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Vital Records Offices


Vital Records

ALASKA BUREAU OF VITAL STATISTICS
Department of Health and Social Services
Bureau of Vital Statistics
5441 Commercial Boulevard
Juneau, Alaska 99801
Telephone: (907) 465-3391
Fax: (907) 465-3618
Office Hours: Monday - Friday 8:00 am - 5:00 pm


The Alaska Bureau of Vital Statistics manages all vital records in Alaska which include birth, death, fetal death, divorce and marriage certificate data, along with reports of adoption. They are not kept at the borough/census area level. Vital Statistics offices are in Juneau, Anchorage, and Fairbanks (see below this paragraph). The Bureau's website (URL above) provides detailed information on what kind of records it holds and how to request copies.

Bureau of Vital Statistics
3601 C Street, Suite 128
Anchorage, Alaska 99503
Telephone: (907) 269-0991
Fax: (907) 269-0994
Office Hours: Monday - Friday 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Bureau of Vital Statistics
615 23rd Avenue, Suite 300
Fairbanks, Alaska 99701
Telephone: (907) 452-4863
Fax: (907) 452-4872
Office Hours: Monday - Friday 8:00 am - 4:00 pm


The State of Alaska began recording births, deaths and marriages in 1913. The Bureau of Vital Statistics has assembled an extensive collection of church records in order to create delayed birth certificates for people who did not have an official record at birth. The bureau will conduct searches of these records, but requests will be denied if the purpose is genealogical.

For birth, marriage and death records prior to 1913, write the office above or consult the original congregation an ancestor may have been affiliated with. These earlier records will usually be ecclesiastical in nature.

All Vital Statistics records are strictly confidential until they become public records. Births become public records 100 years after the event; deaths, marriages, and divorces become public records 50 years after the event.

Boroughs and census areas maintain their own deeds and other property records.

By Alaska statute, all vital records are strictly confidential until they become public records:

Birth certificates (1913 to present) become public records 100 years after the event. Until then, a person may obtain only his or her own birth certificate, except for parents who may obtain their own child's certificate.
Death certificates (1913 to present) become public records 50 years after the event. Until then, only a spouse, parent, child or sibling, or of a deceased person, or a legal representative of a family member, may obtain that person's death certificate.
Marriage certificates (1920 to present) become public records 50 years after the event. Until then, only family members and their legal representatives may obtain copies of marriage certificates.
Divorce certificates (1950 to present) become public records 50 years after the event. Until then, only family members and their legal representatives may obtain copies of divorce certificates.  Note: Divorce certificates are one-page documents outlining who is divorced and when and where the divorce took place, and are available only through the Bureau of Vital Statistics. Divorce records, which include all the pages filed in a divorce, and divorce decrees, rulings summarizing the rights and responsibilities of the divorced parties, are available only through the Alaska Court System. The Alaska Court System's FAQ has information about getting copies of divorce papers through the records department or clerk of court where the case was filed.


Personal check or money order should be made payable to Bureau of Vital Statistics. To verify current fees, the telephone number is (907) 465-3391. This will be a recorded message. Information on how to obtain certified copies is also available via the Internet at http://www.hss.state.ak.us/dph/bvs/.

ALL REQUESTS MUST INCLUDE A COPY OF A PICTURE ID OF THE APPLICANT. Enlarge the copy and lighten it as much as possible to be sure that it is clear and readable when sent to the Bureau. A signature under the copied ID is also required.

The Alaska Bureau of Vital Statistics only keeps records for events which occurred in Alaska. Thus, if your relative lived in Alaska, but died in another state, you would have to order the death certificate for your relative from that other state - even if your relative was buried in Alaska. The Centers for Disease Control, National Center for Health Statistics, maintains a list of "Where to Write for Vital Records" in U.S. states and territories.