse road.  Dr. White began to let his lines loose and I asked him to let me drive and he said:

             “‘Who are you?’  I told him and he knocked me out of the buggy.  I led the team around the corner and the buggy was in the ditch.  I then looked around and my father had fell out of the buggy.

             “I went back and tried to get Father up, but couldn’t and I put something under his head.

             “They were drinking.  I think they brought it from Charleston.  They were drinking from a bottle.  There was no quarreling between father and Dr. White.  They seemed to be under the influence of whiskey.  Papa did not seem to notice Dr. White hit me.

             “I found out this morning that father was dead.  I spent a good deal of time trying to get Papa and Dr. White up.  I got Dr. White up, but he fell down and I couldn’t get him to Papa.  He told me if I would get him to the buggy, he would go and get Papa up.  We were both in the buggy and I went to sleep.  When I woke up, I found Dr. White had fell out of the buggy and his overalls caught on the stirrup.  I ran back to Papa and found him dead.  It was after dark when this last occurrence took place.

             “When I told Dr. White this morning that Papa was dead, he said it was a ‘damn good thing.’  I tried to get Dr. White from under the buggy so I could drive to a house and tell them.  Dr. White would kick at me when I tried to get him ____.  I did not see him drink or take anything but whiskey.

             “I drove up to the house and told them to send Joe Moore word and telephone Mamma.

             “I don’t know what time Dr. White died.

             “After I left father dead and Dr. White alone, I did not see them again until I arrived at Whiting.”

 


Monday, 26 Nov 1906:
METROPOLITAN MUST PAY SUM OF $495.60
Judgment Awarded James Meehan as Executor of John Williams

In the county court today before Judge Dewey, suit was brought by James Meehan, as executor of the estate of John Williams, to recover on a policy in the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company.  The defendant alleged that the deceased had scrofula and disease of the lungs prior to taking out the policy and had secured the latter by false representations.  The evidence failed to show this and judgment was awarded the plaintiff for $495.00.  The plaintiff was represented by Lansden & Leek and M. J. O’Shea and J. D. Mocraot of Paducah appeared for the Metropolitan.


Tuesday, 27 Nov 1906:
Negro Given Fifty Years

Belleville, Ill., Nov. 26.—Albert Whitesides, a negro arrested several days ago at Sedalia, Mo., on the charge of having shot and killed William Leitscliun, a white man, here last May, entered a plea of guilty in the circuit court and was sentenced to fifty years in the Chester penitentiary.

CARD OF THANKS

We desire to take this form to extend to our faithful friends our heartfelt thanks for the aid and comfort extended us during the illness and death of our beloved son, Otto Tauber, Jr.
Mr. and Mrs. Otto Tauber


Wednesday, 28 Nov 1906:
DAUGHTER OF LATE FRED DOUGLASS DEAD
Was an Aunt of Wife of Dr. William H. Fields, of Cairo

Mrs. Rosetta Douglass Sprague, only daughter of the late Frederick Douglass, one of the most celebrated negroes this country ever produced, died at her home in Washington, D.C., yesterday.  She was an aunt of Mrs. Fields, wife of Dr. W. H. Fields, of this city.

EDMUND S. DEWEY STRICKEN DOWN
Heart Failure Caused His Death at 8:15 This Morning
END CAME WITHOUT ANY WARNING
Sketch of His Useful Life as a Citizen and a Public Official

Edmund S. Dewey, city comptroller and former circuit clerk of Alexander County, died at 8:15 a.m. o’clock this morning of heart failure, at his home No. 628 Twelfth Street.

Mr. Dewey had not been strong for some time.  Six months ago he had an attack of heart trouble and at that time his family was warned that his death might occur suddenly.  Friday Mr. Dewey had a severe attack of indigestion, but he recovered and Monday and Tuesday was feeling so much better that he went to the office for a little while.  Even this morning he appeared to feel as well as usual, and dressed and went downstairs to his breakfast.  He had started to take his accustomed seat by the stove in the living room, when he suddenly fell to the floor.  His daughter, Miss Jennie, was alone in the house with him.  She ran to his side, but he was then unconscious.  Neighbors were hastily summoned, a physician sent for, but nothing could be done to prolong the life that was fast ebbing away, and he died in a few minutes after he fell.  His children were all promptly notified and arrived within a short time after the attack, but he was dead.

Mrs. Dewey is at New Albany visiting her daughter, Mrs. T. J. Flack.  A little girl was born to Mrs. Flack a few weeks ago, and Mrs. Dewey went there to be with her.  She expected to remain over Thanksgiving and had warned Mr. Dewey to join her there on that day, but he did not feel able to attempt the trip, and so had planned to remain at home on that day.  Mrs. Dewey was promptly notified this morning of Mr. Dewey’s death and is expected home tonight, if she can make the railroad connections.  It is not expected that Mrs. Flack will be able to make the trip.

Edmund Sabin Dewey was born Nov. 10th, 1836, at Lenox, Mass.  In their old Massachusetts home, his father, Oliver Dewey, was a man of importance and affairs.  Besides holding many civil positions of trust in his community, he was for two terms sheriff of Berkshire County.

In 1862 Edmund S. Dewey enlisted as a private in Co. F, 130th Illinois Volunteer Infantry.  He had not been long in the service when he was made sergeant major of the regiment, and soon afterward was advanced to the rank of adjutant.  The regiment having been decimated by hard service in the field, in January 1865, it was consolidated with the 77th Illinois Volunteers and he was made captain of Co C, of that regiment.

On his return from the army, he was made circuit clerk of Bond County, Ill., and continued in this position until 1868, when he accepted a position as professor of mathematics and military tactics in the Illinois Agricultural College, then recently started at Irvington.

In 1872, he came to Cairo and for a number of years was one of the clerical force of the Illinois Central Railroad at the stone depot, and later was employed by Halliday Bros.

In March 1887, upon the resignation of Alexander H. Irvin as circuit clerk to become postmaster, Mr. Dewey was appointed to fill the vacancy and at the election the following November he was elected to fill the unexpired term, and in the fall of 1888 and in the elections of 1892 and 1896 he was re-elected, retiring from the office after more than thirteen years of faithful service.

In 1894, Mr. Dewey was elected a member of the Board of Education and was made secretary of that body.  He served for a number of years.

At the time of his death, Mr. Dewey was serving as city comptroller, to which position he was appointed by Mayor Parsons in May of last year at the beginning of his administration.

Politically, Mr. Dewey has always been a Republican.  In his religious faith, he was a Presbyterian and was, at his death and had been for many years, an elder in the First Presbyterian Church of this city.  He was a Mason and a Knight Templar, a member of Cairo Commandery No. 13.  He was also a member of Warren Stewart Post G. A. R.

Mr. Dewey was married on June 14, 1868, to Miss Maria Jane French, at Greenwich, Ill.  She died on January 29, 1889, leaving six children, all living:  Judge William S. Dewey, George F. Dewey, Charles B. Dewey, Miss Jennie Dewey and John M. Dewey, all of Cairo, and Mrs. T. J. Flack, of New Albany, Ind.

Mr. Dewey was married again on Nov. 14, 1890, to Miss Mary Ann Lyle, of Lebanon, Ill., who survives him.

Besides his immediate family, Mr. Dewey leaves two sisters, Mrs. Charles H. Sabin, of Lee, Mass., and Mrs. Myra E. Beveridge, of Sioux Falls, S. D.; and two brothers, R. K. Dewey, of Greenville, Ill., and Charles A. Dewey, of DeKalb, Ill.  Mrs. Clara B. Way, of this city, is a sister of his first wife, and Dr. F. A. Sabin, of Anna, is his cousin.

All of the relatives were notified this morning of his death and those who don’t live at too far a distance will probably be here for the funeral, which will probably be held Friday afternoon.  The body will be buried in the family lot in the Villa Ridge cemetery.

Mr. Dewey was exemplary in both his public and his private life.  He was a good man, a good citizen, a kind husband and father.  His years of public service were characterized by faithfulness and honesty.  As circuit clerk of this county, he was one of the best to be found.

That he was always willing to do his part as a citizen was shown first in his service in the army and laer in his service as a member of the board of education.

He was honored and respected in the community and at his death he leaves as a heritage to his sons and daughters, a good name, which according to Holy Writ is rather to be chosen than great riches.

(Edmund S. Dewey, 25, of Greenville, Bond Co., Ill., enlisted as a private in Co. F, 130th Illinois Infantry and was promoted to sergeant major.  He was promoted to 1st lieutenant of Co. C, 77th Illinois Infantry and then promoted to captain.  He was transferred as adjutant back to the 130th Infantry and mustered out 15 Aug 1865, at New Orleans, La.  Edmond S. Dewey married Mary A. Lytle on 25 Nov 1890, in St. Clair Co., Ill.  His marker in Cairo City Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  Edmund S. Dewey Born Nov. 10, 1836 Died Nov. 28, 1906.  M. Jennie wife of E. S. Dewey Born July 12, 1847 Died July 29, 1889.  Mary L. wife of E. S. Dewey Born Sept. 22, 1858 Died April 3, 1934.—Darrel Dexter)

PROMINENT CHARLESTON RESIDENT DEAD
Charles Neal, Well Known in Cairo, Died Last Evening.

Charles Neal, a prominent citizen of Charleston, Mo., died at 7 o’clock last evening.  He was well known in this city, as he made business trips to this city.  He was associated in the saloon business for many years there with James Ravis.

(The 29 Nov 1906, issue identifies him as Charles Nell.—Darrel Dexter)

Mrs. Willie Honey died on Tuesday of last week and was buried Thursday at the Hargis graveyard.
Her death was a sad blow to her bereaved husband, family and friends, who were many, as she was an exceptionally fine woman whom everybody admired.  She left seven children, three boys and four girls, two of them being twin babies.  Mrs. Honey was the daughter of Mr. William Lawrence, of Diswood, and a member of the Baptist Church. (Diswood)

(Her marker in Hargis Cemetery reads:  Lizzie wife of W. M. Honey Born Oct. 10, 1869 Died Nov. 20, 1906.—Darrel Dexter)

DEATH OF OLD TIME RIVER MAN
Capt. James Law Passes Away at Coulterville, Ill.

Capt. James Law, for a quarter of a century and more one of the prominent figures on Cairo’s river front, died at his home at Coulterville, Ill., Tuesday afternoon, about 3 o’clock.

He was 73 years of age.  His years were weighing heavily upon him and for the past 18 months he had been in poor health.

Funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon and the remains will be buried at Coulterville.

Capt. Law was born in England and came to America when a young man of 21, settling in Cairo soon after his arrival in this country.  During the war, he worked for Gen. Grant, when he was located here.
But Capt. Law spent nearly all of his years in Cairo as captain of the Halliday & Phillips wharf boat.  In this capacity he became known to everyone identified with the river.  A few years ago he relinquished his duties and retired to Coulterville, where two of his children lived.

He is survived by his widow, two daughters, Mrs. N. H. Marple, of Coulterville, and Mrs. W. H. Greer, of Morehouse, Mo.; and two sons, John Edward Law, of Coulterville, and James A. Law, of Cairo.

(James Law married Jane Jester on 13 Jun 1861, in Alexander Co., Ill.  William H. Greer married Clarissa Law on 29 May 1887, in Alexander Co., Ill.  —Darrel Dexter)

Memorial to Mr. Dewey—A memorial to Mr. E. S. Dewey, who was an elder in the Presbyterian Church, will take the place of the Thanksgiving service, which was announced as the topic for the prayer meeting at the church tonight.


Thursday, 29 Nov 1906:
FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—E. S. Dewey, Wednesday, November 28, 1906, aged 70 years.  Funeral services will be held tomorrow (Friday) afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the family residence, No. 628 Twelfth Street.  Funeral train will leave foot of Eighth Street at 2:45 p.m.  Friends of family are invited to attend.  The services will be conducted by Rev. A. S. Buchanan, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, assisted by the Masonic fraternity.

Died at Charleston—Charles Nell, a well-known young man of Charleston, Mo., died Tuesday evening.  Mr. Nell was well known in Cairo, having visited here frequently.

Died, at her home three miles east of Dongola, Saturday, November 24, Mrs. Sarah Mulkey, wife of A. J. Mulkey, aged 74 years.  Interment in the Mt. Zion Cemetery Sunday, November 25th.

(Andrew J. Mulcaha married Mrs. Sarah C. Wilhelm on 18 Mar 1869, in Union Co., Ill.  Her marker in Mt. Zion Cemetery near Dongola reads:  Sarah C. Mulcahy Born Feb. 4, 1845 Died Nov. 24, 1906.—Darrel Dexter)


Friday, 30 Nov 1906:
LAST HONOR PAID TO THE DEAD
Remains of Edmund S. Dewey Laid at Rest at Villa Ridge Cemetery
FUNERAL WAS LARGELY ATTENDED.
Masonic Lodge Conducted Service at the Grave, While Knights Templar Acted as an Escort.

The last sad rites over the remains of the late Edmund S. Dewey were held this afternoon and all that was mortal was laid at rest in the quiet city of the dead at Villa Ridge, wrapped in the colors of his country and hidden under a mound of floral offerings.

The funeral services were conducted at the family residence No. 628 Twelfth Street, at 1:30 o’clock this afternoon.  Rev. A. S. Buchanan, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, conducted the service and the choir of the church sang the hymns.  The funeral was largely attended, Mr. Dewey in his long and useful life, having been identified with a number of interest and organizations which gave him a wide acquaintance.

The remains were taken by special train from Eighth Street to Villa Ridge cemetery, where the Masons had charge of the services at the grave.  Cairo Commandery No. 13, Knight Templar, followed as a guard of honor, and the surviving member of Warren Stewart post G. A. R. followed in a body the remains of their comrade to pay him the last honors.

The coffin was draped with the colors for which he fought during three of the best years of his life, and upon his breast he wore his Grand Army badge.

The honorary pall bearers were taken from among his friends and associates, while the active pallbearers were chosen from the Presbyterian Church, the Masonic lodge, the Grand Army and the city council.

The list is as follows:

Honorary—George Parsons, R. A. Hatcher, Sidney B. Miller, John S. Aisthorpe, E. A. Buder, Charles Cunningham, W. H. Gibson, Capt. N. B. Thistlewood, P. W. Barclay, John H. Robinson, J. B. Reed, E. W. Halliday, John M. Lansden, H. E. Spaulding, J. H. Jones, William N. Butler, Walter Warder, John Hodges, Miles Frederick Gilbert, W. B. Pettis, C. B. S. Pennebaker, H. F. Potter, John C. Fisher

Active—Walter H. Wood, William J. Buchanan, P. C. Barclay, Frank Spencer, Charles R. Stuart, John F. Rector, John Snyder, George G. Koehler.

DEATH OF OLD RESIDENT OF COUNTY
John W. Irby Passed Away at Unity Last Night.

John W. Irby, a well known citizen of Alexander County, died at his home near Unity last evening about 7 o’clock.  Appendicitis is said to have been the cause of his death.

The deceased was about 60 years of age, and leaves a widow and four sons and three daughters.
Mr. Irby was a brother-in-law of Capt. John Hodges.  One of his sons, Jubal Irby, is a resident of Cairo and connected with the Woodward Hardware Company.

(John W. Irby married Julia F. Hodges on 10 Sep 1865, in Alexander Co., Ill.  His marker in Unity Cemetery reads:  John W. Irby Born June 9, 1842 Died Nov. 29, 1906.  He is not dead, but sleepeth.—Darrel Dexter)

 

DENIED MOTION FOR NEW TRIAL
John Gore, Charged with Killing Oscar Gurley, Sent to Penitentiary

John Gore, charged with killing Oscar Gurley at an ice cream supper at West Vienna on May 26th, was found guilty by the jury in the circuit court at Vienna and Wednesday a motion for a new trial was overruled and he was sentenced to the penitentiary.

On the first ballot, eleven were for conviction and one for acquittal.  The next ballot all were for conviction for the crime of murder, and then came the ballot for setting the time.  This ranged from sixty years down to fourteen and a verdict assessing his punishment at fourteen was soon reached, which is the lowest sentence that could be meted out for the crime of murder.


Monday, 3 Dec 1906:
FORMER CAIROITE PASSES AWAY
Judge S. P. Wheeler Died at His Home in Springfield Sunday.
WAS PROMINENT AS A LAWYER
Heart Disease after Long Period of Illness Brought His Life to a Close

Judge Samuel P. Wheeler, formerly a resident of Cairo, died Sunday at his home in Springfield, of heart disease.

The deceased was 67 years of age and was a member of the well-known Springfield law firm of Brown, Wheeler, Brown and Hay.

Judge Wheeler had been ill for the greater part of the summer.  His life hung in the balance for days, but he finally rallied enough to be taken away.  Returning to his home, he suffered a relapse a few weeks ago, and steadily grew worse.

Judge Wheeler leaves a widow, five daughters and one son, Willard Wheeler, of New York.  The daughters are all married except Miss Abbie Wheeler.

Judge Wheeler left Cairo in the early 80s, when he moved to Mt. Carmel to become receiver of the Cairo & Vincennes Railroad.  From there he went to Springfield.  He was also receiver for other roads and was prominent as a railroad attorney.  Aside from his position as one of the trustees of the Southern Illinois Normal at Carbondale, he never would accept public office.  When a resident of Cairo, he was one of its foremost citizens, and was quite prominent in the Presbyterian Church, and in the Sunday school of which he was superintendent for many years.

Samuel P. Wheeler was born at Binghampton, Boone County, New York, January 13, 1839.  His father was Alvan Wheeler, born in Massachusetts in 1797, and he was an eminent educator and physician in Massachusetts from 1822 to 1832, when, on account of failing health, he removed to Binghampton, N.Y., where he purchased a farm and spent the remainder of his life.  He died October 12, 1869.  The mother of Samuel P. Wheeler was Harriett A. Bulkley, a descendant of an English family, which was represented in the United States by Rev. Peter Bulkley, who came from England to Massachusetts in 1835.  She died in Williamstown, Mass., in 1875, having reared a family of six children, of whom Samuel was the fourth.  The latter was educated liberally in New York.  He was admitted to the bar in 1859 and the same year located at Mound City, Ill., where he remained until 1865, when he located in Cairo. 

Though his influence has been chiefly with the Democratic Party, he has studiously avoided the political arena and adhered strictly to his profession with commendable zeal.  In 1875 he was appointed general solicitor for the Cairo & Vincennes Railroad Company, which position he held until that company was consolidated with the St. Louis and Pacific railway and was later general solicitor for the Cairo division of the latter company.  He was married on January 11, 1889 to Miss Kate F. Goss, daughter of Milo J. Goss, of Kalamazoo, Mich.

DEATH OF JOHN FOLEY
Passed Away Sunday afternoon After Long Illness of Tuberculosis

John Foley died at his home, No. 513 Eleventh Street, Sunday afternoon about 3 o’clock.  The deceased was 42 years old and had been a sufferer of tuberculosis for some time.  He was born in Toronto, Canada, on May 11, 1857.  The deceased is survived by three sisters, Mrs. Mary Hammer, of Chicago, Mrs. Kate Wichert and Miss Elizabeth McCander, and also two brothers, James Foley and Joseph McCander.  The deceased was a son of the late Bridget McCander.

He was a carpenter by trade and was a member of the Carpenters’ Union.

The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at St. Patrick’s Church and the remains will be taken to Villa Ridge cemetery for interment.

(William McCander married Bridget Foley on 14 Feb 1866, in Alexander Co., Ill.  George G. Wichert married Kate Foley on 3 Dec 1877, in Alexander Co., Ill.  George W. Hammell married Mary Foley on 4 Nov 1874, in Cook Co., Ill.  His marker in Calvary Cemetery at Villa Ridge reads:  John Foley 1858-1906.—Darrel Dexter)

CAIRO NEGROES MOURN FOR “BLACK PATTI”
Who Died at Philadelphia Today.—Appeared at Cairo Opera House Annually

Cairo negroes who saw “Black Patti” at the Cairo opera house last season, listened to the talented singer for the last time, although this was not known at that time, for “Black Patti” died today at Philadelphia.

Manager Williamson booked the singer for his opera house each year, when the playhouse was turned over to the colored people, who turned out en masse to hear and see the famous negro singer.  The show was always attended by some white people, who were curious to hear “Black Patti” and to see and hear the dances and ragtime songs.

After the show the colored society of Cairo would hold a big ball at the Twelfth Street hall for “Black Patti” and the members of her troupe.

But “Black Patti” is no more and Cairo negroes will doubtless mourn her loss.  In fact, her death will be regretted by those of her race throughout the country, by whom she was idolized wherever she appeared.

Although but thirty-five, “Black Patti” won renown not only in America, but in Europe, by her singing.  Queen Victoria, Pope Leo, Czar Nicholas and other were captivated by her singing.

(The report of the death of “The Black Patti” was premature.  Matilda Sissieretta Joyner Jones died 24 Jun 1933.—Darrel Dexter)


Tuesday, 4 Dec 1906:
FUNERAL OF JOHN FOLEY
Held This Afternoon and Remains Taken to Villa Ridge

The funeral of John Foley, who died Sunday of tuberculosis, was held this afternoon at St. Patrick’s Church.  The funeral was largely attended and the remains taken to Villa Ridge Cemetery for interment.  There were many beautiful floral offerings.

The carpenters’ union, of which the deceased was a member, attended the funeral in a body.

The pallbearers were Messrs. J. W. Clifford, W. C. Carter, Miles Dickrt, L. Gregston, J. W. Little, W. E. Piper and F. James.

Charged with Murder—Sheriff Bryant of Mayfield, Ky., passed through Cairo last night with a white man whom he had arrested near Charleston, Mo., and who is wanted at Mayfield as an accessory to a murder committed some years ago.

A Mrs. Harrison, aged 60 years, died in Ullin Tuesday, Nov. 27, and was buried in the Ullin Cemetery Wednesday the 28th.

(Her marker in Ullin Cemetery reads:  Mary S. Harrison Born July 25, 1846 Died Nov. 27, 1906.—Darrel Dexter)

Al Sturgeon’s baby died Friday night of membranous croup and was buried Saturday in the Ullin Cemetery.

Jake Tapprich received the intelligence Sunday of the death of his father at Kearney, Nebraska.


Wednesday, 5 Dec 1906:
DEATH OF MRS. LEE BOYD
Passed Away at St. Mary’s Infirmary Early This Morning

Mrs. Lee Boyd passed away about 4:30 o’clock this morning at St. Mary’s Infirmary, where she had been confined by illness for the past two weeks.  The deceased was 24 years old and is survived by her husband, one daughter, aged two years, besides her father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. William Etheridge, of New Burnside, former residents of Cairo.  She is also survived by two sisters, Mrs. Belle Gardner and Miss Jeno Ethridge, of this city, and four brothers.

The deceased was born on January 15, 1882, in Kentucky, but came to Cairo with her parents soon after and has resided here ever since.  Six years ago she was married to Mr. Boyd.  Her maiden name was Jettie Ethridge.

The deceased underwent an operation several days ago from which she was unable to rally.

The funeral services will be held at the home, No. 3305 Elm Street, tomorrow afternoon at 1 o’clock.  The remains will be taken to Villa Ridge cemetery for interment.  Rev. W. T. Morris, pastor of the First Methodist Church, will conduct the services.

Mr. Boyd is shipping clerk for the Carey-Halliday Lumber Company and has been in the employ of this company for more than sixteen years.  He is a member of Cairo Lodge of Elks and of the Knights of Pythias.  These lodges and his company will be represented at the funeral by the following pallbearers:

The Elks—H. S. Antrim, Edwin D. Carey, Rufus P. Flack, John T. Tennie

Knights of Pythias—John A. Miller, Peter Lind, George G. Koehler, H. S. Blockley

Carey-Halliday Company—C. S. Carey, O. W. Scott, S. Gaines, Frank Short

(Lee Boyd married Jettie Ethridge on 4 Apr 1900, in Alexander Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

BARLOW LADY DIES AT ST. MARY’S INFIRMARY

Mrs. Thomas P. Naylor, of Barlow, Ky., died this morning at 1:30 o’clock at St. Mary’s Infirmary after a brief illness.  The deceased was 32 years of age.

Mrs. Naylor was brought to Cairo last week and placed in the infirmary.  She was in critical condition and although she had the best of care, her death resulted early this morning.

The deceased is survived by her husband and one child.

The remains were shipped to Barlow today.

The remains were taken in charge by Undertakers Burke and Blaine.

Miles S. Gilbert, public administrator, was appointed administrator of the estate of the late Edward J. McDonald, who was killed in a wreck on the Illinois Central in the yards above Fourteenth Street.

FUNERAL NOTICE

Died—Mrs. Jettie Boyd, wife of R. L. Boyd, passed away at St. Mary’s Infirmary, December 5, 1906.  Aged 24 years.  Funeral will be held tomorrow (Thursday) afternoon at 1 o’clock at the home, No. 3305 Elm Street.  Funeral train will leave foot of Fourteenth Street for Villa Ridge cemetery at 2:45 p.m.  Friends of the family are invited to attend.

 

Thursday, 6 Dec 1906:
CARD OF THANKS

We sincerely thank the Carpenters’ Union No. 894 for their kindness and sympathy toward our late brother, John Foley.
James Foley
Mrs. Mary Hammell
Mrs. Kate Wichert
Miss Elizabeth McCander
Joseph McCander

Mrs. Otto Kupper, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gideon Castle, died November 30, 1906, of consumption at Albuquerque, N. M. Mrs. Kupper contracted the disease from her husband, the late Paul Kaufner, whom she accompanied to the west in search of health some time ago. Mrs. Kupper was buried at Albuquerque, it being her request. Mr. and Mrs. Castle have their sympathy of the community (Villa Ridge) in their sad bereavement.

(Paul Kupfer, 24, born in Saxony, Germany, married Ott Castle, 24, born in Villa Ridge, on 2 May 1899, in Pulaski Co., Ill.—Darrel Dexter)

FUNERAL OF MRS. BOYD

The funeral of Mrs. R. L. Boyd was held this afternoon from the family residence, No. 3305 Elm Street. The funeral was largely attended and the floral offerings were many and beautiful. The services were conducted by Rev. W. T. Morris of the First Methodist Church. The remains were taken to Villa Ridge cemetery for interment.

CAIRO MAN WILL INHERIT LARGE SUM.
Norton Renfro Heir to Estate Worth Millions

Norton Renfro, of the City National Bank force, will inherit $140,000 from the estate of his uncle, Dr. John W. Renfro, who died in Yorkshire, England, two years ago. Attorneys have been working the matter up until only the point of establishing identity remains for the Cairoite to receive his portion of the estate.

There are seven nephews who will inherit together $1,000,000, one fourth of the entire estate. Three brothers of the deceased will inherit the remainder. Those in America who will receive money from the estate are J. Renfro, of Paducah, Ky., Judge J. H. B. Renfro, of Carbondale, Ill., Norton Renfro, S. R. Renfro, Osceola, Ark., F. C. Renfro, Brookport, and George W. and William Renfro, Elizabethtown, Ill., They are all sons of D. M. Renfro, who died in Elizabethtown four years ago.

J. Renfro, of Paducah, will sail from New York December 21, for England to establish his identity and claim his portion of the estate.

DEATH OF AN OLD CAIROITE
Mrs. Smith Torrance Died Suddenly Wednesday of Heart Failure.
FOUND DEAD BY HER HUSBAND
On His Return Home from Work—Funeral Will Be Held Saturday.

Mr. Smith Torrance was greatly shocked on his return home from work last evening, when entering his home, he discovered the lifeless body of his wife reclining on the bed. Heart failure was the cause of her death. Mrs. Torrance had been alone in the house and the exact hour of her demise is not known, but she had probably been dead for some time, as her body was stark and cold when discovered.

Mr. Torrance summoned the neighbors and Drs. Strong and Rendleman were notified, none of them realizing the body was lifeless.

Mrs. Torrance had not been feeling as well as usual for several days, but she managed to get about, and little thought was given to her condition. Dinner was prepared as usual by Mrs. Torrance yesterday and upon her husband’s return to work, Mrs. Torrance was reading a paper.

By his wife’s death, Mr. Torrance is without a family, as their three children have all passed away. These were Ella Torrance Farnbaker, first wife of M. J. Farnbaker, and George Bruce Torrence, both of whom died many years ago, and Dr. Harry S. Torrence, who was killed in a railroad wreck July 4th, 1904, at Cripple Creek, Colo.

Three grandchildren survive the deceased, Fred M. Farnbaker, of Cairo, and Mrs. H. H. Harris, of Sedalia, Mo., children of the late Ella Farnbaker, and Levi Torrance of Philadelphia, young son of the late Dr. Harry S. Torrance. Two sisters of deceased also survive, residing in New Albany, Ind.

The deceased was born in New Albany, Ind., about 70 years ago. She was united in marriage to Smith Torrance in 1854 at New Albany, her maiden name being Louisa Johnson. The couple came to Cairo soon afterward and were among the oldest residents of the city. Mr. Torrance conducts an iron foundry at 1019 Ohio Street.

The deceased was a charitable, kind-hearted Christian woman and her death will be a great loss to her husband and will be deeply regretted by her many friends. Mrs. Torrance was noted for her many acts of kindness, and she took a great delight in making others happy. She realized the happiness and cheerfulness that flowers can bring to those who are fond of them, and it was a common custom of Mrs. Torrance to remember her friends, including the newspaper offices, with beautiful bouquets from her own flower garden, which were always appreciated by the recipient.

The funeral services will be held Saturday and will be conducted by Rev. W. T. Morris, pastor of the First Methodist Church, of which the deceased was a member. The remains will be interred at Villa Ridge cemetery.

Among the relatives which are expected to arrive to attend the funeral are Mrs. M. Bowman, of New Albany, Ind., a sister of the deceased; Mrs. H. H. Harris, of Sedalia, Mo., a granddaughter; and Mrs. Grace M. Torrance, of Kansas City, a daughter-in-law.


Friday, 7 Dec 1906:
Mother of Mrs. P. G. Schuh Dead—Mrs. Matilda Clottu, mother of Mrs. Paul G. Schuh, died at her home in Chicago last Saturday. The deceased was 72 years old and was born in Elberfeldt, Germany. She had been for several months with heart trouble. She is survived by another daughter, Mrs. William Wendland, of Chicago, and a son, Victor E. Clottu, of Chicago. Mrs. Schuh has been in Chicago for several days in attendance at her mother’s bedside.